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First Look: KOM Xeno Infinity Drive Hubs Push from the Disc Side

Jun 28, 2024
by Jessie-May Morgan  
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The KOM Xeno Hubs put the freehub mechanism on the disc side, with the axle bearings sitting further apart from one another, reducing the bending moment on the axle

King of the Mountain, have completely redesigned the bicycle hub to switch the drive ring to the disc side. Why? To improve stiffness and load capacity for a longer service life.

KOM Founder, Steve Elkins, has been working away on the Infinity Drive design for 10 years, and now has a patent pending on it. Out of their Peak District HQ, KOM have been producing the Xeno Hubs for around 2 years, manufacturing every component, save for the bearings and pawls, in house. Steve's son, Leo Elkins, gave us a run down on the construction and layout at the Bespoked Show in Manchester, talking through the advantages of the design.
KOM Xeno Hub Details

• 3° engagement (120 POEs)
• Performance claims: Reduced drag, longer bearing life, stronger axle
• Straight-pull spokes only
• Only compatible with KOM proprietary disc rotors
• Available with all major freehub and axle standards
• Price: from £550 (rear) / £275 (front)
• Lifetime Warranty on Axles and Hub Shell
• More information: k-o-m.co.uk




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Placing the drive mechanism on the disc side allows for a much larger diameter ratchet. Claimed weight for the Standard spacing rear hub with XD drive is 260 grams.

Construction

Broadly speaking, most hub designs run the hub shell on two bearings, with a freehub body slid onto the drive side end spinning on one (sometimes two) bearing(s). The main hub shell bearing (the one taking the rider's weight) normally situates near the center of the hub's axle, placing the majority of the load right where leverage is at its greatest. When the system is under big loads (landing, cornering, etc.) the axle can be forced to bend slightly, causing momentary bearing misalignment. Such misalignment introduces drag, and also puts the bearings under greater stress and thus leaves them liable to wear. This layout is nigh-on ubiquitous, and many hubs from well-known manufacturers (Hope, Industry Nine, DT Swiss) rely on it.

King of the Mountain are of the opinion that the Xeno Hub's Infinity Drive layout is a more refined solution, claiming it delivers a stronger hub that is able to cope with greater loads, with the stiffer design delivering prolonged bearing life as a result. Central to the increased stiffness are the two concentric axles that the hub shell spins on. Their bearings are arranged in such a way that pedaling forces are more evenly distributed across the hub shell. The larger outer axle plays the role of transferring pedaling forces across the hub shell, with the inner axle playing the usual role of supporting the hub shell on the thru-axle.

photo
The main hub axle that sits on the thru-axle. On the MTB hubs, there are actually two bearings that sit underneath the cassette holder on the drive side. Placing the bearings very close to the either end minimizes the bending moment across the axle, minimizing flex and resulting bearing misalignment.
photo
The hub's outer axle that transfers pedaling torque from the drive side to a drive mechanism on the (ironically) non-drive side

The KOM hubs still use a basic spring-backed pawl and ratchet system to transfer drive forces to the hub shell, but it's situated on the disc side of the hub. The (would-be) freehub body on the drive side is simply a cassette holder. It threads into the larger outer axle of the hub body, the non-drive side of which houses the six triple-stepped pawls that interface with the 60t drive ring. Only three of the six pawls interface with the teeth of the ratchet; that gives 120 POEs and a resulting engagement angle of 3°.

Spacing the inner axle's bearings apart, with one situated at each end of the axle, is said to better manage the forces across the hub to reduce the bending moment and resulting bearing misalignment. The whole assembly is supported across the hub's full width. The main claimed advantage is that the bearings last much, much longer. The other major one is that the axle is at a significantly reduced risk of breaking because of the improved load distribution. KOM say these advantages are relevant for all bikes, but the design is particularly well suited to use on eMTBs where the torque translated through the hub is consistently higher.

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photo

The aluminum drive ring is actually pressed into a proprietary steel disc rotor. Leo tells us that this configuration allows the steel disc rotor to increase the strength of the drive ratchet by allowing the rotor to take on the radial forces produced at the drive ring. As the aluminum ring starts expanding under high torque, the steel takes on the load. Braking forces are isolated from the drive mechanism, as the rotor itself is bolted directly to the hub shell.

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KOM Hubs only work with their proprietary disc rotors
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Choose from multiple anodized colors of disc rotor carrier

But, we've just glossed over a drawback of the KOM hubs. They are compatible only with KOM's own disc rotors. The production of these is outsourced to a company in Europe. They are available in all standard sizes from 160mm up to 223mm, and all are 2mm thick. A 2.3mm option with also be available soon for diameters of 200mm and upwards; the 223mm x 2.3mm rotor weighs a claimed 234 grams. All retail at £50.

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Looking at each pair of bearings in the KOM Xeno hub, the drive-side one is fixed in its position while the non-drive side one is "floating" - there is no spacer in the way so its position can shift ever so slightly laterally along the axle. This effectively means that when you tighten your thru-axle, compressing everything together, the non-drive side bearing is free to move axially such that it isn't overly pre-loaded in the process.

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Pricing & Availability

The KOM Xeno Infinity Drive hubs are available in Standard, Boost and Super Boost spacing with Thru-Axle and QR variations to accommodate Road, Gravel and MTB. Spoke counts can vary from 24 up to 32, dependent on the intended application. Pricing starts from £550 for the rear hub and £275 for the front.

Author Info:
jessiemaymorgan avatar

Member since Oct 26, 2023
91 articles

177 Comments
  • 264 21
 Proprietary. I'm out.
  • 75 5
 On a part that commonly needs to be replaced too (rotor). No thanks.
  • 42 2
 @breenmachine: I think I probably replace rotors more often than hub bearings.
  • 17 39
flag happyheeltoe (Jun 28, 2024 at 14:10) (Below Threshold)
 @breenmachine: also the easiest part to fab on a bike? Not sure why proprietary rotors are such a turn off.
It’s a laser/waterjet cut piece of steel with no/minimal post processing.
  • 58 3
 @happyheeltoe: because everyone has access to a laser/waterjet….right.
  • 39 0
 @reydin: I carry one everywhere. But I forgot it in my other pants.
  • 12 65
flag L0rdTom (Jun 28, 2024 at 15:09) (Below Threshold)
 @reydin: I mean the vast majority of people have a fabrication company in their town that has one and would do a few rotors for a case of beer, but that's not really the point.
  • 87 2
 @L0rdTom: imagine the audacity to show up to a fabrication shop, wanting something fabricated...for beer. Thats genuinely insulting to any professional. Beer is an acceptable tip, not payment.
  • 16 2
 Agreed. I stopped reading after "proprietary rotor" and went to directly to the comments to confirm that I wasn't the only one thinking the same thing.
  • 2 9
flag happyheeltoe (Jun 28, 2024 at 16:34) (Below Threshold)
 @reydin: well yes. Xometry.com for one, but you’re also allowed to call fab shops in your town and ask for a quote.
  • 4 0
 @reydin: I strap one to my frame underneath my bottle cage each ride!
  • 11 1
 @happyheeltoe: have you ever used cheaper/knockoff rotors? I have and I think they are pretty horrible, I would have pretty low expectations for anyone's first foray in rotor design.
  • 13 1
 @RonSauce: welcome to the bike industry. Most smooth brain knuckle draggers think everything related to bikes should be basically free.
  • 2 0
 Someone will make an adapter then bobs your uncle
  • 17 0
 There is no way they were unable to make this work with standard 6-bolt rotors.
  • 3 0
 Would this work with a brake rotor for Rohloff hubs? Seems a bit off to need a larger diameter, four bolt mount and not pick one of readily available standards.
  • 3 2
 All brakes need different pads so you keep spares or buy/order replacements in advance. I've never had a disc fail mid-ride or carried a spare in my back-pack, so I'm happy to keep an eye on the rotor thickness and not leave replacement to the last minute.
Not mentioned in the article is that these rotors are really really good. Only rotor I've ever had that hasn't warped and had an annoying rub.
  • 2 6
flag L0rdTom (Jun 29, 2024 at 6:06) (Below Threshold)
 @RonSauce: lol I think you're overthinking it mate. My last set of parts was some small fixturing plates for my home squat rack and they offered to add them onto a job for free. The beer was just to say thanks, but granted I have paid a nominal fee for parts in the past.
  • 4 1
 @L0rdTom: where do you get the data from? Does KOM offer the dxf or dwg data? I guess you got like no idea how this stuff works and how long a geometry like these discs takes to program and cut. And I am not even talking about having the right kind of steel for them at hand.
  • 12 1
 @happyheeltoe: I've read some really dumb counterpoints on PB, but yours takes a dominating win. "Just look around your area for a shop that can fabricate you a rotor... what's the big deal?" Well deserved trophy.
  • 3 0
 @L0rdTom: I just get the feeling this is a bad idea. My thought process is the biggest local business supporter of mountain biking in my area is a metal fab shop (Baghouse).

But no one is running discs made by them. Why wouldn't they if they are so easy to make?
  • 1 6
flag L0rdTom (Jun 29, 2024 at 14:35) (Below Threshold)
 I do have a pretty good idea, and it takes almost no time at all if it's adding onto another job, just be nice, don't need your parts in a hurry and supply the dxf's. I accept rotors are more complex as you do want specific steel, heat treatment, and would want to surface grind them for thickness and flatness. For the record I don't think this is a good justification of proprietary rotors, I was just pointing out that it isn't that hard to get stuff made locally. Or even nationally with Fractory and Xometry etc etc.
  • 6 1
 @L0rdTom: so you're telling me its cheaper to have a machinist custom design and fabricate rotors than it is to get mass produced Amazon rotors? Surely if its as cheap and easy as you say you must have custom made rotors on all your bikes.
  • 1 0
 Agreed
  • 7 0
 @L0rdTom: I'm trying hard to get a local place to machine 3 incredibly simple parts for me. I would would supply the material and they could do it in 30 minutes on a manual machine and they want £160 lol
  • 1 0
 @tom666: To machine that would be pretty expensive indeed. Laser cutting is what they do in the factory so it seems to me the price of a single piece wouldn't be insane compared to that of a single piece of a larger batch. I don't know the pricing of waterjet cutting though. I'm not aware of any facing after the cutting and I'm not even too sure whether it would be such a good idea. The sheet is flat and balanced as it arrives at the cutter. And as the cuts will be all the way through, it should remain flat. Removing a thin layer of material from one side could release some residual stresses and actually cause it to warp. It probably depends on the manufacturer, but what I've seen so far is that the laser cutting and the laser etching is being done in a single go, so without any machining in between.
  • 3 0
 Maybe "Proprietary" is the wrong word?
KOM say there is soon to be at least one brake disc company offering this disc type fitting for sale in Europe. Steve from KOM said, "We just want to make sure they make the discs right, so they work well. KOM discs are far more warp resistant than most and the extra strength of the steel in the disc is also used to reinforce the ratchet area of the hub...so they need to be right."
  • 2 3
 @tom666: I'm sorry you're getting shafted mate. £50/hr for a machine shop around here plus materials.

@ronsauce You seem to be very emotionally invested in this, I hope you find your marbles.
  • 1 0
 @L0rdTom: I'm also intrigued as to why local machine shops in MTB towns aren't fabricating disc brakes by the buck load. Let's start with what kind of steel is used for rotors. Different steels have different properties. Is it public knowledge what kind of steel is used in rotors? Is this steel easily available?
  • 1 1
 @Fill-Freakin: Mostly they are some kind of stainless steel afaik, probably nothing as fancy as a duplex, but regardless I'm sure a very short dig could tell you. Most stainless is easy to purchase in sheet form, and laser and water jet cuts well. Surface grinding and heat treatment are bread and butter for machine shops.

I would suspect the reason you don't see them is much more to do with who the hell wants a custom rotor? For what? I guess there may also be an element that because others don't do it, workshops don't think they are worth making. Everyone makes stems, so everyone else makes a stem ad nauseum.
  • 1 0
 @commental: Yep, rotors get damaged all the time for any number of reasons. I don't think I've ever had to replace hub bearings that weren't at least 3-4 seasons old. Rotors can be a 1-2 time per year thing depending on how clumsy I am or how often I wipe out.
  • 113 6
 I actually think this is a very cool idea. Agree they've got a big hill to climb in terms of requiring proprietary stuff, but I'm glad people are thinking out of the box.
  • 40 0
 It's definitely a cool idea, and seems well thought out. But it addresses semi-theoretical problems with one of the few areas of the bike that I don't really ever have issues with. I think my hubs are probably the oldest component on my bikes (in close competition with the stem).
  • 23 3
 @toast2266: I feel like there is room for this product in a world where Ochain exists.
  • 7 2
 @skerby: ochain addresses a problem that modern hubs don't (pedal kickback). This hub still doesn't address that problem, it just improves bearing life and axle stiffness. Which is great, but those aren't really a major issue on most good hubs (at least not to the extent that I'd run out and pay twice as much for a hub that fixes the problems but has a propriety disc rotor).
  • 9 0
 Bingo! I'm not interested in this version... but I am interested in the the 5th or 6th iteration that will let you use any rotor and is perhaps a bit easier to service.
  • 2 0
 Agree, it’s the kind of thing that might make bones more durable and better. I’d not be surprised to see one of the bigger players license it or modify it to take a modular rotor that might alleviate some consumer fears.

It’s only bad proprietary until it’s industry standard*.
  • 1 0
 Agree. Glad someone is taking this on. Hopefully rotor pattern is something that could be open source and other companies could get involved.
  • 3 0
 It's a cool idea, but it makes no sense to me. They absolutely could have made this work with 6-bolt rotors, yet they decided to make their own. Not only that, they went with open-slot and 4 bolt design, which is just asking for trouble. Finally, this really isn't even an issue at this point.
  • 2 3
 I sense a personal connection here. This tech is fine, but fails on solving for real world problems. Nobody has ever had a problem with their hub configuration.
  • 2 0
 Especially since an argument could be made that it is not a bad idea to have larger diameter disc mounts anyway. There’s a reason so many brands started building two-piece discs with large spiders.
  • 4 0
 @blackthorne: I assume this is sarcasm. I've seen plenty of rides ended by broken axles, cracked drive rings, broken pawls or collapsed bearings.
  • 4 0
 @G-Sport: finally talking some sense, I’ve got a feeling a lot of people don’t know their hub bearings are blown up.
  • 62 9
 Well, but why?
Generic formula hubs last years without service, then dt/hope/whatever brand - last more then u keep the frame.

Why would u want something that complex to prolong 20$ bearing life for 1 year?
  • 31 34
 Years without service? You need to ride more mate
  • 11 7
 For a majority of riders this is true. Current hubs are acceptable for most. But some riders who are heavier, ride more hours and ride harder can benefit from this hub design. I’ll bet many hub designers are smacking their foreheads in a "why didn’t I think of this?" Thought.
  • 13 3
 @motdrawde: Dunno about you but that's my experience on Shimano cup and cones, and Hope hubs. Included are multiple flips into the River Thames and general scottish winter weather, no problem.
  • 2 1
 Formula Hubs were the only ones I had that broke very early.
  • 3 9
flag motdrawde (Jun 28, 2024 at 14:45) (Below Threshold)
 @tempnoo1: flips into the Thames!
I’m replacing hub bearings every 6 months ish. Hope pro 4 and generic formulas included
  • 13 0
 Solution is don't wash your bikes...
  • 2 0
 @motdrawde: Had to learn the rotation somehow, I'm not 15 anymore where I can send it on a box jump! Found somewhere with about 5 feet of water and minimal current, took the sting out of the screw-ups. Now I just use a cleaned hi-ten BMX and a swimming pool.

I think hubs are luck of the draw. I now remember a SRAM front hub that had no grease from factory, screwed itself within 3 weeks. I've heard people being too strong for Hopes, and Chris King ceramics not lasting.

Another random thought I had, we always use sealed bearings in MTB hubs. Those seals aren't for water are they? They're probably great for dust, but maybe they're trapping water in? That lays blame to the hub design.

Who knows, try some DT350s everyone seems to love them.
  • 3 0
 @tempnoo1: I got 3 months out of my hope bearings, they're good hubs, but not infallible.
  • 13 0
 @ADHDMI: what the f*ck were you doing with them!?
  • 3 0
 @jenksy: flip in river Thames (common practice as @tempnoo1 points out) > bike wash
  • 2 0
 are you jet-washing your hubs at point blank range or something?
  • 1 0
 @Shatner: about 2000km a year in all British conditions. Never jet washed, only garden hose. My hope hubs are about 8000km old and I don’t think I’ve ever done the front hub as it spins like new. The rear has seen a lot of bearings, a few seals, 2 or 3 freehub bodies and a couple sets of pawls as well
  • 1 1
 @Shatner: When it comes to washing bikes, I'm not sure whether point blank is so much worse than chasing your bike as it runs/flies away and hides behind trees and in rabbitholes. I do however agree that the latter sounds like a much more entertaining (yet messy) approach to bike cleaning. So yeah, with such an opportunity within reach, washing your bike point blank would be a bit rude.
  • 2 0
 @motdrawde: When you live somewhere that's not a mud pit most of the year and your stuff needs less service.
  • 2 0
 I've raced xco and cyclocross slop with my mtb - same bearings on my Hunt wheels for the last 4 seasons and they still spin like new...
  • 55 2
 or just buy a dt350 and never look at it ever
  • 15 15
 or one of the new oneup hubs for even less
  • 21 0
 I don’t personally like DT hubs but this is accurate. My single speed has Dt350 that are several years old and severely neglected and function perfectly. Maybe I should like them.
  • 9 3
 @graveldaddy: Did you know they sell the Hub body separately for 50 bucks. When you purchase the 50 dollar hub body they are basically equal in price to a 350.
  • 7 1
 Or one of the original hugi’s. Decades without service.
  • 10 12
 Show me a DT350 that has anywhere near 3* of engagement, AND is reliable.

DT350's are great hubs. But if high engagement is important to someone, they are not realistically an option.
  • 2 0
 Yeah and easy to service.
  • 5 0
 The big thing with DT350’s is.
You can get end caps for almost any axle spacing.
I’m not gonna get my 197 fat bike hub on a 135 rear.
But I know my almost ten year old 142 hub will be rebuilt for my next bike.
BTW I’m almost 300 lbs and have done very little to my hubs.
  • 7 1
 @FrankS29: Oh no, how could one ever ride a ghastly 6 degrees of engagement?
  • 1 2
 @nickfranko: you also seem to have missed the RELIABLE part.

Run a 350 hub at that engagement, they chew the ratchets up. This is exactly why DT is trying again, with the 240 DEG hub.

10* engagement is realistically the highest engagement you can reliably run on a 350 hub.
  • 38 1
 Let's see, the last time the bearings on my DT Swiss hubs wore out was ... checks notes. I'll get back to you when they wear out.
  • 10 0
 My 350s are close to 9000 km,still smooth
  • 29 1
 When your design reaches the point where you have to make OTHER components (like brake rotors) proprietary, you have torpedoed yourself. There has to be a way to keep the same basic concept without requiring a proprietary rotor. Until that happens, this hub is going nowhere.....sorry, but that's the world we live in.
  • 10 1
 Agreed. Seems a bit arrogant (or frivolous) to not at least make it 6-bolt. And that to straight pull anf I don't invision too many sales
  • 2 1
 And a 4-bolt system at that? No, thanks.
  • 24 0
 This is like the polar opposite of OneUp's "no-nonsense" hubs. I predict OneUp will sell a ton more.
  • 26 2
 But why?
  • 11 1
 " Leo tells us that this configuration allows the steel disc rotor to increase the strength of the drive ratchet by allowing the rotor to take on the radial forces produced at the drive ring."

Stiffererer.
  • 8 4
 @mrbrighteyes: stronger axles too, if you're able to put the bearings farther outboard. This is the weak point of cassette and freewheel hubs, they have a big bending moment right in the middle.
  • 13 3
 Other than I9 Hydra axles snapping, how often are axles the problem? If this layout is stronger, shouldn't it be lighter?
  • 14 0
 the article should start with this video: www.youtube.com/watch?v=qO6DUSKhbRU
  • 1 0
 @vemegen: cool as hell, does the mandate of straight pull offset the gains elsewhere? I like how he addressed the disc comments above
  • 2 0
 @skimgosu: I'm interested to know people's experiences. I've personally broken 4 axles over the last 4 years or so. 185lb.s 6'3" riding in bham.
  • 2 0
 @zmums: That's brutal. May I ask what hubs/wheels? Fast and heavy will pretty much destroy anything though
  • 1 0
 @skimgosu: three DT swiss, and an e13. They do get relatively abused, but I'm for sure not the heaviest dude out there on a bicycle. I'm mostly interested to see if other people are also breaking axles. I don't break a ton of parts as a rule, just the odd wheel or der and one or two frames over the years.
  • 5 0
 @zmums: Stan's axles also used to break all the time. After a few broken aluminum axles they warrantied me out for the e-bike hub with a steel axle and that's working great. I think the Flow wheels might come stock with a steel axle now? Not sure.
  • 3 0
 @skimgosu: have to replace bontrager axles quite a lot and I have replaced dt axles, but there are on heavy use dh bikes...but I'll still stick to my dt350's
  • 18 0
 When did PinkBike start limiting free users to only 2 active BuySell Ads at a time and what is the deciding factor for such a limitation than corporate greed? Such a subscription limited approach to what is supposed to be a community based marketplace is a far cry from being a "a community riders made for riders, by riders" @brianpark
  • 10 0
 I've sold over 100 things on this site and that will not continue if I have to pay. IM OUT. Thanks Outside!!!!!!
  • 5 0
 Trailforks is on that greed train as well.
  • 11 0
 On standard hubs the right side weight loaded bearing is located near the middle of the axle, which is the least supported part of the axle and spot of greatest flex and weakness. So hubs now have overbuilt axles to support from the middle. This graphic will help illustrate how the bearing is near the middle.
cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-dkttq6iuv8/images/stencil/1024x1024/products/1691/6561/180-HUB-Evolution-Axle__52738.1579719888.png?c=2

This hub moves the weight loaded bearings close to the dropout for maximum stiffness and strength.
  • 8 0
 I never thought it could flex until I rebuilded my rear hub! It's may be because of my weight (210-220lbs) but on my Hope Pro 4, the faces between the pawls of the freehub are chewed up by the inner tooth ring. Never saw on all freehub I rebuilded before but I was like 160-170lbs. Hope' support said that's caused by the flex and they told me to file down the burrs... lol However while it's not really pleasing to look at lol, the hub still works great. :/

So I really like the idea of moving the right side bearing closer to the frame but the proprietary rotor is not great...
  • 6 0
 @CaSentLeTabarnakMonHomme: I'm your weight, and after destroying my 3rd Hope 4, I'll stick with ratchet rather than pawls, as they deal with that sort of thing a lot more gracefully.
  • 9 0
 @g-42: dt350 4 ever
  • 13 0
 Is it just me, or would a video of the action improved this content significantly?
  • 4 0
 Just added a video above.
  • 11 0
 Four bolt - CODA Approved!!
  • 9 0
 Very clever but I haven't snapped an axle since the QR says. Proprietary rotors and straight pull spokes are deal breakers, price is a ball breaker.
  • 7 1
 Hear me out - could you move the anti-pedal-kickback elastomer ring from OChain into the hub and get "chainless" suspension with a single part? OChain very rare on consumer bikes but you see it on every WC DH bike that doesn't have a high pivot, it's clearly having an impact on speed.
  • 1 0
 @tpfenning: It's existed for three years and won Hardline? Ok, I am out of the loop. That's the hub innovation I'm looking for.
  • 6 0
 I have really liked these since I first learned about them a year or so ago! Are you going to do a review on them?
  • 9 0
 We'd certainly like to try them out yes.
  • 6 0
 They took a good idea and smothered it with very questionable execution and design choices.
  • 6 0
 30 second ad in the middle of a 60 second video… this is what I can here for…
  • 3 0
 I imagine they must have tried this... but it looks like moving the ratchet mechanism a little more inboard, maybe as part of the spoke flange (j bend), they then could have had 6 bolt or centerlock rotors and appeal to a lot more people.
  • 3 0
 My Shimano XTR rear Hub has - let me think - around 15000 kms on it. I service and grease the cups and bearings once a year or so and alls well. The latter look like new. They have been in used in two enduros. Often on natural rough single trails.
  • 4 1
 I saw the proprietary rotor and thought "great, another new standard". Then I thought about it a bit more, and a new rotor mounting standard could be really useful. Not necessarily this one, but maybe a 6 or 8 bolt standard that has a much wider interface. Rotors are so thin and the mounting point is so close to the center, and it's a real challenge for them to stay perfectly true. It would make sense to have a mounting standard with a diameter wide enough that it just barely fits on a 160 rotor so there's not nearly as much metal to bend. I know that higher end rotors solve this problem with an aluminum center section that's riveted onto the steel braking track. If this is effective, why not just have a larger aluminum shell/spider as part of the hub standard, both for rotor bending resistance and better heat sinking, and then all rotors could be relatively cheap steel rings?

And if you do this, the non-drive-side shell diameter could grow and then there's plenty of room for things like non-drive-side hub internal power meters and drive rings.
  • 1 1
 Because that's heavy, and you're moving weight farther away from the point of rotation, which has a bigger impact. I mean, I guess someone can copy Buell's idea.
  • 4 1
 @nickfranko: you’re saying taking the inner aluminum portion of a shimano ice tech rotor and making it part of the hub is heavy? Even if you move the fixing bolts to where the rivets are now and eliminate the rivets? And even though the hub will get larger, which means the innermost portion of the aluminum will now be hollow for a bigger opening? I don’t see how that makes sense.

Right now you have a small diameter for the hub and then a bunch of material to get to the 180, 200, or 220mm diameter of the rotor. In every situation where a manufacturer tries to save weight, they don’t go with small tubes and lots of material. It’s always larger diameter which means more strength, and thin tubing which is less weight. A bigger hollow hub with ice tech style spider arms cast in is not heavier.

And the only weight that is moving out from the center vs an ice tech rotor is that the bolts go in the position where rivets would be. That’s such a tiny change that I can’t believe it would be a point of contention.

If this wasn’t the optimum setup for strength and weight, we wouldn’t have crank spiders with a relatively large bcd. We have direct mount cranks for versatility and because we don’t put large cogs as part of a triple on a mtb anymore. I argue that the creators of the 6 bolt standard never saw rotors growing to their current size, and they would have had crank style arms from the start if they did.
  • 4 1
 If you have no issues with rear hubs, i agree that you don’t need this.

However, I’ve just had a rear wheel built with one of these hubs. I am a big guy, 120kgs, 195cm, and have broken every rear hub I have ever used (inc DT swiss and Hope). Some last 1000kms, some 250kms. It is either axle shearing or freehub/pawl/ratchet disintegration. Most seem to be caused by flex as very well described here (www.youtube.com/watch?v=qO6DUSKhbRU), and is on full sus, hardtail and now with even greater frequency on an eeb.

The one hub that now does not break, is a Hope Pro 4 for which a friend machined for me a solid stainless steel axle with M8 bolts.

Unfortunately this is a problematic solution for my eeb which has a UDH, so I’ve decided to give KOM a try. (Interestingly, I talked to Chris King and they were not keen on suggesting their hubs would be any better, and i9 etc seem to be solving no issues but costing a fortune)

Now about 250kms in, the hub so far seems fine. ratchet is V noisy. The disc is indeed nice and consistent. Currently in the alps for a long weekend, let’s see how well the hub lasts. Fingers crossed!
  • 4 1
 I saw this concept a little while ago. Yes, another proprietary piece of hardware, but you have to admit it’s a superior design.
Glad to see these come to market! Thumbs up to 2.0 & 2.3mm rotors
  • 8 2
 Lost me at straight pull only
  • 2 0
 Me too.
  • 3 1
 I rather like a straight pull - easy to remove or replace a broken spoke in the field without removing cassette. Has to be with bladed spokes though to make it easier to work with
  • 4 0
 @mountainsofsussex: Removing the cassette only requires a quick pull because it's attached to the freehub. Why is that a big deal?
  • 1 1
 @nickfranko: some cassettes/freehubs do pretty much fall off, others need cone spanners or big Allen keys, which I certainly don't carry in my riding pack. And if a disc has to come off, that's a faff, especially with CL.
  • 3 0
 @mountainsofsussex: Have you ever broken enough spokes to need to repair trailside? I've broken spokes on a number of occasions, but it's never stopped me from completing my ride. I think the worst situation was 3 in one go. I've never even considered carrying spares with me, just wrap the broken spoke(s) around others then replace when I get home.
To be fair I ride 32 hole rims, maybe it's more of an issue on lower spoke count hubs/rims.
  • 2 1
 @commental: I've replaced a spoke during an enduro race - probably could have carried on. It's more about the leftover spoke (s) flapping around, being distracting or getting caught in the chain etc as they're hard to secure permanently. Each to their own on this one
  • 6 0
 Really enjoying the amount of ads in every short video now (sarcasm).
  • 2 0
 To be fair it's down to YouTube rather than Pinkbike. The amount of ads is becoming a joke. My browser stops them when watching on my laptop, but I like to use Chromecast for longer videos and can't find a work around for that, so casting less and less.
  • 2 0
 I remember reading up on these last year or whenever. Despite some of the comments here, it seems like this would be perfect for fatbike hubs. As those seem very prone being roasted and flexed into submission.

If you've broken multiple 190/197mm hubs, then you know what I'm talking about.

For $600+, straight pull spokes and proprietary rotor....that's a hard no, sadly. I'd be much more open to it if I could run a regular rotor.
  • 3 1
 Two proprietary axles in a proprietary hub with a proprietary drive system that is only compatible with their own proprietary rotor which is not offered in a thickness that competes with the growing new standard of thicker brake rotors. Throw some straight pull spokes in there and call er done.
  • 1 0
 "A 2.3mm option with also be available soon for diameters of 200mm and upwards"
  • 2 0
 As much as I like innovation and seeing people thinking outside the box, proprietary stuff always comes with its downsides. Props for coming with something new and new ideas.
Just on a side note I myself do not suffer with hub reliabilty problems. I’ve switched to Hope a long time ago (since pro 2s) and never looked back. Never had problems with those (the pro 2 is still going strong on the 26er).
  • 1 0
 Looks neat, but I’m not an early adopter. Once other people deal with the proprietary stuff (and it’s common enough not to be rare and proprietary) then maybe.

Also, 350 hubs have set a hell of a bar for any hub with any layout to match.
  • 1 0
 Interesting, I like the thinking behind it, I wonder if heat build up from the disc would cause ratchet problems, probably not I guess.it's a shame about the proprietary disc situation but those who will build wheels with these hubs will most likely grab a spare disc anyway.
  • 3 0
 Man I need this. I've sheared two thru axles, an inner hub axle, and toasted a couple of bearings; on one bike. Anyway this can be affordable to broke ass college students?
  • 1 0
 Not a chance
  • 1 0
 As someone who's mangled more than his fair share of hubs, this seems like legitimate innovation. I can accept proprietary internals and proprietary small parts, which is par for the course with most hubs anyway. But a proprietary rotor is a big pill to swallow. There has to be a better way to solve that.
  • 1 0
 Right now I'm happy with Shimano and Hope hubs, I can service them, get spare parts, available in
steel HG freehubs, hub end spacers to suit vatious axle lengths, diameters and I can choose which
disc rotor, J bend spokes just work, choice of colours and depending what I go for a cost that suits.

Been around for ages stood the test of time, so until all that can be matched no need for me to change,
will just watch from a distance and see what becomes of this new stuff : )
  • 1 0
 It's definitely a cool idea, and seems well thought out. But it addresses semi-theoretical problems with one of the few areas of the bike that I don't really ever have issues with. I think my hubs are probably the oldest component on my bikes
  • 1 0
 My thinking is it's just a bicycle built as light as possible to get the job done. I don't believe this hub is 260 grams. straight pull spokes suck IMHO, and only one of the five bearings by their physical dimensions appear to have any longevity and reliability built in.
  • 1 0
 Ohh I like it. My Norco Sight murders drive side bearings, possibly due to no brace in the seat stays. Snapped axel in XT hub. 4 x drive side bearing replacement in 350's over 4 years riding. It's due for another rear wheel.
  • 2 1
 Do people, other than like a person that's over 200lbs, actually feel hub flexing? I think people are pushing for as stiff as possible and as light as possible - at what point does a bike become unridable because it is designed to perfection that the cost wouldn't be feasible. In addition, this hub uses 4-bolt pattern - why didn't the engineer go with the regular 6-bolt or 3. At least with the 3-bolt pattern, you will still be able to use 6-bolt discs. People like to put out knew things but don't think about adapting to current standards. It's a repeated problem that has failed so many times!
  • 2 1
 The designer absolutely did not want to use a new pattern, but he REALLY didn't want to have any more issues with pawls, so the pawls work at a bigger diameter so the load on each pawl is lower. The space inside the disc was "wasted" space so a great place to locate the bigger ratchet ring.
The discs are the best I've ever used and the ONLY disc I've ever had that hasn't warped and then had an annoying rub.
  • 1 0
 @G-Sport: Meh, done with pawls. New discs are always straight anyways. So, discs will rub once they get toasty and start warping - that or the calipers get dirty and only one side of the pistons are actually activated.
  • 1 0
 @CSharp: Prior to these discs I would have agreed with you, but I'm well over a year in and discs are still dead straight despite plenty of hard use. Normally I find discs warp enough to rub within the first week of ownership.
  • 4 0
 Send me one... I'll ride it and figure out where it's going to break...
  • 3 0
 The youtuber Peak Torque has a great video on this:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=qO6DUSKhbRU&t=40s
  • 1 0
 One more odd-ball: What if other hub mfgrs start making hubs with this bolt pattern? Seems it would be lighter, with 2 fewer bolts, 2 fewer mount nodes, less mass for the rotor overall.
  • 5 2
 You lost me at propriety rotor…
  • 2 0
 Do you prefer centerlock or 6 bolt?
  • 1 0
 @Vudu74: Jeez, that rachet cap could easily accomodate a centerlock interface.....whoops - back to the drawing board - at least there'd be some compatibility with an existing industry standard (not a very popular one, but still)
  • 3 3
 These are hilarious. My favourite unovation of the year so far. Brilliant. I mean it's unfortunate that it will financially ruin at least one person involved, but that's life.
  • 2 1
 The KOM hubs look good, but are they solving something that really isn't a problem? Lots of hubs on the market have excellent durability and longetivity.
  • 3 0
 Make an adapter for 6 bolt... then im in.
  • 1 0
 I mean, it's quite a clever design and all. Very nice, well done. But it just feels like a solution to a problem that I never even had...
  • 2 0
 The 'dual axle' is interesting. You could put a wide ratchet mech, or bearing clutch, inside the hubshell, not outboard.
  • 3 0
 They lost my interest when I saw straight pull and proprietary parts...
  • 2 0
 I feel like its a cool idea but the whole thing has been killed by the word " proprietary"....
  • 1 0
 License this and get it out there. Hard to see a downside. Hope it takes off and you make a shit ton of money to use to make something else
  • 1 0
 The hub architecture seems very interesting but why massively increase your market friction by using a proprietary disc standard? Self sabotage.
  • 12 11
 Actual innovation. Not for everyone but probably the most durable hub available.
  • 2 2
 Most durable is still a DT 350. That’s the bar and we won’t k in if the OneUp hubs or these come close for 5-6 years.
  • 5 0
 @wyorider: I know some big guys who would kill a 350 free hub in less then a month. A design like this should really help with this crowd
  • 1 0
 Shimano did the same years ago, their silent clutch hubs anchored the freehub drive to the left side of the hub.
  • 2 0
 Hmmm I wondered about that. I loved my STX-RC silent hubs back in the day, but it's been decades since I looked at how they actually worked.
  • 3 0
 Even the current shimano hubs, with the steel freehub body bolted on the hub shell, have in common the fact that they put the load bearings at the extremities of the axle. No bearings needed in the middle because the hub shell and the inner portion of the freehub body are connected as one.
  • 2 0
 Proprietary rotors? Ok... 6 bolt guy fo life.
  • 2 2
 ahhhh no, Im sure the 'high engagement is better' crowd will be onto these though, Seeing as they like useless crap that often has a negative performance outcome.
  • 2 0
 So a rotor weighs almost the same as the whole hub? Huh.
  • 1 0
 Let's say you go on a biking trip with your friends and hit ur rotor and need a new one.... WOMP WOMP
  • 2 0
 and the price of admission is ridiculous
  • 3 4
 With Hubs like DT Swiss, Hope, I9, Chris Kings around, i just dont see why get anything else. Not worth risking a failure for questionable 'advantages'
  • 1 0
 Looking forward to the feelz test.
  • 1 1
 Would be interesting to see how well this hub works on a transmission equipped 170mm ebike, compared to a normal hub.
  • 1 0
 *FBI busts down the door* “dont you dare…. not on my watch!!!
  • 3 4
 I don’t get y’all’s complaint about the rotors?! How often are you having to replace them? Just buy a damn spare and don’t worry about it
  • 2 0
 "innovation"
  • 1 0
 Proprietary Rotors……Nah pass on that!
  • 1 0
 stopped reading when I saw the proprietary rotors
  • 1 0
 Nice, but the gain over just using regular shit isn't worth it.
  • 1 0
 Looks cool, neat idea but it’s proprietary. It’s not for me.
  • 2 2
 cool. ANOTHER new hub design,
  • 4 3
 This seems silly.
  • 4 5
 Pointless wank. The problem it claims to solve is not really a problem big enough to warrant all of this.







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