First Look: Nukeproof Dissent Carbon Downhill Bike

Apr 19, 2023
by Matt Beer  
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Nukeproof hasn’t been shy about letting the world know a carbon version of their Dissent downhill bike was on the way. We featured a bike check with team rider, Adam Brayton, back in September, although the frame details were kept under the camo wrap.

From the outside, the frame appears to be very similar to the aluminum model, but Nukeproof have packed a ton of features into this new carbon-molded Dissent. For starters, the change in materials saves 430g and the kinematics have been tweaked. Nukeproof has also condensed two of the wheel-size options in the Dissent family into one carbon model, as well as devising new sizing nomenclature, called, NP1, NP2, and NP3.

Two build kits with a mix of SRAM / RockShox and Nukeproof components begin at £4499.99 (GBP) / $5699.99 (Euro) / $5,199 (USD), plus there’s also a frameset to custom build too.
Dissent Carbon Details

• Wheel size: 29er or MX
• Travel: 200mm
• 3-position main pivot progression adjustment
• Coil or air shock compatible
• Reach: 445, 465, 485mm (+/-6mm cups inc.)
• Chainstay: 440, 445, 450mm
• Weight: 3.48 kg (raw frame, size NP1)
• Pricing (complete): £4499.99 GBP / €5699.99 EUR / $5,199 USD - £5999.99 GBP / €7499.99 EUR/ $6,999 USD
• Pricing (frameset): £2999.99 GBP / €3599.99 EUR / $3,199 USD
nukeproof.com





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Frame Details

Besides the obvious switch to the sculpted carbon material, the Dissent platform now combines both the 29er and mixed wheel frames into one sleek package. Nukeproof has employed the use of four variable fixing points on the frame to do just that. They’ve also worked in a flip-chip at the seatstay pivot to retain the geometry and kinematics between the two rear wheel sizes. A slotted 200mm post-style brake mount works for all three chainstay lengths.

Behind the built-in fork bumpers, you’ll find tube-in-tube cable routing that runs throughout the front and rear triangles. There’s also a healthy dose of rubber along the chainstay and under the downtube.




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Kinematics

The kinematics have been altered to add suppleness with an air shock and Nukeproof says riders may find themselves moving up a spring weight from the aluminum Dissents, if they prefer a coil option. At the main pivot there is still a progression adjustment, however, that’s been reduced from four to three positions, giving 21, 25, and 28% progression versus the previous 17, 21, 26, and 30% settings. The frame still uses a 250x75mm shock and the smooth articulation of a bearing eyelet on the lower mount.




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Geometry

If you’re familiar with their alloy version then you’ll recognize the 3-position chainstay adjustment at the axle which now varies between 440, 445, and 450mm. One of the critical numbers that doesn’t change though is the 63-degree headtube angle.

Then there are the three frame sizes that fall under a new naming scheme, NP1, NP2, and NP3. The reach numbers start at a baseline of 445, 465, and 485mm, but can vary by 6mm in either direction depending on the orientation of the supplied offset headset cups.




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Pricing, Specs, and Availability

Although the Dissent Carbon can adapt to either rear wheel size, you’ll still have the choice to pick which one works for you when deciding on a build kit. The frame kit is available now in the EU, UK, and USA, while the complete bikes will come to the eastern side of the pond next week. Towards the end of July and August, the Comp and RS builds will come to the USA.

The Comp comes in a gloss grey color and retails for £4499.99 GBP / €5699.99 EUR / $5199 USD with a RockShox Boxxer Select, Super Deluxe Select air shock, G2 RE brakes, and Sun Duroc wheels. SRAM also takes care of the drivetrain with a 7-speed GX shift kit and Descendant crankset.

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On the £5999.99 GBP / €7499.99 EUR/ $6,999 USD RS build, upgrades are made all around to the gloss red bike. SRAM / RockShox bits bump up to the Ultimate variety and the wheels swap to Nukeproof’s Horizon V2 HG. There are also Code R brakes with 220 and 200mm rotors, and an XO1 DH drivetrain.

Nukeproof’s own Neutron and Vector components and Michelin DH22 TRL cover the cockpit and tire specs on both builds, plus, MRP’s G4 chainguide is fitted for chain security.

If you’re after just the frame, that’ll cost £2999.99 GBP / €3599.99 EUR / $3,199 USD and will only be available in the grey color option. It’ll include the Super Deluxe Ulitmate air shock, rear axle, headset, and paint protection wrap already installed.

Author Info:
mattbeer avatar

Member since Mar 16, 2001
363 articles

181 Comments
  • 186 2
 Very nice. I can't wait to strongly consider one of these in the Black Friday sales and then not buy one because my nearest actual mountain with a chairlift is 1000 miles away.
  • 56 2
 A week in Morzine in summer - a few trips a year Wales to get uplift. You can definitely justify it bud Wink

^my inner demon speaking
  • 19 2
 I was thinking about that. DH bikes have to be one of the smallest markets in bike sales. Even when you go to DH parks the majority of people are riding enduro or trail bikes.
  • 7 0
 @everythingsucks: They are the smallest. Thats why you started seeing companies like Rocky Mountain who traditionally made one stop producing. Not enough to justify the R&D, time, money etc. to keep them
  • 32 1
 @everythingsucks: on of the smallest markets, but definitely the one with the most feelings surrounding it.
  • 21 2
 @everythingsucks:
But only people who know what a real ride on a DH bike is like appreciate the companies work to further develop these bikes
  • 5 0
 @tom666: username checks out Smile
  • 7 9
 I drive just shy of 1400km every weekend to ride in Bromont, Québec as it's my "local" mountain. You can do it Big Grin
  • 20 2
 @everythingsucks: I used to think that but now my 'do it all' bike weighs 38lbs which saps the fun out of a lot of the non park riding I do. I think I'd actually be better off with a DH bike and a much lighter, less capable trail bike.
  • 2 2
 if it weren't a 29er, it would be good fun around town
  • 6 0
 @everythingsucks: Ya it's partially a marketing cost to develop those bikes, especially if you don't have a WC team/racer going on. The good thing is that we all WANT to be riding DH bikes in our head, so it sells normal bikes for them when they showcase DH riding Smile
  • 3 0
 @thepwnstar39: Definitely. The other part of it is DH bikes are a great platform to apply unproven designs without the constrictions of weight, pedaling efficiency, or price (to an extent). The technological trickle-down from DH bikes to Enduro, and even Trail bikes, is a driving factor in a lot of brands developing one.

Interestingly, you can almost determine whether or not a brand has a DH bike or not based on the rest of their lineup- the new Nukeproof Giga, Specialized Enduro, etc. frames look like DH bikes with a single crown slapped on, whereas a comparable Yeti SB160 or RM Altitude look far more trail-bike inspired.
  • 1 0
 @everythingsucks: Yep! I suspect they're in the process of developing one for all the reasons above. Probably trying to work out if their new six-bar layout makes for a good high-pivot application.
  • 6 0
 @justanothermatt: Exactly. By the time your enduro rig has thick tires, coil shock, proper wheels, etc its no longer a good allrounder. Snoqualmie just opened their bike park, and now local folks are having to reconsider the 'one bike' setup. If you put a season's worth of abuse on your 10K carbon enduro superbike in a month of lift-access, it actually becomes more cost effective to have the dedicated DH rig that is built for the park environment.
  • 3 3
 As much as I like having multiple bikes I just don't understand having a DH bike if one has to travel so far to ride them. Why not rent a bike? Because it isn't the new hotness or unique to your style? I love beating on a rental and handing it back to them and not having to do any maintenance.
  • 5 0
 Even if I don't ride it very often and it's an older (but well maintained) model, nothing beats the feeling of a DH bike down some gnarly trails.
  • 2 1
 We drive 8 to 12 hours each way to ride lifts. You can do it!! Smile
  • 2 1
 @cky78: Can confirm^ Big Grin
  • 1 0
 @justanothermatt: Why did you make your bike so heavy? I have an XL that weighs nearly 8lbs less despite having 160mm of travel.
  • 4 0
 @justanothermatt: Agreed. I tried the one bike quiver when the v4 nomad came out and soon found out that they’re not that great for regular park riding, especially on a durability front. Now, with things like the Range, I see a mirror problem. These super Enduros are getting closer to being as capable as DH, but still at cost and compromise. They’re heavy sleds that are too much bike for the kind of things most people peddle into, but aren’t quite a DH bike and will never be due to the characteristics required to make them uphill capable. These super enduros tend to be pricy as well. At the same time, trail bikes now have the aggressive geo you once needed to buy a big bike for. As such, I’m starting to hear from more and more people planning to ditch the super enduro for a 2 bike quiver of a trail and DH bike.
  • 1 0
 @cky78: that is madness! but respect! how do you fit all your bikes on a prius? b/c no way the gas $ for those trips would make sense, otherwise.
  • 1 0
 @thepwnstar39: Bingo. And NP bikes are truly one of the most ripping on the market. I can't wait to see what they do with the Reactor.
  • 2 0
 @nickfranko: I didn't set out to make a really heavy bike I just wanted something reliable, it's an XL Nukeproof Giga with an EXT coil, Zebs and a DT wheel set with DH tires. I have 4 bike parks under 30 mins from home and decent trials on my doorstep. The bike is amazing but compromised.
  • 1 0
 @kyleluvsdh: YEA BUDDY!! Smile
  • 1 0
 @moroj82: The trips can be a little pricey, but they're worth it for the dh riding.
  • 2 0
 @everythingsucks: Enduro bikes are so good now you can definitely ride them in pretty much any bike park, but DH bikes are more fun when it get's really rough or really big. That's the only justification I have for owning one, and it's pretty thin.
  • 131 18
 Guide brakes on a DH bike is that a fucking joke
  • 31 6
 Hi, I'm the real nobody and I I upvoted this comment.
  • 60 9
 They're Guide G2 RE, basically an e-bike brake with Code caliper - seems fine to me.
  • 4 1
 @tavaenga: would be better with HS2 rotors
  • 29 1
 If this was Mighty Car Mods those brakes would go "IN THE BIN!"
  • 50 1
 I find Guides ideal for DH racing, they solve the problem of me being to scared to get off the brakes
  • 14 0
 But remember, not braking makes you go faster, and using Guides ensures you don't have the option of braking!
  • 12 2
 Guide REs are the guide lever with the previous gen code caliper. It's basically a cheaper code.
  • 7 0
 @melonhead1145: cheaper than the Code R brakes that come on the $7000 model?
  • 3 3
 @tavaenga: My ebike came with the G2 RS brakes, after 2 rides i ditched them.
  • 4 0
 good brakes just make you slower!
  • 2 1
 they are kind of like plastic pedals bike shops used to give you, supposed to pull em off and throw them in the trash.
  • 9 0
 @wbro74: G2 RS and G2 RE are very different brakes amigo
  • 1 0
 @TommyNunchuck: But do you think they would fit on my Honda?
  • 5 5
 @wbro74: Agreed Code R and Code RSC are very different brakes. I have a set of Code R that I ditched for TRP brakes and will be installing them on my DJ this week. Code R is the worst brake to date I have ever used.
They Heat up and Fade on not even long DH runs, they have mediocre power. I tried everything, Multiple bleeds, 220 rotors, different types of pads.
  • 5 0
 @Snowsed341: really? I can personally say I've been running code Rs with 200mm rotors for years on my nomad with no issue. Whistler, sun peaks ect never had an ounce of fade and they have pretty good power too. Maybe different model years matter.
  • 3 0
 @nismo325: Yeah, who knows maybe mine are just defective. But i dont feel like i am alone in this!! My TRP brakes 4th set on different bikes are awesome. Quiet, Power, Modulation, Control, look great. Love TRPs!! I also had Formula Cura 4 Brakes which were amazing also.
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13: *revs barless chainsaw*
  • 1 0
 @Snowsed341: yah you never know. To be honest I wasn’t expecting to keep them on my bike for this long but they have been better than expected. I have heard great things about the new trp stuff definitely wanna give them a try.
  • 2 1
 @Snowsed341: Everyone repeats this sentiment but the Code RSCs shouldn't produce more power than the Rs. The difference is the swing link in the RSC cuts out a bit of the slack pull in the lever (when you pull a bit but the pads haven't contacted the rotor yet), and the RSC contact pad adjustment lets you go a bit longer between bleeds.

I'm not a fan of either (but still too broke to get rid of them). It feels like SRAM released the Rs as a fundamentally flawed brake, and then charged us tons more for the band-aided RSCs. This would be acceptable if it weren't for the old Avid Codes having the same issues over a decade ago.
  • 2 2
 @ryanandrewrogers: just upgrade to a pair of xt 2 piston takeoffs, loads more power in those than any sram brake LOL.
  • 2 1
 @englertracing: Meh, certainly get longer-lasting performance in between bleeds on any set of Shimmys, but if you're willing to bleed the Codes all the time they perform well enough.

The 2-pot XT's are impressive for what they are, but I don't appreciate the on/off switch feel. Going to TRP or Hayes next for sure.
  • 3 0
 @ryanandrewrogers: Formula two pistons are a great option as well
  • 3 1
 @Snowsed341: Maybe you were using Guides, maybe you didn't use the proper pads for the application, maybe you filled them with the incorrect fluid, maybe they were defective. But, they're not that bad.
  • 1 3
 @nickfranko: they are really that bad, at best like someone rubbed grease on a rim brake. If they are suitable for your use you must be under 125lbs, and a very timid rider.
  • 2 0
 @englertracing: exactly stopping 220 geared vs 150 geared is a huge difference.
  • 45 6
 Trail Bikes on coild shocks and DH Bikes on air shocks Smile you gotta ove our industry
  • 23 3
 Yeah but you know, Trail bikes have progressive layout so they require linear coil shocks, whereas downhill bikes have linear layout so require progressive air shock ! Or the other way around ? Arrgh I don't know anymore Smile
  • 14 4
 They swap it around every few years to keep punters buying stuff....
  • 33 1
 I just checked on CRC and the only Nukeproof bike on sale today with a coil shock is the aluminium Dissent, you know... a DH bike. I checked Vitus as well to be sure and found no coil shocks. Assuming CRC have no say in what other brands do (or that there isn't a single, omnipotent "industry CEO" somewhere out there), this comment isn't relevant to this bike at all?

But I thought to myself, "OK, these guys can't be talking out their arses, there must be a rear shock conspiracy" so I checked some other very popular brands. I gave up after 5 websites with, respectively: no coil shocks, no coil shocks, coils only on DH bikes, coils only on DH and FR bikes, coils on 165mm+ and air on shorter travel.

I swear pinkbikers will say anything to complain these days Big Grin
  • 2 1
 @betsie: more like every couple months!!
  • 14 0
 An air shock is going to work, off the shelf, for any rider. Pump it up to the desired spring rate, go out and ride. And it also works great for rental bikes, where you don't want to be fussing with changing coils for each rider. Since Nukeproof is a consumer direct brand, it makes sense that they'd run something that favors ease of setup over pure top end performance.
  • 2 3
 I always thought that this is a more logical use than the opposite. At least on my bikes. A DH shock works for 5 min and then it can cool down so be always in the best temperature range. An enduro shock usually works for not less than 10/15 min and has far less chances to completely "rest" and cool down. I can feel a noticeable difference in performance on my enduro air shock after a long descend. It never happens on my DH bike.
  • 2 0
 @William42: Exactly my thought (beyond my first silly post here). I was thinking that usually you find coil shocks on custom builds or on classical bikes (other than DH bikes for sure) after some months/years of use, when the owner starts to tweak things and replace parts to his liking (when they know better how their bike reacts and also how they want it to react). So I guess the logic behind having an air shock as a starting point makes sense
  • 6 1
 one guy who races DH and Enduro explained it to me:

a DH rider does not want comfort. Shocks are being used for the bigger hits. That's why air shocks are okay.

An Enduro rider wants comfort because the races are longer. Because they get tired, they need the shock for the smaller hits also. A coil shock is more comfortable and therefore more appropriate for Enduro than an air shock.
  • 2 0
 Companies prefer to spec air shocks because its cheaper for them to spec 1 shock across all sizes, rather than having to hold different springrates for each size. It makes a significant difference to the balance sheets at the end of the year. Enduro bikes sell much higher numbers than DH bikes, so the market is more competitive and little things like spec choice can swing people onto your bike from a competitors more easily, so it's worth putting a coil shock on to sweeten your spec. DH bikes are more niche, so people tend to buy their favourite frame, spec be damned.
  • 7 0
 @bananowy: as I pinkbiker I would like to complain about you complaining about the complaints.
  • 2 0
 Air shocks also reduce the weight on spec sheets which is only a plus for manufacturers along with the other factors
  • 1 0
 @vhdh666: Enduro stages tend to be much longer too. I don't mind air and love attacking a short track on air shock but when the stage is over 10 minutes a coil sure is nice.
  • 10 0
 You guys are pulling a lot of "facts" out of your arse.
  • 1 0
 @briceps: I was intrigued to see that Jack Moir races the first round on coil, the 2nd on air as there was more pedalling involved.
His choice and results over the coming months will be interesting.
  • 2 1
 @bananowy: So, did you not check Specialized? Or Santa Cruz? Because it was pretty easy for me to find some non-DH bikes with coil shocks.
  • 1 0
 @nickfranko: I did check both and my comment doesn't say I only found coils on DH bikes.
  • 26 1
 really good looking bike
  • 5 1
 agreed.
  • 21 6
 “Nukeproof Dissent Carbon Downhill Bike” and yet they make one out of carbon! Facepalm
  • 30 0
 I'm not sure what point you are making but I STRONGLY AGREE
  • 14 0
 @browner: Dissent matter, I didn't get it either.
  • 11 4
 Problem isn’t these bikes are too capable….but the new mtb’er is being served shit blue flow trails by parks/cities everywhere. The double blacktrail in the network near me barely gets any riders on it, and it’s unreal.
Alas, It’s all about Blue Flows and Yewwwing at the bottom.
  • 6 0
 more black, double black flow and tech! even beginners are sick of all the featureless blue shit
  • 5 0
 I'm tired of all the "harder" stuff being wooden features and other things the local crew puts together while drunk over the weekend. There will be an epic descent, off the side of the actual trail. Everyone wants flat smooth cut walking paths with giant wall rides like they're at the skatepark. There's like two chunky descents in my entire state.
  • 9 0
 Frame only is very overpriced
  • 1 0
 Old dissent was about $2500
  • 7 0
 Thats a great red though
  • 4 1
 @wburnes: old dissent is currently £1200 frame only or £3500 for the X01 build...
  • 1 1
 When will SRAM update the DH drivetrain with all the new Transmission tech
  • 1 0
 My Commencal Supreme frame was $1,900 brand new
  • 6 0
 Frame prices are always ridiculous, Nukeproof or else. What is shocking is the euro price, even before brexit you wouldn't see many of these in Europe aside from in Ireland but now you definitely won't see any. Pity as these bikes are pretty spot on thanks to design team in Northen Ireland that are on the ball.
  • 7 1
 @Balgaroth: Maybe they could set up a Black Friday Agreement.
  • 1 0
 @Balgaroth: The LBS where I live currently sells a ton of Nukeproof Bikes. Before the opened about 1 ½ years ago you would see them very rarley but now you can see them almost on every ride
  • 3 0
 Supreme DH v5 is the same price w/o a shock
  • 1 0
 @Dagabba: Do you know where to find it? Can't see any in stock on their US site.
  • 1 0
 @plustiresaintdead: Chain Reaction- don't know if that's helpful to you over the pond though.
  • 1 0
 @Dagabba: Where? only a size small
  • 1 0
 @jimmythehat: oh that's a shame.
  • 1 0
 @jimmythehat: I think the 290 (full 29) has other sizes in stock.
  • 1 1
 It's a buyer's market. Dealers are dealing. These posted prices are 'suggested retail'.
  • 1 0
 @jrocksdh: Commencal is a direct to consumer brand. No dealer involved.
  • 1 0
 @angel-liar-fight-dark: I was talking about the nukeproof. Those are sick though!
  • 1 0
 @angel-liar-fight-dark: this article/post about commencal?
Ok so set aside DTC models(mfgs) then
  • 10 3
 Needs bottle mounts
  • 7 2
 After scrolling a long way, I was concerned I would have to make this post...the world is right now.
  • 1 0
 That's called a giga
  • 4 0
 Nukeproof carbon option barely any lighter than their alloy offerings, I prefer alloy and saving several hundred pound.
  • 1 0
 On the V1 version the shock is a 250 x75 and now it’s 225x75 wonder why the change? And just a pet peeve for me is cable routing is only through the right side of the bike, I’ve always preferred cables go around the head tube
  • 2 0
 Its still 250x75. Thats what it says on the spec sheet anyway
  • 1 0
 @Shitass @brownstone Thanks for the catch.
  • 1 0
 Theres a sweet marketing campaign for ya: first look, here on PB - goto the site & all bikes are totally out of stock. Guess ya had to be in the know 1st. Frames are available but this is like going out to eat at the best restaurant and they're like "hey, here's all the ingredients - enjoy cooking it yourself!". Ppppffffffttttttzzzzz....a letdown. But to the point - any idea when full bikes will be in stock, Nuke?
  • 3 0
 Very interesting. Is an aluminium model continuing alongside (like the Mega) or is this replacing it?
  • 1 0
 Replacing.
  • 5 1
 Come on now, when is the new boxxer coming out?
  • 12 0
 They're sitting on a warehouse full of them until they've sold all of the old ones
  • 1 1
 August
  • 2 0
 Does it came with a race engineer to help you work out hitch of the many many setting combos you could choose is the best for you
  • 4 2
 If you buy one you are expected to know the basics of geometry and suspension. Otherwise such bike isn’t for you
  • 3 1
 Why are the photos private? I'm trying to save them for my wallpaper collection.
  • 12 0
 “wallpaper collection”
  • 3 0
 One of the best looking DH bikes I've ever seen.
  • 1 0
 Very good looking bike but but too capable for the trails I have access to, and I would need to make a dropper post fit there.
  • 3 1
 I’ve been after an aluminum xl 297 frame for a year now. 0.0 interest in a carbon dh bike.
  • 3 0
 boooooh no 27.5 / 27.5. cuz everybody is a racer?
  • 1 0
 That's new. Looking forward at the on the run rear wheel 29 to 27.5 adjustment....
  • 2 0
 No headset cable routing? BIN
  • 2 0
 Looks amazing. Needs a coil shock though
  • 2 0
 €3600 for a nukeproof frame only wow
  • 2 0
 gotta love a candy apple red bike
  • 4 1
 29" is dead.
  • 2 0
 Ewww Tartar with Beer? Yuck! (J/K)
  • 1 0
 Woah that's a high bottom bracket. Kudos, IMHO the sub 350 trend is too low for a long travel 9er
  • 5 4
 29 is dead as hell. If your making race only DH bikes you don't understand the DH bike market. 27.5 options or fuck off..
  • 1 0
 The connection between the down tube and the head tube doesn't look good IMO.
  • 1 0
 It's a nice bike but it's a crime that Sam isn't going to be on a state of the art high pivot machine.
  • 3 1
 Nice looking bike !
  • 10 8
 29 is dead
  • 2 1
 Theres nothing else yet
  • 3 1
 @Shitass: 26 even 27 at a push :/
  • 3 2
 @naptime: then maybe you should get off your wolly mammoth and smell the 21st century
  • 1 3
 @Shitass: LOLZZZ if you say so. even more LOLZZZZZZ
  • 3 2
 @naptime: get back on your shitty old kona stinky then if you think 26 is better. We left 26 years ago for good reason
  • 6 8
 @Shitass: naw 29 is dead look at all the freeriders, none of them are on 29 they all have custom frames to fit 27.5 and 26 mullet and the brands think we are stupid and don't notice. 29 is good for racing but the vast majority of people on DH bikes don't race, just want to crush laps and hit jumps. The bike companies that are still only making race focused 29 DH's are behind the time and making themselves look outdated and obsolete. I guess if your scared of all jumps and just want to stay on the ground and you have no style and can't do whips or tables and love you anus getting buzzed and blowing your 29 over the top of every berm and breaking your collarbone then 29 is really still the way to go.
  • 4 1
 @luckynugget: if those are your problems, you are the problem. Not the bike. Niko Vink is the only one wanting smaller wheels. Watching hardline and rampage, they were all in 29ers. 29 isnt dead youre just looking at the wrong bikes. If you want a freeride bike look fir a f*cking freeride bike lmao. Theyre everywhere. Dont come to a race bike expecting a freeride bike
  • 2 4
 @Shitass: user name checks out....
Was that reason marketing by any chance???
An I'd HAPPILY ride a stinky over any modern plastic bike that's obsolete in 6 weeks because industry "standards " .......

(I ride a supreme V2 btw)
  • 3 2
 @luckynugget: yer not wrong there. 29er riders LOVE a minion up thier butt crack
  • 2 3
 @Shitass: I don't know what rampage you were watching that even had a single 29 bike but obviously we live in 2 different worlds seeing as nothing you said is from this reality.
  • 2 1
 @naptime: so does yours. Youre dreaming
  • 2 2
 @luckynugget: might have been wrong about there being 29 in rampage, but every single bike there is as standard 27.5 or has a 27.5 version. So if you dont like 29 look there
  • 4 0
 @naptime: or youre too short to handle a 29.
  • 1 1
 @Shitass: yeah you're right I'm only 6ft (an thats not even sarcasm BTW. I'm genuinely agreeing with you)
  • 2 2
 I don't know how it is where you ride but around here, most of us that used to have a DH bike now have an Enduro bike, mostly 29er or MX and use this to ride the Park. Only ones still owning a DH bike are lads that race DH seriously. And then when you see DH bikes others than racers at the Park it usually is beginners or guys that ride twice a year either on old DH bikes. Then there is a handfull of teenagers that believe they are the next Vink that ride DH or Freeride 27.5 to send whips, which Goldstone or Finn can put to shame without even trying while racing on a full 29er. Unless you are sending proper tricks in which case 29 might be a limitation (Like the lads at Rampage, Dark Fest and such) otherwise you are just kidding yourself and wheelsize isn't the issue, your talent is.
  • 2 1
 @Balgaroth: if you say so......................
OH an sponsored riders ride an hype up what they are PAID to ride an hype up all to keep the marketing of gimmicks flowing.... To think otherwise is fkng naive. OH an BTW, ALL your heroes are juiced....... FACT

On a plus side tho, they can perform at thier level on any wheel size, HELL they could shred the shit out of any of us PB commenters on they Nans shopper FACT
  • 2 0
 @Balgaroth: that sounds like a whack scene...
Still tons of DH bikes, brand new DH bikes where I'm at in kamloops, people of all ages flipping and spinning their DH bikes, riding DH bikes at the bike park. There's enduro bikes too but many of them are on 27.5 wheels and set up for barspins/tailwhips. The dog walking karen crowd is on enduro bikes too but they don't really count. I guess if you have lots of good jumps and the scene doesn't suck then you see a lot more people making use of the 200mm travel and 27.5 wheels. Maybe you all started riding a lot more boring and thats why your all on 29 enduro bikes now because you only see going fast in a race as the top measure of what bikes are for
  • 1 0
 @luckynugget: we don't have many bikeparks in the area, the few are really good but we all ride enduro 90% of the time/season. So most of us have a bike setup for mroper enduro stages, often (very) steep and that's that. We only have one DH race that remains from when I was younger and racing DH, nowadays if you really want to race DH you need to go on French Cups all over the country or at least Alps cup (AURA) which is betwen 5 to 10h drive to go there. Most of us gave up on racing because of that, and if you are not racing then a good enduro bike is plenty to ride at the park and send a few whips on the big air. We have a few Freeriders bit that scene has never been huge.
  • 1 0
 What bike is a Nukeproof pulse? It’s on the anti-squat chart
  • 1 0
 It's the old DH bike, before the dissent released, odd that they compare it to the pulse instead of the v1 dissent
  • 3 1
 I’d hit it
  • 1 0
 Nukeproof cable routing is never clean
  • 2 0
 I'd hit it, and quit it.
  • 1 0
 Great looking bike , and it's SAM HILL Proven so thats enough for me
  • 4 0
 Sam Hill will be warming his up as we speak. Can't wait to see him cutting loose in the world cup this year.
  • 1 0
 Missed opportunity. Should be the Terra
  • 1 0
 That is one sassy looking whip!
  • 1 0
 Looks great! I really like it tup
  • 1 0
 Damn this thing is wicked cool. Fangity fang fang fangaroo.
  • 1 1
 I just still can't fathom a DH bike without a coil on the rear shock.
  • 1 1
 275, 275, 275, 275 etc…….industry is broken
  • 1 0
 Reach numbers suck …
  • 1 0
 Basically there ain't an XL(505+)
  • 1 0
 Great looking bike!
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