First Look: Orbea Launches Longer Travel Occam LT

Sep 16, 2021
by Seb Stott  

Orbea recently overhauled their Rallon enduro bike. Guess what? It's longer and slacker than its predecessor, and it has more travel when compared to the original 150mm-travel Rallon. This has opened the door for something to fill the gap between the 140mm-travel Occam and the 160mm-travel Rallon. Enter the Occam LT (LT stands for long travel - obviously). With 150mm of squish at either end and similar geometry to the 140mm Occam, Orbea says this is the bike for people who think the new Rallon is a bit too much bike.
2022 Occam and Occam LT Details

• Carbon and alloy frames
• Travel: 140mm (regular) / 150mm (LT)
• Wheel size: 29" only
• Head angle: 66-degrees (regular) / 65.5-degrees (LT)
• Sizes: S - XL
• Price: $2,999 - $8,699 USD (regular) / $3,659 - $6,299 (LT)
orbea.com

The regular Occam (left) continues alongside the new Occam LT (right)

The regular 140mm Occam isn't going anywhere and has also been updated with a new rocker link that is shared with the Occam LT. The new link has fewer parts and allows for a mini tool to be stashed in the hollow pivot axle, but keeps the suspension kinematics the same. The difference between the 140mm and 150mm bikes is in the shock - the LT uses a 210 x 55mm shock, rather than 210mm x 50mm. This is teamed with a 150mm Fox 36 in place of a 140mm Fox 34 fork. It is possible to switch shocks to convert a 2022 Occam to an Occam LT (or vise-versa), but Orbea doesn't recommend fitting the longer shock to an older Occam as it may contact the frame. The 2022 bike has an updated top tube in small and medium sizes to prevent this.
Like the 2022 Rallon, the Occam is now compatible with a little tool that sits inside the rocker link pivot.


Geometry

The longer fork slackens the seat and head angles by half a degree on the LT, but otherwise the bikes are nearly identical. Technically, the LT's slacker geometry will reduce the reach slightly, but this isn't shown in Orbea's geometry chart. With a head angle of 66-degrees, Orbea insists the Occam LT is not a "mini-Rallon"; it's significantly shorter and steeper, offering a more agile ride.


Suspension

The kinematics are nearly identical between both Occams, except for the LT's extra 10mm of suspension travel. Both bikes are progressive throughout the stroke, with about 18% progression from start to finish. Anti-squat is around 120% at sag, although the LT will have slightly less anti-squat if it is set up with the same percentage sag because the anti-squat values drop off deeper into the travel.

Specs

Compared to the standard Occam, the default spec on the LT includes beefier (four-pot) brakes, more aggressive tires and piggyback rather than in-line shocks. But through Orbea's MyO (My Orbea) programme, it's possible to configure different specifications when buying online. It's even possible to swap to a 150mm Fox 36 on a 140mm frame, or up the shock travel on an otherwise standard Occam. On the LT models, you can pick between coil or air shocks, and it's possible to choose between different tire specs (Minion or Assegai) or upgrade certain components like brakes, dropper posts and forks.



Occam LT Builds

OCCAM M10 LT - $6,299 / £5,699 / €5,699
Frame: Orbea OMR Carbon
Fork: Fox 36 GRIP2 Factor
Shock: Fox DHX Factory (Float X option)
Drivetrain: Shimano XT
Wheels: Race Face TURBINE-R30 TLR
Tires: Maxxis Minion DHF 2.50” EXO/Dissector 2.4" EXO
Seatpost OC2 Dropper 31.6mm
Saddle: Fizik Taiga S-alloy rail
Cranks: Shimano XT
Handlebar: Race Face Next R 35 780mm
Stem: Race Face Aeffct, 50mm
Brakes: Shimano XT Four-pot



OCCAM M30 LT - $4,599 / £3,999 / €3,999
Frame: Orbea OMR Carbon
Fork: Fox 36 Performance GRIP
Shock: Fox FLOAT X Factory
Drivetrain: Shimano XT/SLX
Wheels: Race Face AR 30c
Tires: Maxxis Minion DHF 2.50” EXO/Dissector 2.4" EXO
Seatpost OC2 Dropper 31.6mm
Saddle: Fizik Taiga S-alloy rail
Cranks: Race Face Aeffect 32t
Handlebar: Race Face Next R 35 780mm
Stem: Race Face Aeffct, 50mm
Brakes: Shimano Deore Four-pot



OCCAM H20 LT - $3,659 / £3,199 / €3,199
Frame: Orbea Hydro Polished Triple Butted Alloy
Fork: Fox 36 Performance GRIP
Shock: Fox FLOAT X Performance
Drivetrain: Shimano SLX
Wheels: Race Face AR 30c
Tires: Maxxis Minion DHF 2.50” EXO/Dissector 2.4" EXO
Seatpost OC2 Dropper 31.6mm
Saddle: Fizik Taiga S-alloy rail
Cranks: Race Face Aeffect 32t
Handlebar: OC1 35mm 12mm Rise 780mm
Stem: OC1 35mm clamp, 50mm
Brakes: Shimano M6100





88 Comments

  • 71 1
 They should come out with a scooter and call it the Occam Razor.
  • 16 0
 I believe a rigid singlespeed would be the Occam’s Razor of the bike world…
  • 2 0
 That would be neat, but one might consider that to be beyond necessity.
  • 57 1
 Reading all of PBs 170mm enduro bike reviews reminds me that 150mm coil, a Fox 36 and decent geometry is enough for any descent and much more fun on the climbs and on long rides.
  • 8 0
 I agree. Based on the Enduro category reviews that category of bike seems to now be mini DH bikes (with DH features such as a coil shocks, idlers, DH spec tyres) with a steep seat angle to make the climbs more tolerable and a water bottle mount to keep PB happy.

Whilst I appreciate that this is going to suit some people, it's huge overkill for most UK riding (and I suspect the same in other countries too). I ride a V3 Bronson with 170mm Lyrik Ultimates, which seemingly sits now in 'trail bike' category, it's incredibly capable, fun to ride and even that is more than I need in many cases.
  • 4 0
 Especially given the + geo changes in the last few years. I recently bought a NP Reactor (130rear/140mm fox 36) and it shreds everything just as well as my 160mm megatower did. I took it to the bike park and for sure I could say there...a little more travel and fork would be great. But man anything else, even the normal rocky nasty stuff...I couldn't be happier. The biggest thing is it has a wheelbase and front center more like a long travel bike. Not saying I'll stop buying 170mm bikes, but wow how bikes have changed just in the past 3 years.
  • 2 0
 @foggnm: Fully agree. Just built up a NP Reactor 275 (140r/160f) with a Marzocchi coil out back and couldn’t be happier with it. Strikes a great balance of geo and travel for 99% of my riding.
  • 1 0
 Just to play devils advocate, and it's different strokes for different folks, but I'm slightly faster uphill on my 170mm enduro bike than I was on my 150mm trail bike. Not that I'm setting records either way.
  • 31 0
 Nothing wrong with that H20 LT. Fox Dpx2, 36 with grip damper, and SLX drive train at $3600, that is a solid deal
  • 18 1
 The uber progressive camp is going to freak when they see a coil fitted on a bike with 18% leverage.
  • 15 2
 Yeah, I've ridden bikes with 0% progression and a coil shock and it can work; you just run less sag and maybe more high-speed compression. The bottom-out bumper actually does a lot for you with a coil shock. I'd say 18% is a decent amount of progression though.
  • 4 0
 Or throw a MRP progressive spring on it.
  • 4 0
 @hellbelly: Or a Cane Creek one if you can stand the white colour. Utterly transformed my wallowy enduro weapon.
  • 6 0
 @hellbelly: Sprindex is even better. progression at the end of the shock stroke and even adjustable.
  • 2 14
flag brawlstars5000 (Sep 16, 2021 at 8:09) (Below Threshold)
 Coilshocks are actually progressive and dont go too well with very progressive rearends, at least for the average Joe. Most people only take the spring into account, but the damper also takes more and more force to compress. On a good number of shocks the bottomout bumper ist quite big, which means that you have a very progressive shock in the last centimeter (or so) of travel. Coilshock should work well here.
  • 4 1
 @chakaping: or a DVO. Not white either!
  • 3 0
 @lefthandohvhater: I thought Springdex is linear with adjustable linear rates?
  • 2 0
 @vanillarice19: Theyre progressive at the last 20% of the stroke. So really just when you're hitting the bottom out bumper but its still nice.
sprindex.com/pages/overview
  • 6 0
 @lefthandohvhater: This review suggests the Springdex is digressive in the early travel when the adjustment is wound on. www.bikeradar.com/reviews/components/rear-shocks/sprindex-adjustable-coil-spring-review
  • 4 1
 @brawlstars5000: A coil is not progressive in and of itself (progressive coils have a mile amount of progressivity), where an air spring by its nature is. A bottom out bumper is exactly that, a bumper that controls bottom out. Likewise the damper is independent of the spring and can be tuned to adjust for different amounts of spring and linkage progressiveness.
  • 2 0
 @seb-stott: That is very interesting. I'm glad they did that testing. I was certainly curious about how that worked with the gap there. Would love to see the graphs of that data.
  • 1 0
 @seb-stott: I've gotten good results from very little sag and wide open high speed compression and a decent amount of low speed. It gives up the first part of the travel easily due to no HSC but the spring is so heavy it doesn't bottom out + the shaft speed is lower towards the end so LSC kicks in.
  • 1 0
 @chakaping: I've got the white valt on my enduro, and it is an awesome spring, and the white is actually SUPER cool. Matches the decals on my fork, and the lettering on my frame.
  • 1 0
 @Darwin66: Did it make a big difference for you? I'd say it's the single biggest improvement I've ever felt from a parts upgrade. Mine is on an old-school CCDB coil on a Radon Swoop 29, which used to trapdoor through it's travel before.
  • 1 0
 @carym: Just look at force diagrams of coil dampers - better than stating the obvious -linear springs are linear.
  • 1 0
 I'm running an MRP Hazzard with a progressing coil on my Marin with 18% leverage and it's been a dream
  • 1 0
 @chakaping: Its the only coil I've ever used. Had an newer x2 performance and swapped to a new dhx2 factory. This spring seems super cool. At first I thought my bike was too soft off the top and I felt like I couldn't pop. Sped up my lsr a few clicks, and slowed down my hsr (added a bit of lsc as well) and It feels absolutely awesome. Super soft off the top, supportive in the mid stroke, really supple overall. Sometimes it can feel a bit stiff in the chunk, but that's probably because I'm running too much preload and lsc.

Really still learning how to tune a coil.
  • 10 0
 Stoked to see proper trail bike geo in 2021. I've heard good things about the Occam's pedaling characteristics and the LT sounds like a compelling east coast enduro bike. The M30 LT looks like a compelling package.
  • 9 0
 Orbea has been hyping up this release far too much for what is effectively a paint and component spec update. I now understand why shops are expecting significant quantities of these in short time, though.
  • 6 0
 seems like a great price for the specs (especially if you can find one). Does Orbea's build quality back it up?
  • 4 0
 @SATN-XC: You'll be able to find one in the next month or two if you want one (not the case for certain other bikes that have recently launched).

As far as build quality goes... I've owned bikes from Trek, Giant, Santa Cruz, Transition, and Orbea. I've also built up bikes from Yeti and Nukeproof. I'd say Orbea is somewhere in the middle of the range for build quality. It doesn't come close to Santa Cruz or possibly even Nukeproof, but it's similar to Transition and Yeti.
  • 4 1
 @SATN-XC: yes, yes it does. I have a 2019 Rallon and it is phenomenal.
  • 2 0
 @SATN-XC: I've got an Occam with a Fox 36 and I'm very happy with it.
  • 5 0
 Lol gotta love UK pricing. It costs us £3199, but $3659 is more like £2650, and 3199 Euro is £2730. So why are we getting charged so much extra for the same thing? Oh wait, lol, I know why.
  • 1 4
 It's always been like that. Nothing to do with the 'thing' you think it does. They just have a legitimate reason to rip us off now.
  • 3 1
 @filbertst: The thing I think it does? You've lost me.
  • 2 1
 @redrook: Yeah I'm not sure that's even a sentence.
  • 1 0
 @redrook: The thing you think it has something to do with.....Brexit.
  • 6 0
 Maybe with this new shock I wouldn’t TURN OFF MY REAR SUSPENSION EVERY TIME I PUT MY WATER BOTTLE BAVK IN!!!!
  • 3 0
 Where is the 27.5 version :-( , seriously if every brand must keep at least one 27.5 bike in their rooster it's definately in the trail/fun category, exactly where the occam sits.
  • 2 0
 "Orbea doesn't recommend fitting the longer shock to an older Occam as it may contact the frame. The 2022 bike has an updated top tube in small and medium sizes to prevent this."

So my 2021 Occam in L in can upgrade with the new Rocker link and up the rear travel to 150mm or did I miss anything?
  • 4 0
 I like bikes, they are fun to ride, sometimes I jump high, sometimes I don't.
  • 1 0
 Underrated comment.
  • 1 0
 So the regular Occam and the LT use the same frame, and the LT has a longer fork and longer shock giving it less BB drop, and slacker HT and ST angles...but somehow the standover height, stack & reach stay the same?
Did I miss the reality distortion field generator in the spec list?
  • 1 0
 This frame is basically the same as the orbea rise, I think, yet the bike version doesn't require the frame strut? I guess the area around the bb/motor beefs it up enough so it's not necessary?
  • 3 0
 I think there is a typo on the geo run down.... does it have a 65.5 HT angle or 66.5?
  • 4 0
 65.5 according to the website
  • 3 0
 Orbea OCCAM XLT for when 150mm is not enough but the 160mm rallon is too much
  • 3 0
 Launched straight onto the 6 month wait list
  • 2 0
 Why do the y-axis values on the leverage ratio graph indicate a percentage?
  • 3 1
 science
  • 1 0
 So no real change other than just a tweak in the top tube shape to accomodate a coil for S and M sizes.

*You could already spec 150mm fox 36 and 4pot brakes in 2020.
  • 1 0
 nice bikes For the LT I had a whishlist MX, option for DPX2, option for 160mm front, option for carbon wheels ... maybe a swat like door in the frame
  • 2 0
 That alloy frame looks great. From the distance, looks very much like carbon. Those welds, sweet polish work
  • 2 0
 Na ohne HP und Idler wird des nix
  • 1 0
 Like, genau, eh
  • 1 0
 It's cool that they are speccing Galfer rotors on their bikes! I love mine!
  • 1 0
 Now you can ride even closer to the edge. I bet the bike has razor sharp handling.
  • 1 3
 Glad they finally decided to do something with that big empty hole in the linkage that looks like crap currently. The seated reach is still too short, the chainstays too long, and the leverage ratio too high for heavy riders so buyer beware. Also their build kit on the regular aluminum models is terrible.
  • 2 0
 i feel like orbea is the kane to specialized stump jumper undertaker..
  • 1 0
 Brother from another mother
  • 2 0
 Hot Bikes.
  • 2 3
 *Insert snarky comment about outdated head angle and too-long seat tube (on the large)*

But seriously Orbea, is this a bodge job with an old frame design or what?
  • 2 0
 But honestly that seat tube is too long. At L the ideal length is around 430 max.
  • 1 0
 @kusa: You know the score. How have they arrived at that massive jump between M and L?
  • 1 0
 This is what the new rise will look like
  • 1 0
 looks like fox 86d the gloss finish on the lowers.. thank you
  • 1 0
 I will wait for the 145mm option. Or maybe 142.5
  • 1 0
 Sick
  • 1 0
 The SOCCCAM!
  • 3 5
 Look excellent and keeping if real with the same size wheels!
  • 2 2
 Yes, although give it a few years and the mullet will go the same way as the once ubiquitous fat bike, plus bike, original mullet etc.
  • 1 2
 @mr-moose: Totally agree
  • 1 0
 every year has a fad. this year is mullet. last year was hardtail. 19 was ebike. 18 was wide tires. 17 was 27.5+
  • 2 2
 @quesoquesoqueso:
1 Hardtails have never ever been a fad.
2. As much as I despise them Ebikes are not a fad either.
3. Plus Size Tyres was an utter fad.
4. 27.5+ as above.

The award for the worst fad in Mountain Biking since the days of Gary Fishers clunkers are Mullets! By a billion miles!!
  • 2 0
 @MattP76: if you have to hear about everyday for a year, its a fad.
  • 3 0
 I don't think mullets are going away. Too many pros like them because on a 29er it's easy to get tyre buzz on bigger drops/jumps (so I am told).
  • 1 4
 @redrook: It'll go. A fads a fad. And this one is an absolute stinker!!
  • 3 0
 @MattP76: I don't agree that it's a fad. As I say, too many pros are using them for what they feel is a very good reason. I don't see it being useful for me. It'll go if the UCI disallow it for some reason perhaps.
  • 1 1
 @redrook: For consumers this fad has died a lot quicker than I expected. Pros may use them but let's face it they are the only ones who can squeeze the minute benefit it may provided. Interesting that Sam Hill is apparently switching back to 27.5 all round.
  • 1 0
 @MattP76: That is interesting, but it's also interesting to see how many are still using mullets, and not just racers - Remy Metallier for example. We'll see how long it lasts. Just because only the pros can squeeze out the minute benefits doesn't mean that it will stop, lets face it only the pros will notice the differences in a lot of biking products, yet people keep buying them.
  • 1 0
 @redrook: Very true, but give it a couple of years at most and Mullets will be gone. A lot of bike manufacturers have not put them in their 2022 line ups. That speaks volumes.
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