First Look: Push Industries' Elevensix Shock

Feb 17, 2015
by Richard Cunningham  
ELEVENSIX shock 2015
  The Elevensix's remote IFP reservoir sits perpendicular, not in-line with the damper body, as is common practice. The pair of blue dials are the shock's "Dual Overhead Valve" feature.


Push Industries is arguably the largest and most successful aftermarket suspension tuning business in the world, and after over two decades in business, founder Darren Murphy announced today that Push will sell its own shock. The Elevensix is a coil-over damper with a remote reservoir, and it is targeted at the all-mountain and enduro racing segment of the sport. While that market is dominated by air-sprung forks, Murphy says that his coil-over design is better suited for suspension designs with travel in the 140 to 160-millimeter range. Reportedly, the Elevensix weighs slightly more than its air-sprung competitors, but it is significantly lighter than any of their coil-sprung models.


ELEVENSIX shock 2015
A look at the large-diameter damper shaft, which moves a lot of fluid through the damping circuit. Low speed rebound and the orange bottom-out cushion is on the left. The damper piston and shim stacks are on the far right.
ELEVENSIX shock 2015
Two compression valves removed from the Elevensix shock. One is set firm for pedaling and the other, plush for descending. The shock's external lever toggles between them.

To ensure that the shock's damping rates and spring curves are spot on, Push will build every Elevensix shock as a custom order for an individual customer, who will then have access to the tech who assembled the order for future questions. Most everything outside or inside the Elevensix shock is manufactured at Push Industries' facility in Loveland, Colorado, and the few items which they out-source are also made in the USA with domestic materials. The MSRP of the Elevensix is $1200 USD. At present, Push has configurations to fit the Santa Cruz Nomad 27.5, Pivot's Mach 6, Yeti's SB66 and SB6C, Niner's WFO, the Ibis Mojo HD and the Banshee Rune. In case your bike wasn't on that list, Push is presently certifying the Intense Tracer 275, Ibis Mojo HD3, Giant Reign 275, Specialized Enduro 29, Transition patrol, Knolly Chilcotin, Norco Range and the Trek Slash.

bigquotesA complete Elevensix shock with a 450 pound-inch spring, ready to bolt onto a Santa Cruz Nomad, with a mount reducer kit is 825 grams. That's 135 grams lighter than a comparable Cane Creek DB Coil and 225 grams heavier than the CCDB Air in the same configuration. The Fox Float X and RockShox Monarch Debonair come in at approximately 425 grams in the same configuration. We feel confident in the fact that the performance gain far outweighs the weight penalty in this case.
- Darren Murphy

ELEVENSIX shock 2015
ELEVENSIX shock 2015
Murphy discovered that a rounded, parabolic shaped needle would control rebound flow in more even increments than a tapered needle would. Who knew?




Key Tech Points:

This bullet point list, taken directly from the Elevensix press release, outlines the key features of the new Push shock:

• 100% Manufactured in Colorado at Push from only the finest domestically sourced raw materials.
• 100% of vendor components are domestically sourced.
• Each unit is hand assembled, vacuum bled, and dyno tested. Built custom to rider specification based on rider weight, riding style, and frame application
• Patent Pending "Dual Overhead Valve" design offers two completely decoupled ride characteristics that can be toggled between on-the-fly. For the first time riders can have
ultra plush and ultra firm suspension characteristics without compromise.
• Tool free external adjustments for low-speed rebound, low-speed compression, and high-speed compression.
• Parabolic low-speed needle design for both compression and rebound eliminates the “gap” found in production MTB shock external adjustments.
• Exclusive HyperCo ultralight suspension spring, available in 25lb/in increments. Made from high tensile spring alloy and featuring Optimum Body Diameter technology,
eliminating spring deflection and body wear.
• Next-generation digressive damping characteristic from compression valves provides incredible traction and control while allowing for through-travel on square impacts.
• High volume oil and nitrogen reservoir for fade-free performance.
• Built using premium Maxima shock fluids.
• Exclusive 360-degree spring capture and bump stop cup eliminates extrusion of bumper under extreme bottoming loads and ensures proper spring alignment.
• Weight: Approximately 850 grams, ready to install
• MSRP: $1200 USD
• Contact: Push Industries


HyperCo Ultra Light Suspension Spring
The HyperCo spring is wider in the center to prevent it from rubbing against the damper.

ELEVENSIX shock 2015




Interview: Darren Murphy - Founder, Push Industries


ELEVENSIX shock 2015

Push industries has been tuning and servicing mountain bike suspension forks and shocks since 2003, when founder Darren Murphy began with an 800 square-foot industrial space in Irvine, California, furnished with two bike stands, a roll-away toolbox, two work tables and a dozen plastic bins that contained a modest number of custom designed damping pistons, seals, shims needles and springs. I was lucky to be one of the first people that Darren trusted to reveal his plan to rebuild Fox shocks and provide a custom tuning service that would tailor the shock's performance to the individual rider, as well as to the idiosyncrasies of the many suspension designs of that pioneering era.

Every dollar that Murphy possessed was in those tiny little plastic bins and I couldn't help thinking about how risky it seemed to bank on the possibility that riders would box up their forks and shocks and send them to a virtual unknown, who would then charge a decent sum in exchange for his promise that the items would perform noticeably better when they were returned. Darren is gifted with an uncanny understanding of how suspension works, and he made good on his promises. Based upon word-of-mouth alone, Push Industries, now based in Colorado, grew into a worldwide business in just one decade. Using custom parts they design and manufacture in house, Darren says Push has tuned or serviced over thirty thousand shocks and forks. We interviewed the man himself to the get the back-story on Push industries and the factors which led him to develop the Elevensix shock. - RC



Where did you get your start in the bicycle suspension business?

My first job was with Marzocchi back in ‘95. Back then, MTB suspension development was on fire. I still remember going over to Bryson’s house and having him pull out the first Z1 Bomber prototype from a bike that he brought back from Italy. We put the bike together and myself, Jim Mahan, and Bryson rode around smashing curbs and stairs. At that point I knew MTB suspension was going to be big.

When and why did you launch Push Industries?

My wife and I started PUSH in 2003 in Irvine, California. The business model had been proven in the motorcycle industry and I felt would be a great asset to riders in the MTB world. I started out servicing and tuning the Fox Vanilla coil series, offering a line of engineered and machined tuning parts that would allow me to customize suspension to meet the expectation of niche riders. Having worked on the manufacturer’s side, I understood some of the challenges and limitations that existed for the big brands in regards to working directly with the end consumer. After speaking with a few industry colleagues and putting together an initial plan, we went to work.

Who is your basic customer, and what is the type of service that is most asked for?

Two types really. The first are riders that have exhausted their efforts trying to get a certain ride quality out of their stock suspension. These types of riders don’t fit the mold of the “average rider” as determined by product managers or they have a certain expectation of what they want out of their bike. The second are riders who are in need of service on their fork or shock and make the decision to have it tuned more specifically for their riding style instead of just a standard service. By far, the riders coming to us are looking at tuning options, not just service.

What is your estimate for the number of forks and shocks Push Industries has worked on over the years?

Haha! That’s not one that I normally get! I can say that there’s more than 30,000 PUSH Factory Tunes out there in the world. We’ve been very fortunate to have a very supportive customer base!

bigquotesBy having two completely independent fully adjustable valves that you can toggle between on-the-fly, riders can not only have both a setting that is incredibly plush and extremely firm, but they get to define what those settings are ultimately to meet their individual needs.

What did you learn from over 21 years of servicing suspension that led you to design your own shock?

We learned that riders want something that is user friendly, durable, and has simple adjustments. We’ve built a ton of technology into Elevensix, but the one that stands out the most is our patent-pending Dual Overhead Valve system. This technology was developed as a direct response to customer feedback. In this day and age of on-the-fly adjustable suspension, riders are looking for something that doesn’t compromise. With all of the current shocks in the marketplace, the quick adjust compression lever is tied to the overall compression damping level in the shock. This means that both product managers at bike companies and tuners such as ourselves, must settle on a compression setting that offers good bump sensitivity while still having firmness when the lever is flipped. The reality is that firm pedaling settings with the lever on, means a reduction in small bump sensitivity and vice versa. This also means that the rider is locked into a certain range that they can’t adjust themselves. With Elevensix we’ve eliminated that compromise. By having two completely independent fully adjustable valves that you can toggle between on-the-fly, riders can not only have both a setting that is incredibly plush and extremely firm, but they get to define what those settings are ultimately to meet their individual needs.

Why a coil-over design, when air-sprung shocks are widely accepted and more adaptable to different rider weights and suspension curves?

Performance. We were specifically targeting the 140-165mm travel bikes and in that category coil shocks have significant advantages. We won’t be stocking any complete shocks, just parts kits. This is because each shock will be hand assembled by one of our technicians one at a time to customer spec taking into consideration rider weight, riding style, and leverage characteristic. This ensures that each rider gets the right setup for their bike.

Where does your shock fit into the marketplace? Will you be selling only to aftermarket customers, or will you also be seeking OEM sales?

Initially, production of the shock is going to be very limited, and for that reason we are limited to aftermarket only for now. OEM is something we’re exploring with several interested manufacturers.

What features does the new shock have that might set it apart from a reservoir shock from Cane Creek, RockShox or Fox?

Certainly the technology, but also the process. As I already mentioned, our Dual Overhead Valve system is unique in the fact that it gives riders two completely user-adjustable, independent shock settings that can be toggled on the fly. Additionally, this can all be done without tools. Another key technology is the use of parabolic needles for all of our external low speed adjusters to ensure a controlled, consistent change between clicks. We also have worked very closely with HyperCo, one of the world’s premiere suspension spring manufacturers in both the spring and spring retainer system. With this shock, we’re offering 25-pound increments in spring rate and a 2-pound spring tolerance. We also are taking advantage of HyperCo’s Optimum Body Technology and advancements in high performance spring alloys. For a given spring rate we’re between 100 and 200 grams lighter than a traditional MTB spring. With our spring and retainer system, we not only have eliminated unwanted spring rub on the shock body with a 360 degree capture of the spring ends, but have incorporated a bottoming bumper cup eliminating the extrusion of the bumper like in traditional slotted retainers. We’ve also added friction-reducing shaft and cylinder coatings, seal designs, asymmetric piston bolt, increased nitrogen and oil volume…..the list goes on.

bigquotesWith all that being said, the one element that stands out the most is that we make it. Not just assemble it from parts sourced from both here and abroad ...we actually make it, starting with 100-percent US-sourced raw materials.

With all that being said, the one element that stands out the most is that we make it. Not just assemble it from parts sourced from both here and abroad….we actually make it starting with 100-percent US-sourced raw materials. For parts that we don’t make such as springs, seals and glide rings, we utilize domestic vendors with whom we have built a close working relationship. From the initial design to laser marking the final product, it’s all done behind our doors in Colorado. We use state-of-the-art 3D CAD systems, and 3D CAM systems for all of our design, engineering, and CNC machine simulation. 100-percent of our machined parts are manufactured using the latest CNC technology from DMG/Mori, Citizen, and HAAS. We have complete on-board suspension data logging for all of our in-field testing as well as a custom built Roehrig Engineering EMA dynamometer that has trail playback capabilities as well as an additional Roehrig unit used for quality control.

As I mentioned, the product itself will be hand assembled and made custom to order, including vacuum bleeding and finally dyno testing to ensure the build quality. Each customer will then get a settings card, dyno report, and technician phone extension and email address as a point of contact. Who better to help you with your product than the person who’s logged thousands of miles on one, was involved in the development, and built it with their own hands?

Besides the damping controls, did you include any other features like needle bearings in the spring collars or eyelets?

The shock does have a built in polymer spring bearing and will come ready to bolt up to the bike with our 5pc sealed polymer mount bushing kit. Both of these items are extremely durable and increase small bump sensitivity.

Are there any fit-up issues for some of the most popular AM/enduro models?

At this point we’re limiting sales of Elevensix to those bikes for which we have a fully developed application, instead of just selling a shock to someone because it’s the correct size for their bike. For that reason we don’t currently have any known fit issues.

How does Push Industries plan on supporting the new shock – warranty issues, rebuilds, on-line tutorials, etc?

All warranty concerns as well as service will be handled directly through PUSH or one of our Factory Tuning Centers. We will be coming out with a “Tech Tuesday” series of online videos where we’ll discuss setup, installation, and technology. Due to the complex nature of the damper, we won’t be providing tools or materials for consumer service unfortunately.

Will you be selling through dealers or directly through Push Industries?

The shock will be available directly from PUSH as well as our Factory Tuning Center partners: TF Tuned in the UK, Suspension Experts in North Carolina, SuspensionWerx in Canada, and NS Dynamics in Australia. We also will be welcoming retailer sales here in the USA. Retailers can purchase directly from PUSH for their customers as well as their employees.

Is there a fork coming down the pipe any time soon?

Hmmm…...that would be interesting wouldn’t it?



View high res and larger images in the gallery




319 Comments

  • + 216
 I stop reading the article when I saw $1200 USD.
  • + 70
 Enduro specific... what did you expect?
  • + 104
 I can't believe it doesn't have carbon air cooling jet fins turbo enduro on it for that price !

My $450 CCDB Air CS will do the job just fine. I love Push, but I don't need to feel the ants I'm running over on track.
  • + 11
 yeah 1200 is insane. I'm a pretty young guy but I remember when 1200 got you quite a bit in this industry. The inflation rate is incredible. I could replace the rear shock on an r1, with an ohlins tuned for the track for significantly less than that.
  • + 1
 Not so long ago you could get a new frame for that. It was on discout but 1200 is insane.
  • + 128
 Are you guys familiar with the term "bespoke"? It's just a word that means "custom made for you." You can buy a suit off the self for $200 and have it altered, or if you have way to much money, you can go in to a tailor multiple times to have measurements taken, and have a tailor hand produce a custom product for you for upwards of $1,500. This shock is a bespoke shock. You pay a premium for a slightly better product, that makes you feel like a pimp
  • + 94
 For 1200 I know where they can push that...
  • + 12
 BOS kirk. Msrp 720, IF it even manages to surpass the BOS, is it really going to be alnost double as good?

(And still much heavier)
  • + 5
 I could do a king racing set up for the front of my vehicle for that.....
  • + 7
 It should come with free service for life. It would be hard to pay that and still have to pay to service the damn thing.
  • - 2
 1200 bucks for factory direct and it weighs twice as much as my monarch? no thanks
  • + 22
 There's too much complaining in this article! You're getting something that's 100% custom that Push spent so long making something with no compromises. I wouldn't buy one now that i'm in my last year of my MBA, but next year...maybe i'll need one for my Patrol
  • + 4
 Rockshox vivid air 525 grams , £300 brand new @ bike discount.de, then send it to push for a personal custom tune , half the price and half the weight.
  • + 27
 Bollocks to you guys. I think it's awesome. I'm not going to buy one but it's still awesome.
  • + 14
 Does it come with a frame for 1200?
  • + 93
 nmpearson: Who gives a f*ck that it's 100% custom, what difference does it make? I'm not a World Cup rider, for $1200 I'd rather fly to Hafjell for a week and shred every trail until I'd pass out than sit at home and wank to my $1200 shock. People need to spend less money on building their bikes and more money on riding them.
  • + 9
 "I ain't got no respect for anybody in a suit"- Lemmy Kilminster . I would add anyone with a 1200 usd rear shock
  • + 2
 Push doesn't do any custom tuning for any of the RS rear shock lineup.... So that's not happening.
  • + 1
 @mnorris122 I know the term bespoke. I'd gladly buy a bespoke suit but in terms of suspension damping there are cheaper bespoke options (avalanche). The difference between a bespoke suit and a bespoke shock is that you can feel the quality difference between a bespoke suit and a regular suit (unless you buy a shitty bespoke suit) but for shocks? You can tune the damping to your needs in your CCDB or get a custom tuned AVA or BOS.

I don't deny push makes a high quality product. Hell it even may be better than anything else on the market but when it costs twice as much as it's competition while the difference on this level is marginal it makes no sense. Also the production process makes no sense. It's cool that they hand assemble it for every user but outside of making you "feel like a pimp" it makes little sense.
  • - 3
 I am not gonna buy it I am not stupid!
  • - 1
 @extremmist the only think you convinced me of is that you're an idiot. It makes a huge difference! I've felt just about every suspension. I'd love something make specifically for me. Look...people are going to buy it. If the market is there, you may as well do something about it. If you look at push, they needed a way to make money. So they needed a way to differentiate themselves and they chose to differentiate themselves with price. I see nothing wrong with what they're doing. I don't have the money to buy one, but you can't go after them for the price.
  • + 19
 $1200.00 dollars seem very high for a "bike" part, however, take one to any top rate machine shop, have the best hydraulic company duplicate the valving and then factor in all the R&D that goes into something like this and $1200.00 is a STEAL!! I work in manufacturing and hydraulics, you are looking at a cost of probably $6-$7k to copy one that would not function as well.
That being said, I also can't afford one but sure wish I could!
  • + 41
 Man I get tired if everyone complaining about how expensive bicycle parts are! There are reasonably priced parts for people without the dough (or new to the sport), and there are parts like this that are undeniably expensive. The point I am making though is that this is supposed by a top quality offering. if you buy the most expensive suit, $12000 is just a starting point. If you buy a long travel kit for your tacoma (which is already f*cking expensive) you should start in the $10000 price range.... $1200 for the highest level offering is pennys compared to other sports, and considdering the low deamand, its just how it is. If you want cheap, buy RS's $250 offering.. This thing looks like it was truely designed from the ground up to be for a single purpose; rough enduro courses, and to top it off they will tailor it for you and your bike. Brilliant. Maybe il get my hands on one one day.
  • + 12
 $1200 IS a lot of money BUT...

it doesn't completely sound out of line considering this is as close to 100% USA made as it gets (sourcing raw materials domestically whaaa?) new product from a small company
and it is fully custom built for every customer...

The RS-1 migh have more exotic materials and more materials, but it's got a giant company behind it and I would say it's in the same price range...

And I'd take this shock over an RS-1 any day.
  • + 3
 perfect product for a comparison test against ccdb, bos & avalanche. would love to try a product at this price point one day....
the 160 travel market makes sense since it is the biggest group and fastest evolving in terms of design. riders are pushing these bikes pretty far
  • - 1
 bigburd has the best comment though!
  • + 26
 I think the term you are looking for is "bebroke".

Unless you be rich.
  • - 2
 This shock costs 200 more then my tr250 frame...
  • - 3
 @racer303 hit it right on the head. is this shock really THREE times better than a CCDBCS? I mean come on. At a certain point you hit the law of diminishing returns. This shock is a perfect example of that point. With that being said, the dual valve idea is stupidly ingenious.
  • + 14
 The bespoke argument falls on it's face when you realise the ' bespoke ' part that makes this 1200 is just different thickness washers laid in a slightly different order.

There will be a generic lay out for 4 bar bikes , a generic layout for single pivots and so on with only tiny differences between them in terms of rider weight , most of the ' bespoke ' settings will be achieved through turning the dials and using the correct sprig weight , much like any other shock out there.

Getting a shock tuned before you have ridden it is a bit of a fallacy anyway , I mean when asked about riding style , I bet most people are not honest
I wonder how many people say " well I mostly ride red/blues and drag my brakes most of the way while casing half the jumps" , very few I expect , most will go for the ' hard/aggressive option ' , either answer is so relative and subjective that the best any company can offer you from only the written word is a base tune for your weight.
  • + 7
 I agree with fullbug.

The 1200 dollar price point is expensive and I would probably never own one of these. However, think about the number of riders out there trying to replace a number of bikes in their quiver with just 1 "Enduro" bike...especially the 160 mm travel options (which this shock covers). Now I am not saying this shock is going to turn your enduro bike into a full on DH rig but I bet with a custom tune it would make the bike much more capable than the stock setup...especially if you share your riding style with Push.

I feel like this shock is marketed correctly at 1200 bucks. I mean based on all the things I read about the industry, this shock is marketed to someone who maybe only owns an enduro bike or competes on an enduro bike but also wants to do shuttle runs with said enduro bike without having to shell out the cake for a full on DH rig (where even an entry level bike will cost north of 3K).

I mean, if I only had an enduro bike and wanted to make it as versatile as possible for light DH and competitive enduro...I would seriously consider buying one of these things to avoid having to purchase a whole new niche bike at double the cost.
  • + 9
 Clearly the shock wasn't designed for you guys if you think $1200 is too much.
It's a bespoke product made to order for high end racer's bikes, who likely won't be footing the bill themselves.
Nobody claimed the product to be 'affordable', so stop bitching and whining. It is what it is, and if you don't like it, don't buy it. Simples.
  • + 0
 @nmpearson Telling another poster he's an idiot?
Although it is always becoming for a student to insult other people on the internets... your other posts make you just another troll.
  • + 11
 I don't see this as an average consumer product, but a race specific. For those competing at a high level, this could be worth it. Custom tuned to work right. Weight is good (touch under Bos Stoy and same as Marz Moto C2R) for a coil, despite the dual compression valves. Having the 2 compression valves puts it above any other coil shock for AM/Enduro use. It does carry a 1lb weight penalty and $600 premium, but that isn't what matters in a race if it makes you faster. Besides, air shock + custom tune is already approaching this price. Add in less often rebuild schedule and it isn't as outrageous. $1200 is the low end for motocross shocks.

If you are not racing competitively or don't have a ton of money to burn, then keep enjoying your air shock. That doesn't hurt your wallet any. But don't complain about this option being available for others.

What we need to see now is how well it works. Cane Creek's climb switch adjusts low speed compression and low speed rebound. This adjusts low and high speed compression, not rebound. What will have a better affect? Only heard good things about CC's Climb Switch.
  • + 14
 Honestly .... enough with these discussions, it's the same discussion, just insert expensive part you cant afford here _. There are already tons of options at budget price points, they set out as a leading tuner of suspension to make the best shock they could produce. As it turns out, it's not cheap. It's a low production USA made high quality piece of engineering. $1200 seems perfectly reasonable considering what they have invested in this.
  • + 8
 There's no one in telling you that you need to buy this shock. What is up with people thinking that if its over priced, its stupid? Mnorris said it beautifully, its custom to you. Think of trek bikes, you can buy a carbon fuel for a round 4 grand, go to project one and "customize" your bike and now its 9 grand. If you can't afford it, don't bitch about it.
  • + 6
 i'd coil all things if i could afford it. i'll take grip over weight savings all day. every day. lookin forward to the reviews. best of luck with it.
  • + 13
 I never understand people complaining about a single price point when they are awash in a sea of products at every price point imaginable. If you want a cheaper part, MANY companies make one for you to pick from. But the mere fact that a small custom company can go out on the financial limb to make something like this is soooooo awesome for the bike industry. Its how the line is moved and new technologies are made and perfected. Engineers, riders, and designers pushing the boundaries is the entire reason that you can by a bike today off the shelf that will vastly outperform ANYTHING that was available 10 years ago. And yes, at the margins price will always increase exponentially relative to performance - a $3,000 mountain bike will almost certainly be twice as good as a $1500 bike, but a $12,000 bike will only be marginally better than a $6,000 one--this is not new. I am constantly amazed at people's beyond unreasonable expectations that new technology will work flawlessly and cost walmart prices. If you want affordable parts, spend more time on the buy/sell section of Pinkbike, not the newsfeed for new products.
  • + 5
 Everyone seems to want something for free these days...
  • + 5
 Indeed, if the sticker price is a shocker, then you're not the customer they're after. Time will tell if this is a smart business move for PUSH. Having had my fork factory tuned by them, and upon return feeling like I was riding an incredibly awesome new bike, me thinks they'll probably sell a few.

And, if you recall Cane Creek initially hand built every DB coil to order. I wasn't on the PB boards back then, though I'd be surprised if there wasn't a matching response to both the pricing and cottage industry manufacturing approach. If PUSH isn't sure they're gonna move volume on these, and the price alone will block a huge part of riders, then it actually makes a ton of sense to assemble on-demand. Basic lean manufacturing in action there...

That all said, if I were in the position to build up a $10K+ custom bike, why not? I'd rather see suspension performance go this direction than something that requires a battery. Then again, I supposed we all have our luddite tendencies Wink
  • + 2
 @ekho ,,,I am stupid and I still aint gunna buy it !!!
  • + 2
 This price is in line with other premium bike upgrades, whether it's an I9 wheel set or newfandangled 11-speed drivetrain. Nice to have, performance improvement, expensive for sure but not overpriced, especially for a locally sourced/manufactured/customized product. I won't balk at anyone I see running this as much as I will a $2k+ carbon wheelset (but that's just me). Like kevmocal said, if you're building up an uber expensive bike, then why the hell not? Final thought - would love to see this tested against the equivalent CC shock or some of the other lesser-known custom options like Avalanche.
  • + 0
 @stickman5000 The fact that the shock costs a lot to make doesn't mean it's worth they money. Using the same argument every movie with a budget of over 200 milion dollars should be worth your money when a lot of them obviously aren't. I'm sure PUSH is a quality product. What should be in question here isn't the price in relation to production costs and method but the production method itself. It's not cost effective and I don't see how it could provide a noticeable benefit over a shocks made in house and then tuned like for example avalanche does.

@sam264 we are not bitching. Any internet post is subject to critique. If PUSH is to function as a company someone has to pay MSRP. They need to sell products. So the critique is well warrantied.

Also a ton of people on the custom hype train tend to forget that most of the riders, even pros can't describe their riding style properly.


@WasatchEnduro I9 Wheelset isn't 2x as expensive as any comparable product.
  • - 2
 @Vanguard he came after me first after I was just complimenting Push on what they're doing. This is exactly why I kind of hate pinkbike. And yep...i'm a troll who quite a few people in the industry respect. You nailed me
  • + 3
 Yep, lots of people here were definitely bitching. As I said, most of the posters on this website are not target customers.
  • + 4
 Just to start with - I'm not going to buy one. i think that it's a great piece of incredible technology that applies to people that aren't your typical pinkbike user. For the price you are getting a CUSTOM MADE shock! Try and see if RockShox would do that for you.
  • + 0
 Come on pinkbike where is your EnDuRo dedication :-/ :-0 :-)
  • + 4
 @D-Owen "if you buy the most expensive suit, $12000 is just a starting point"
My point is - why would you buy the most expensive suit? I can have a bespoke suit for $1200 that's going to do the job as well as yours for $12000. Few months ago my tailor made me a cashmere trench coat for €650 - if I gave you a similar €2000 Armani coat, I'm pretty sure you wouldn't be able to tell which one is more expensive (and definitely not three times).
In other words, once you reach a certain limit, increases in price will stop resulting in noticeable increases in quality (many times it's only a placebo effect - you know you have the most expensive thing so you convince yourself that it's also the best one and it was worth the money).
  • - 2
 To all the people completely missing the point and blindly defending this product and trying to justify it by saying ' if you cant afford it then dont buy it' the problem is not that I cant afford it , the problem is that the price is totally unjustified , so stop talking down to me like you know my finances and willingness to spend and getthe fucking point !
  • + 3
 See I don't think it is totally unjustified, just because you can get an equal performer (speculation) for less money does not make it totally unjustified. You see this all the time, look at motorcycles. You can get a Japanese superbike for half what a Ducati counterpart will set you back. That doesn't make it not worth it. Every nut and bolt on the Ducati will be pleasing, the exact look, the sound, the aesthetic ... you pay a premium for it. You can argue it's not worth it for some, and I would agree with you. Looking at this shock I can tell you they are not ripping people off, they are not making a ton of money on this. There has been a lot of effort put into this and it looks to be the highest quality, designed and built domestically. This is a niche product and I don' t say that to talk down on folks it just that if you don't understand it - it wasn't made with you in mind.
  • - 1
 LOL, ask Valentino Rossi about Ducati being a pleasing premium bike... Big Grin
  • + 5
 What I'm saying is that it caters to a different crowd. You buy a Ducati because it's a Ducati, and you like it... not because it's faster or cheaper. Our taste in bikes, as hard as magazines may try to quantify and calculate, is subjective and can be emotional.
  • + 1
 @DARKSTAR63 You sir get it! If it performs even half of what I would imagine it will, it is a heck of a deal.
@bigburd, how can you say the price is unjustified? have you ridden one and compared it to what you think is the benchmark of justification? I believe knowing what it would cost to just copy the physical part here, not even saying it would function at all, you would be over 3k. no questions asked, and the target buyer for this aside from the guys that just buy the best, is for the people that know their suspension and will totally justify the extra cash for quality and performace. so don't let your settling for the regular mislead others that top drawer stuff is not worth it, it usually is worth that and more!
  • + 0
 @Extremmist an irish tailor made you a bespoke 650E coat? The materials must be shit on it. Seriously. cashmere isn't equal to cashmere. If the source is shitty the material is shitty.

@DARKSTAR63 you are right if you are willing to pay for every nut and bolt and the production method then it makes sense. That's how people should justify it. What I doubt is people thinking custom is the magic word that makes your shock 10x better.
  • + 2
 No, and I would agree, it doesn't make it better. I picture the buyer of this someone who has the money to spend and wants something different. So at the end of a ride, when you are cracking beers, your buddies go damn dude that shock is pretty trick ... or when you are standing in your garage staring at your bike... you think, damn that's pretty trick. You just appreciate the work that went into it and admire it. You can get outright performance for less, we know that. I'm not saying I'm a prospective buyer- but I get it.
  • + 2
 While I NO way condone a $1200 shock, and I did not read EVERY comment above so this may have been mentioned.

I think part of the reason for the outrageously high price is that its made here in the US, which is fairly impressive, not too many companies do this any more. But what I think really drives the price up, and is also pretty rare in this day and age, is that ALL the materials are sourced domestically in the US. That has got to get them next to nothing, relative to what they could get for the same cost overseas. Plus you also get to speak with a tech that built your shock anytime, I would like more elaboration of what this includes, is it just about your shock if it has problems, or will they talk to you on the phone for an hour while you rip laps and make minor adjustments?

Those are some pretty unique and cool value added features, but I still don't think it justifies $1200. Sorry PUSH.

Someone above had a pretty good idea, and it would certainly justify the price more so than it currently is, and that was to have free lifetime servicing. I think that would certainly get some people on board with spending $1200 for a shock.
  • - 2
 Maxima fluids did it for me. Absolute garbage.

Let's be honest, Avalanche is located 20 minutes down the road. Plus they have human pricing not this "we want your first born child" crap. Lastly they use spectro fluids (way better).
  • + 4
 nobody here knows Push's long and short term business strategy with this shock. all we can realistically assume is the goal is to make money back with their investment in this shock as well as bringing future ideas they have to reality. it's a company that originally provides a service and is now turning itself into mfger of a product. that takes balls and money. hard to understand the negative response in regards to pricing when one doesn't have first hand info of the finances involved. it's just a choice, like kitsbow, enves, rolex.... you can't walk in to bugati and complain about pricing. why complain about something you can't afford?
  • + 3
 I also think it's worth nothing that sometimes companies make things as an exercise, and to promote the brand. It's called a halo product and they generate buzz and promote brand image. When was the last time we talked so much about PUSH?
  • + 4
 ^this.
  • + 2
 @bigburd
Nobody is making assumptions about your financial situations, and we don't need to. Just the fact that you don't want to pay it because you feel that you can get all you need from an off-the-shelf product tells us all we need to know, and this is that you are not a target customer.
Clearly you don't know a great deal about business or manufacture. Short productions runs cost more than large batches. One-off bespoke work costs even more. I'll leave you to fill in the gaps there. The price is easily justified, and it's not that much more than a CCDB anyway.

Funny thing, people are willing to drop about $2k on decent front suspension, and while there's more metal in there, that doesn't necessarily mean that there's more engineering, and it certainly doesn't mean that it's more important. So why are the purse strings so tight when it comes to rear suspension?
  • + 1
 I was thinking the same thing.... if this was a fork ... it would be cheap.
  • - 1
 @spaced The material is 100% cashmere from Nepal. But I'm sure a Polish tailor would make me a better one from 10 % cashmere and 90 % dog fur and add a free bag of industrial salt and a bottle of methanol for cleaning it as a bonus.
  • + 0
 I don't think the pricetag is high because of "made in USA", but because of complexity.
Two compression damper, so txice the price of compression damping.
The parts are machined in the most complex way thinkable for a shock. Look at the part linking the shock body, the eyelet, the piggyback and the compression dampers. Way more complex than on other shocks I know. (Which are cast or forged most time).
And the spring alone cost 100$ (but 825g with these is not a light shock, same as my stoy with a sa spring)
  • + 4
 Price is set at the projected demand for the maximum number they can actually build. If they set it at $600 they will not be able to fill all the orders.
  • + 2
 @prestonDH a ton of what you are talking about is done by Avalanche. That's why outside of the production method I did not understand the price. It's also basically one guy in a garage (or is there more of them now, can't remember)
  • + 1
 @Extremmist you are being conned. The price of your suit makes as much sense as buying a carbon downhill bike for 500$ new and msrp. Either the material is not what they claim or the build quality is crap and you can't see it. Probably both and probably it's made in Nepal in a sweatshop a bit like in China (the sheets of material themselves) so basically you have a china sourced suit. A good source material roll for a suit can cost as much as a car. Go read about it or ask anyone in the business before you start spouting BS.

Also it's nice you negrep Polish tailors but you can find craft anywhere and I'm talking about someone who has a successful shop in Moscow. I don't like big business Ruskies but one thing you can't say about them is that they like their suits cheap. Also Poland had a huge clothing and materials industry for a long time.
  • + 1
 ...but it's like a steampunk vivid coil.
  • + 0
 @bigburd a little butt hurt, are we? Your comment, and every other comment, lost all validation when you said that the price was completely unjustified WITHOUT EVEN TRYING IT. Don't get me wrong, $1200 is ALOT for a shock, or most aftermarket products for that matter, but how do you, or anyone else, know its unjustified without having tried it? For all you know, this could be the be-all, end-all shocks, the best in the world, never will another one be produced as good as this. While that is unlikely, the point is that you dont know that for sure without TRYING IT.

My sincerest apologies for pulling you away from being closed-minded and bashing products purely on the price being too expensive for you, with no actual regard for how the product actually performs....


@sam264 gets it and makes some pretty REASONABLE points.
  • + 1
 No butt hurt here , was just having a nice little debate until some one had to lower the level with ' but hurt ' comments.

I said my piece , some agreed , some didn't , continuing the debate was pointless , no ones opinions were gonna change so there was little point to carry on.

And do you really think it will be that much , if any better than what is currently available ?

And yes with out trying it no one can form a real fact based opinion , it's all speculation , would of thought that much was obvious as the product is not even in the market fully.

With out facts in time on paper showing that it actually is worth say 30 seconds per stage ( random number ) versus another top line shock it's all just chit chat from both us and from PUSH.
  • + 0
 @bigburd technically a debate is formal with facts underlying each persons argument, and while I was debating in biz grad school I dont remember using the word "f*ck" and commanding people to get my point... but maybe debate means something different in the UK? To answer your question, do I really think that this shock is THAT much better, as I said in the comment above? No, I was just making a point, the same as you had just made in your last comment, which was that not I, nor you or anyone else for that matter can claim the price is justified without using it first. But I agree 100% without facts on paper, it really is all just speculation.

@faul just because you have 2 compression dampers does not mean it is twice the price, have you considered volume pricing? and you may be right, it is not such a high price solely because it says "made in the USA". but I would bet that much of that additional cost is due to being made here in the US and sourcing the materials here in the US. have you ever looked at CM's cost here vs. overseas? it is night and day, not as much as 5 years ago, but the price differential is pretty staggering.
  • + 4
 Holy moly. My dash is just lighting up. This is starting to get really annoying.
  • + 2
 ^ AMEN. speaking of that - is there some sort of un-follow feature on PB comments?
  • + 0
 this^^ talk about beating a deadhorse. if I had a nickel for every comment I might buy one of these. probably not though
  • + 0
 @spaced It is made in Nepal, I knew that from the first moment, what difference does it make? As long as it's designed by me and tailored for me, I don't care. Cashmere goats don't live in Ireland so the fabric has to be from Asia and many of Irish tailors employ Asian immigrants so most likely it would be made by Asian hands anyway. Moreover where do you think most of the designer clothes are made? I have a Ralph Lauren jacket and it's made in Cambodia.
Btw it's not a suit, it's a coat.
  • + 1
 @Extremmist It makes a huge difference in quality. What you have a chinease quality material vs one sourced from Italy. The difference is huge. The material comes from Asia but the fabric itself better come from a quality producer. Most top tailors buy their materials in Italy. That's where all the best suppliers are. The chinease and asian suppliers offer lower quality materials. Asian people can sew the suit together but the if the sheets of fabric have to meet certain standards. Chinease standards are low. That's why top London Tailors like the ones that dress the royal family or the rolling stones don't buy fabric from nepal.

As for Ralph Lauren if you are using that company as a measure of quality you should not speak about fashion or the clothing industry.


btw. Still your fabric is cheap. Your coat costs less than it costs a good coatmaker to buy their fabric for a coat.


PS. Your argument is even more silly than saying cheap chinease carbon rims are the same quality as easton carbon wheels since both of them are made in Asia.
  • + 0
 spitfires where cool
  • + 1
 @Spaced Nepal is not China. They were manufacturing Cashmere clothes in Nepal before the Europeans knew that such material existed.
The Royal family buys the most expensive clothes not because they're best but because they don't want anyone else to wear the same thing. It reminds me a joke about two Russian oligarchs when one asks: "How much was your coat?" And the other answers "Five thousand dollars, but there's a new shop where you can buy it for six."
  • + 2
 Why are we talking about the origin story of cashmere….shut the f*ck up
  • - 2
 @Extremmist how long somone has been making someone has no influence on how good it is. Using that argument you should have a road build by the greeks because they have been building roads long before the irish.

Also nope. Savile Row suits and coats are overpriced yes that is true but that still doesn't mean they aren't top quality. Also the italians have been making fabrics for coats for way longer than people of nepal because their cashmere was used for different purposes. Want an asian style coat, then yeah but I assume you are talking about western clothing products.

Also manufacturing Cashmere doesn't mean they are the best at making suits and coats or that they were making coats for that long. I assume you've bought a regular coat, not what sherpas wear. So if you want to go with heritage the british coats have a long tradition while the nepalease coats have no tradition.


Though I should cut it this - you know nothing of fabrics. Go to Pitti Uomo (basically the event with the most style on the planet) and ask how many guys there are dressed in coats like yours. I know it feels nice to be thinking you've got a great deal and by your own standards you did but if your goal was to buy a top quality bespoke coat with fabric made by masters and the coat itself was made by masters then you have failed miserably.


PS. I know nepal is not in china but production quality wise they are the same. Vietnam also isn't in china but bikes made in cheap factories in both countries are of similar build quality. How hard is to get that ?
  • + 2
 @Spaced There's a wide gap between "the best" and "shit". Buying a coat is not a competition, it's not about finding one product that will be the best, it's about finding a product that meets certain quality standards (= is not shit). Once my €650 coat meets all my requirements, I don't care if you find one that's 10 % better and 10x more expensive.because I don't get any additional value for the extra €5850.
It's like buying a graphics card for your PC; yes, if you look at the specs, the best card is GeForce Titan Z for €3000. But if you look at your screen, you won't see any difference between €3000 Titan Z and €300 GTX 970 because nobody can tell whether a game is running at 100 fps or 250 fps..
And the same thing applies to coats, shocks, everything. Products should be compared in real life, not on a paper or in a lab under a microscope.
  • - 1
 Yes I agree but you claimed that something made relatively cost effectively for 500E is the same as a savile row product and it's wrong.
  • + 1
 It could be cheaper, but the cost of raw metals in the US has gone up a bit over the last decade. These things are only going to get more expensive with inflation and materials demands. Then again, most people don't understand economies or cell phone plans.
  • - 1
 Again - look up Avalanche. They are a small company that builds and custom tunes the shocks for you for half the price. That's why the price here is so shocking. The quality difference between the two can't be that high. Hell nothing suggests there is any.
  • + 2
 I have nothing against Avalanche but they assemble most of their cartridges using existing parts for use inside factory chassis. Not, in any way shape or form the same thing.
  • + 1
 I'm not saying about their cardridges but about their rear shocks. Please read my posts corretly. Their shocks are also custom tuned and made locally.


Why is this :
www.avalanchedownhillracing.com/woodie.html

Twice as cheap compared to push?
  • + 1
 I did read it. They do not manufacture all parts in house. They build their shocks from motorcycle parts. It's cool, and I have respect for them, but its apples and oranges. They are assembled locally (actually 45min from my house) but it's not the same as what is being done here with all design, machining and materials sourcing done domestically. Not trying to justify the exact price although I tend to think it's appropriate, but to make it sound like they are doing the same thing for half the price is just false.
  • + 2
 No I get it's not the same thing. I just want the people to notice the difference. What am I simply saying is that what they are paying for is an unecessary complication in a production process. It's a bit like a non GMO, gluten free, organic food product. A ton of them are good but if you go overboard you pay extra for something that's not necessairly better than something with one less label.

I get that some people want your parts to be made locally a that logic aren't most of the commenters hipocrites if they don't own a locally made frame (not many of them in the US since even intense uses TW tubing. Devinci and who else is left?) and all other parts (kind of a problem with forks and tires)
  • + 2
 I think organic is a load of shit, if you feed an organism a chemically enhanced diet it grows bigger and stronger than one that's half starved. I'd take the plump one over a scrawny one every time.
  • + 0
 I am no foodie, vegan or organic food nut job, but I buy some organic stuff and some "regular" stuff. However, your comment about "organic is a load of shit" is mostly a load of shit, to grow a food that is "bigger, stronger and more plump" than a naturally grown food (organic), they modify the genetics of the food, as well as using a slew of chemicals to spur growth. Studies show that some of these methods increase the chances of people getting cancer as well as increasing tumor growth.
  • + 3
 ...like breastesses but to see a chicken as big as a turkey is alarming
  • + 0
 How did we end up on mutant chickens
  • + 2
 I wish I hadn't commented in this thread because I'm still getting shit from it in my inbox.
  • - 1
 I wish you hadn't either ...... what you said about a custom tuned ohlins is not true.
  • + 1
 it's definitely doable if you know where to look. Don't be so bitter bro. Life is good
  • - 1
 ebay doesn't count. I'm not bitter, and even though I sold my street bike a few years back I would have to guess a custom tuned top shelf ohlins shock to run at least what this shock does ... if not more.
  • + 1
 Keep the noise down ,
  • + 2
 @prestonDH the problem with organic is that it has become a label. There are many fake organic products that are still cheaply made and they include unhealthy substances, just not the ones you would suspect.

On the other hand there is no proof genetically modified foods are harmful and scientists are areeing on that. We are just suspicious because we know how big food companies are making really bad really crappy food for us. Though that has little to do with GMO and more to do with the overal quality and cost cutting policy they use.
Though you are right about chemically induced growth. That's risky. Overall I try to buy food that woudl have been called organic 10 years ago. So no stupid labels, just something my grandma would think is fine but some GMO solutions are actually pretty neat (like GM rice to help with vitamine defficiency that happen in some parts of the world)
  • + 0
 You've got to die of something. Cancer may be the biggest killer but it's not the only one.
  • + 1
 Just throwing this out there, I still want one of these right meow.......
  • + 55
 Just remember guys, this site isn't about the shiny things. It's about the joy you feel riding your 9 speed x5 bike with a blown DHX4 and Domain that's missing a rebound knob.
  • + 20
 hey did you find my rebound knob?
  • + 5
 ^^^Downhil, gets it. Use your money to go riding and don't worry about having the latest and greatest.
  • + 2
 Best comment on here I've seen in years.
  • + 10
 sarcasm guys....I'm referencing the previous diatribe on "It's not about the shiny objects" quickly being countered with the most expensive rear shock the mountain bike world has ever seen.

This is what people go to gear sites to see. The cool new shit that will eventually find it's way to cheaper bits.
  • + 1
 I'm with you, and I love reading about the newest stuff. Especially things that actually increase the performance of modern bicycles. However, I'm laughing my ass off every weekend with my M6 on 32mm boxxers missing a rebound knob. But dammit do I love my avalanched Elka!
  • + 1
 Oops, I must have missed that article. I was probably out riding my crappy bike in Squamish!
  • + 46
 I'm super glad to see Push actually making something. Even though $1200 is rediculously expensive, when you take into account that each shock is completely domestically made and is perfectly tuned to the rider and the bike, it's honestly reasonable. It's expensive to make small quantities of products inside the US. I think that this may be a cool option for those with way too much money, or those that are very serious about their ride. I'd love to try one out.
  • + 11
 Its great that Push is stepping up to the plate and taking the next step into manufacturing. Initial offerings may be expensive, but who knows if it takes off prices may drop for later products.
  • + 3
 Now all I need to buy one is sell my house or get a sponsorship.....hey Push wanna sponsor me?
  • + 5
 When you consider the cost + shipping of sending another manu's shock to PUSH to have it tuned to work properly the $1200 price tag is less difficult to swallow. I have no doubt the performance of this shock will be top notch and the service will be the best you can get, based on my limited dealings with the crew at PUSH. It's out of my budget… mostly because I just dropped serious coin got have PUSh tune my shock… Frown
  • + 2
 Fox and Cane Creek do a majority of their machining domestically and in house as well.
  • + 19
 Hats off to them. A lot of people are happy to pay three grand for a plastic made in China Santa Cruz frame. I bet you a tenner right now that this shock costs more to make than a nomad c.
  • + 1
 @the-vault they also are a much larger volume operation.
  • + 0
 Still not "reasonable" in my opinion! I spent $1,300 on a set of King coilovers for the front of my truck! Custom tuned, 2 shocks with reservoirs, they are fully machined and are MASSIVE, at least 7x the size of this one single shock...Oh yea, R&D AND manufacturing all done here in the USA. I have purchased from Push in the past but this is pretty ridiculous. I could see $800 max and that is only due to where the industry currently is.
  • + 0
 well its a great start....................no matter the cost.............progress is not free....outsourcing however almost is!!!
  • + 1
 Yeah that's true, but King also makes thousands and thousands of those shocks every year, so they have much lower costs per shock. The guys at Push will probably only make a couple hundred of these.
  • + 2
 @SoCalMX Once again, volume, King makes thousands of shocks a year thus they are able to price their shocks lower. Are you aware how much it costs to utilize a CNC machine, especially if it's not in-house? It's not cheap, so if you are selling things in very low volumes that drives the price up because now you have to cover the expensive manufacturing process.
  • + 4
 @SoCalMX
The thing is, you can't compare this shock to the resi'd Kings on your truck. Instead, compare it to the completely custom king bypasses that BJ Baldwin is running on his race truck, and you'll see an apples to apples price comparison.
Heres a little photo reminder of what he's running:
i.kinja-img.com/gawker-media/image/upload/s--E3AkvdZ4--/18vw0uyjkr24fjpg.jpg
sadly, as awesome as king resi's are, they're nothing compared to a proper race set up (in both price and performance)

I think people need to understand that when they complain about the price of this shock. This is a TOP of the line product that not many people will ever need, and its priced accordingly. it isn't aimed at the general public.
  • + 23
 Elevensix - not affiliated with fiveten
  • + 1
 ooooh i get the reference nowO.O

i am still riding my 2003 cannondale jekyll with push tuned float RL Razz Nice to learn they actually started that year..
  • + 17
 someone needs to explain the word "niche" to pinkbike users. The shock looks amazing and the weight is centrally located so on a 28 pound carbon steed 1 pound added to the frame, might not be so important if it handles that much better. Can't wait to see some tests on how it works in the real world. It doesn't cost any more than a high end fork, people will buy it if it's good.
  • + 14
 Shhhhh... stop interrupting the mass bitching about the price. After all, everyone on pinkbike is soooo awesome the manufacturers should be paying them to use their stuff. But yeah, I'm totally perplexed by this level of bitching. Of course it's expensive, it's a custom tuned made in the USA product.
  • + 2
 People don't realize that a product like this is not for the vast majority of the MTB community. Same thing with something like a $10,000 S-Works or top of the line Nomad. Even if they could afford it, they don't ride at a level where they would reap the benefits of such a quality piece of equipment. These type of products aren't for your weekend shredder who tears around with homies twice a week. They are for hard core riders and racers who are at a level where top quality parts can make a real difference, and who view such purchases (most likely partially covered by smaller sponsors) as investments, the returns being race wins and further progression toward whatever their goals might be. No way I could afford this shock even if it did fit my Bronson but Im stoked to see this level of suspension available to the (not so) general public.
  • + 3
 Exactly. It's like the Bugatti Veyron- I will likely never be able to afford one, but I'm glad it exists, and it's one hell of a piece of engineering.
  • + 15
 "To ensure that the shock's damping rates and spring curves are spot on, Push will build every Elevensix shock as a custom order for an individual customer, who will then have access to the tech who assembled the order for future questions."

This is just awesome.
  • + 3
 Yes, it is. But the reason they will remember you is because they are not selling it by the hundreds in the first days or months. With this price tag it's easy to remember rider X or Y and his bike. I bet they will even remember your kids names and pets. hahahahahah ;-D
  • + 16
 I accidentally clicked on this article while at work and my boss fired me for watching porn.
  • + 14
 $1200 for a shock? I know its custom and all. Plus Push know their shit when it comes to suspension.
But wowzers! That's one pricey shock.
  • + 7
 It is expensive but it is made in house in North America. I will guarantee you their profit margins are small compared to fox and rockshox. These aren't a mass produced warranty issue waiting to happen. These are a hand built custom masterpiece. The price is high but its worth it compared to its competitors.
  • + 9
 The bad thing is, most prices do not translate for Europe. So in Germany it will be around 1300-1400 Euro
The same happened to GoPro, once the 4 came out in the US for 340$, in Germany it was 480 Euro and the GoPro 3 Silver, once the 4 came out, went from 250 to 320 Euro. Prices, what you gonna' do!
Price wise I guess it's not that bad, even though I will never be able to afford it, but knowing how good Push are, they only do suspension, so the product will be very good Smile
  • + 2
 @ FrEeZa (1 hours ago) => true story
  • + 3
 @KUNTHER you are right but at that price they just aren't competitive. Given that the market for coil shocks for enduro is already pretty small they are really narrowing their target clientele.

Also Avalanche is cheaper and also made in North America to custom spec.
  • + 8
 Did you guys not read the " Who is your basic customer" part.....this shock is clearly not for the average rider. There are plenty of inexpensive shocks for us to use.
  • + 2
 Think yourselves lucky. It will be 1200 GBP from tf tuned...
  • + 8
 @MDRipper I use an avalanche cart in my fork and a DB air in my shock. So yeah I'm in the target group for quality suspension but even people like me will find that price strange. The problem with the push shock is that it's twice as expensive as the expensive shocks.
  • + 1
 ava 3 => best upgrade i have make for my boxxer 32 and now my r2c2..
  • - 2
 I see it is not for the average customer, but do you think most pros will run one, given that they are already sponsored?
I mainly see rich kids getting these, and I do mean kids Big Grin ...which in term may actually be a good thing. With a shock like this, they will be like Chicago, blowing away trees from all that speed they're carrying down them ROOTS as they are on the never ending Quest for love a.k.a. that next big thing after the next big thing.
Damn, it felt good to write that last sentence!
  • + 13
 What a beauty, what a PRICEY beauty! Jesus the numbers just keep on rising....
  • + 6
 "Reportedly, the Elevensix weighs slightly more than its air-sprung competitors, but it is significantly lighter than any of their coil-sprung models."
My Elka coil shock weights 900g with spring, and my CCDB air weights 530g.
So how is the claimed 850g "slightly more" than 530 and "significantly lighter" than 900??
  • + 6
 So it seems that the industry has taken years to attempt to convince us that air shocks are the way to go for Dh (cough cough, suckers) and it'll just be a matter of time, then, boom, stendec and push industries want to sell us coil shocks for our trail bikes. What the actual fk? Had there even really been an argument for coil on shorter travel bikes? Other than for those that piss around with their ride (me!)? Complete u turn?
  • + 2
 Robin Wallner has been racing an S-works Camber with a coil Öhlins. Robin is an Öhlins development rider so that might tell you where the gold Ö stands on the issue of short travel coil shocks..
  • + 3
 Everyone knows coil is better. Air is purely about convenience at point of sale. Few people get the right spring for a coil shock. They do weigh more, but in my opinion the extra weight is worth it because they Hoover up all the tiniest bumps, give you mega grip in corners and never fuck up. Like a marzocchi fork, you can service them once every two or three years but you can never tell the difference before and after so you wonder why you bothered. The first monarch I had, I had it serviced three times in the first six months and it never worked how I would have liked. Changed it for a dsp dueler with ti spring and never looked back. Three rear bushings and two bikes later, it still works like new and I've never even thought about having it serviced.
  • + 4
 I've been trying to tell everyone for years that they should switch to coil on their trail bikes, but everyone is so hung up on weight they will sacrifice the most important performance items on their bike. Riding a $3K+ carbon Nomad frame with a stock Fox air can is like buying an ipod and using the stock headphones and calling yourself an audio enthusiast. Utter garbage suspension just to save an amount of weight that you would never notice. Three places you should never compromise performance for weight: suspension, brakes and tires. Take it out of everywhere else. Like you can even tell when your bike is a pound lighter on the downhills anyway. And unless you are XC racing, who gives a shit about saving 20 seconds every hour on the uphills, in the unlikely event it even amounted to that much.
  • + 2
 You're dead right about where to save weight kramster. I'll never understand everyone wanting to run air shocks on park and dh bikes to "save weight". In most cases with big travel bikes like that an air shock will never perform as well and all you're doing is doubling the maintence schedule. Problem is you can't expect better performance out of a coil on every bike. The leverage curve on a lot of bikes designed for air shocks is too high to use a coil. You wind up either loosing good small bump cause you have to use a higher spring rate than normal or you just bottom it out on everything.
  • + 2
 I must say coil vs air is a bullcrap of a finest kind like wheelsize or clips vs flats. I have 36Van it is awesome, Shiver SC - awesome! Had Sektor Coil - it was utter shit, spring played no role what so ever, there was nothing that could work with that chassis and damper (hello Revelation!). I had DHX 5.0 on a Nomad and it was wuite good in a bikepark, but sucked big time at XC, had PUSHed RP23 - infreakingcredible for XC, just ok in a bikepark - at the end of the day RP23 won. RS Vivid Coil was crap, so were MZ Rocos. When it comes to performance you can have good coil shock and good air shock, just as crappy ones of each kind. Where coil wins is virtually zero heat build up (which is a subject to arm/leg pump, so in many cases is a BS - bla wanki bla, air shocks heat up on long descends - yea ya wanker, too bad you can't descend for longer than 2 minutes, because you need to stop and rest!), service interval and theoretical reliability - theoretical, because it freaking depends who makes it. All in all, it is the coil shock that is more likely to survive a 2 week lift days frenzy. Yet all those dream of top performance possessed Strava warriors out there, racing wannabies who obviously service your shocks every week so it's ready for KOM, won't be let down by a good air shock, just as you won't lose much by added 1lbs of weight if you go for a coil. Just ride what comes along, and if you want to lash out 1200 for a shock, then do it! May God, Science and Gluten abolishment front bless you!
  • + 1
 Well it is worth considering that some suspension designs are optimized for air shocks or coil shocks based on their leverage curves. If my bike was designed for an air shock, I would use and air shock. If it was for a Coil, use a coil...
Most DH bikes are designed around coil shocks, so of course an air shock is going to feel weird/crap regardless of reliability, if you just throw on the off the shelf model.

This is why there are shock tuning companies. If you are trying to put a coil shock on an bike designed around air, than the tuning comes into compensate for the different spring rates.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns sorry but you are very wrong. The fact that you can find a shitty coil fork and a shitty air fork doesn't mean there is no difference between air and coil. I know it's part of your spiel to say everywhere that we should ride in wheelbarrows and be happy about it but there is a middle ground between being gear obsessed and a hipster riding on a fully rigid bike with cantilevers.
It's way harder to make a reliable air fork and I don't mean just one that doesn't fail but one that has constant performance. What's more a ton of them have wonky characteristic, especially forks. It's probably possible to make a quality 160mm+ air fork but I'm yet to try one that's as good as a coil in every way (not even better).

Also for DHX 5.0 being good - LOL. That shock has no damping.
  • + 1
 Whatever man, there are very few normal people who give a sht and I am nowhere close to say that you are not one of them. Tippie rides Suntour, Gee Atherton does not ride CCDB and Simmons is on stock Marzocchi - what a bunch of tools
  • + 1
 LOL crafting brand was about trust, in human devotion and love.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns you need to stop smoking whatever you are smocking because I don't know how does Tippie riding Suntour relate to what I've said. Did you want to say that the fact that some pros being paid to ride some products proves that those are their favorite products of all time and that all those guys wouldn't change their brand if sponsorship wasn't an option. Jesus then Twilight is the best movie ever, I work for the company that sells it therefore I must like it. Stronk logic man.

Also I never suggested they are tools. I also never suggested anyone who rides mid range products is a tool. I just say there is a difference between products which you don't want to aknowledge just to look cool and keep your anti gear tirades on pb.
  • + 6
 way back when...i used to build custom furniture for (generally) very wealthy people. if i could find a market for people willing to spend $1200 on a side chair, PUSH will find a market for this. as he mentioned, PUSH has rebuilt and custom tuned 30,000+ shocks and forks from other manufacturers. that's more than enough ground work to ensure success, IMHO. doesn't mean i'll be buying. but someone will.
  • + 6
 Anyone who thinks the price is high has obviously been stuck in bike land (probably used bikes at that) and never gotten into an expensive hobby such as rock crawling or ultra 4 racing. $1200 wouldn't even cover 1 of the 4 corners of required suspension. This is the best of the best, and that's what your money gets you. No sense in even comparing it to anything else.
  • + 1
 Totally dude, I've got a crawler and it's amazing how quickly the costs add up, and mines just a cheap toyota. Those Ultra 4 guys are crazy...100 grand for a rig!
  • + 1
 so youre comparing a bike shock for 165mm travel bikes that are about 8 inches eye to eye to a shock for your truck that is in the 35 inches eye to eye area (i just did a quick google)? yeah. so outside of the fact that they both work the same, they are both completely different in terms of BOM cost. so, no comparison.
  • + 2
 And how many 36" shocks does Fox Racing build to keep the pricepoint for a 2.5x16" ressy at $4-500 WITHOUT a spring?
Another Ultra 4/ Pirate member here...
  • + 5
 I have had bad luck with a bunch of OEM fox air shocks, and will be trying out an aftermarket RS soon (they make the only other bolt on option for trek abp remedy frames) but if I continue to struggle with crappy rear suspension failing on me I might just have to give this a long hard look. It is a lot of money, but coilovers generally last longer than air.
  • + 1
 I had the exact same experience. If you want performance and reliability, steer clear of air. Even the cheap dsp dueler is far superior to any air shock.I've ever tried.
  • + 1
 The new age air shocks are much better. Don't waste your time, DB Air all things. Race them all year, send it to suspension experts once a year. Same as a coil.
  • + 1
 By new age I assume you mean aftermarket highend stuff (like db air). I'll look at the costs before making a purchase, but if I am going through the trouble to buy special hardware to make it fit I am going to have to be sure it is better than the RS
  • + 9
 Shocking!
  • + 4
 It's gonna be a great shock depending on push's history and customer support , no remorse. It is expensive indeed , if you can afford it you are likely to enjoy it ...if not save up and get it or dream of it .....what's all the hate ?
  • + 4
 We won’t be stocking any complete shocks, just parts kits. This is because each shock will be hand assembled by one of our technicians one at a time to customer spec taking into consideration rider weight, riding style, and leverage characteristic. This ensures that each rider gets the right setup from for their bike.

So will they offer a free or heavily reduced lifetime tuning service. Cos if this shock is "all that" and at $1200 it should be, you may want to keep if for all the bikes you will ever have (depending on shock length of course) I damn sure wouldn't want to be buy a one new every time I changed rides.
  • + 6
 sweet looking shock - I'm surprised other companies haven't come out with a coil shock with a climb compression circuit before.
  • + 4
 People need to stop acting like they have a basic human right to own the nicest items on the market. Be happy that it exists and will trickle down to lower price points in future. Ride your bike a lot or get a job. Those are the two choices in life kids.
  • + 7
 I like how people are willing to drop $1200 on a fork no problem but when a shock is $1200 everyone goes nuts.
  • + 2
 Something to do with a price to weight ratio.
  • + 3
 All these "experts" here crack me up. Yes, $1200 is a lot of cash. But this is the Ferrari of coil shocks. Custom tuned, hand made in the US, very low production numbers. Stop your whining. If you want a mass produced shock for less than half the price get one. This is NOT intended to be for Joe Six pack's $1500 beat up sled.
  • + 4
 Avalanche racing has all of these features beat, is made in the USA, proven reliability, air bladder instead of the piston, custom tuned, high tensil/lightweight precision spring and sells for $600! All sizes available.
  • + 4
 There's a huge difference between "made" in the USA and "assembled" in the USA.
  • + 2
 I like Avalanche, but it doesn't have all these features beat. Ava doesn't have the "climb switch" with fully independent and adjustable damping circuits. Plus, I'd ALWAYS take an piston over bladder in my shock. That is if you like your shock to work for more than a few months before your damping starts to change and become inconsistent due to nitrogen leaking into your oil. Avalanche does offer piston, so not a plus for Push really. Not 100% positive, but looks like the Push shock is about a quarter pound lighter.
I think BOS Stoy is a great option or even Marz Moto C2R. Neither have the "climb switch" for this category of bikes as they are DH specific, but cheaper and around the same weight. It's up to everyone to determine what they are willing to pay for what features they want to have.
  • + 2
 @bicyclehigh, are you saying Avalanche are not made in the USA? I thought it was some guys with a CNC machine shop making parts as the orders come in?
  • + 8
 shocking
  • + 1
 Damn, bet me to it.
  • + 6
 ccdb tends to be considered cheap...oh god something is going really wrong.
  • + 5
 probably the worlds best shock, but i'l never be good enough at riding to justify spending that much on a shock, my tf tuned shocks will do just fine
  • + 2
 Ok, it's expensive as hell. But it's great that bike/component companys go all in. It pushes the bar higher and the sport forward. It might be cutting edge now but in a few years the stuff trickles down and then end up on a more affordable scale later on. And then you guys can thank the companys like Push for pushing your pushbikes further.
  • + 1
 yeah, when the double barrel came out it was also really expensive. Now it is around 500-600 euros...
  • + 5
 I wonder how much R&D goes into a "high performance polyurethane dual-lip shaft wiper"?
  • + 2
 What we have been seeing in the last few years is the idea of "If money was no object" and it some ways it really takes away from the sport. Here is an example - if money is no object, why not get this shock? I'm sure it's amazing! But spending 5K on a bicycle only to have the "Pro" level when the "Factory level" with XX1 and Carbon wheels is 10K. 20K bicycles are on the horizon!
  • + 2
 Darren Murphy sounds like hes put his life and soul into this industry. For that, he can charge whatever he wants, and suspension nerds, or people with the money will buy for the custom factor. If I made a living riding a bike, I'm sure I would look into this option to try and get an edge.
  • + 2
 I doubt I will ever be able to afford/justify one. Especially since I am now married and though my wife stares at my new wheelset & kind of thinks something is different but isn't sure enough to call me out on it,. This she would notice, and chop the balls off immediately. However, I applaud PUSH for bringing this to market & wish that I was someone who could afford this. Eventually the price point may come down. I hope that this works out for them and perhaps one day, like everything else that I purchase I will find a used one for sale that I can test out. But like many of the above comments I will stick with my CCDB Inline that I only paid $340 new for.
  • + 1
 Where did you pay $340 for it. Every I look they are $400+. Another reason PUSH is selling direct only I imagine. Gets rid of tall the up and down online pricing and everyone and their brother getting the "bro" hookup. Cank Creek is a great shock BTW
  • + 1
 Fleabay brand new in box. It was actually $370 but I had $30 worth of eBay bucks to spend at the time.
  • + 2
 Does PUSH ship to Canada at all? I recently tried to order the DRCV volume tuning kit from their website, but when I select Canada and put in my postal code, I get a 'We do not ship to this destination'. Why even have Canada as an option at the checkout then? It's not like I live in a bombed out area of no mans land or something, so I don't understand the issue, other than website problems...
  • + 3
 Give SuspensionWerx a call. They can help you out.
  • + 1
 Thanks man! I actually remembered about them after I posted this, and I sent them an email. They carry the kit so I will be getting it through them.
  • + 2
 If I save $100 a month for 2 years I will be able to buy this shock and a Fox 36. Just think I could get a whole bike in 7 or 8 years. Oh yeah the LBS still sells 26" aluminum Santa Cruz Nomads for $2600 bucks complete. I guess you know what I'll be doing in 2 years, riding.
  • + 2
 Nice box way Mori Seiki NLX, good thing you have the cc the sump and chip pan in those are horrible. I wonder if they bought that from Triad MT. They definitely cut great heavy duty parts, he didn't skimp out there.
  • + 1
 825g with a light steel spring is not light.
And why fully adjustable compression? It's made for a rider and a bike, so the only tuning needed is a low speed compression on the "plush" circuit.
1200$ is not cheap, if there were less knobs it would be less expensive and not less efficient.

The rebound don't seem to be affected by the "switch" lever? So a ccdb with climbswitch may be more efficient on the "firm" position.

The two settings and the spring desing are interesting things, but this shock is not on my wish list. A simpler version of it, cheaper, would be on the top of it.
  • + 1
 This article is too rhetorically advanced in regards to discussing its weight and size.. There isn't a single a picture of the shock mounted on a rig, there isn't a picture that shows how beefy the shock actually is,and after all this talk about the dual valve system we don't even get to see a clear pic of said system. You have a diagram and a couple shots of individual shock pieces, but why am I not seeing a whole shock? On top of that its hard not to mention the section that explains weight differences with comparable prodicts.. We see a clear and concise weight difference when he mentions the DB line, but when he says float x and monarch debonair he simply says those clock in at 425...which is prolly true, but the eleven six weighs over 800grams. They failed to mention that its double the weight of a monarch plus, as if that's irrelevant.. Shouldn't have brought it up if you are scared to tell the truth.. After all that I still think this shock is pretty cool.
  • + 1
 That's a nice lookin' shock, and as typical for the MTB industry, a stupidiotarded price. Not even a titanium spring? WTF do I get a BJ with it then? GTFO. "High tensile spring alloy". LOLZ. I'm LOLin' right now. LOLin' on the fvcking floor!!!
  • + 1
 This seems like sketchy business practice slightly to me. If I were Fox or RS and had depended on a certified center like PUSH only to find out they were now selling their own shock after years of dissecting and reverse engineering mine...I would be slightly pissed. I wonder how those conversations went?
  • + 2
 This is PUSH's take on a suspension damper, not PUSH's take on a FOX or RS product. Its like saying DVO have poor business practices and copied marzocchi because they worked for them years ago, when its simply a case of some experienced suspension specialists forming a group to manufacture their own product that they feel satisfies their market best.
  • + 1
 Perhaps, but if I were to be buying this, the selling point would be that it's domestically made and not mass-produced in a third-world country for pennies on the dollar.
  • + 2
 This is their best "take on a suspension damper" after years of partnering with and servicing their now closest competition man. Cane Creek DBA made in USA for half the price....
  • + 2
 I guess it's a good thing I have CC Double Barrel on my bike then Wink
  • + 1
 But this is entirely different to a CCDBA...
  • + 2
 Maybe if Fox or RS made a decent shock to begin with then Push would never have had to improve upon their products to begin with! I think that the concept of the best shock tuner in the world deciding to cut out the middle man is an awesome idea. Yes the price sucks in a big way, but wait a year or two and the price will come down as they learn to build them cheaper. For a first run production shock, I would say its a fair price. Maybe I will end up with one on my Enduro 29er down the road
  • + 0
 @ridehard84: 19 months later, no price decrease. Must be a sustainable product....
  • + 5
 BOS shocks are personally tuned for bike/rider and costs way less.
  • + 1
 They just have a few tunes, they are not personally tuned for every bike and rider.
  • - 2
 Do you really think Push will have individual tune for every bike??? Very likely they do just like BOS and define basic tunes for different suspension types.
  • + 7
 and you'll be more likely to see bigfoot than get a reply from their customer service...
  • + 2
 They most likely have a dozen settings or so, with only a few used for 80% of the shocks, and pick the right one for the rider/bike combo. Unless someone has a very specific request, they can't do specific setting for everyone. It's like this for all the brands on the market, BOS included. BOS has 4 or 5 settings, and that's it. It still isn't enough and may require some tuning afterwards for specific frames.
  • - 1
 @HenkkaK and that's why you neg rep me? I understand Push will do the same. It makes no sense to have a specific tune for every rider. It paper it could give you some damping advantage but in reality no one will feel it. That's why bos has 5 if I remember right.
  • + 3
 I'd recon that Push will offer custom tunes per each rider, not only a few. That is their business. With the high price, and low quantities, they have no reason to not offer custom tunes. You have to consider weight, terrain, skill, riding style, travel and leverage curve.
  • + 1
 ^ +1
  • + 3
 They can offer any tune you want, but for 95% of the shocks or forks they went thru, they just picked a setting. And that is completely normal ! you can't have someone spending hours of fine tuning and dyno testing for each and every client they have !

For a fork, they will have 5 or maybe 6 settings, 1 or 2 that are used the most (because let's be honest, the majority of riders is around 70kg, and not an EWS champion) and then on request or necessity, a specific tune.
Same goes with the shocks, they have some basic tunes for most suspension designs (rising or falling ratio, weird one -like Nomads and some VPPs- linear, ...), and then a few variations depending on rider weight. And that's it ! And again, that's completely normal, it would just be a business killer to spend hours for every client.

And the result for the client is just perfect (I guess that if the client isn't completely happy they'll take the shock/fork back for some fine tuning).


Having only a few settings to work on isn't a thing to be ashamed of, they still spent hours and hours of testing to find these settings Smile
  • + 2
 @kc358 you would be surprised how little variables there are. Tuning shocks in anything less than 10lb increments would make little sense since you could gain that weight after a good party. Skill and riding style are basically the same. Same for leverage curve and travel - you set up damping for it with similar parameters. How many types of terrain in terms of different shock shaft movement there are? 2 or 3? Without very narrow damping adjustments I doubt it makes sense to have more than 10-12 custom tunes and that's me being generous and thinking they are probably as anal about suspension as me.

Seriously I'm a suspension geek. I experiment with idiotic settings all the times, went through a few custom tuned products over the years and tbh you are seriously overhyping it. It will be a great product but not because it's super duper custom but because of the design itself so let's concentrate on that because it's what most of the commenters are mission and it's what they should be focusing on.

Also remember you can still have custom tunes without building a shock from scratch every time.

@Ploutre exactly. Most people ride similar terrain, have similar riding style and weigh around the same. It's nice that now everyone feels like that one special snowflake but the reality different.
  • + 1
 Btw on another note, BOS has been using "parabolic shaped needles" for like 7 or 8 years Smile
  • + 1
 If only they responded to emails and discovered that little thing called customer service I'd gladly buy their products. I love how the Idyle Rare Air performs.
  • + 1
 Try it now, they've recruited someone to take care of the customer service (including now the branch in the USA) some time ago, and all the emails I've sent in the past 6 months have been answered within 48hrs. Which is a massive improvement over the 2 to 3 months delay they had just a year or 2 ago Big Grin
  • + 2
 Suspension tuning is not that simple. You should see how many settings pro motocross riders go through during practice at a track. Forks and shocks getting rebuilt numerous times to get it right. Every track they run a different setup because the bumps are different. And that is always with a single rider on a single bike (linkage type).
Just think about it. One rider would have completely different settings for a Santa Cruz Nomad, GT Sanction, Yeti SB6c, SB5c, Ibis Mojo HD3, etc. etc. That's one rider, one weight, one skill level, just different bikes. A different tune will be needed for each based on travel and leverage ratio.
Now, multiple riders on the same bike. Different weights require different springs. Then compression and rebound settings need to be tuned based on that weight and spring. A 150lb rider, 170lb rider, 200lb rider, etc. will all need different settings.
Skill level and riding style are NOT the same. One pro level rider may charge into rocks and roots while another pro rider may weave through/around. One might expect the bike to plow straight through while the other want it to bounce over. On the other hand, skill level may relate to the riders speed and their ability to control the bike, use their weight to move it around, etc.

ALL of these factors are taken into account by any reputable motorcycle suspension tuner. Some even have riders come in to take measurements and personally talk to the rider. And it isn't uncommon for them to do a free second rebuild if it doesn't work perfect for you the first time.
  • + 1
 There could easily be dozens of settings necessary for each person/bike combo to work right. Yes, some may overlap based on different factors, but it is up to a knowledgeable tuner to figure it out. Most motorcycle tuners do not use dynos for every shock, it is about knowledge and learning what works and applying that. So there is no reason for Push to have to waste time and money dynoing every shock to get custom tunes. As they have been doing testing with specific bikes, it wouldn't be hard to start tabulating settings for each bike. 15 settings per bike wouldn't be outrageous. There will certainly be more than just 5 factory settings to choose from.

If it was completely impossible for them to make any money doing it, how have they survived doing nothing BUT custom tuning forks and shocks for so long, just like in the moto industry?
  • + 2
 Not all the different bikes need a specific tune. You have tunes that would work for one frame, that would work perfectly fine for another.

Do you think the average MX rider changes his suspension setup for each and every track he goes to ? I'm talking about the guy doing a ride every week-end, with his mates. No he doesn't, he probably has his shop mechanic do the work, every X hours of riding his mx bike, and then he just enjoys the riding. If he wants more out of his suspension, then the mechanic may refer to the equivalent of Push in the MX world, and get the fork/shock tuned.

As for the factory/pro/semi-pro riders who do fiddle with their suspension, who need the best out of it, they have mechanics to do it. They can relate what they felt on the bike, where he thinks it would get better, and then the mechanic does his magic. Some kind of Push on the side of the track if you like. But that's just not what most of the mtb world does.
  • + 3
 And when you're talking about pro-level riders, that may surprise you, but being very good at MTB (in general, may that be xc, enduro, dh, ... even top riders from the EWS or UCI DHI) doesn't make you any good at telling what's good or bad on your suspension. I know someone who used to assist some people in the DH WC circuit (actually still does ^^) to setup their suspension, and sometimes he would go the complete opposite of what the rider said, because with his knowledge he knew what to change to correct what the rider felt.

I still maintain that for every shock they have (of course, not many chances that you can reuse what you have done on a RS Kage onto a Fox RC4), they have a rather small amount of setting (and by setting I mean a compression piston, preload spring, needle, shim stack, ...) and eventually if the case requires it, alter it.

15 settings per bike is actually already too much. Think about it, say we have 100 frames on the market (way more, but whatever), about 10 different shocks on each frame (probably more), 15 settings ? that's already 15000 combinaisons of pistons, shimstacks, ... Just impossible to track this.

Instead the way things most likely are is that for every shock, they have say a dozen settings, and these settings will work for most frames you can have. Some frames that are completely different in design may end up with the very same setting if it fits. If I take the example of the Lapierre DH 2015, chances are the setting would be close to (if not the same as) the one on a RM Flatline from 2010 or a NS bike Fuzz DH (all 3 bikes are very progressive designs, with a leverage ratio pretty close).
  • + 1
 I completely agree on the free rebuild if the guy isn't 100% happy, and I do hope that most reputed brands offer this (at least the ones I know in France do that ...). It took something like 5 settings to a guy to be completely happy with the Fox shock he had on his Nomad (probably the worst suspension design to work on ...).

I woudln't mind to have the opinion of Push (and not one from the marketing dpt that made this press release ...), but I'm pretty sure of what I wrote. Smile

We should open a thread for that haha Smile

(hope I haven't mixed up things writing the comment tho...)
  • + 1
 Hopefully Push can chime in. Having setup my own shock from Race Tech parts (as well as designing compression valves for a suspension company) I can tell you their chart for each shock contains probably 30+ settings for compression, and 10 for rebound. That's my shock, on my bike. A different shock with a different piston design WILL require different shim stacks and different leverage will require different stacks. Again, they have tabulated stacks for those bikes as well. As I said, I am sure many WILL overlap, but just picking one out of a hat for an "average" rider is how you end up the the average performing stock suspension and why tuners exist. i have been through 5 iterations of setup on my dirt bike to get to where I now ride. The tuner worked with me to customize it for me, not by picking a set stack. A good tuner ignores what the rider says he needs and bases it on what matters (just because it is harsh doesn't mean there is too much compression damping, my dirt bike proved that).

The nice thing with Push making their own shock is they only have to worry about ONE piston and shaft design, unlike moto tuners.

No, I don't change my settings every time I go riding like a pro, but I also don't consider this shock to be a low end consumer product. This is high end, high performance for racing. If I raced competitively then I'd want the best, and having a custom setup shock will ALWAYS outperform some stock, average unit. And it will cost more.
  • + 1
 @kc358 you overestimate the differences in leverage ratios between bikes. They are waay smaller.

As for skill and riding style not being the same but they are the same variable. The variable is riding style. If you have a low skill level you have a specific riding style. That's what influences the shock. The variables are 1. How and where you ride the bike (so the forces that will act on the wheel that change dynamically) 2. What's the bike (suspension wise and they are more similar from a shock standpoint than you think) 3. Your weight (also influences the forces acting on the wheel but it's mostly a constant)

Though I must say you are a perfect client for someone working in marketing like me. You belive in facts but you don't take into account how unimportant some of them are. That way a marketer doesn't have to lie, he just has to work with engineers to find nuggets of knowledge that make little difference outside of the lab (and sometimes no difference in the lab too but they look nice on the web page)
  • + 1
 I had a custom pushed fox shock in the past, just soo nice to ride compared to fox. They know their stuff thats for sure, for those who want custom tune like me that cant get on with ctd and the likes. Bit pricey for me atm but if was price was to fall a third I'd be looking at an upgrade. I currently have a custom Avalanche shock but would quite like a remote on that lever to flick when need to pedal the DH bike as not that steep here...
  • + 1
 Gotta love how Push tries to compare the static friction to air shocks just to try to make it look like it is something special. The weight is closer to competitor's coil shocks than their air shocks so this is what should be shown. I bet it has higher static friction than competitor's coil shocks otherwise these would be listed also.
  • + 1
 Nice looking shock. My current one is PUSHed. Now I need to get a longer travel rig so running it is an option....... next bike in the 140-150mm range. Looking forward to a review. I wonder if coil will make a resurgence in the Trail/AM category? Don't know that I'd every pay $1000k+ for a rear shock, but those Cane Creeks are sure looking affordable now.
  • + 0
 I imagine PUSH's margin$ are modest - even at $1200. What the majority of you call "High" prices are here to stay. If all of the R&D, manufacturing, QC, and employment takes place in the USofA, a small biz like theirs CAN NOT operate on anything less. Lets hope it stands up to a tuned Avy!
  • + 1
 I was really into this shock, then I got sticker shock... I can get both a great fork and shock for that price. If you have the budget for this more power to you, but geez that's a little steep.
  • + 0
 I wonder how much actual time and money was spent on R&D. How many hours of riding, shock dyno, and etc.. this shock has. Is it really proven to perform. Can the average rider feel the incremental adjustments. I did not see where it says service intervals!!!
  • + 0
 For those complaining about price: considering that this is their first production run and everything is domestically sourced, it's not a bad price. I would expect their pricing to be comparable to Trek's Project One series, also made in the USA. They have also targeted this market on purpose. You may spend ~600 on a CCDB, but it's made in larger volumes (discount on production cost, amortized design cost), and its also made offshore (as far as I know). This much for a product that's probably pretty damn good seems reasonable for the elite/rich level rider/racer.
  • - 2
 CCDB is made in Fletcher North Carolina, not offshore by any stretch of the imagination.
  • + 1
 Are all the parts sourced in North America? Guess I was wrong, sorry Cane Creek!
  • + 1
 From what I understand they do source some parts from overseas. They also machine a bunch in house and every shock is hand built and dyno tested in Nc. So they can't make the same claim Push is making, but there aren't many products, particularly in the bike industry that can!
  • + 1
 It is out of my league for sure. Can see this is for pros and as the 300g of weight penalty should be different to anybody whos bitchin about it, but damn thos thong is beauty!!!
  • + 0
 Well.. What can I say.. I am dissapointed. So much money for this shock, but it still uses an IFP with a less-than-a-dollar O-ring seal... Did you PUSH guys ever consider a bladder instead of an IFP? Good thing you implemented a coil spring with progressive spring rate. At least that. Compression stack are promising, though. But I can't see a lot of innovation here, sorry. Please, you are PUSH industries - you know what is expected from you.
  • + 0
 There is no justification for that price.

Yes, I read that is it "custom" made. Yes, I read that it is made in the USA. Doesn't matter.

It is clear that demand does not exist to manufacture the product. Debuting at a price that accounts for the specificity of tooling, materials, and fantastically low demand is not how you better the brand/industry/sport/rider satisfaction.
  • + 0
 My question is why? There are already options for those that want a custom shock (Avelanche springs to mind and is far less expensive). Why not spend some of that R&D time and money to develop improvements for Rockshox and Marzochii products? I would assume there is a far broader base of people looking for those improvements and better potential profits.
  • + 3
 PINKBIKE!!! REVIEW ONE NOW!!! It better be twice as good as a ccdb coil then for that price.
  • + 4
 this just proves one thing to me ... sex isn't cheap !!
  • + 1
 It's very simple: this is not a shock for anyone on a budget. Just as a V-10 is not for anyone on a budget. Just a fact of life my friends. Some people can only buy Kia's...and some people can (and do) buy Lamborghinis.
  • + 1
 I see this in the future being redesigned for DH applications. Who knows maybe one day it will come stock on the top of the line bike you wanna buy. 1200 ain't that bad as well.
  • + 1
 If you want 100% American made shock, you best to be paying if you want to be playing....bike technology has slowly been catching motorcycle technology....hence the price trend.
  • + 1
 I would rather they spent their efforts tooling up to work on my Lyrik. The work they did on my Monarch (no longer available...) was spectacular.
  • + 3
 this sport is getting out of hand with prices
  • + 2
 looks like a new Stratos shock to me. I hope they perform as well as they should.
  • + 1
 Dudes, if you send them your fox 34, they drill out the lowers so they can put rockshox seals in. Then of course, Fox will never look at your suspension again.
  • + 1
 Ok, so my dream build would be a GG Mega Trail with this shock, a DVO Diamond, I9 hubs on stans flows, and either a X1 or something like it.
  • + 1
 I would imagine the cost is in-line to recoup some of the R&D reverse engineering that has been done over the years. $1200 is insane.
  • + 2
 DVO Topaz is coming...patience...you could almost buy three of them for that price.
  • + 1
 anybody know what company made/makes cheap ti rear shocks. this is a real question. i came across their website a year ago, shocks for around $300
  • + 1
 Just put light steel spring like sa-springs. Cheaper, same weight as the Ti ones. And cheap Ti springs are worse than cheap steel springs.
  • + 3
 I wish my bike was worth $1200, let alone my suspension!
  • + 1
 Luckily no one is complaining about the 1200$ price point and the 850 grams of weight. And I thought pinkbike was only complainers... Razz
  • + 1
 that's a killer design. Kudos to Push for thinking out of the box with a new design. This would definitely pass as an instant collectors item. Love it.
  • + 2
 Arrogance at its finest. I like expensive stuff but this is not justifiable.
  • + 1
 would it not be possible to make a capable shock that can be easily set up for people without a degree in nautical engineering or rocket science
  • + 1
 Looks really well made. Great finishing details. The price is not so nice for me but I am sure people with bigger wallets than mine will give it a go.
  • + 2
 and for the poor owners of Specy Enduro 2011, still no other option than the RP23 Frown i want a piggy back!
  • - 1
 The only way you could justify $1200 for this is if it worked twice as good as say a vivid r2c coil or ohlins, which I guarantee it does not. I'm totally fine shelling out maybe an extra $100 for a shock made in USA with domestic parts but DOUBLE the price of the competition is ridiculous. Who ever buys one of these is a complete tool that got taken advantage of.
  • + 3
 Needs more adjustment dials and knobs if I'm honest
  • + 3
 I like the industrial look, a la Curnutt shocks back in the day.
  • + 2
 Any chance of a model or kit that will allow this to replace the bullshit that is the FOX DRCV on the Trek Fuel's?
  • + 2
 You can use just about any shock in place of the DRCV. AS long as it has the same extended length and stroke. There are mounting hardware kits available out there for a standard shock. Also you might want to take note of the valving of the shock, the DRCV is tuned for Trek.
  • + 3
 What a deal I'll take two
  • + 2
 Looks ok i guess, apart from the price and color.
  • + 2
 I wonder where they got the name from.... 5.10 +1?
  • + 1
 theres watches for our wrists out there that cost $10,000's This shox can tell time.
  • + 2
 so expensive.. for this price i hope this shock make café..
  • + 2
 Now I know how to spend my money
  • + 2
 Save some lives instead of buying this shit
  • + 2
 sooooo, do we send these back to push when we want to get them "pushed"?
  • + 1
 Send it Suspensionwerx to get it fixed!
  • + 1
 I will be able to put a full lift kit on my truck for the same price!!! this price is crazy!
  • + 1
 Just another Stendec/EXT-ish Arma & Storia.
But, this one looks much cooler than Stendec's.
$1200 for shock?!
Nuff said.
  • + 1
 So....where's the photo of a complete shock with this press release!!??? Wtf
  • + 2
 First picture. It doesn't show up on my phone, but does on the computer.
  • + 1
 Lame that's the only one missing on mobile, thanks
  • + 3
 Dear Santa,.......
  • + 2
 It won't fit my Cube. And $1200 gets me alot of hookers..
  • + 2
 PRICEY as a CURNUTT SHOCK for a FOES, some similiarities in look as well.
  • + 1
 Might as well buy a whole new frame with a shock for the price of the shock. It seems to be a luxury
  • + 1
 well, besides the price (which is just ridiculously high) - I like it, a lot.
  • + 2
 Who needs this shit seriously
  • + 2
 WANT... too bad they will never have a fitment for a trek
  • + 2
 So, did Push start in 1993 or 2003?
  • + 1
 I remember it being 2003 when Push started. That is some really bad writing. You could just drive over there and talk to Darren. He did a few shocks for me and they worked fantastic.
  • + 1
 so i take it wasn't coicidence that my 2003 jekyll float RL was pushed? it might well have been among the ones done in the first year of business XD
  • + 2
 Call it the "12 Hundreds" instead of 11Six.
  • + 2
 But this one goes to eleven!
  • + 0
 There should always be a bench mark that other products wish to achieve. This shock is costly. It should be. Thank god for hi end bling to drewl over.
  • + 1
 top engineer - crazy glasses. guaranteed
  • + 1
 Make a fork, and make it 26" compatible! : )
  • + 12
 every fork is 26 compatible Smile
  • + 2
 ghetto yes
  • + 3
 Not even ghetto a 27.5 fork will work 100% perfect with 26" wheels
  • + 1
 Good bad whatever. Cost cannot be justified.
  • + 1
 To myself: "$1200, these comments are going to be good..." *scrolls*
  • + 1
 i'll buy it, anyone wanna buy 3 of my bikes?
  • + 1
 I want triple overhead valve for my xc bike
  • + 1
 It reeks of poor people in here
  • + 1
 Suddenly the rest of my bike feels affordable! Thanks Push!
  • + 1
 1200$...holy shit Big Grin
  • + 1
 holy effin comments yo
  • - 1
 so big it only works in half the frames you can buy! probly works great tho !
  • + 1
 yeah looks like the Öhlins so will fit Demo's !
  • - 1
 Ferrari F40 replacement transaxle = $18,000. Bike shock built for you = $1,200.
  • - 1
 That's one sexy hell of a shock !
  • + 0
 1200 lol
  • - 1
 The price says it all.
  • - 3
 Sweet shock! I am super happy with both of PUSHed shocks! Now... a cartridge with real-man damping to RS-1 pleaaaaase!
  • + 2
 You mean custom damping for a lefty
  • - 2
 that price!!!is this the JOD?or maybe even JOY?
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