First Look: Push Unveils HC97 RockShox Charger Damper Upgrade

Apr 17, 2019
by Mike Kazimer  
RockShox's Charger 2.1 damper has been on the market for less than two weeks, but the consummate tinkerers over at Push already have an aftermarket upgrade option available for riders looking for even more adjustability. It's called the HC97 Compression System, and it's designed to replace the stock Charger or Charger 2.1 compression assembly in found in RockShox Lyrik, Pike, and BoXXer forks.

The HC97 is made in Colorado, and has 28 clicks of low-speed compression damping, and 28 clicks of high-speed compression damping. That wide range of adjustments is intended to allow riders to get their fork set up exactly how they'd like, without needing to worry about ending up between clicks.
Push HC97 Details
• Fits Charger 2 and 2.1 dampers in Pike, Lyrik, and BoXXer forks
• 28 clicks LSC, 28 clicks HSC
• Made in Colorado
• Includes rebound re-valve shims
• Made in Colorado
• MSRP: $245 USD
www.pushindustries.com

A parabolic needle design, much like what's found in Push's ElevenSix shock, controls the amount of low-speed compression damping. Push say that using a rounded, rather than pointed, needle shape makes for a more consistent difference between each click of adjustment.



There's more to the new compression assembly than a bunch of extra adjustments – Push also eliminated the shims in the compression valve and replaced them with a sliding valve seat, another design also found in the ElevenSix. The sliding valve is designed to allow for more oil flow during big square edged hits, in order to help the fork compress freely without any harshness or spiking.

Push didn't get rid of all the shims, though; shims are still found on the Charger's rebound damper. For riders looking for something different than the stock rebound tune, Push includes rebound valving shims with each HC97 kit, along with instructions on how to use them.

The kit is priced at $245 USD, and Push have a step-by-step video on their website that details the installation process for customers who want to take the DIY route instead of having a shop perform the upgrade.


Early versions were silver, but the production versions of the HC97 are anodized black.

Initial Impressions

Over the last few months I spent time on a fork that had been equipped with Push's ACS3 coil spring conversion kit and a prototype version of the HC97 Compression System, along with Push's low-friction seals. The extra-smooth, small-bump swallowing performance of the ACS3 kit was just how I remembered it, but this time there were even more compression adjustment options.

At 160 pounds I'm on the lighter side of things for most stock fork tunes, and it's not unusual for me to end up with the LSC and HSC almost all the way open. With the HC97, I ended up with more room for adjustment than I typically have - there were eight more clicks of low-speed and six clicks of high-speed available to me if I wanted to run even less damping – the overall range seems like it should suit a wide variety of rider weights and riding styles.

I haven't had any issues with the Charger 2.1 damper in its stock form, but I can see the appeal of being able to really fine tune the amount of low- or high-speed compression damping. For the extra-picky rider who wants to have as many adjustments as possible at their fingertips, the HC97 makes sense. It also makes me wonder how long it will be before Push go all-in and release a fork of their own. After all, they've got the internals figured out, now they just need to come up with a chassis to house them.







150 Comments

  • + 74
 seems fairly unnecessary given how good the charger dampers have been, but you have to give those dentists something to bling their bikes with
  • + 27
 Is it just me, or does the description have a hard time selling the product? It seems like some pretty minor changes for $245. Who knows, maybe people will be blown away when they ride it. Mike didn't seem that excited by it.
  • + 8
 They are not bad, but it would be a nice upgrade from charger 1 if somebody wants hsc/lsc dials. From “details” it seems only charger 2 and 2.1 are compatible, but from text it seems charger 1 is compatible as well. How is it?
  • + 0
 @Tr011 and those mechanics!
  • + 5
 This dentist approves of the pricing.
  • + 20
 I respectfully disagree! As a light rider myself - same weight as Mike K. - I find the stock Charger damper to be too harsh. I've done nothing but complain for nearly 2 years about my Pike. For $245, this might actually shut me up!
  • + 6
 @kubikeman: I'm 145 and I agree, but I'm not certain that this will fix my issues.
  • + 6
 even at 185# I find the Charger 1 to be pretty lame. I run an ACS3 with low and high speed compression on my fork fully open (RCT3 model) pretty much at all times.

Also, it's ACS3 not ASC3 @mikekazimer
  • + 3
 @jbadger, thanks, I re-ordered that letter jumble.
  • - 14
flag zokinjo (Apr 17, 2019 at 9:07) (Below Threshold)
 You would not believe: These dentists screw more beautiful girls than you as well... Big Grin
  • + 4
 If you fall outside of the normal weight range that these forks come tuned for, then you will run into problems. I think riders of average weights (whatever RS defines that as) probably will see less returns on something like this as opposed to those of us on either end of the curve (lighter or heavier).

I have pretty consistent problems with the stock RS and Fox forks for that reason.
  • + 6
 @shinook: In that case, wouldn't a custom revalve be the better option? Spring-loaded compression is not as tune-able as a shim stack. I know, shims are springs, but shims are readily available, whereas doing anything remotely weird with a coil setup (digressive or whatever) will be... funky.
  • - 2
 Does it eliminate the bladder? That seems like the main failure point/downside to the stock Charger 2.
  • - 2
 They have you believe that they are good, rs has a better marketing dep than these guys, on the other hand these guys have better r&d, as they seem to be always ahead of the competition
  • + 2
 @funkendrenchman: I'm in the same range and I think that the stock HSC preset is the problem not the LSC (RC3), as I have to run less pressure than I'd like. At 20 % sag it's awesome for rough and fast sections but on slower sections I get hung up too much, forcing me to run closer to 30 % sag which is a little unnerving in steep stuff...
  • + 4
 @adespotoskyli: I thinks it’s less about which R&D is better and more about what their goals are. RS wants an easy and cheap to manufacture one size fits all product. While Push is more about tuning for individual people and their needs.
  • + 1
 @jzPV: I've had both the RCT3 and the RC2. The RC2 was supposed to have opened up the HSC somewhat, but I'm not sure they went far enough. I also run 30%. I'd love to run 20-25%, but my hands get beat up.
  • + 2
 @Lwerewolf: PUSH posted some information on this in their YouTube channel and on MTBR, but my understanding being that the Charger damper is not really capable of being re-shimmed with any level of effectiveness, which is why they developed a different solution.
  • - 1
 How is it for dentists if its $245USD and the Charger 2 ( not 2.1 ) is $360USD?
  • + 4
 Unfortunately I cant delete my stupid previous comment... carry on
  • + 1
 @zokinjo: no female dentists in slovenia, huh?
  • + 6
 It all depends on how and where you ride. In SC the stock damper is fine, in Socal at speed in chunk it can use some help. Incremental improvements on something good get very expensive very quickly. It is always the last 5% rule where 90% of the cost is in the last 5%.

BTW where is the love for Dr's and Executives? All you guys talk about are the Dentists and those guys are poor by comparison!
  • + 1
 @kubikeman: For less than $245 you can get a suspension tuner to work some custom magic for you. It is well worth it!
  • + 2
 @salespunk: All depends.. The Dentists I know, own their own practices.
  • + 10
 oh the dentist comment again. Thats not been overused yet. Rolleyes
  • + 4
 @shinook: Lighter viscosity damper oil for lighter riders helps a lot and effects all dials including rebound equally.
  • - 1
 Grip2 in Fox eliminates the bladder. Fox gets my money. Looking for a barely used 36 Grip2 on classifieds with cash in my mouth. As soon as one pops up I won’t spend more than 300$ after selling my Lyrik with Charger 1 and I get a fresh fork with similar adjustability, easier to service at home and possibly more reliable
  • + 14
 @timbud: Your from the UK im surprised you even know what a dentist is
  • + 4
 @Tr011: lol there’s another original one. Well done lad
  • + 2
 @Tr011: hahaha
  • + 3
 @shinook: And in that assumption, they are totally correct. I dynoed the shit out of the charger 2 forks and revalves did were not really possible due to the valve design. Charger 2.1 is very new but I dont think its a vast improvement.

From a performance standpoint, I really miss the charger 1!
  • + 1
 Lol@Tr011:
  • + 1
 Always curious with these upgrades that replace an already high end part of these forks. Would they just work with the cheaper forks too. Yari, Sektor, Domain etc. I'm not really up to date with the latest suspension stuff but I thought more than a few use the same chassis. So couldn't you just get a Yari, get all the Push stuff in there and make it a fork as good as a Lyrik with the same Push stuff in there? Now that seems like a sensible upgrade, especially for those who got their Yari as original equipment on a complete bike (and are actually after what Push is offering, of course). After all, that's what I thought Push used to do with Fox shocks too. You could just as well have a Vanilla RC shock instead of this DHX5.0 as they'd swap it all out anyway.
  • + 18
 Apparently Push didn't like Rockshox's simplified adjustment range. Personally I agree with Push. I like having the tuning options available versus them already being chosen for me.
  • - 13
flag wibblywobbly (Apr 17, 2019 at 8:50) (Below Threshold)
 This is 100% correct. SRAM, to be blunt, thinks you are a moron. SRAM thinks you cannot be entrusted with the responsibility to set up your own bike and has to make it as easy as possible.

I’m glad Push is making things like this because it proves America hasn’t gone totally soft.
  • + 32
 @wibblywobbly: MAKE SUSPENSION FORKS GREAT AGAIN!!
  • + 8
 If you're of average weight the "simplified" range will probably work for you. If you're heavy, light, or a pro moar options=most better. You guys whine too much about having options.
  • + 40
 @wibblywobbly: Go to any trailhead and 95% of customers can't even set up sag and rebound damping properly. Simplifying their forks is the smartest thing they've done. Fox is same. The only forks in either companies line up that allow for finite adjustment are a couple of the top end models. How it should be. It's not a conspiracy.
  • + 7
 @wibblywobbly: In general they are right as well. Most friends who ride a lot have terrible suspension setup and no idea how to tune it.
  • + 3
 @btjenki: I was going to say that too but didn't want to sound elitist.
  • + 7
 @wibblywobbly: ok, but SRAM is kinda right. Even lots of the best riders I know have their suspension set up pretty badly and could benefit from keeping things simple. Tinkering is not for everyone.
  • + 5
 @skylerd: Is their suspension really set up 'badly' if they're 'lots of the best riders' that you know?
  • + 2
 @Almazing: If you put Troy Brosnan on a walmart bike, does he become as slow as me?
  • - 4
flag wibblywobbly (Apr 17, 2019 at 11:37) (Below Threshold)
 @tgent: I get it. They want to make money and need to cater to the lowest common denominator. We simplify our trails and are adding electric motors in the pursuit of attracting new riders so I guess we should do the same with our suspension.

We should demand better as consumers though.
  • + 10
 The funny part of all of this is that there are people that legitimately think that having more knobs on your suspension is going to make you magically faster than all your friends on your recreational trail rides.
  • + 6
 @phops: and many of those people that think more knobs are better end up making their suspension feel terrible by having the knobs turned to the wrong adjustment.
  • + 1
 @btjenki: that's why I don't understand everyone running Fox 36 Factory and comparatively priced forks (+- $1000). Some excellent riders I know can't feel the difference between a Fox CTD and FIT4. Then why buy high-end forks? Just buy a stiff RS Yari on discount and call it a day.
I on the other hand am a very mediocre rider, but bad forks and shocks annoy the @#€ out of me. Maybe I should stop tinkering with my Mattoc and McLeod (love them both btw), man up and start being a better rider ...
  • + 3
 @wibblywobbly: We have demanded better, and that's why we have a ridiculous amount of options just like this product. As a consumer you can buy anything from an X-Fusion cheap but solid fork with few adjustments to this with 28 clicks of high and low speed compression and rebound.

My point is that for the average rider, this is way overkill. Pros, journalists, and the top 1% of expert riders will likely benefit from an upgrade like this, but the average rider has no idea how to use this properly.
  • + 1
 @btjenki: No RockShox did away with external HSC adjustment on the Boxxer, that came back as they realised people wanted and needed it.
  • + 2
 @tgent: I am a highly mediocre rider and I ride the best gear I can get my gimpy hands on, it is an investment in saving my ass from my own incompetence. The better my suspension works the better the control and traction will be for me as I clumsily choose difficult lines and make awkward decisions. It may give me a little bit of extra dangerous courage but I think that is more than offset by the benefit in having more control when trying to ride out of bad spots I was going to get into with a shit bike or a great one. I don't regularly ride heavy gnar but when I do get into it I want to be as ready as I can be.
  • + 0
 If they really wanted actual 'fine tuning', they'd get rid of the clicks and have a full 360-720 smooth knob. Gets rid of increments and allows the rider to really fine tune their suspension to the thread position in the damper. But of course, 'smooth knob tuning' doesn't sound as awesome as '28 CLICKS OF ACTION!' in MTB marketing where one-upping each other with higher numbers is the status quo.
  • + 1
 @tgent: “My point is that for the average rider, this is way overkill. Pros, journalists, and the top 1% of expert riders will likely benefit from an upgrade like this, but the average rider has no idea how to use this properly.”

Who is the average rider?
It’s an honest question, not being facetious. Is it the average person that owns a mountain bike, even if they may only get out on it a couple times a year. Or is it the average type of rider you would see at a trail on any given day?

Is it similar to me and golf, where I own a set of golf clubs and play a few times a year maybe, but I wouldn’t call myself a golfer.
At what point do you start to call yourself a golfer / mountain biker and then where is the average beyond that?
  • + 3
 @phops: My suspension setup determines how confident I am on the trail. Right or wrong is subjective.
  • + 1
 @riderseventy: I would define the average rider as the average in rides or time on the bike per year. Most PBers are not your average rider and are likely in the top 10% or so of riders. The average rider probably rides once every other week, which is a decent amount, but not a ton.

Many people I know who ride a lot, say 3-4 days a week, have no idea how to set up their suspension. Those people are better off with simpler suspension setup.
  • + 1
 @tgent: or even better, having a friend that can set it up for them Wink That's assuming they can feel and appreciate the difference but don't know how to achieve the right setup.
I have a friend that once did a race on largely level terrain with 50% sag... Once I adjusted his air pressure during the break, he got much faster.
  • + 2
 @Almazing: you aren't considering repeatability of adjustment. Take your fork to a shop for service and they should record your measurements and set it back up that way when they're done, but things happen and the fork doesn't always get returned the way it was brought in. How do you record and reproduce "426.2 degrees" of low speed compression? Short answer is you make a knob with lots of small clicks. They are doing what you suggested (more adjustment) but in a better way that lets you reliably hit the same setting.
  • + 15
 Didn't spend enough money on your $900 Lyrik Charger 2.1? Want to spend more money on it? We've got the thing for you! Push's new AC3S coil conversion makes a good thing slightly better! Just $389!

BUT WAIT THERES MORE: Need more ways to spend MORE money on your $900 fork with $389 coil conversion, we now have a $250 damper upgrade!

So much money emptying from your wallet that you can feel the speeeeed!
  • + 4
 Power and speeeeeeeeeed
  • + 2
 i suppose you could just buy the fork chasis with no internals? but i feel like the uppers+lowers (without internals) is more expensive than a brand new fork
  • + 1
 @adrennan: unfortunately you still need everything except the airside components. This modification requires the damper. The damper, crown, lowers and seals will be more than buying a fork.
  • + 6
 It's heavy and pricey but the Avalanche cartridge is the closest option to a high-level damper you can drop into a $300 used Yari/Revelation/36 GRIP/etc. FAST is a close second, lighter, a little cheaper. The biggest advantage to the FAST UP is that it'll actually make a Revelation lighter than a Pike with Charger 2.1. Finally the NovyParts SPLUG, which seems the best deal going for a cheap Yari/Rev upgrade.

I'd love to see someone do a lab test/ride test of Charger RC, Charger 2.1, Avalanche, FAST Up and Novy Splug.

EDIT There is also a new option in town: www.m-suspensiontech.com/federgabel/rock-shox-yari
  • + 17
 Is 28 clicks really necessary? I doubt most people can feel the difference between click 16 and click 17.
  • + 4
 On the original charger only the first 5 clicks from fully closed seemed to do anything, that left like 10 clicks for vodoo tuning.
  • + 8
 I found the Charger 2 quite underwhelming. Harsh at midstroke, doesnt give enough travel fast enough, repeated hits make rattling. I think Push goes the right way by changing the oil flow in the compression. Would like to try it.
  • + 0
 I have the exact same issues. I'm curious what the actual issue with the damper is.
  • + 1
 Are you referring to the RCT3 or RC2? I found the RCT3 as you said but not the rc2.
  • + 5
 Hm, I don't really have the best opinion of poppet valve compression circuits. It seems to rely too much on the mid valve shim stack, unless there is something else going on I don't know about? I thought maybe Push started using Cone Valves but it doesn't seem to be there. What is the big deal about a poppet valve compression circuit? I'd much rather have shims that I can swap for a tune. I guess its a better way to make the clickers more effective, but orifice damping has pretty significant limits to its abilities afaik. THE TONE QUEST IS ETERNAL!
  • + 4
 Mixed feelings.... there's a reason the best dampers run shims....and a reason why people get rid of them....to go to a universal damper that don't have fine tuning adjustments…and kind of work good..?? Just an observation.
  • + 4
 So if it works on Pike and Lyrik I'm assuming it could also replace the damper on the Revelation and Yari? You can drop the new RockShox Charger 2 in on those forks and the Charger runs 200+ so this could be a good option to upgrade Revelations and Yaris, assuming (and I'm not sure why it wouldn't) that it's compatible.
  • + 9
 On second reading noticed this was just the compression assembly in the Charger unit, not the entire damper. Nevermind, carry on.
  • + 2
 But this isn't the entire damper. It doesn't include the bladder, lower damper assembly etc. I don't know for sure, but other elements of the damper might not work together.
  • + 3
 Big +1 on Push coming up w/ their own chassis. Id imagine theyd have to price it just above the top end Lyric or 36 bc if the total cost to Push on internals is say $500, then and I cant imagine a chassis would take more than $500 to manufacture, then you can mark up to say $1200-1300. Thats WAY more consumable than $1000 (Lyric) + $400 (coils) + $300 (damper). For the same result youre out the door at nearly a third less the total cost. I mean these costs are obvs just guesses and idk about optimal pricing in this industry but given the performance and near legend status theyve built, why not capture that market share thats just standing there...
  • + 1
 It would be easy enough for PUSH to buy a great chassis and drop their guts in (say X-Fusion or Suntour) but that’s not their M.O.

Manufacturing lowers and crowns in the USA for 100% domestic product (not just assembling forks in the USA) is doable but it will definitely result in a super-premium product not a Lyric + $300.
  • + 1
 Thing is, making lowers is super expensive with currently used tooling a manufacturing techniques. I talked to the Öhlins guys when they put RXF 34 on the market and they said the lowers was the biggest cost to develop and was the limiting factor in how many wheelsize/axleversions they could put to market.

Maybe 3D printing could change that.

But then why do it? Most lowers in black without stickers look the same and perform pretty damn good.

CSU:s would be a cool thing to offer though with optional threds and stiffness so you really could build frankenforks mixing springs and dampers from whoever.
  • + 3
 At 160 pounds I'm on the lighter side of things for most stock fork tunes, and it's not unusual for me to end up with the LSC and HSC almost all the way open

Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't this indicate an inadequate pressure set up in the shock? Shouldn't we be setting those dampers all the way open, setting sag, then going back to tune the damper? Or is this an issue of restrictive valving in the damper?
  • + 4
 I think what hes saying is to get sag right his spring rate is very low. So low that in the most open settings of his damper, its still over damping the spring system. More or less that there is not a wide enough range of adjustment in the Charger. So yeah I think you were on the money with "Or is this an issue of restrictive valving in the damper?"
  • + 4
 dampeners need to work for a WIDE range of weights and riding styles . lighter / heavier riders sometimes need more adjustments than allowed from base tune . same goes for more aggressive riders .

on most suspension setups there are really one 3-5 clicks that a actually useful of the standard 20-22 available . so some of us have our suspension re valved or shimmed to meet out requirements . i personally go to avalanche suspension to have this done . but that to isn't cheap . . using this method allows users to simply replace their dampener with something "pre tuned " so to speak at home with minimal down time .

quality dampening allows me to run a lower spring rate . get more grip , have more control and not bottom out .

bottom line if it isnt for you then it isnt for you .
  • + 2
 @Ayyggss: Yeah, but why not sell some shims and a set of instructions for re-valving the compression stack vs selling essentially a nonadjustable stack that obviously has to be meant for everyone, unless you tell them your weight, riding style, typical trail conditions, etc and they send you the appropriate seal. But, that is assuming the seal has some sort of porting, otherwise you just replaced your shims with a solid seal that for the life of me I can't figure out how that part of this system is any better. The tapered low speed comp needle sounds cool though, need to go make one on the lathe now and try it out! Either way, cool to see new tech and designs and such!
  • + 5
 @mtbrider119:

if you have even taken apart any suspension . its nerve racking . id much rather pay .

and you are correct I tell Craig , Avalanche Suspension , my weight, riding style , trail types , frame im using it on .. he even recommends a spring rate for me to use with is always spot on . so for my im paying for his knowledge more than im paying for his shims . but some people prefer to use something like this and play with spring rates them self .

some people still ride single speeds , rigid and road bikes

to each is own .
  • + 0
 I too don't understand this. Compression damping is velocity dependent, not pressure dependent. Set sag and progressivity with pressure/volume and compression damping should be set to speed of hits? Rebound damping IS dictated by the spring rate but there should be plenty of range available to suit?
  • + 3
 @tcmtnbikr:

Have you ever sat on someone else’s bike that was significantly lighter than you ? Cycled their suspension ?
Have you ever sat on someone else’s bike that was definitely heavier than you? Cycled their suspension ?

While the rebound is dependent solely on spring rate . More spring pressure more dampening required.

The compression circuit fights spring pressure , Rider pressure and force upwards if I ride my bike anything less than aggressive at my current setting it feels like shit . Way to stiff . The faster I go / harder I I ride the better it feels . Found I get away with the compression fully closed and rebound fully closed on. My older x2 ? Yes bc I did before I got a tune . Now I live in the middle of the setting leaving more range of adjustment. What if I were heavier than 190 ? What if I was already at the end of my settings leaving zero room for additional adjustment .

Since a tune I dropped from a 550 to a 450 spring and dropped a spring in my fork too and now support myself with more dampening .

Hope I’m making sense
  • + 3
 that is essentially what rs does. On their website it gives you very clear instructions on how to re-stack the existing shims in different order depending on your weight range. Did it to my boxxer because stock damping was too light, works beautifully now, and I didn’t have to buy any parts.
  • + 2
 @tcmtnbikr: Compression damping is impulse dependent. Impulse is roughly force*time and force = mass*acceleration. Therefore the impulse is basically dependent on weight of the rider and how fast they are going. Because HSC damping requires 'opening' the HSC circuit with the impulse if your mass is small (160# here) and/or your speed is average to slow you get too much HSC.

If you're a light rider because compression damping acts in the same direction as the fork spring if you run more sag (lower pressure) you can get the HSC circuit to open up a bit more on smaller hits so the overall ride is smoother. On the other side heavy riders run less sag when the HSC isn't enough to help 'hold up' the fork on small bumps.
  • + 1
 @tcmtnbikr: I think compression dampening is both velocity and pressure sensitive. A 200lb rider and a 120lb rider running through TBE same same course at the same speed with the same compression damper will not have the same dampening.
  • + 2
 @gaberoc: what is the advantage of adding compression? Why not dial the correct spring rate and rebound then leave the compression open?
  • + 1
 @dubod22: I've often wondered the same.
  • + 4
 @dubod22: Two things, first, most people want some low speed damping support to help stop the fork feeling too mushy, it will dive very heavily under braking and body weight movements with super light compression. Second, if the compression damping is too light the wheel can end up travelling upwards by more than the height of the bump in some circumstances, and leaving the ground. During a high speed compression the wheel can have significant upward momentum, so it actually needs it's upwards movement slowed down to keep the wheel on the ground or the moving weight of the wheel keeps travelling upwards into the air before the spring on it's own catches it. You know how you sometimes see another car on the road with a blown damper and the wheel will bounce right off the road after a small bump? A bit like that but only happening once rather than continuing to bounce because you do have rebound damping unlike the blown car shock. A square edged bump, or a series of them, like a nest of roots or a rock garden, where the height of the bump is less than the available upward wheel travel can do this, and it's not good for grip because, obviously, the wheel is coming off the ground.
  • + 5
 "I'm so worried about ending up between low-speed compression clicks!", said no one ever.
  • + 1
 Can't even imagine how much custom Musa lowers would end up costing. I am no engimaneer, but precision casting mg does not sound cheap. Nor does cryo pressing a csu with enough quality to not creak. Back to my basic bitch pike, for which I paid as much as that cartridge. Deals
  • + 3
 Stupid sport. Paid premium to get the best fork on the market, but wait, it's not worth shit! so pay extra to make it good. I'am done, my KY tube is empty
  • + 1
 Apart from possibly lower friction from the stock damper, this assembly does nothing. You would be far better off getting a custom shim stack tune to the stock damper for an even finer level of adjustment. I'm still waiting for someone to release an internal bypass mountain bike damper but at this rate I may have to build one myself.
  • + 1
 What do you mean by internal bypass?
  • + 1
 Isn't that pretty much what WP shocks use, and I believe some other offroad stuff but often result in weird dogshit results in WP? I imagine trophy truck has a different use since they do much bigger travel so they can make things taper better, and allow for huge end stroke rebound changes but my WP shock feels horrible. The amount of fixing it needs is a joke. Ohlins started it, and I think figured out a new way around it because when I bottomed my Demo I thought I was going to be a dead sailor but it just soaked it up, slowed down for a second then went right back to normal. Maybe they have a bottom out rebound trick like MXT's huck valve
  • + 1
 @emptybox: on WP shocks its a needle that fits into a oil flow path inside the piston post (where the shims and all that go) and it has 2 pistons. Once the needle engages into the oil path of the main post, the oil will only flow through the secondary piston, ie a bottom out or later engagement. They use this on linkless KTM to improve the bottom out function. The stock set up kinda blows though for a long time.

i.ytimg.com/vi/d8NiPl2D7Jk/maxresdefault.jpg

This photo makes it easy to understand IMO
  • + 1
 @emptybox: A bypass shock allows for the suspension fluid to bypass the compression & rebound assemblies through a port in the damper sleeve allowing for a position sensitive damper. If you want more info fox has a pretty good explanation in one of their bypass trophy truck suspensions ads.
  • + 1
 too many comments to see if my point was made, but with a 2017 Pike Charger 1...this Push upgrade + a Debonair.....I get a new fork for $325 or so instead of $600+. Decent deal if I see now reason to get ride of current fork and go through the hassle of selling it to help fund a new pike....This is all assuming it does what it says it does.
  • + 1
 once i got the Avalanche damper in my forks i never think for any "useful" updates again, been on it for ages since my 888,
now on my Boxxer chassis (Ava damper) never had any better fork..., plz forgive me but Charger damper is a crap, if you know anything about suspension you must know it...it needs serious rebuild and valving..until it gets to work on a pro level...
I dont see how this gadget will sort all its issues for 250 buck...just get Avalanche damper for 400$ and go 4 a ride...
  • + 1
 I purchased the Push spring conversion kit for my Fox 36 170. $800 later, (including 1 warranty spring). I had a fork that was WAY TOO STIFF, made TONS OF NOISE, and came no where near using all the travel. Biggest pile of garbage that"s ever been produced by a consistently dishonest industry, that I've had the displeasure of being bilked by since 1985. I had to sell the bike (a custom biult carbon Range) to my chumpy hoarder buddy, just to end the nightmare... F'#K Push.. THEY SELL JUNK !!!!!
  • + 1
 Couldn't you just get a lighter spring? Also what kind of a solutioén iís it to sell a bike. My fork could use a service, time for a new bike!
  • + 1
 @Pavel-Repak: 5 different springs.. 5 !!. and a modification(s) of the preload assembly could not make the fork use more than 140mm of its 170mm travel... also tons of metallic rattles. After the spring kit is installed it is not possible to return it to its previous air cartrige. The only solution would have been to purchase another $1000 fork.
  • + 1
 1985?
$800? for a kit that sells for $ 389 ?

No kidding..... Only junk here is this dishonest post
  • + 5
 I was good until the price
  • + 1
 too bad it's not compatible with the original Charger damper -- it would be a good upgrade for it. And there's no reason to shell out for both a Charger 2 (or 2.1) + Push HC97. At that price, just get an Avalanche open bath cart.
  • + 2
 This is stupid, if all things where equal except for the steal plate vs the shim stack it would still open the same way on big hits and then you could have "more steal for feel" using the shim stack.
  • + 5
 Aside from have LSC & HSC externally adjustable, I don't get the point of this. A shim stack is easily tuned to what ever you need. The replacement solid sliding valve seems like it would add more stiction and somewhat defeats the primary benefit of a bladder vs IFP, changing inertia of a sliding object aka the sliding seal. But what do I know, I'm not trying to make money off of unedumacated people haha Pull out a face shim and see what happens, costs nothing but an hour or two!
  • + 1
 My 19 Lyrik was a bag of balls. Warrantied in the end but managed to get my money back so now on a Fox 36, massively plusher out of the box but of course there was obviously something wrong with my Lyrik. I would however have been even more pissed off when they released the Charger 2.1 only a few months after releasing the Lyrik with Charger 2 which in itself was claimed to be the best thing since sliced bread/air to breath/the wheel. Paying ANOTHER £200 for the Ultimate is just SRAM taking the mick.

Adding this into the mix is nothing short of ridiculous. Who knows, perhaps they were developing this after the Charger 2 came out and was met with mediocre applause, but SRAM pipped them to the post with the 2.1 so now this still has to be claimed to be better than the 2.1.

It's a shame really, had multiple sets of Pikes and a Charger'd Boxxer all of which have been fantastic forks completely undermined by a bad Lyrik.
  • + 1
 Worthy Upgrade for an RC or RCT3 Fork but the gains appear pretty minimal for a RC2. 28LSC/28HSC vs. 18LSC/5HSC. The point of having only 5 clicks is so you can actually feel it.
  • + 1
 The cutaway looks like the can adjust Poppet spring rate by rotating the seat down. Quite a cool design, but does not let you have the progressive speed valving of shims to anywhere near the control level.
  • + 0
 Step 1, bring back the totem. Step 2 gimme LSR, LSC is lame on any of the suspension I’ve ridden (forks or shocks) takes away from small bump compliance. Use the LSR to adjust for bob and if your hitting anything hard enough to blow through your low speed dapning, your into the high speed dapning anyway. If you set up your sag correctly you shouldn’t blow through your mid travel.
  • + 2
 I'm pretty sure the rebound on charger damper only adjusts LSR. The dig valve supposedly is the preset HSR.
  • + 1
 @clink83: I was refering to the PUSH HC97 details. 28 clicks LSC, 28 clicks HSC.
  • + 4
 Ouch - that's harsh Push!
  • + 1
 “...for the extra picky rider...” who probably just needs to actually ride a bike! Thought the Push fork would come out at See Otter this year!? Shame...
  • + 2
 Trails get easier. Parts get more intricate. One of those just doesn't make sense.
  • + 2
 CMON MRP, now make a charger damper with 14 clicks and at $123.00 that would be priced less like an ENVE product.
  • + 0
 It doesn’t fix the poor bushing fit so as much as I appreciate what Push is doing, it is polishing a turd. They may as well release one for a Suntour, quality of chassis is comparable with RS.
  • + 3
 Why doesn't it fit charger 1?
  • + 2
 It’s just the compression assembly, not the whole damper.
  • + 2
 too bad it doesn't work with the basic Charger2 RC, then it would be a pretty significant upgrade.
  • + 2
 Seems that pushing this for Yari & Revalation would be better sales tactic
  • + 2
 I agree. Buying Yari or Revelation at discount and modifying it past factory level of performance that Lyrik or Pike provide out of the box is what makes much more sense than marginal or even doubtful gains that can be squeezed out of already quite good performing products.
  • + 1
 Only 28 clicks of high and low speed? I'd be really impressed if it had 29.
  • + 2
 or buy a fork that is great out the box like my mattoc pro 2.
  • + 2
 PUSH Fork c'mon man! When does it come out?!
  • + 2
 Yeah but, where is it made?
  • + 3
 Made in Colorado (x2)
  • + 1
 If I can put this in my C1 Lyrik it is the same price as a charger 2 and I am interested.
  • + 2
 Do you know that it's made in COLORADO!
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer the link to the acs3 is still misspelled. sorry man, just looking out!
  • + 1
 Push rear shocks......when are the push forks coming out....me need fork....fork it's what's for dinner!
  • + 1
 really no need for them to make their own chassis when they already make all the internals
  • + 2
 Mine is on the way!!!!!
  • + 1
 Sweet now your fork can blow up at the same time as their shock!
  • + 1
 blow up. Does that mean people are having issues with the shock?
  • + 1
 @filryan: One of my friend's has blown up 3 times. Another guy just once.
  • + 1
 Shimless...it would be unsensetive.
  • + 1
 What can you do for the awful stiction in my SID chassis?
  • + 1
 my fox grip do not need any tune! maybe i am not that enduro?
  • + 1
 Lyrik works perfect!!!
  • - 1
 You have to pay for performance! These guys are no Push over
  • + 6
 I really dont get the point of this product- it costs as much as a whole new tuning cartridge.
This should be half the price.

And the EXT Storia for example is 400€ less than an 11-6, lighter and suitable for more frames.
  • + 2
 @NotNamed: but if you are in North America push is the better option.
  • + 1
 @krumpdancer101: the EXT is still less expensive in NA... And has very good after sale support (forgot the name, something with motorsport).

I Like my 11-6 but it sucks that I cant convert the same shock to a 222mm lenght because Push says no..and the conversion prices are way too high for my liking (300-400€ with a spring....you get Fox X2s for that)
  • + 1
 @NotNamed: yes that’s true. I got my 11-6 used and tuned for $800 so that’s why I got it plus I got a pike with there internals so I wanted to keep it the same. Think I will try the EXT on my v10 though.
  • - 2
 Why buying a fork which need cost upgrades and don't buy a fox or another fork with better properly function
  • + 5
 Don’t people upgrade their fox fork with push?
  • - 1
 "It's too push to be true"
  • - 2
 Yea boi

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