First Look: Schwalbe's New Wicked Will Tires

Jun 10, 2021
by Mike Kazimer  

Today's XC and short-travel trail bikes are more capable than ever, which can make choosing the right tire a tricky proposition. Do you go with a fast rolling, low-profile tread pattern and deal with the decreased traction that typically results, or put on something slower rolling but with better grip and braking performance?

Schwalbe's new Wicked Will is designed to fill the gap between those two options, a tire that sits in between the Racing Ralph and the Nobby Nic, where it's positioned as a versatile option for downcountry and trail riders. The tread pattern is derived from Schwalbe's more aggressive options, but the tread height is lower in order to improve the rolling speed.
Wicked Will Details
• 29 & 27.5" versions in 2.6, 2.4, and 2.25" widths
• Super Race, Super Ground, or Super Trail casing
• Addix Speedgrip compound
• Weight: 892 grams (actual, Super Ground casing)
• Available first quarter 2022
schwalbetires.com

The Wicked Will will be available in three different casings when it hits store shelves sometime in the first quarter of 2022. For the 29 x 2.4” version, the Super Race version weighed in at 814 grams on my scale, and the Super Ground tire came in at 892 grams. The Super Trail option is claimed to weigh 920 grams. All of the tires use Schwalbe's Speedgrip rubber compound, which places more of a priority on rolling speed and durability compared to the Soft and UltraSoft rubber used in Schwalbe's enduro and DH tires.

There are 2.6, 2.4, and 2.25” options for 29” or 27.5” wheels. Evolution line tires will be $94.99, and the Performance line tires will be $65.99 USD.



Ride Impressions

I mounted up the 2.4” Wicked Wills to a set of Roval Control Carbon wheels that I'm currently running on a Transition Spur. Setup wasn't too laborious, although it did take a few extra attempts to get them seated and sealed – that thinner Super Ground casing seems more likely to collapse into itself and allow air to escape during inflation compared to the more supportive sidewalls found on Schwalbe's burlier tires.

I've been able to get in a solid handful of rides in on the Wicked Wills so far, with conditions ranging from tacky perfection to drizzly and moderately muddy. They're satisfyingly smooth rolling tires, especially if you're coming from something with a meatier tread pattern. Luckily, smooth doesn't mean sketchy, at least in this case, and I've been very happy with how predictable the new tread pattern has been.

The small squarish knobs do a good job finding traction when the ground has some give to it, sort of like the tiny cleats do on a golf shoe. Or at least the way I imagine they do... I haven't ever actually worn golf shoes before. The amount of braking traction is reasonable, especially considering the relatively small height of the center knobs. Transitioning onto the cornering knobs is a smooth, uneventful process, although it's still worth remembering that this is a relatively low profile tire. Charging into a turn at full speed and expecting the front tire to hook up like a Magic Mary probably won't have the desired outcome...

If I was purchasing a set for myself, I'd be more likely to choose the Super Trail casing rather than the Super Ground casing I've been on. I haven't had any punctures, but at 23 and 25 psi the number of times I've heard my rims dinging against the ground has been too high for my liking. Running higher pressure obviously helps, but it also reduces some of the traction that comes from the tire conforming to the ground. Terrain and riding style obviously play a role too, but for riders who tend to end up on rowdy trails with their short travel bike, choosing the thicker Trail casing and not worrying about the slight weight penalty will be the way to go.

I'm going to keep putting the miles in on these, and will report back on durability, as well as with some comparisons against other options in this category.




159 Comments

  • 89 13
 I just don't understand why Schwalbe decided to give their new generation of tires such a strong protection against punctures. On my 150 mm-trailbike i used to ride the Schwalbe Magic Mary 29x2,35 in the soft compound, which weighed in at about 950 grams I believe. To use the same profile with the same compound now, I have to choose a version of the Magic Mary with about 1200 grams of weight. Same with this tire, in my opinion 850 - 900 grams is far too heavy for a tire which sits between Nobby Nic and Racing Ralph
  • 32 4
 100% this, I'm fortunate to ride in an area where the rocks are scarce, soft and rounded.. I never had a single issue with the MM snakeskin setup.. and now that option has just disappeared. I hoarded the damn things when I saw the next gen come through..
  • 71 2
 A lot of people complained about durability of Schwalbe tyres. Now you have it..
  • 23 1
 @BigMagnus: Fully agree.
The MM Snakeskin Soft was the perfect front tyre for a light trail bike. (mine are in between 850-950g, 29x2,35")

And for "full enduro", the sturdier SuperGravity variants were available anyway.
  • 18 2
 Yes, the light Muddy Marys were awesome trailbike tyres. Now that they are gone, my money goes to Maxxis (or Hutchinson).

@pakleni: That makes no sense whatsoever. The heavy, tough Super-Gravity versions were always available for those who needed them. And the old, lighter Schwalbe tyres were no more fragile than the ubiquitous Maxxis Exo versions.
  • 11 0
 @pakleni: That's why people should of bought Super Gravity and not snakeskin. Never slashed a tyre, almost always had Exo/Snakeskin. Not a pro but I do blacks and champers in the French/swiss alps. The rock razor is hands down my favourite rear tyre. Went really well with a MM up front. But not keen at all on tyres over 1kg. Anyway, tried out the new Dissector because I wanted to play around with Maxxis again and am happy I did. Got pretty much one of each of their tyres in exo and really enjoying testing out combos.
  • 3 0
 Yeah, can't say I really see the point of this tyre, where the Nobby Nic really does this job better.
  • 1 0
 Exactly. Although I have seen a super ground MM several times now for sale on an online platform, so they seem to exist as an oem version. My old MM stock for the front should last 1.5 years, though.
  • 4 0
 I was dealing with the same issue, was on MM fron for several years, luckyly found replacement and even better on my local trails - Michelin wild enduro magi-x ....
  • 27 1
 @drmantistobogganmd:
This is exactly the problem, Schwalbe adapted their tyres to users that were misusing the tyres. This is really stupid.

It's like if people start to use the lightest XC wheels for DH and then come crying "DT swiss 1200g carbon wheels are shit, I broke them on my first Champery ride". Then DT proceeds to "update" their XC wheels to 1800g wheels.
  • 12 1
 Yes, exactly!!!! I loved the older MM up front, amazing tire- but the new options weigh so much more that i opted for the assegai. If im going over 1100gr, i might as well get the sickest grip possible.
  • 2 3
 You should try the Magic Mary in Super Trail. I think it´s an amazing combo of damping and stiffness. I don´t feel the weight on my 29"er trail/enduro-bike that much tbh. Actually I´m quite impressed with the rolling characteristic compared to the DHR II i ran before.
  • 2 0
 When they made the change I went out and bought two of the old Magic Mary's so I would have some stock going forward. I haven't need the heavier casing but love the grip at relatively low weight that that tire provided. I guess in a couple of years Ill have to figure out a suitable replacement.
  • 7 0
 @pakleni: in my experience the durability issues I've seen were problems with knobs getting worn out and ripping off far earlier than other tires. I haven't had any schwalbe casing issues
  • 3 3
 @mtmc99: give the maxxgrip assegai a try. Yes, its nearly 200gr heavier at 1150. But the added grip is worth it. I loved the MM, praising it for 3 years, and the weight played a huge factor. But if i'd say the MM grips "awesome", the assegai is "unworldly". I found myself leaning the bike into angles i didnt think possible (and still scare me).
You could go for the maxxterra compound for apples-to-apples against the old MM, and shave off almost 100gr... (Though the maxxgrip is addictive)
  • 7 20
flag thenotoriousmic (Jun 10, 2021 at 5:21) (Below Threshold)
 No offence but if you was running a magic Mary snake skin with no problems you probably didn’t need a magic Mary in the first place and would have been better if on a lighter tyre anyway.
  • 11 2
 @thenotoriousmic: Sorry, but that is just a very, very silly thing to say. Have you ever heard of soft and deep or loose terrain? Light riders? Smooth riding styles? By your logic, no one should ever run an EXO Minion because they "didn't need it in the first place".

@mtmc99 As of today, promising (light) alternatives are Michelin AM2, Continental Baron and of course the ever-dependable Maxxis DHR 2 Exo.
  • 1 7
flag Ktron (Jun 10, 2021 at 5:51) (Below Threshold)
 Snakeskin = Super Trail in the new casing naming. Apparently it is still made in this format, though obvious depends on what retailers stock.

www.schwalbe.com/en/mtb-reader/magic-mary
  • 20 2
 Absolutely! One of the strong selling points of Schwalbe tires was the equation weight x rolling resistance x grip. I've been using a Hans Dampf (790 g) / Magic Mary (870 g) combo for quite some time and now, the same tires are over a kilo -- that's way too much for trail/light enduro riding where you have to climb for some time. Hear me, Schwalbe: we want the lighter casing back!!!
  • 2 0
 @Ttimer: 100% agree!
  • 5 2
 @thenotoriousmic: Pretty snobbish and elitist of you to assume that.
  • 1 0
 @pakleni: Spot on
  • 2 0
 @drmantistobogganmd: that comment applies to the majority of comments on Pink Bike
  • 2 0
 @Ttimer: And I would take a Der Baron Projekt as my equal best all time all rounder (best combo of rolling resistance, stupid levels of grip and impressive wear) with the only 'weakness' being the side wall sealant weep after 600-650 km as a rear tyre (under a 98 kg rider).
Michelin WILD Enduro Gum-X is currently holding the title by a smidge due to a side wall that is still dry at the 800 km mark (although knobs are starting to tear/ break up).
  • 2 0
 100% Correct. Too heavy to call it a tire that sits in between NN & RR
  • 2 0
 Michelin Wild Enduro Front Magi-X... ~1000g, better and cheaper than MM.
  • 2 0
 Well, maybe it's your chance to try out the Kenda Small Block 8, which is mostly available in lighter weights, includes 26", and has been a pretty good tire in my experience (for this kind of application). The pics immediately reminded me of the SB8.
  • 3 0
 @Ttimer: Trail Mary's were like the best front tire I ever used. Too bad.
  • 2 3
 Some of us live where prior Scwalbe casings were utter crap. I still won’t ride them because after killing something like 20 tires in one season.

If you live where there’s coarse crystal granite, limestone or some other good to ride but sharp rocks then light casings are a no-go.
  • 1 1
 Write is somewhere When a guy buys and weighs it its going to be minimum 100-150gr heavier than the spec
  • 1 1
 @pakleni: Yup, ride rocky tech and it was like a butter casing. Two options would be nice but everyone riding tech I know dumped them due to puncture and sidewall. Honestly damage was already done once they went to this gen. A shame too, loved their grip.
  • 1 0
 @LuDH: People don't realize that the heavy casing tires really often perform better overall because of that stability they provide.
The old SnakeSkin tires shredded knobs quite quickly for me, but at least Schwalbe was good at proving warranty replacements.
Also, my wife is a light duty rider and the Snakeskins work very well for her. Fast, light, no reliability issues.
  • 5 1
 I'll go out on a limb here and say you might be over-tired on your bike. Riding the slowest compound on the biggest tire with the lowest weight puts you outside of the use-case for a MM. You might find a heavier, less grippy tire proves enough traction while rolling much faster.
  • 3 0
 @cjeder: Yah, it's a limb your on all right. I don't run DH casing tires. The SnakeSkin was indeed too fragile for me by a long shot but I'm finding 1000 gram tires with inserts from a variety of manufacturers work just perfectly. That's my balance.
Wish I could run the fragile 700-800 gram tires cause they really are a lot faster.
  • 1 0
 @foxinsocks: How wide are your rims? With 30mm inner width rims, I find the Assegai's profile to be too round. They do have a lot of grip at moderate lean, but I prefer my grip to be on the edge of the tires. 30mm is also on the lower limit of what Maxxis' Wide Trail tires were designed for, which makes no sense since 30mm is sort of the standard nowadays, and which is why they have a rounder profile than ideal at that width. I have even thought of getting a wider rim to try them on, but it's cheaper to just get other tires.
  • 3 0
 Totally on board with these comment as well as I have the Snakeskin/Soft MM front/HD back combo and love them for trail riding. However, I’m not going from 930 to 1230 grams of rotational weight when I have to replace them.

Goodbye Schwalbe, hello Maxxis!
  • 2 0
 I was exactly the same, been running MM front & rear since they came on the Market, now gone to Maxxix DHR as they are lighter than the new MM, such a shame
  • 2 0
 Its super annoying actually. You cant get a super ground soft magic mary. Only the tougher heavier super trail and super gravity. I have never pinch flat a front tire i my life I dont need a heavy casing in front. Also I have been waiting on Shwalbe for months they have been sold out everywhere.
  • 1 0
 @FloImSchnee: the only front tire I will run I just trust it.

Now I have to take on almost a pound of rotational weight for no reason.
  • 1 0
 @ArturoBandini: pretty sure it was a bike park version you saw but we can hope.
  • 2 7
flag thenotoriousmic (Jun 10, 2021 at 23:02) (Below Threshold)
 @Ttimer: I agree completely exo minions are completely useless. It needs at least a double down. Clearly not very silly as schwalbe agrees hence why they’ve dropped snake skin magic Mary’s. No half measures, if you need a minion / Mary then you need to appropriate carcass that can handle the speed those tyres are capable off. You just put holes in a exo / snake skin or tear it of the rim. Not to mention how awful the ride quality is on light weight tyres especially considering how hard you have to run them to stop pinch flats and burps.
  • 2 0
 here in BC, Exo casing or equivalent are basically useless. DD is a minimum. I suspect these heavier tires will actually hold up to the demands of this type of mtb.
  • 1 6
flag thenotoriousmic (Jun 11, 2021 at 0:28) (Below Threshold)
 @DGWW: exactly. A snake skin magic Mary is useless and that’s why they don’t exist anymore. You need a carcass that will support the demands and speeds that a downhill tyre is capable off. Anyone complaining that the new tyres are too heavy shouldn’t have been on that tyre in the first place.
  • 4 0
 @wyorider: you know super gravity and downhill casings were already available for the old ones right? This is exactly the reason why schwalbe changed this now to the worse, users that wanted the lightest choice but expected protection of a dh tire.
  • 2 0
 @radbikr: Absolutely agree. US east coast riders know all about rocks. Everyone I know rocks serious tires on their bikes because weak casings just get shredded in this part of the world.
  • 5 0
 @DGWW: No, they are not useless, there are many terrains for which they are the ideal option. That perspective might be valid for where you ride, but there are other conditions elsewhere in the world or in the country where a tire with around a thousand grams is the best option, even for the rear. And I mean real enduro use, not "all mountain".
  • 1 3
 @DavidGuerra: Last time I attempted to run an exo I somehow managed to burp my front tyre without noticing lost a load of air and rolled the tyre (dhf) going into a steep chute and had to deal with a double wrist injury for the rest of the summer. They’re just not worth it, other than having more weight to lug around they’re better in every single way. Get used to the weight and you’ll never go back to flimsy light weight tyres again.
  • 2 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Of course I am not trying to invalidate your preference for more reinforced tires, I'm just saying that the lighter ones do have their place. I'm doing the national enduro cup, and have been doing enduro competions pretty much ever since they began, and an EXO tire is indeed quite enough for most courses here. Others might have a different opinion, but this is just based on my experience and on what I see most people riding. On my home trails on the other hand, I use more reinforced tires because the rocks are aggressive (sharper/more jagged). Up north from what I encountered, rocks are rounder and don't slice the tires. Others might have a different experience, this is just from what I encountered so far. On the race I entered last weekend, with an EXO DHF at the rear and a Pepi's insert, the rear took some strong hits on high speed sections and it was fine. That's no big deal though, tires are more likely to get damaged on the landing of drops and jumps, where they are subjected to higher forces
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: It's true that from my time riding fully rigid mtb's, I know how to go easy on tires, no matter the speed or the terrain. This ability is just useless in landings due to the increased G force.
  • 1 2
 @DavidGuerra: My days of backing off for my tyres sake is over. I don’t see the point in running an exo and an insert. More weight than a dh tyre but without the protection.
  • 4 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Good for you then. There certainly is a point in running an exo with an insert, and a very valid point. Not sure if I have to explain it to you? You get a superior protection against rock slices with a DH tire, but that's not the only type of damage a tire can suffer, as you surely know. So the best option just depends on the terrain, on what pressure you want to use, etc. And the weight of an insert also varies, as well as its efficacy. The weight of my rear tire/insert combo with an EXO is comparable to a DD tire with no insert. But on my local trails it's riskier to use EXO-level tires, they end up all patched up, so I have other options for that. Although my trails can even kill or damage DH tires with an insert.
  • 4 0
 @thenotoriousmic: I've seen plenty of UK trails in videos that really don't seem aggressive at all, so even though the ones you ride might be aggressive, I don't understand your difficulty in understanding the use cases for a ligher enduro tire.
  • 1 0
 @DavidGuerra: "here in BC, Exo casing or equivalent are basically useless." this is specific to this location. I am making no claims about how useful they are elsewhere.
  • 1 0
 @DGWW: Yes, I thought I was replying to thenotoriousmic's response to your comment, saying that a SS MM is useless, but when I realized that I replied to you, I was unable to edit or delete the comment. I have no objection to what you said.
  • 1 0
 @DavidGuerra: and you wouldn’t use a magic Mary or a minion on those types of trails. I’m not saying you should never use a lightweight tyre I’m saying you should never use a lightweight downhill tyre. It’s not just weight, you have a better ride quality with heavier tyres, they’re better damped, don’t deflect as easily, you can run better pressures, less likely to burp, more support obviously tougher honestly everything is improved with a heavier tyre other than increased rolling resistance and obviously it takes more effort to get to the top of the hill.
  • 4 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Nope, lightweight downhill tires do have their usage. I can't believe how difficult this is to get across? Some downhill trails are just not aggressive for the tires, yet they need all the grip you can get. And regarding tire stability, that depends. The extra stability might not be worth the extra weight. If you run an insert that will also give you more stability. The greater problem of a lightweight grippy tire for me (if you're not using it in very aggressive terrain) is that it's more likely to get warped than a less grippy tire with the same construction.
  • 5 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Also, what's your business telling people what they should ride? Just like you learned that a more reinforced tire is better for what you ride, others might learn that a lighter one is better. What makes you think you know other people's business better than them?
  • 1 4
 @DavidGuerra: I don’t think your understanding. Tread, compound and casing all have to play nicely. If one is wrong then the whole tyre is ruined. It not just about not putting a hole in your tyre there has to be a carcass that can support the compound and tread pattern.
  • 2 3
 @DavidGuerra: You can ride whatever you want I don’t care I’m just trying to help you understand why snakeskin magic Mary’s don’t exist and the reasons why running heavier tyres is better for these types of tyres.
  • 4 0
 @DGWW: Really? A few years ago, EXO Minions were basically the default tire for most people I met on the shore. And judging by the rigs I see on NSMB today, there are still tons of people running EXO tyres in BC.
  • 1 0
 @Ttimer: I suppose if you are riding pretty tamely, they could work, have destroyed a few there myself which lead to the move to tougher casings. Also maybe lighter riders can get away with them ?
  • 4 1
 @Ttimer: I know right? ...it wasn't that long ago Richie Rude was winning Enduro races on 2.3 Aggressors. Some people think needing DH tires makes them a bada$$ but unless you're on the pointy end chances are you're actually a hack.
  • 1 0
 @davec113: no way he was on exo casing aggressors. IIRC they were double down maybe even with insets.
  • 4 0
 @thenotoriousmic: sounds like your problem with the MM snakeskin would have been solved by choosing the correct tyre for your type of riding ?
If you got the the park version you would have had all the support you want for your gravel road skids
  • 1 0
 @zede: that’s like 70a or something ridiculous like that. Basically it’s made from plastic. Orange or purple super gravity’s only.
  • 3 0
 @Ttimer: just buzz word stuff now most reviews of bikes and press complain about exo snakeskin being specced on super enduros and E-bikes. I have always ran exo/ss. I will continue to do so until it becomes a problem for me. I ride tubeless with inserts. Spend up to a month a year in the alps. Favorite trails are Swiss national and Plenny Black. Don't need to flex my masculinity by having DD tyres. Nor do I care what people think about me, my ride or my riding. I have fun and if it works for me and whatever works for you. Then party on Garth.
  • 1 2
 @drmantistobogganmd: well it clearly has become a problem for you or else you wouldn’t be using inserts. The insert puts your wheel weight well above most downhill tyres so why not just use the appropriate tyre in the first place instead of botching it.
  • 2 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Well go figure, I even used EXO tires at the front of my 26" DH bike, on seriously rocky trails, and had a great time. No punctures, no lack of support, no backing down. And I do think you'll have the most fun with a ligther tire. If you can get away with it.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: I won't comment about the SS MM though. Never tried it, and felt only slightly tempted to buy it, because in that I agree with you, it probably doesn't have enough support. And it's on a lighter category than EXO. But it might be fine for a more all-mountain use.
  • 45 0
 schwalbe is one big puzzle.
Tire produced purposely for rear wheel? There is no hard compound with strong protection.
Do you want sticky light front tire? Shure the softest ones comes only in the toughest casing.

they have too many options to choose but still don't fulfill typical expectations. Why other companies cant make the same as WTB? Just four types to choose per size, easy to read, production is cheaper bc you order bigger number of the same tires instead of distract for 8 small different batches.
win win.

As i remember conti and michelin have simply choosing too. You want hard or soft and that's it. They have just weird names for their technologies.
  • 11 0
 Conti's naming conventions are abominable.
  • 10 0
 Schwalbe's product portfolio is definitely the worst for interpretting what the hell your getting. Maxxis isn't much better, but I've had better luck with Maxxis tires so I've invested more time in my Maxxis decoder ring.

WTB is great for simplicity. Light/Tough; Fast/High Grip. Just sucks their tires are so heavy, and leak sealant and air like crazy. I'm using Byways on my road/gravel bike and love them... except I'm constantly pumping them up, they're practically pissing sealant and they're also flat prone... I think at least in part because the sealant is dryng out prematurely and can't handle normal Chicago road debris.
  • 2 3
 this tire even looks like a straight rip-off of the trail boss. wtb tires for life.
  • 3 1
 @Glenngineer: for how long I have run wtb tires, I have never dealt with excessive weeping. wonder if it is sealant related?
  • 1 0
 @Glenngineer: I have had all the same issues as you with wtb tires. My Byways were my favorite wtb tires and they delaminated after like 350 miles.

My Trail boss light / fast was 1200g. Wtf?
  • 15 1
 @Maxxis does the same thing....options galore, but none of them satisfy what almost every rider I know wants. When will they realize that MANY aggressive riders want to run a hard compound with strong protection in the rear, and a softer tire that can be slower rolling in the front.

All of their options for dual compound are EXO or EXO+*, and all their DD/DH casings are 3C MAXXGrip which last all of 5 rides when run as a rear tire. MaxxTerra is slightly better but not by much.

I would KILL for a Dissector in DH or DD in the dual compound.

*the exception being the aggressor coming in Dual + DD, which I am forced to run despite it being a thoroughly meh tire for loose over hard.
  • 3 0
 They killed off the light trail in 2.6. Last generation you could get the Hans dampf and Nobby Nic in 2.6 snakeskin at under 1000 grams for 29”, perfect for hardtails in non rocky areas. Now you are stuck with 1200 gram versions. This would be a great rear tire in 2.6, but combining it with a 1200 gram front Nobby Nic makes no sense. Well at least the Bontrager XR4 and Maxxis Rekon are available.
  • 7 0
 @bigbrett: THIS!

I want an XC semi slick with TOUGH casing and hard rubber in the BACK;
and a DH tire with soft rubber but LIGHT casing in the FRONT.
  • 1 0
 @Ososmash: I really loved the vigilante/Trail boss combo. But they’re just too damn heavy. If they could make a trail boss around 900g I’d buy the hell out of it
  • 1 0
 Can's disagree with that. If they'd make the HD2 Super Trail with ramped center knobs in a Speed/ Grip Addix that tire would be a fantastic hard pack rear for instance.
  • 2 0
 @dontcoast: what about e13? I don’t know all of their options, but I think they have you covered.
  • 1 0
 @BamaBiscuits: That’s my favorite combo! Unfortunately I still ride 26” and cannot find them anywhere.
  • 2 0
 @DHhack: the problem is i haven't seen them in poland anywhere to buy :/
  • 2 0
 Not just Schwalbe, tire manufacturers all around don't understand this. I can think of only a few tires that are an exception. Like the Assegai super soft in Exo+ (ligther carcass, softer rubber) or the WTB Fast/Though versions (stronger carcass, harder/faster rubber). Seriously, these are the only two exceptions I can think of, of a tire that either has softer rubber with lighter carcass or a harder rubber with a stronger carcass.
  • 3 0
 Heck, even 4 feels like a lot. XC weight wiener casing. Average bro casing. DH monster casing. Done. The more aggro the softer it could get or just keep each with a softer & harder casing.
  • 2 0
 @Kptzbik: ahh yeah that’s no good. We can buy direct from them here in the US.
  • 2 0
 @DavidGuerra: The new Specialized Butcher can be had in a lightish casing and very soft T9 rubber.

And Vittoria makes fast rolling but tough tires. None are terribly grippy, so you need to mix brands for a good front/rear combination.
  • 1 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: than you have created 6 versions mixing three casings and two hardness, saying that 4 i a lot Wink
  • 19 1
 1st quarter 2022, why bother announcing it? If you can't buy newly launched products within a short time after launch, it doesn't make sense, consumers will have forgotten.
  • 8 0
 because they come on scotts nee bike and ppl were asking?
  • 13 1
 I am an xc guy and it seems schwalbe is going with extra heavy casing lately - so I am hoarding a dozen of the old Rocket Ron's in Liteskin 2.25x29. At 500 grams a tire - they feel like magic compared to the heavy slow tires of late.
  • 1 0
 I stocked up and hoarded the older lighter ones also.
  • 6 0
 You might be interested in wolfpack tyres then, it's the new-ish company of the guy who developed the BlackChili compound for Continental and the Addix compound for Schwalbe, and his tyres are both good value and a lot closer to the Schwalbes of old. 590g for a tubeless tyre much like the Rocket Ron is pretty decent.

wolfpack-tires.com/produkt/speed
  • 14 0
 Looks like a Rock Razor with enlarged center knobs.
  • 4 0
 Exactly what I was thinking. Looks like they took everything that makes the Rock Razor a good tire and made it a little worse. Made the center knobs bigger and slower rolling, and gave the side knobs less bite. Rock razor probably isn't everyone's cup of tea, but I'd have a hard time choosing this over a rock razor. I guess the WW is just more of an XC tire while the RR is a gravity tire. However I am keen to try this, especially since it comes in a 2.6 while the Rock Razor does not.
  • 1 0
 @Jakesmith32: do you mean 29x2.6 cause the Rock Razor does come in a 27.5x2.6.
  • 1 0
 @Jakesmith32: I too love the RR. But it weighs 1000+ grams in the Super Trail and is a rear specific tire for obvious reasons.
This Wicked Will fits the bill for a front trail tire.
  • 1 0
 @MxMizrahi: Yep, when I was running a 29x2.35 RR on my FS trail bike I was wishing it was wider after using a 27.5x2.6 Specialized Slaughter on my hardtail. I think 29x2.6 would be a great size for semi-slicks in my opinion.
  • 12 4
 Looks kinda Bontragerish. But that's not a bad thing...

Gotta love Schwalabe's tire naming "system", can't wait for the Zippidy Zack gravel tire! Smile
  • 12 0
 Can we get an Undulating Ursula?
  • 5 0
 I can't wait for a Zippidy Zack either! That will go on alllll the wheels
  • 9 2
 Schwalbe develops a heavy "XC" tire and Pinkbike commenters compare it to Magic Mary, Assegai, and other trail and enduro tires. Makes perfect sense.
  • 8 0
 Maybe because a heavy xc tire makes no sense.

Wanna take a crazy guess what most people use for "heavy xc riding"? I'll give you a hint, its trail and enduro tires.
  • 3 1
 @RonSauce: Correct. Heavy XC makes no sense.
  • 10 7
 Ride them long enough to tear off a side knob, and note mileage and condition of rest of tire. The last 10+ Nobby Nics & Magic Marys I've retired have gone this way while the center tread was still at 75% or better. There is only one conclusion: Schwalbe's insistence on rotating the axis of their side knobs 20-30 degrees from the tire's line of travel guarantees that knobs will snag & tear off upon contact with rocks long before they show signs of undercutting. In over 30yrs of trying, I have never once torn off a near-new condition knob off a Specialized or Maxxis tire with a parallel row of side knobs: Schwalbe's tread patterns work, they just don't last anywhere near as long as the competition.
  • 3 1
 ^This. Addix fixed the wear rate of the rubber, but not the knob configuration. Knobs still shear clean off the casing when they hook up with jagged rock. This behavior is unique to Schwalbe.
  • 3 1
 I have had two high rolller II's on the back of my bike and both starting shedding their side knows within a couple of rides..
  • 11 0
 Just out of curiosity, why do you keep using those tires if over ten of them have had a problem? Do they offer some other performance benefit that's compelling enough to keep you buying and riding them, or do you just have a cheap line on Schwalbe tires?
  • 1 0
 @qualms23: Exact same experience here. Seems like a major issue.
  • 3 0
 100% this. My Ibis Ripley came with Hans Dampfs front and rear. I was at about 200 miles when the rear tire started having side knobs sheared off entirely, and that's mostly XC mileage in the southeastern US. Still had plenty of tread life left, but was side knobs were being torn off whole. MSRP on those tires is like $80+. At something like $0.30-0.50 per mile, I'm left wondering why any OEM would spec them, and why anyone would buy them in the aftermarket?
  • 3 0
 Can’t up vote this comment enough! Exactly my experience with Schwalbe v. Maxxis.

The Addigrip rubber (did I spell that right?) is amazing when new, love the Nobby Nic up front, but at least in the dry and rocky American Southwest, they wear sooo fast.!

And definitely have to second the “other worldly” comment on Assegai up front. Truly, the lean angles you can get away with are Sci-Fi-ey. Insane.

As for rear tires, I find the Dissector to be the new perfection, and either the DHF (or of course the venerable DHR II) as rear tire options 1b and 1c. Just my experience / $0.02...
  • 3 3
 @Insectoid: Sounds like a Specialized or Maxxis marketing dude.
  • 2 0
 @Insectoid: I've picked up my Schwalbes in the $40-60 range, just smart shopping and patience. I live in really rocky area w/ abrasive soil that eats tires fast, and I do 6000mi+ annually, so I'll burn through 4-5 sets of tires a year. I've owned that many Nics & Marys because A) they offer the best balance of grip, braking, and rolling speed I've found in their respective classes, and B) because I've been stubbornly torture testing them in hopes that I might get a set that don't shed knobs like shark's teeth. This hope has been utterly for naught: it's back to Minions & Ground Controls because I can bank on them wearing evenly and keeping all their side knobs, no matter how undercut they get.
  • 3 0
 @qualms23: The High Roller2 is hot on the heels of the Ardent as the second worst piece of over-rated trash ever produced by Maxxis. The undersized side-knobs lose their bite quickly, especially if you're running something softer than Dual compound on rocky soil. The Dissector manages to suck less than the HRII on center tread wear, but still suffers similarly from under-dimensioned side knobs. If you want a rear gravity tire that wears well, get a DHR II in 2.4 or bigger in Dual Compound. Maxxis increased all knob dimensions on Minions when they introduced the Wide Trail line, which has significantly increased the length of time it takes to undercut a side knob to the point it will no longer properly support cornering loads.
  • 2 0
 @Veloscente: i also run a minion dhr exo+ and its has literally lastest forever, the side walls are actually about to split open but the tread on top is still looking good.. the first hr2 came with the bike and the second was a double down reduced down to 20$. 20$ completely wasted
  • 7 0
 Too heavy for an XC tyre, so many other better options out there
  • 3 0
 Schwalbe has lost my with their new tyre product line.

MM and NN was a good option but now - not so great as the options are lacking. Heavy on the Magic Mary's side and the Nobby Nic soft has limited case size options. The New NN is a great tread but most size options are in Speed Grip which is like riding on ice in the wet.

I have recently been testing an Vittoria Agarro 29 x 2.6 trail on the back with my Magic Mary 29 x 2.6 Soft front (which still wanders in soft sandy conditions and over roots) and I am blown away by the Vittoria. Great tyre and transforms the bike with decent grip and great rolling / pedal friendly - really friendly. When I chew through the Magic Mary I will be looking at replacing it with a Mazza 29 x 2.6 trail up front - see how that shapes up.
  • 1 0
 I've been on the Agarro all season. Front and rear in 2.6/2.35. Local terrain is fairly mild, and it's been a great combo. I ran a Dissector rear for one week in Pisgah, and it looked ate up. Both Agarro look like new. The right blend of speed and traction for where I ride. Ppl in this thread would complain about em, cuz not super light, but they work, and work well. And I'll likely still be riding them next season, based on current wear.
  • 4 1
 Former golf industry tech and competitor here. Pretty solid description in the article of how golf shoes work...well done @mikekazimer. The only exception would be if you were wearing metal studs like Bryson recently (fuelling the bro-down with Brooks Koepka in the media; metal spikes are banned at most courses in North America and Europe, but PGA Tour pros may use them - though most don't, as they end up putting spike marks in other players' putting lines). I guess the MTB equivalent would be showing up on fresh singletrack in the early summer just bristling with confidence and crushing trails with some fresh Schwalbe Ice Spikers mounted, lesser mortals be damned!
  • 2 0
 Looks like a great rear paired to a MM. For those who don't want to go full semi-slick, but still want something that can be pedalled all day. Semi slicks are fun on the right trails, but if you find yourself on a proper steep and loose trail control of the rear is seriously compromised.
  • 2 0
 Been running Schwalbe Magic Mary and Rock Razor combo for about 4 years now, love the duo but have spent a ton of money replacing the Razor due to tread knobs falling off!!! I've since switched over to the Kenda Helldriver and Hellkat combo, lets see how long that last...
  • 6 1
 At least Schwalbe are realistic about the availability date.
  • 1 0
 Yeah but I'll never remember this next year.
  • 1 0
 I’d consider this as a summer rear tyre (as opposed to a meaty Big Betty for the other 3 seasons) as it looks fast rolling. So question… in the Super Trail guise is this really going to offer the same protection as a Super Trail BB also in 2.4?
  • 1 0
 this will take the place of the old rock razor snakeskin on the back of my trail hardtail when it is available. 900g fast rolling is perfect for that application. probably with a nobby nic up front. Big bike will be Mary/Betty
  • 5 0
 Opportunity missed. Should've called it the "Wet Willy"
  • 1 0
 The Magic Mary is a great tire - soft compound and good amount of tread around the sides for cornering. If Wicked Will is similar compound, then I'd go for it. I'm not as concerned with tread pattern for riding in Greater Van area.
  • 1 0
 I got Hans Dampf Super Gravity Soft Addix as a stock tires on my Polygon Siskiu T8. Such a weird tire. Weighs over 1200g, not rolling fast enough to be rear, has extremely sturdy casing, tread pattern lacks cornering grip as a front. This is not only the case for HD, but most of the new Schwalbe tires seem to have very unbalanced characteristics.
  • 9 5
 I stopped reading at 892 grams. Why not run a Dissector or DHF?
  • 4 0
 This is awesome for anyone named William.
  • 2 0
 Anyone named Dan would be equally rewarded with Schwalbe.
  • 3 0
 I'll keep my 650g Rocket Rons
  • 1 0
 @AAAAAHHH: or Fred, they would be furious after getting the millionth puncture.
  • 4 0
 Xc bikes are becoming enduro bikes
  • 7 4
 Ummm, that's a Rock Razor isn't it?
  • 2 0
 Definitely looks pretty similar with same micro knobby center but less aggressive side tread.
  • 1 1
 Anyone else ever ride the old Wicked Will?

www.pinkbike.com/news/schwalbe-wicked-will-Review-2010.html

They were dangerous tyres for a big bike, would step out without warning and leave you looking up a the sky!!!
  • 1 0
 I bought 70 of those over an 18 year period and all of them failed spectacularly. I also had them step off cliffs even when I was off the bike. The knobs would also randomly launch into space. A friend had one take his eye out. Another friend died after a knob fired up into his brain through his nose. I loved the low weight though. The casings would also fail early most of the time, but we have steel knives pointing out of most of our trails.
  • 3 0
 Looks similar to the WTB Trail boss.
  • 2 0
 I see it's still Bring Your Child To Work Day at Schwalbe. At least they stay busy with that paint pen.
  • 2 0
 Looks like a Magic Mary born around Chernobyl
  • 2 0
 Just conceived. Will have too wait 9 months until it is actually born.
  • 1 0
 Still trying to beat the Hutchinson Toro -- twice the $ you gonna pay for nothing much in performance gain.
  • 1 2
 Lots of comments here about this tire's weight. Is that the most important thing? Isn't tread pattern, compound, casing, puncture resistance, durability, and longevity equally or more important than just weight?
  • 1 0
 Perfect candidate to cut out the center knobs, make a Edge 22 with good volume and soft rubber.
  • 5 3
 No 26r love
  • 2 0
 I was thinking it would be a good 4x tyre but sadly not
  • 3 2
 Please compare against Bontrager XR3.
  • 5 1
 Xr3 is honestly a super great tire. Good as a rear for something fast rolling that corners well. Plus they are cheap.
  • 1 0
 Here I'll do it for you. The bonti tire is better.
  • 1 0
 @TheBearDen: I ride the XR3 now, and love it. Just always curious how it stacks up with the competition without having to spend the time and money testing out alternatives myself.
  • 1 0
 Should sell great around me in Boston
  • 1 0
 These look great for more jump oriented lines. I’m down!
  • 2 1
 So essentially a newer, heavier version of the Rocket Ron.
  • 1 0
 Oversized Rock Razor
  • 1 2
 Looks like a Specialized.
  • 3 0
 Looks like a Slant Six.
  • 1 3
 Just take your MM and cut down the knobs and there is the WW
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2021. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.022498
Mobile Version of Website