First Look: The Aper KOMPace Has "Rising Pivot Technology"

Nov 22, 2023
by Seb Stott  
photo

High-pivot bikes continue to prove popular, but most only provide a truly rearward axle path (their main selling point) during the first part of the travel. As the suspension gets deeper into its stroke, the axle starts to move vertically, and then often forwards slightly towards bottom-out. In theory, this reduces the ability to absorb square edge hits when already deep in the travel.

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Aper is a startup bike brand from Greece, founded by two mechanical engineers, Nikos Lamprou and Giorgos Kostopoulos. Aper is Latin for wild boar, which roam the Erymanthus mountains in Greece near where the company is based. Their first bike, the KOMPace, is a 160 mm travel enduro bike with something they call "rising pivot technology".



photo


Suspension

The axle moves up and backwards throughout the whole travel range, thanks to a virtual pivot point that moves upwards and back as the suspension compresses. One of the most extreme high-pivot enduro bikes we've seen recently is the Forbidden Dreadnought, which has an axle path that moves backwards by 30 mm over its travel range. The Aper's suspension system has 45 mm of rearward movement over its 160mm of vertical suspension travel.

It achieves this with a main pivot that slides on a linear rail (somewhat like Yeti's Switch Infinity system), which moves up and back at a roughly 45-degree angle as the suspension compresses. A link connects the rear triangle to the mainframe and helps define the axle path, which curves upwards very slightly as it moves back and up through the travel. The 60 mm stroke shock is mounted such that it slides parallel to the rail, minimising rotation at the shock eyelets. An idler pulley moves with the swingarm, minimising pedal kickback and keeping anti-squat levels in check.

photo
The rear axle path (orange) is far more rearward than most high pivots, maintaining a path that approximates the fork's trajectory (blue). On this scale, most bikes would have a rear axle path that looks almost vertical, then slightly forward towards full travel.
photo
According to Aper, the leverage curve is regressive (there's more leverage over the shock at the end of the travel than at the start). This will likely require an air shock with plenty of volume spacers to work well.

Aper doesn't have anti-quat or anti-rise numbers to share just yet (I'll update this article when they do) but it's safe to say that the anti-rise (the effect of braking forces to compress the suspension) will be on the high side.



photo

Geometry

Aper is offering three sizes, each of which has two BB height/frame angle options thanks to a flip chip which is located on the lower shock mount. Aper says the flip chip can be used to run the bike with a 27.5" or a 29" rear wheel. However, the geometry chart shows a 9 mm difference in BB drop between the settings, and a 27.5" wheel is 19 mm smaller in radius than 29", so the geometry won't be fully compensated. So, it's sort of a halfway house between a geometry adjuster and a wheel-size compensator.

According to my calculations, with 29" wheels in the low mode, the BB height will be around 348 mm; with a 27.5" rear wheel in the high mode, it will be around 338 mm. Both fall within the normal range.



photo

photo
The aforementioned flip chip.
photo

Construction

The frame is CNC-machined in-house out of 7075 T6 aluminium (somewhat like Pole's bikes). It features a bottle mount with a claimed one-litre capacity, SRAM UDH hanger and an anodized finish with a choice of colours. The rail system benefits from a maintenance grease port. The claimed weight is 4.080 g (S1, w/o shock). Maximum seatpost insertion depth is as follows: S1: 345 / S2: 356 / S3: 367 (mm) *values valid for most shocks. [These values are higher than those published in the press release and the original version of this article].

The Aper KOMPace is available to preorder now at aper-bikes.com. The price is €3,469 for the frameset including headset, seat clamp, chain device, thru-axle and idler, for orders placed before December 31st.

photo




Author Info:
seb-stott avatar

Member since Dec 29, 2014
287 articles

178 Comments
  • 223 6
 And now a quick word from the PB comments section to find out what we did wrong, take it away . . . . .
  • 64 8
 Where does the battery go? You mean i actually have to put effort in?
  • 116 1
 spaces between ellipses was your first mistake...
  • 12 3
 Please could you make every single person on PB happy? Wink All jests aside...looks HOT! Yummy...
  • 5 6
 I’m just seeing the square tubing and thinking about bruising my knees all over that frame
  • 60 3
 @browner: Ahem, technically an ellipsis is three periods, not five. And ellipses is the plural. So you're both wrong.
  • 18 0
 The shock's gonna get dirty. Re-design the whole thing.
  • 1 0
 The name easy
  • 18 0
 We're available on a consultancy basis too; so if you want us to tell us what you did wrong at the initial brainstorming or drawings stage we can do that as well.
  • 7 0
 @browner: I prefer the "horizontal ellipsis" unicode character over three periods… and in some fonts, it includes non-breaking spaces.
  • 9 1
 No headset routing? Big fail.
  • 4 0
 My craftworks enr has more rearward travel and most import its mostly in the first 2/3 of travel so has more rearward movement on square edge hits and less for bottom-outs. Idler moves on the linkage as its I-track, looks like they trying to get round i-track patient with it on swingarm instead, not sure if this will have same effect on pedal support with out chain growth or kickback. linkagedesign.blogspot.com/search?q=craftworks
  • 2 10
flag nickfranko (Nov 22, 2023 at 7:19) (Below Threshold)
 @TimMog: An ellipsis is a series of dots, not explicitly three dots....
  • 3 1
 the only thing surprising is the reach options are all LONG....really forcing riders hands (I'll roll with it, pun intended) to use long frames. It has seemed to long trend was slowing down a bit, but I guess not...
  • 5 0
 @nickfranko: an ellipsis refers to a series of the period symbol in punctuation of written words. Not "dots" in general.

Over to the next person....
  • 12 0
 @RadBartTaylor: These reach numbers are silly. I'm 6' and 475-485 is my sweet spot. Of course there is personal preference involved, but it seems like anyone under 5'10" is going to struggle to find an appropriate size.
  • 3 1
 @Chondog94: Exactly, I'm 6-4 and personally like 480-490.....but with average riders 5-10ish not sure what their thought process was?
  • 9 0
 Pinkbike comments: Another four Bar linkage bike! They’re all the same. Booooooooooo! We want innovation!

Also Pinkbike comments: Not that innovation! Boooooooo! This bike I’ve never even ridden is going to suck! And it’s ugly! Boooooooooo!
  • 13 1
 @nickfranko: Sorry dude. I’m an editor. It is explicitly three dots. Or periods. Whatever. (Go ahead type three periods in Word. It groups them for you). Yeah, you can use more, and we know what you mean, but we’re judging you.
  • 2 1
 @RadBartTaylor: Look at the SA, the ETT will be the comparable to every other large out there.
  • 4 0
 You fucked up regarding seat post insertion would be my guess
  • 6 0
 I just can’t wrap my mind around a Greek brand picking a Latin name
  • 6 2
 Imaging slipping off the seat and cutting ya testies in that top linkage
  • 2 1
 Better question is what did they do right?
  • 2 0
 Please over complicate this elasto-kinematic axle path control mech, perhaps by adding some more linkage points or pulley wheels? Maybe route some cables or hydraulic lines through them and add a flip chip or shape shifter linkage and control lever(s). That would be awesome. Still won't actually buy or ride one; but it'd be good for a laugh or two!
  • 3 1
 @thustlewhumber: ETT isn't a metric I personally look at....
  • 3 0
 @AndrewHornor: — The 'Em' Dash is believed to be superior to ellipses — especially when there is an issue with ellipsis overuse! ............. — I'll show myself out! ...
  • 1 0
 @Hayek: In Australia, We call a wild boar a bushpig!
  • 5 0
 @iwhizz: That's an odd name, I'd have called them chazzwazzers
  • 2 0
 regressive leverage ratio? noice.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: hey Mr. they R, don't hate in till you try ! be the ight take a long time to get one of this example's you can say what you like >>.
  • 2 0
 @iwhizz: I would buy a bike called the Bush Pig
  • 1 0
 @Chondog94: I am 5'11" and I prefer 520-540mm of reach so I don't see a problem here
  • 44 2
 I'm just a buddy of the folks over at Aper Bikes, so I'm throwing out my own two cents here. The whole idea initially took a cue from the 303 DH bike, but don't get it twisted – this is a whole different animal, a Horst link won't dish out the same ride vibes. Sure, in theory, you can whip up a rearward axle path with other designs, but in the real world, that comes with a truckload of other headaches, as we all know.

Shouting out the 303 roots just goes to show how far back in the day the Aper crew has been kicking it in the MTB scene!

After clocking serious hours on the early prototype (we're talking over a year), and hearing tales from riders way better than me (some of them rocking it at the tippy-top elite level), I can tell you only good things. What really blew my mind wasn't just the downhill performance (which you'd expect from a rig with these characteristics), but the almost complete lack of pedal bob.

Even on the beat-up proto – left filthy on purpose after a ton of abuse – the rail system held up like a champ. No wear and tear to stress about. (FYI, the current rail system is a different one with beefed-up specs.)

The proto I had in my hands weighed in at about 17.5 kg, packing 170mm 36ers, FOX X2, GX Eagle, Saints, EX511's, DD tires – and no carbon bits except for the handlebars. AFAIK the claimed frame weight is a tad lower than 4kgs, including chain device, rear axle, headset, and seat post clamp.

Oh, and on a personal note, everything down there is A-OK, even after a few wipeouts! "
  • 2 0
 What length dropper are you running?
  • 4 0
 @youwerecool: Oneup V1 165mm
  • 11 0
 I suggest a winter riding in the uks Peak District which is largely made of grinding paste
  • 1 0
 What length cajones are you running?

Nah, I reckon even big ballers will be A-OK, stop fretting folks Smile
  • 5 0
 @chrismac70: Nothing survives a whole UK winter. Most military vehicles wouldn't even survive an afternoon round the Peaks
  • 40 4
 The balls destroyer
  • 5 0
 Destoroyah!!!!!!
  • 7 0
 Liteville do castration even better
  • 4 0
 A nut cracker
  • 4 0
 @mcharza: just in time for Christmas. Dickens suspension.
  • 23 1
 Am I the only one who has a problem with a regressive leverage curve in this application?
  • 4 0
 I thought the axle path was the leverage curve to begin with Big Grin
  • 2 0
 me too Smile But that doesn't change the really interesting design!
  • 7 1
 I thought we had left the era of mountain biking where there were bikes with regressive curves, but I guess not.
  • 4 3
 not for an airshock, its pretty spot on, if your wanting to run a coil its not so goo.
  • 8 1
 @bat-fastard: even for an air shock…
  • 3 0
 @bat-fastard: That may true for some. I've found that I like somewhat progressive leverage curve with air shocks.
  • 3 2
 @taquitos: yeah me too
Even with an airshock you have stuff it with spacers and pressure to work, but turning it into a pogo stick.

I glad those days are mostly over.
  • 7 0
 @bat-fastard: We also need to consider the interaction with the damper, not just the spring. While it's true you can match an unconventional motion ratio curve with a correspondingly unconventional spring curve to produce a conventional wheel rate (spring), you would still be stuck with the unconventional wheel rate (damper).
  • 3 0
 This did seem a bit odd to me. presumably the point of this design is the performance that the axle path gives, but then you have the downside of a regressive curve. seems like they would need to be very careful about what shocks people run and all of them would need a custom tune. I wonder if the possible advantages in axle path can ever offset that.
  • 1 0
 @hmstuna: It's possible to have the axle path with a different motion ratio curve. Whether such an axle path is ideal is an open question.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, like the axle path idea, but the regressive leverage kills the whole concept.
  • 20 0
 So this is what yeti could have made if they were back in downhill racing? Seriously interesting design, can't wait to see a downhill bike with this design.
  • 15 1
 That link looks like something you tow behind a tractor late into the summer night, not something you want 20cm from your ball bag.
  • 2 0
 Well said sir
  • 12 0
 That first pic makes me think of what you could expect if you asked ChatGPT to design a high pivot bike
  • 12 1
 Eric Cartman: "I'M GONNA KICK YOU IN THE NUTS!"
  • 7 0
 All jokes aside about pinching the nether regions, which I don't see being that big of an issue, this bike looks sick. On top of that lets all appreciate that this super niche, awesome, well built bike has a frame price that's quite a bit cheaper than a mass produced yeti frame.
  • 10 0
 if the latest Slash and a Liteville 301 had a baby…
  • 7 0
 Nice. We could call it the dick slasher
  • 6 0
 Wonder what the actual seat-tube angle is, that looks slack af. Not sure if riders who prefer a more downwards sloped saddled can get their preferred angle, and this probably puts more wear on the dropper since your downwards force is at a significant angle to the dropper. Interesting idea though, price is probably necessarily high but it's gonna deter people from trying it out for the possibility of incremental gains, vs the many tried, tested and excellent platforms out there. Good luck anyway!
  • 6 7
 Definitely to slack for us taller bumblers
  • 1 2
 its listed
  • 2 0
 @maestroman21: actual is not same as effective. That actual angle looks like a late 90’s DH frame…
  • 1 0
 My '21 enduro and '22 chilcotin were a bit less slack, both wore through the black ano on the front side of a post in 1 season of riding with a 210.
  • 8 4
 Looks cool ... and that all I have to say on the positive side. Now on the negative side, such rearward axle path will most likely result in being thrown out the from door quitle badly in sketchy deep travel positions. Ridiculously long reach is probably there to compensate that issue, but your arms are only so long and you will probably feel stretched unless being massive. And the icing on the cake is the rising rate suspension. Only way to have this behave somewhat reasonably will be to use an air shock with big negative volume AND shit loads of tokens in the positive chamber. But this will create a lot of forcs at bottom out, so unless you accept to ride with massively over damped rebound stack, this will be an ejection seat at bottom out, combined with the geometry flucatuation due to massively rearward axle path the tends to shift the weight on the front well, good luck riding this hard, especially in the steep.
  • 3 0
 Are you saying rearward axle path is unrideable? This isn't much different to forbidden which everyone froths over.

Personally, I don't like high pivots much - I had a couple and found the suspension traits made a big impact on how they rode.
  • 1 0
 @russthedog: some manage to make it work, and with longer reach it might be better. My experience was with a Suprem V4.0 which still had short reach even for the time and I noticed the issue until it actually threw me over. Got rid of that bike and never had the problem again, even with a the Fury 2019 but it has more of a mid pivot than high like the Suprem. Actually a friend from Ireland got a Forbidden 2 years ago and replaced it one year later with a Giga. I asked him why he changed already and his feedback was exactly what I experienced with the V4, despite the Fobbiden having a long reach. Now this is a sample size of 2 people so don't take it for gospel, but when you look at the evolution of Rear to Front center ratio (not reach which doesn't change) then it all makes sensse really. The center point of the bike varies a lot with a long travel fork and very rearward axle path.
  • 6 1
 Lots of great engineering here. But @seb-scott real Q: If the goal is for the rear to travel like a fork, why not use a fork instead of all this linkage and materials? Asking for a friend.
  • 11 0
 position a fork with the same angle at the back and start drawing the nonesense...
  • 5 0
 @PauRexs: 1990's Manitou called....
  • 3 0
 @PauRexs: Ha ha, absolutely. Starts sketching that bike, and get back to us.
  • 1 1
 @RadBartTaylor: nah, I mean with a fork mounted in the desired plane. A shortend fork with inverted stanchions would be pretty short.

It might be daydreaming, but it seems like it would weight less and be easier to tune. It just would take some imagination to go against historical stay layout.
  • 1 0
 @PauRexs: I did. Inverted fork, shortened to only necessary length, stays attach to the lowers (now uppers). If we're going to the extreme of CNC and a bunch of extra pulleys, this doesn't seem that far fetched.
  • 4 0
 I tested this bike in Finale for almost a day, I had literally nothing bad to tell about it. The test bike had almost identical components as my own bike (Propain Tyee), but just a bit smaller frame. It felt better in every way than my own bike while going down, despite not having my preferred handlebar, stem, grips and pedals. I am not good enough rider to judge perhaps but I also tested more popular bikes just few weeks prior from Yeti, Specialized, Pivot etc and none felt as good as this one.

I really would like to see PB doing a full review for KOMPace, I am curious if they'll agree with me.
  • 5 2
 Clever design…but…why? Does the benefit this design brings out way the extra cost associated with developing and manufacturing? Surely a nicely thought out clean Horst link design delivers enough performance at a far cheaper cost.
  • 17 0
 Purely guesswork from me, but perhaps they built a prototype, rode it and felt it had something more to offer compared to all the Horst link designs? Starting a project like this and trying to make it commercially viable is a huge task (esp.in Greece) so they must really believe in it. Much respect, wish them all the best!
  • 3 2
 @justwan-naride: Or they build a prototype, decided they already spent too much money developing it, so now they have to sell it.
  • 2 0
 @fred-frod: It's way harder to do this sort of thing outside of US/UK they probably just wanted to make a cool bike and take some risks doing it
  • 8 0
 It's all Greek to me...
  • 7 0
 4.080.
  • 2 0
 I invented this. You can see my previous comments on a moving idler. Enjoy a bottle of Raki in gratitude :-)

My next invention is to solve pedal feedback with a freehub clutch, perhaps like a Classified hub, that is only engaged when the cranks are rotating. So, bluetooth crank rotation would send a signal and the freehub would engage. Of course only solves pedal feedback when coasting.
  • 5 0
 Weird looking, but interesting approach... wonder if it is gonna sell...
  • 5 1
 Who cares about the tech. More importantly, what lovely riding, scenery and editing guys.
  • 1 0
 You made me look. Very nice.
  • 1 0
 Is that Greece? Erymanthus? Looks sick
  • 2 0
 @tofhami: That's in Greece, Smolikas
  • 2 0
 Let's have a review comparison between this and the Contra MC. Both Take the HPI+dual link thing to the extreme. Both actually come in some really big sizing options too, which is nice.
  • 5 1
 @seb-stott there was a time pinkbike included a short video of rear suspension. please bring back those times.
  • 1 0
 Seb - please explain how a 19mm smaller rear wheel radius directly corresponds to a 19mm lower BB, if this is what you are saying. Your calcs appear to be 348+9 = 356 - 19mm = 338. By your calculations, the 29er in high geo setting would be 356mm which is a perfectly reasonable height for mulleting. The chain stay length doesn't appear to be factored in to your calculations. A 9 mm difference could be about right considering the chain stay length of this bike, therefore the geo with a 27.5 rear wheel in the high setting could well be same as the geo with a 29 rear wheel in the low setting.

"However, the geometry chart shows a 9 mm difference in BB drop between the settings, and a 27.5" wheel is 19 mm smaller in radius than 29", so the geometry won't be fully compensated. So, it's sort of a halfway house between a geometry adjuster and a wheel-size compensator.

According to my calculations, with 29" wheels in the low mode, the BB height will be around 348 mm; with a 27.5" rear wheel in the high mode, it will be around 338 mm. "
  • 1 0
 Seb, I meant your calcs appear to be 348+9=357..... High geo setting would be 357 be your calcs?
  • 1 0
 Funny thing about this: the bike is advertised as having 160mm of travel from a 60mm stroke shock and a 45mm of rearward travel. Yet in the chart above it’s visible this rearward travel is achieved with 175mm of rear travel. Which is the right one? Is there the possibility to have a 65mm stroke shock for 175mm of rear travel?
  • 5 3
 would love to see it with Lal drivetrain... like with treck they wouls save this stupid pulley hanging and a delirieur... a perfect trade off...
  • 2 1
 Super interesting design. It seems logical that the rear wheel should follow a similar path as the linear front wheel suspension, no? Could that be achieved with a parallelogram? I'm sure it's been tried before right?
  • 4 0
 No ones gunna say how the seizes are large xxl and xxxxxxxxxxxxxll
  • 2 0
 Those numbers are crazy, at 6'1 there is no reason for the smallest size in a size look the most appealing to me.
  • 1 0
 So if they axle moves rearward 45 mm and the chainstay is 430mm, does that mean the chainstay will max out at 475mm?

If so, that's a seriously long bike. I suspect chainstay at sag is 440mm ...
  • 3 0
 And it comes with a nut cracker on the top tube, just in time for the holidays!
  • 3 0
 can we get a squish video please, should be mandatory on all posts about new suspension linkages
  • 1 0
 Visons of a pinched nut sack and optimus prime! I can't imagine trying to keep that rube goldberg mess clean and working well in the PNW. I will look forward to seeing it in an Ok Go video soon.
  • 4 1
 will be a dream to clean after a ride in the mud ^^
  • 4 0
 Ooh pinchy
  • 3 0
 Losing bollocks technology
  • 4 0
 Is it broken?
  • 3 0
 Soundtrack by Andre 3000...
  • 3 0
 frame bearing count: about 30...
  • 2 0
 So how far can you lay a dropper on it's side and it still function and not have the warranty void?
  • 4 1
 I would never ride a bike named after strava
  • 3 0
 3 sizes, okay for t shirts not high-end bikes
  • 2 1
 give me all the drawbacks of a nicolai lambda, a kavenz vhp and anything linear rail - but with the weight, the price and the dirt pickup of a medium sized bulldozer.
  • 2 0
 Instead of a battery, this comes with a very handy "nutklipper". These days I hear, it is a very sought after accesory.
  • 1 0
 I hope the axle path more than makes up in plushness for the 10mm of travel compared to a Ransom, cuz the frame weighs almost 5lbs more.
  • 9 6
 Castration Technology
  • 20 1
 Dunno what's your riding style man, but if your balls are there you're doing it wrong.
  • 3 1
 "Sir, I'm afraid your rear triangle's just too darn high"
  • 3 0
 Pivotopolous
  • 1 0
 We all know what the real question is for a bike with evolutionary suspension design - does it bumble?
  • 3 0
 Pretty nice looking rig.
  • 1 0
 "Continue ton be popular" lol with who? the home made projects? the few who visit this site? bias much?????
  • 2 0
 Imagine rushing your balls between the frame and that link........ ouch!
  • 2 0
 I find it strangely beautiful
  • 2 0
 Shoulda called it the ‘Sack-tap’
  • 2 0
 stupidly long reach numbers, Guess everyone in Greece is over 6'
  • 1 0
 Really cool design. Would like to see a video of the frame cycling through its suspension.
  • 1 0
 and a straight chain line
  • 2 1
 Takes a max 50mm dropper post
  • 3 2
 Should call it the Roshambo
  • 2 4
 Looks like an arrival with fetal alcohol syndrome.
  • 1 1
 Rochambeau
  • 1 0
 @mammal: The French general who commanded French troops during the American Revolutionary war at Yorktown?? Weird analogy
  • 1 0
 I guess the down vote doesn't get the reference
  • 1 0
 @dchill: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rock_paper_scissors

That's where the name comes from.
  • 3 1
 @mammal: I was talking about Roshambo the game on South Park where they kick each other in the nuts

getyarn.io/yarn-clip/76be178e-d106-49f0-a7a0-2c1a45847367
  • 2 0
 @dchill: Gotcha.
  • 2 0
 broken kneecaps incoming
  • 1 0
 Land of the giants on the reach. Comfy!
  • 1 0
 Looks like a ... Nicolai (Nucleon)
  • 1 0
 Wouln't the bottom link be succeptible to binding due to high sideloads?
  • 2 0
 RIP...balls
  • 2 0
 the ball pincher 5000
  • 1 0
 Linkage movements above a top tube…. I dunno, looks like a liability
  • 1 0
 Cool. Have fun trying to find replacement parts though!
  • 2 0
 Do the squish
  • 1 0
 This thing looks violently delicious.
  • 1 0
 That lr is depression is horrible.
  • 1 0
 Zero leverage progressivity?
  • 1 0
 Cs lengths are at top out, add 20mm for the at sag length, correct?
  • 1 0
 Sick design! Can't wait for a review. Hope it rides as rad as it looks.
  • 1 0
 its a shame snoop quit ganja last week cuz his pivot be so high
  • 1 0
 When lego technics comes without instructions
  • 1 0
 Location of the video deep canyons ?
  • 1 0
 Sounds like Canfield were into something all those years ago!
  • 2 2
 Its not that hard to deliver a rearward axle path for the full travel.
  • 11 0
 That's true, but I think the idea here is that the axle path is less curved so more consistent in its direction throughout the travel than a (high) single pivot. Whether that's a good thing or not is another matter.
  • 2 0
 @seb-stott: not a good thing, rearward travel is for square edge hits like rocks / roots / potholes, mostly in first 2/3 of travel after that your into jump/drop bottom-out where you don't want rear end getting much longer. I've 50mm with 42 of it in first 2/3 on my enduro craftworks, my Dh rig hasn't just as much but both feel spot on.
  • 2 2
 Looks like a new version of an Balfa BB7
  • 1 1
 "I wouldn't touch her with yours"
  • 2 1
 If they could lower the seat stay an raise the Top tube, move that top link It may not be that replulsive............?
  • 1 0
 Looks like a… slash?
  • 1 0
 Needs more idlers . . .
  • 1 0
 Yeti 303 WC
  • 1 0
 What the bike….?
  • 2 2
 And another fugly frame
  • 1 2
 This hideous abomination has 0 chance at market success.
  • 4 6
 Proposing a new name for this model: Debollikator 3000.
  • 5 1
 Maybe ask a doctor if they're down there
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