The Chickadeehill LFB6 Shock has 2 Positive Air Chambers

Jan 18, 2022
by TEBP  
Chickadeehill LFB6 shock Copyright by Kevin Sames mr.kvnsms
The new LFB6 shock by German suspension company Chickadeehill.

Chickadeehill is a small suspension company based in Aachen, Germany. They've gained quite a bit of fame in the mountain bike world for making AWK tuning kits for suspension forks. Their tuning kits and their first shock, the LFB6, share the same unique feature - they have a dual positive air chamber with a floating piston.

According to Chickadeehill, the dual positive air chamber with floating piston closes the gap between mid stroke support and plushness. The spring characteristics can be tuned very precisely and can be adjusted "to work with any leverage ratio, frame geometry and rider preference". Developing the LFB6 took them three years and the team at Chickadeehill says that their new shock is mainly aimed at gravity riders.

The shock has a twin tube hydraulic damping system and offers a wide range of adjustments. Low and high speed compression as well as low and high speed rebound can be adjusted externally and without tools. Riders won't be able to add volume spacers, but Chickadeehill can add them at the factory should the bike or rider need them.

Chickadeehill LFB6 shock Copyright by Kevin Sames mr.kvnsms
The chickadee themed shock will definitely be a good conversation-starter.

The idea behind the twin positive air chamber is to create a nearly linear spring curve and offer more mid-stroke support. When you're running a rather low pressure on a regular air fork or shock to get good small bump compliance, you'll usually need a few progression spacers to prevent bottoming out too frequently. Therefore, the fork or shock will become really progressive towards the end of the stroke.
Chickadeehill LFB6 shock
Metric Sizes: 210 mm and 230 mm
Trunnion Sizes: 185mm and 205mm
Climb assist: optional
External adjustments: LSC/HSC & LSR/HSR
Price: 1279 € (including 19% VAT)
More info: https://www.chickadeehill.de/

Using two air chambers means that you can create a rather linear spring curve. The second positive air chamber replaces progression spacers and starts to work when you're using roughly 50% of travel.

In other words, the idea is to create a coil-like feel, but without the coil weight. It will be interesting to see how well this technology works in the real world but unfortunately there is no review dropping tomorrow.

Chickadeehill LFB6 shock Copyright by Kevin Sames mr.kvnsms
The first batch of shocks is ready for assembly.

Chickadeehill LFB6 shock Copyright by Kevin Sames mr.kvnsms
Chickadeehill LFB6 shock Copyright by Kevin Sames mr.kvnsms
The external adjustment dials look like they can easily be turned while wearing gloves. In the center of the golden main air piston you can see the inner air sleeve. The white plastic sleeve is where the real magic happens: This is the floating piston that separates the two positive air chambers.

While the major parts of the shock are sourced in Europe, smaller parts such as seals are bought in from German dealers, but according to the manufacturer it is difficult to track the origin of these smaller parts.

This completely new shock is an interesting addition to the current offerings by other brands. The dual positive air chamber can mean that setup might take a little bit longer, but for every rider who likes to tinker with their suspension, it might be worth it.

Chickadeehill LFB6 shock Copyright by Chickadeehill
A side view of the shock internals.

Chickadeehill LFB6 shock Copyright by Kevin Sames mr.kvnsms
Chickadeehill LFB6 shock Copyright by Kevin Sames mr.kvnsms
The LFB6 has a familiar shape and looks different nonetheless. It will be interesting to find out whether we'll see more of these in bike parks this summer.

Chickadeehill LFB6 shock Copyright by Kevin Sames mr.kvnsms
Chickadeehill LFB6 shock Copyright by Kevin Sames mr.kvnsms
The team behind Chickadeehill made sure the shock was tested thoroughly.

Chickadeehill LFB6 shock Copyright by Kevin Sames mr.kvnsms
Philipp Heise putting the LFB6 through its paces.

After reading this article, you might wonder what Chickadeehill means? It's a play on words that involves the name of the founder of the company.


All photos by Kevin Sames



175 Comments

  • 102 9
 Not even read it. Its different so I dont like it. But also Fox and RS should totally do this.
  • 23 3
 red nob or blue nob ..... red pill , blue pill hmmmmm
  • 42 2
 Manitou has already been doing the dual positive chamber thing for years on their forks. It’s the same idea as their IRT system.
  • 4 6
 @Dyceman: came here to say just this
  • 18 1
 @Dyceman: Same with the Diaz Suspension Runt (drop-in air chamber upgrade for RS and Fox), and the EXT fork and others, I'm sure.
I've used the Runt on a Lyrik and currently use one on a Fox 34. I am a fan of that product and of the dual positive chamber concept. It takes some experimentation to find the right pressure settings, though.
  • 10 1
 @Dyceman: and chickadeehill even longer.
  • 5 1
 @los36: I am really impressed with the Diaz Suspension Runt. It really allows you to dial in mid stroke support.
  • 3 0
 @los36: Agree about the Runt. It's transformed my fork.
  • 3 0
 Formula did the same in their dh forks, so the concept isn't exactly what I would consider new. But I'm still a huge fan of it, as I love to tinker around to find the sweet spot in my settings.
  • 3 1
 @x-rider: New as in a shock, not in a fork. Wink
  • 9 0
 @x-rider:

First available shock to do that (EXT will follow soon).
Chickadehill was the first to do it for forks. Even before manitou
  • 6 0
 Correct me if I'm wrong, but it is the first consumer available rear shock with this feature as far as I know?

Yes, it has been done in many forks already, ohlins included.
  • 1 1
 @bansaiman: I think you will find MARZOCCHI were the first make a 3 chamber air spring with Doppio air (+PAR)
Then in later years moved all 3 chambers inside the air cartridge with ATA. This was more than 15 years ago!
  • 2 0
 The whole website is in German….. doesn’t help anyone that can’t speak German…
I wish I had more hands, so I could give those titties four thumbs down
  • 61 2
 I'm going to hold out till there is three positive air chambers and at least two negative air chambers, that way I won't have to rely on the hi/low comp/rebound adjustments to guaranteed that I'll never be able to get it set up correctly!
  • 42 4
 Finally time to get rid of those dumb volume spacers. Sure, they work for something, but high performance they are not. This is the real deal. Like Manitou IRT, this system offers near complete control over the positive spring. Volume spacers were a half ass solution to a poor air spring design. They were a “band aid” solution. This is the proper way to achieve a true high performance air spring with full tuning capabilities. From experience my Dorado with IRT is miles better than the stock air spring or IVA.
  • 6 1
 I'm completely your opinion.
BUT I have always been fascinated from the old BOS Deville which is definitely more smooth and less prone to stick slip than any rs, fox, manitou fork I have recently ridden (even when they have been tuned) and which have been really supportive even without spacers.
. No joke. Just Bought a used Deville 34 from 2015 a week ago and tried it the last days. Unbelievably smooth initiation of movement from start to all of its travel. Besides open bath cartridge which saves some sealing and thus friction or breakable parts. High quality manufactured.
Of course their casting is not that stiff but for 140-160mm trailbikes and riders up to 90 kilo it's sufficient.
  • 2 0
 @bansaiman: fully agree with you, I had Deville 170 from 2014 recently and this fork outperformed every modern fork that I've tried, less than 2kg with open bath, and the most impressive grip I've ever experienced from suspension, even with the rebound fully open it wasn't easy to pick up the front wheel from the ground it was so planted, so probably not the best for nowadays "jibbers". Unfortunately I've damaged the fork during serious crash, now I'm using Manitou Mezzer which I really like and it's a top fork but can't compare it to Bos
  • 1 1
 Meh. There's a place for every design. I agree with you but volume spacers are still better than nothing and a way more simple solution. Wouldn't be surprised if dual + chambers become mainstream for mid to high end shocks and volume spacers trickle down to low budget and stay for some mid level shocks
  • 3 0
 @mechatronicjf:

That's what manitou did.
Look at mezzer or mattoc pro vs expert.

But spacers are shitty. Always opening up the fork with those fine threads is time consuming getting on my nerves and in winter not the best idea to perform trailside.
Cheers
  • 1 0
 @GrzesiekDH:

Would love a revised version with same only refined damper, more stiffchassus, for both wheel sizes and just eased if the niggles the old ones had and that would be a killer air fork.

Some had reliability issues and the others that didn't, are still rolling around today
  • 35 2
 Shocking. That doubles the positive news
  • 32 8
 How many riders actually spin 4 knobs to get dialed in or do you eventually get to a 'good enough' mentality and put the stopwatch away and just have fun riding?

-a guy with a hardtail with a fork with LSR and LSC who couldn't tell you his current setup.
  • 26 0
 Some do, some dont. For me, dialing it in is part of the fun. Most riders shouldnt have 4 way adjustment though, since they dont take the time to learn about suspension and end up with a worse setup.
  • 4 0
 I did spend a few hours dialing in the settings on a cane creek double barrel air. It did make a difference, but minimally so. I don't have a problem with the super deluxe r on my current bike. In my mind, its a 'nice to have but not essential' situation. Like flip chips, pad contact adjustment, return speed on a dropper etc.
  • 14 1
 It's a full suspension thing. You wouldn't understand.
  • 3 7
flag rbeach (Jan 18, 2022 at 4:36) (Below Threshold)
 The differences are minimal, it's the sort of thing only bike reviewers ever seem to actually care about. This is clearly intended for people who are going to maximise those differences.
  • 13 0
 For me, I found I enjoyed learning how to tune more for what I learned about riding than I learned about suspension. Due to owning a “fully tunable” shock for the first time, I had to learn what type of riding forces are affected by each type of compression and rebound… and where does the effect of shock circuits stop and suspension design begin… all to say: it ultimately gave me a deeper appreciation for bike & suspension design and the trade offs that come with it, ultimately leading to a deeper and more comprehensive appreciation for my bike. That’s just where my curiosity took me. For others, certainly different.
  • 8 1
 @endoplasmicreticulum: you make too much sense, a rare find here at the comment section.
  • 3 0
 Having a hardtail and some Enduro and DH bikes, I find it extremely difficult to isolate things on the hardtail but can tune my full suspension bikes without much trouble. So if you never got to ride a full suspension it is no surprise you have a hard time.
  • 2 0
 When I get a new shock (or better, a new bike) I spend a lot time fiddling with initial setup, but once it's dialed, I'll leave it alone for weeks or even months. The only time I mess with it again is 1) when I'm riding some place new or 2) when i'm servicing it
  • 3 2
 You do have to spend some time getting the rebound and compression dialed in on full suspension if you don’t like getting launched off of the bike because your rebound was too fast.
  • 6 4
 When I had a shock with all the knobs, every time I turned one it got worse. Seriously. It's like all 4 knobs only adjusted the amount of suck.
  • 2 1
 @nickfranko: rebound yes, compression no. A lot of more basic/lower end shocks only have rebound. It's not been a problem on mine.
  • 3 0
 Depends if you're near the middle of the adjustment range or near the ends.

I'm 100 kilos (without gear) and ride heavy/smashy, so I take the time to adjust all 4 knobs (and PSI & volume spacers) on my fork and the 3 on my shock because if I left them in the middle then the big suspension movements I cause would not be well controlled, decreasing comfort and traction. So I took the time (maybe an hour, nothing crazy) to dial it in.

Opposite might be true for a 55 kilo rider, where the middle adjustment could be overly stiff and then there isn't much movement of the suspension, also decreasing comfort and traction.
  • 4 2
 Married with a baby. Haven’t spun my own knob let alone three others any time recently.
  • 3 0
 @endoplasmicreticulum: just like you, then. Some do have ribosomes, some doesn't.

Jokes aside, I've owned suspension products with 4 way damping adjustment in the past (LSR, LSC, HSC, HSR). From my experience, the first one does really have an impact on ride quality. The next two is nice to have, especially if I want to push my bike to the limit (eg. racing, chasing KOMs). The last one is just a gimmick IMO, I can't feel the difference between different HSR settings.

Nowadays, my forks only have LSC and LSR, shock only have LSR (with lock out).
  • 1 0
 @rifu: Same as you but on the hardtail the back-end chatter makes it way more difficult to isolate things. As for HSR if you have a chance watch the video about it from Vorsprung. Basically he only consider it if LSR is still too slow, otherwise keep it shut. Frequently feel the need for LsC and HsC tho.
  • 3 0
 Well, getting the air spring right is the most important part... the clicks make a difference obviously, but they aint gonna fix the spring being wrong.
  • 4 2
 @rifu: LSR is probably the most important adjustment on a shock. HSR is purely a gimmick considering suspension pretty much rebounds are a given speed. High vs Low speed is not the speed of the bike, it’s shaft speed. Breaking bump vs g-out. Mtb’ers are just a bunch of suckers.
  • 2 0
 @stubs179: Spring rate (force that the HSR is controlling) varies a bit between bikes and riders?
  • 2 0
 As far as forks go, I have the 4 way spinners on the 38 on my spire, and it feels good using settings basically copied from Lars Sternberg (who largely designed the Spire). I was surprised how much better it felt with slightly less air and a lot of compression and rebound damping compared to what Fox recommended.

On my old bike I had the 4 way spinners too, and spent a whole day lapping the same rock garden trying to dial everything in, and only wound up changing a single click.

On both bikes, once it felt good I stopped messing with it. I certainly don't change it around for different rides or anything.

I also have a Z1 on a hardtail, and I actually use the single compression lever all the time to adjust for different types of trails. I use it way more than the fancy dials because it has a useable amount of change that I can feel and even if I get it a bit wrong, it is easy to just open back up. I think that fork is probably perfect for most riders, including me.

But even then, you are going to have to pry the orange lowers on my factory 38 out of my cold, dead hands.
  • 1 0
 @mtb-thetown: If you only changed one click after a bunch of dialing in, that doesn't diminish how powerful the adjustments can be. You are obviously smack in the middle of Fox's/Lars' estimates of how it should be set up, but that's not always the case, especially for riders on either end of the weight spectrum and/or riding style spectrum[s] (smashy vs floaty just for one example, picky vs plowy for another).

"even if I get it a bit wrong, it is easy to just open back up"

Not sure why this doesn't apply to the LSC/HSC as well if full-open is the default, it's pretty easy to spin them all the way open. Yes, the lever is convenient for making quick changes, but I don't think it has a more "useable amount of change", it's just that you're more willing to slap it all the way around.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: more willing to slap it around sounds exactly right. It's also easier to keep track of what I'm doing cause i just look at the lever. I'm lucky to be average build, so although I'm picky on some things, it's fairly easy to get a decent suspension setup.

I'm certain that other people have different experiences, just sharing mine.
  • 15 0
 Being from Massachusetts, I like the name. Chickadee is our state bird. Shock seems wicked nice too; beautifully machined and we’ll thought, if a bit overkill for my riding…but there’s no kill like overkill.
  • 11 2
 I guess this is comparable to what Trek did with it's DRCV dampers some years ago: enlarging the positive air chamber beyond a certain point in it's travel, thereby decreasing the natural progessive nature of an air spring.

Trek did it with a valve between the main and secondary chamber that was fysically pushed open by the main piston , by the way.
  • 3 0
 I thought this exactly when I read about "creating a more linear curve"... I have a DRCV shock on my old Rumblefish and it needed a lot of volume spacers to avoid bottoming out all the time.
  • 4 0
 Immediately thought of the DRCV as well. As if the bad shock feeling wasn’t enough, I never ran through as many shocks as with that one. At some point had to replace it with a standards shock, which was a blessing for the bike.
Now, almost 10 years later, I hop Chickadeehill won’t reproduce the same mistakes. Sure they are aware of such misproductions.
  • 4 0
 @sack-zement: not sure what the trek system exactly was, but the shock reminds me more of the manitou irt or the chickadeehill fork thingy. it works great on manitou forks, i wonder why they did not use it on their shocks and went with the mara system.
  • 1 0
 Nothing improved my 2012 Remedy as much as ditching the DRCV shock for a standard (early trunion mount) Monarch that RS made specifically for that task.
  • 4 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: you have enough space on a shock to adjust negative to positive volume ratio, with fine enough adjustment that you don't need the "IRT" to have a good spring curve. It's another story on forks (single crown even more) so the IRT makes more sense here.
  • 3 1
 @dsciulli19: not the same thing as twin positive chambers chambers
  • 2 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: I'd guess it's a packaging problem for the smaller space in a shock. Looks like these guys might have figured it out.
  • 3 3
 It's not the same. The drcv opened mechanically opened by a small "finger" pushing it open depending on position.
Herr the chamber just starts moving, when the pressure in both chambers is at the same level.
Try an AWK, RUNT IRT in your fork. This is superior to solo debon air stuff
  • 1 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: Same with Ohlins - 2 chamber fork, 1 chamber rear shocks?

I wonder if it has something to do with the leverage ratios being higher on the rear sus vs the 1:1 of the fork?
  • 14 1
 I never tried DP, only saw it in movies
  • 10 2
 ask your mum.
  • 7 1
 @mtb-scotland: f*ckin got'em
  • 7 1
 In such times where everything is extremely expensive, i certainly wouldn't call it a "boutique" item. Considering it is a small brand , at the moment, i don't find it expensive.
And commenting on complexity, many rear shocks already have these adjustments, but no one is complaining....
Just wait untill they give some sponsorships and more ppl see the product on the trails.
  • 8 0
 I'd consider it if i didn't have to say chickadeehill to everyone who asked me about it.
  • 5 0
 Cool. Could have a ChickaDoodleHill on a Boutique steel rig for a similar/cheaper price as a S-Works or Trek 9.99 whatever. Bikes are for fun, it’s fun to run unique cool rigs.
  • 4 0
 Have you ever tried the AWK for forks?
These guys know what they are doing.
There wasn't such a rant about the new EXT shock, which is quite similar regarding the air spring (at least from my surfacial technical understanding, maybe differs in detail).
  • 7 0
 Chickadeehill ? Now that's a name for a suspension company.
  • 3 1
 'Lady of the hill' ?
  • 4 0
 @tremeer023: nice! this makes sense now, it is better than say Soft Egg Boy.
  • 1 0
 Is it tho? Lol @lowejw:
  • 3 0
 Are all the seals and rubber bits standard industrial sizes? Would be nice to do a full overhaul straight out of MSC or Grainger rather than sending it all the way to Germany and waiting for the next Ever Given to ruin shipping lanes.
  • 4 0
 Don‘t know the exact sizes yet but I know the guy behind it (worked several years for the German distributor) and the sizes are industrial standard for sure.
  • 1 0
 This must be a very big ever given to block the whole Atlantic Sea... And there is still air shipping too
  • 2 0
 @x-rider: COVID - Hold my beer...
  • 4 0
 Why do companies keep saying about trying to achieve a coil like feel with an air shock but without the weight. If its aimed at gravity riders just fit a coil! That extra weight is not going to be noticable.
  • 3 0
 Isn’t this what EXT is doing with their upcoming air shock as well? Two positive chambers? I am a fan of that design on forks (Had a lyrik with a DSD Runt and now have a mezzer with IRT).
  • 33 32
 The dumbest thing about these super expensive "boutique" (whatever the f*ck that means) shocks is that the type of people who buy them wouldn't be able to tell the difference between this and a £300 shock...

For when you're off to ride the trail centre and your Fox Factory suspension just isn't expensive enough!
  • 40 2
 i feel like thats an observation on the customer base, not the product?
  • 9 0
 This ^^^^
  • 21 0
 @GumptionZA: Yeah a bit like the Impreza, completely ruined by the type people who drive them.
  • 11 2
 A budget watch is OK to know what time it is. Some people prefer a Rolex, can afford it and enjoy bying the top of the top just "because". Why not?... even if it's kind of ridiculous and pointless for us.
My "budget" gear: Suntour Triair + Marzocchi Z2 prefectly do the job and l love it Smile
  • 12 3
 I can totally tell you what's the difference between a 300$ shock and this one. Let me just show you my powerpoint presentation with some charts from my 2000$ suspension data acquisition device... ;0)
  • 10 1
 @danstonQ: Nobody said they couldn't. The point is that most people who buy a Rolex are buying it because it's expensive, not because they know why it's any better than a cheap watch or could tell the difference.
  • 2 9
flag n734535 (Jan 18, 2022 at 4:10) (Below Threshold)
 Who are "the type of people who buy them"?
  • 9 2
 @n734535: Obviously the type of people who earn lots of money and buy the expensive stuff but couldn't tell the difference between it and the cheaper stuff. The typical "all the gear, no idea" type. I know plenty of people just like that.
  • 12 0
 @n734535: When I went to Nepal there was someone who worked in marketing in London who had never done any mountaineering before, but went to the Arcteryx store, bought everything, and expected that they could simply buy their way up the mountain. That didn't work out for them. They also spent a lot of time complaining that they "only" had £500K to spend on a house. So probably those types of people.
  • 2 2
 @n734535: the type of people with a bicycle id guess
  • 6 0
 @redrook: the struggle is real
  • 20 1
 @rbeach: nah most people who actually know about this poduct are bikenerds and not many people have their nerd coming out at a point when they actually make money. They usually have been riding bikes for a long time and are somewhat decent riders. I would rather say fox x2 kashima is more of a product for the "no idea" crew.
  • 5 2
 @Compositepro: This is priced well above just what anyone with a bicycle would normally spend. Clearly in early development and aimed at riders who are going to maximise minimal gains. Nobody who isn't a racer at a high level is going to feel the benefits of this shock.
  • 4 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: Tell that to architects and engineers, I don't know any of them who are struggling for spare cash Wink
  • 3 0
 @Greeta25: My dentist buddy is into bikes too but he would never even come across this shock. Enineers were poor bikenerd students at some point, i know first hand and they used to spend every euro they got for bikeparts. Now they earn more and pay more -seems alright. (they ride less though)
  • 1 0
 ... or good enough.
  • 7 5
 Where did the person with money touch you?
  • 4 1
 Some guys have bigger wallets than other guys.
  • 3 2
 @Mntneer: ffs prince andrew again
  • 1 1
 @Greeta25: hi......now you do
  • 8 0
 I dunno how it is where you are, but I'd say people who don't know what they're doing are unlikely to seek out small brand suspension. They'd just go for Kashima and figure they are good.
  • 2 1
 @Jackaboo: But hopefully the trickle down economics make it a reality for the rest of us in the not too distant future.
  • 3 0
 @SonofBovril: That's not what trickle down economics means. But yes, new tech does usually filter down to consumer level.

Trickle down economics is the hypothesis that tax breaks for companies will create jobs and other benefits for the poorer. It's also not true and has been thoroughly debunked.
  • 3 0
 @Greeta25: trickle down technology
  • 5 0
 Looks like a Float X2, on a Session.
  • 5 0
 I'm not buying anything under 5 positive chamber, sorry.
  • 4 0
 Wonder if EXT's video leak of their upcoming air shock forced chickadeehill's to push up the launch of their product.
  • 1 0
 If customers can't change the volume spacers, does that mean they also can't do an air-can service? Because from the looks of that cut-away drawing, if you can get access to the inner air seals, then you should have access to the volume spacers as well...
  • 1 0
 Seen this a few times. Getting LSC/HSC/LSR/HSR dialled in is relatively easy if you have a good initial setup, mostly very useful for those of us outside middling weight, but not for a typical sized rider on a trail.
Where it's useful is DH racing when you're doing the same run multiple times over a couple of days as the LSC in particular ups as you get faster and more confident, but then offsetting the dynamic changes becomes quite routine, like for every 2 clicks LSC I need +1HSC, +2LSR, - 1HSR as an example.
I liked it when racing, but not so bothered now
  • 3 1
 If the Shox is from Germany then the lettering should be in German too, it would help me understand what the Shox setting are.
  • 7 0
 Druckstufenverstellrad
  • 8 0
 @SickEdit: Hochgeschwindigkeitsdruckstufenverstellrad und Niedriggeschwindigkeitsdruckstufenverstellrad
  • 1 0
 @sp00n82: thats what im talking about. puff't rebound/compression whats that.
  • 4 0
 @sp00n82: My tiny non-german brain cannot believe that this actually works when placed in google translate
  • 1 0
 Has anyone tried the AWK tuning kit on a V1-2-3 (top-tube mounted shock) Santa Cruz, to see if it's possible to really minimize the nagging regressive-progressive curve and make it more linear/predictable??
  • 2 0
 EXT is developing an dual positive chambershock as well. Let's see whose shock is finished first and which one 's shock is even more expensive.
  • 3 0
 Not about whose is finished first. I guess we have a winner here Wink The LBF6 is on the market.
  • 3 0
 I own one! Smile
  • 1 0
 @JensBR:

And difference to other air shocks... X2? Can you give a review and comparison, please?
  • 1 0
 @PhilippHeise:

Then lets See about categories 2 and 3:
Price
Function
  • 2 0
 @bansaiman: in direct comparison to x2 and dhx2 it has ways more midstroke support and you can run very fast HSR. Rear wheel follows the ground pretty efficient and smoothes all the bumps. Btw I run a version w/o lockout. Its not necessary. Compression supports as well in the uphills.
  • 5 1
 New shock From Alcampo?
  • 1 0
 Most underrated comment
  • 4 0
 Not expensive enough
  • 4 0
 put a bird on it!
  • 1 0
 Chickadeehill BRDHS Factory Racer, Bryce Shivers
  • 3 0
 almost 20% VAT? They've lost their damn minds.
  • 1 0
 Looking at the seal head configuration, I'd put money on it being manufactured in the same factory as the Cane Creek air So I'll pass in this instance
  • 6 4
 The dentist air shock is born for your dentist bike.
  • 4 2
 At least they came up with a good name for it
  • 4 1
 Hehe- not.....
  • 5 2
 Coil is still the best.
  • 2 0
 I don't have a calculator handy but I'm pretty sure that's $6500 US.
  • 2 0
 Good article, TEBP. The LFB6 looks perfect for my LBFM.
  • 3 2
 If they are wise, they won't bother with trunnion.
  • 6 4
 better stay with coil
  • 1 0
 Even a colonel would pop an eye out adjusting all those knobs.
  • 1 0
 Is that a Nukeproof specific bottle?
  • 1 1
 its a fidlock bottle
  • 1 0
 Guess I'll have to sell the other kidney...
  • 1 0
 FOUR dynamic air seals...
  • 2 1
 O’Coil rules! O’Coil Rules! O’Coil Rules!
  • 1 1
 This seems like a lot of seals and technical complexity to achieve what coil shocks already do.
  • 1 0
 How long will it last?
  • 1 2
 So basically a Trek DRCV? Those worked out real well.
  • 2 0
 Nope, drcv was opened at a certain position. Awk starts moving when pressure in both chambers becomes equal. The drcv then rushed through its travel whereas awk gives you far more support and even though use able travel in comparison to a debon air system
Below threshold threads are hidden





Copyright © 2000 - 2022. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv42 0.025302
Mobile Version of Website