First Look: The New Last Cinto is a German Made, All-Mountain Lightweight

Mar 24, 2021
by Henry Quinney  

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Last Bikes are a manufacturer based in Dortmund, Germany, and have been in operation since the turn of the millennium. They tend to specialise in the more aggressive trail and enduro bikes. Their range contains the Tarvo, which incidentally is claimed to be the lightest production enduro frame, the Glen and the Coal.

The new bike, the Cinto, is a new all-mountain bike based around a modular platform that is shared with the Tarvo. We're seeing more brands go down this route, which can be a good thing. However, although a rejigged linkage plate can tweak the geometry to bring it in line with the needs of a shorter travel application, it often means there is something of a hangover in terms of weight.
Last Cinto Details

• Wheelsize: 29" or mullet
• Carbon fiber frame
• Travel: 145 (r) / 150mm (f)
• 65° head angle
• Chainstay length: 431, 431, 437, 443mm
• Reach: 442, 464, 495, 528mm
• Made in Germany
• Claimed frame weight: 2.1 kg (4.6 lb)
• Frame only: €3999
last-bikes.com


Last aim to get around this by using what is already an incredibly light platform in the form of the Tarvo and going from there. The frame weight starts at a svelte 2.1 kg (4.6 lb) and full builds can be as light as 11 kg (24.3 lb). You may also see the CNC'd cover that allows for in-frame storage. The storage cover is machined in-house and is size specific to allow for the most efficient use of the surface area.

Last Cinto
This particular build showcases the best Germany has to offer, and it ain't half bad.
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Last Cinto
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Last Cinto
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In-house manufacturing and a modular design allow for endless tweaking. This rocker link is available to allow the use of a mullet setup.

Geometry
The platform delivers 145mm of rear travel via a rocker link and a rear flex-pivot. It has a recommended fork travel of 150mm but the frame can accommodate up to 170mm, although Last suggests that while the bike will take it, 160mm might be more of a suitable limit. It uses a full complement of sealed Enduro Max bearings.

Last Cinto
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The Cinto uses size-specific geometry and the chainstays will change depending upon the front triangle to hopefully achieve a bike that gives the best blend of fore and aft balance irrespective of size. It also makes use of a mixed wheeled setup option and can be converted to a mullet platform with the MX rocker link. With a 29inch wheel, it offers clearance for a 2.5" tire.

All sizes are built around a 65° head angle that is complemented by an effective seat tube angle of 77° and upwards, depending on size.

Last Cinto
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Last Cinto
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A SRAM Universal Derailleur Hanger, rattle-free cable routing and removable ISCG tabs should make this popular.

Suspension

The Cinto, from sag, has 29% progression. You can often find with aggressive mid-travel bikes that you can run out of travel because they can be so capable and they enable you to write cheques that your lesser amount of travel isn't so happy about cashing. The Cinto aims to get around this by offering a decent amount of progression towards the end of the stroke. It's this characteristic that also means it should work well with coil shocks, which are inherently more linear, or larger volume air shocks.

When calculating anti-squat, a large variable can be simply where the centre of gravity is. This, of course, will change from size to size and rider to rider. Last, to negate this, change the pivot placement depending on the frame size and combine it with an estimate of where the COG will lie. From there they can tailor the anti-squat value for the frame size. With the blue markings, you can see the frame size with this optimisation compared to the grey line which represents it without. In the lower gears the value is quite high, which means that as you pedal the suspension will be trying to extend. This should ensure both grip and efficiency. Please note that the graph shows the anti-squat throughout the whole range of gears at sag, not one gear through the entire stroke.

For the anti-rise, which is a value that tells us how our mass transfers when we apply the brakes, the Cinto is relatively flat and spends most of its stroke at a value between 80-100%. Under braking, a value closer to 0% will mean that the shock wants to extend, above 100% and it will try and compress as you get on the anchors. At around 100% it will mean that the rider is quite supported by the neutral reaction of the suspension to braking forces, as it neither extends nor compresses as the rider's mass shifts forward.

Last Cinta
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Last Cinto
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Last Cinto
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Last Cinto
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Last Cinto
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A choice of two stock colours or you can even have your frame custom painted. It's also available in raw carbon.

Options & Availability

The Cinto is available to order now with delivery in August. There will be only 100 frames available to buy per year and pricing, for the frame only, starts at €3999. Build kits are available with your choice of RockShox, Fox, EXT or Intend.


160 Comments

  • 66 5
 Normally I like to laugh and point fun at carbon frames that require such expensive molds that brands have to re-use them across sizes and models.

This frame started out so light as a big enduro bike that in this shorter travel form its still probably lighter than nearly all its competitors in this travel bracket. Its almost 4 pounds lighter than the Privateer trail bike frame.

I'm really, really impressed (impressed with that price too)
  • 10 1
 Impressive weight, impressive layup too. As I scrolled the story and saw the closeups of the carbon on the finished frame my immediate thought was 'I hope they offer this in raw...', so pleased to see that is an option! Beautiful craftsmanship.
  • 31 9
 yes $6,000.00 CDN for a frame is dirt cheap I will take a dozen
  • 11 2
 I am not really impressed with the the price really your still paying 4K for a third of a bike
  • 48 2
 Waiter.... there’s a hair in my carbon.
I’d like a refund...

I’m sorry sir...it’s our Last bike...
  • 5 21
flag jclnv (Mar 24, 2021 at 11:24) (Below Threshold)
 @mikealive: Craftsmanship? The derailleur hanger doesn’t fit the frame mold.

I like it but if I was paying that I’d want the option to have right side rear brake routing and a simple BB mold without the unnecessary ISCG option.
  • 24 0
 @jclnv: SRAM's UDH Is designed to rotate a bit in case of an impact, that's why the frame has that extra space there. You won't be able to return it to its working position without tools, but it might save your frame/derailleur.
  • 12 3
 @madmon: @Ooofff I'm impressed with how HIGH the price is, not how low it its.

For goodness sakes, its almost as much as a Yeti!
  • 1 22
flag jclnv (Mar 24, 2021 at 12:23) (Below Threshold)
 @southoftheborder: I’m sure I’ve seen that hanger implemented without those reliefs. I can see them filling with crap. I don’t think I’m convinced it’s worth the design ugliness to save a derailleur.
  • 13 0
 @jclnv: I do miss full ISCG tabs on my Spur. I think it's great to have this option.
  • 2 1
 @pyromaniac: gusset do a iscg tab spacer that replaces the spacer on my bb and it works a treat
  • 19 0
 You can spend thousands of dollars for an asiatic bike frame that bike companies charge unreasonably. Or you can give value to your money purchasing such a beautiful piece of art, engineering, quality, and attention to details from Germany. Like This One.
  • 3 0
 @southoftheborder: doesn't it just then rip that grub screw out and tear the rear end anyway?
  • 2 0
 @scary1: No beard net...good looking frame tho, but will it last being so light?
  • 2 0
 Not putting another pivot in the rear triangle, for maximum destruction. I like your style.
  • 3 0
 @hamncheez: well its made at bikeahead in Germany and a fair bit lighter than your average yeti isn't it.
  • 2 0
 Luckily only 100 people will spend $4k on this frame.
  • 1 0
 @Kyanw: grub screw or lightweight sacrificial hollow pin, designed to shear at anything above normal loads, but needs a press tool to remove the broken halves?
  • 1 0
 @scary1: Maybe if its a Lahar
  • 61 10
 I understand the clean look of internal cable routing but as I begin to swap parts from an old frame to a new frame I have to tell you I'm getting sick of having to cut or disconnect the brake line and mess around with re-routing cables through the frame. I guess I'm not the target customer for the "smooth" look. I would rather ride than clean and polish my bike to make it look great. External cable routing does not bother me but maybe if I spent all my time taking pictures of my bike with scenic backgrounds it would be different.
  • 58 4
 17 year bike industry vet here, all I've done is build/service high-performance MTB. The move to internal has been one of the worst, dumbest things so far. Depending on how its routed it takes considerably longer to build the bike, and as you pointed out, makes what should be a 5 minute brake swap into a half hour of swearing. Hell I'll take a pressfit BB if that means I could get external brake routing and a ZS headset that still uses cups that press into the frame. Headset bearings that sit directly on carbon are another big no-no in my book. Its not about 'progress', because that would mean the bikes are easier to work on and hold up better. Its about selling you something 'new' and novel.
  • 26 10
 internal cable routing is for the vain and those who don't work on their own bikes.
  • 22 3
 Amen. I'd take clean external routing over internal almost any day.
  • 6 20
flag Ooofff (Mar 24, 2021 at 10:44) (Below Threshold)
 Narrr internals great looks sick, your cable don’t get cuts in them and then you leak fluid everywhere it does take longer however but, it’s not that hard I can imagine for bike shops it’s annoying since you guys wanna make big dosh
  • 7 0
 I just built up my bike with internal routing and my next one (N+1) definitely won't have this internal routing nonsense.
Look at the Deviate Highlander, that's an example of clean and external cable routing.
  • 5 1
 @hypermoto: Interested to know more about why you don't like headset bearings sitting directly into the frame/carbon? As a home mechanic I enjoy the simplicity of it and don't have to buy another expensive tool I would use infrequently. That said this is purely from a ease of service/home maintenance perspective.
  • 6 0
 Yeah, my old Patrol had internal route. My Sentinel is external! For me, it’s one of the frame highlights!!
  • 13 4
 I clean my bikes way more often than I swap brakes (never: so a one-time job that is easy with guide tubes and I have to cut the line to length anyway) and there always seems to be dirt and abrasion under the external hose, so internal all the way for me.

But then again, I also like pressfit so maybe it‘s just me. Think about it: Glue in a metal part with threads, thread in another metal part where the bearing is pressed into vs press in a bearing and done. Best compromise if frame manufacturers can‘t manufacture a bearing seat: thread-together pressfit.
  • 1 1
 @hypermoto: picked up a used e Heckler and was surprised there were no headset cups....not impressed with the finish either compared to the ZS. Does seem silly that the rear brakes are not external.
  • 2 0
 @hypermoto: all the above - I 100% agree with your opinion - the "evolution" of cable placement in frames is shocking and also there is nearly no brand that has done it "right" = easy to work on and non rattling
  • 1 0
 @listeryu: Trek. It's basically push straight through with one zip tie/snap fitting in the middle of the downtube. Holes on either end are huge
  • 1 0
 How often do you swap parts over from one bike to another? It's not that big of a deal unless you are in the 1% that buys a new bike every four months.
  • 1 0
 @b-w: Even if you frame swap (or replace a component with a new one) only every couple years, for some folks the hassle of a brake re-bleed and re-routing lines/cables is still not worth it for the minimal aesthetic payoff vs well-routed external lines.
  • 38 1
 A pink bike on Pinkbike!
  • 7 0
 And Dangerholm will still scrape the paint off
  • 1 0
 So meta...
  • 1 0
 @DizzyNinja: he could get one in raw but I'm sure he will order one with color just for the show
  • 34 2
 If you aint first, yer last.
  • 19 0
 Shake n' bake!
  • 3 0
 ...that just happened!
  • 9 0
 How much you sellin that weed for old man?
  • 4 0
 I'm not sure what to do with my hands.
  • 4 0
 Shut up Chip or I’ll go apeshit on your ass! (RIP Walker Bobby)
  • 25 0
 very confusing, first look: Last Cinto
  • 14 0
 Something a bit Yoda-ry about it.
  • 1 0
 the cranks look very rearward to me as if you could fit an e-motor in the frame
  • 17 2
 Frame sizes named for suggested rider height. Why did it take so long for someone to think of that?
  • 2 0
 Maybe it was too metric?
  • 1 0
 Meh... rider height is a bad metric to go by. I'm 195 and I will get a 185 Last frame (not this one though Smile
  • 11 1
 Really interesting looking bikes, but I haven’t been able to get over my mental hurdle regarding that frame cost
  • 29 2
 Cost as much as most other Carbon Frames from SC/ Yeti...for a made and designed in Germany it really isnt that expensive.

And the cost per unit must be way higher for 100 frames/ year.
  • 36 0
 Well, if you can get 0 bikes from Taiwan at 3000EUR for frame or 1 bike from Germany at 3900UER per frame than it looks like a bargain Wink
  • 11 0
 @NotNamed: no, it's more expensive, as the EUR 4k are without shock, I.e. 4,5k-5k with shock.

Hightower CC incl. shock: EUR 3,3k
Ibis Ripmo incl. shock: EUR 3,5k

Nevertheless: both new Last carbon frames for sure are highest quality, best weight and made in Germany.
  • 6 5
 @NotNamed: I understand why it’s more expensive. The frame, with no shock, will be over $5000 USD including shipping and import duties. A Santa Cruz of Yeti frame with a shock will come out to around $3500. In the grand scheme of things, $1500+ isn’t a ton of money, but it is in the bike world.
  • 50 2
 @onlyDH: In the grand scheme of things, $1500 is a ton of money, but it isn't in the bike world.

There, fixed it for you.
  • 5 1
 Regardless of how much it costs to produce, I just don't know who these people are that can afford these bikes. I'm not poor either, just amazed. My Ripmo AF is pretty damn fun to ride for 4500CAD complete, just seems hard to justify that on just the frame, no matter who made it. Looks nice, though!
  • 3 0
 @FloImSchnee: I didnt want to be 500€ precise ;-)
A Yeti frame runs also ~3800-4000€ (yeah with a shock) but for me the price is justified.

Labor / developement must be expensive on such a small scale- and I would be happy to support smaller brands who put the big brands to same weight/ psrformance wise.
  • 3 4
 @jake28: that’s very woke of you. I’m not wasteful, and I’ve been broke before. However, $1500 won’t change my life for the better or worse.
  • 6 1
 I would love to see an anonymous PinkBike Poll one day that asks what people do for a living to truly see how many doctors, dentists, stock brokers, real estate moguls and engineers are here. When I see "$1500+ isn't a ton of money" I have to wonder.
  • 4 0
 @dirtdiggler: Lotta credit cards out there.

Bikes for me just seem harder to justify as the fun had on a lesser bike that's ONLY 4000$ is not that far off a 10000 bike. The entry price for the sport is not severe, but the price for top end gear really high.
  • 1 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: though, the entry price is getting worse and worse ... thinking back of the value old 2000€ yts brought, now you get the entry level for 2700€ at most direct brands and the value of components is total trash
  • 1 0
 @Stokedonthis: miss the times of 2k with r2c2s or 2,5k limited Tues :/
  • 7 0
 Judging from my Last Glen, which this is a carbon copy of (pun intended) it should be a ripper. Got my Glen set up with a 160mm fork and it handeled everything I've thrown at it so far. The progression combined with a progressive spring from MRP makes it feel super playful, would suggest a linear spring for chunkier stuff tho.
  • 2 0
 Agree with this! I have a V1 Glen and it's a beast, had it setup with 160mm too! Need to work hard and upgrade to this one!
  • 4 0
 I was about to say, if the carbon is too expensive, they make a very nice alloy version.

www.pinkbike.com/news/last-bikes-launch-the-2021-glen-and-coal.html
  • 1 0
 Agreed, got the new Glen MX. Handles everything without issue, all alloy and still extremely light. last have it nailed for fanboys than can let go of the big brands.
  • 1 0
 I've been riding the Coal (alloy 160mm enduro 650b) for 4 seasons. The bike takes it all and I have zero complain about it.
Jumps, longs days on the saddle, shuttle days... So playful and efficient.
  • 2 0
 @Rideuse67: Bought a Coal in the first production year.
Frame bearings still have no play at all.
It's taken all kinds of abuse, been to bike parks and raced enduro on it, still straight as an arrow.
Hell, the Coal frame is lighter than most carbon frames on the market, and it's proven to me beyond any doubt that it's extremely durable.
My next full suspension bike will probably be another Last, I am extremely happy with mine.
  • 8 0
 Specs, looks and geo are pretty damn good on this bike! Then you see the price tag and goes wow. Then you realize it's frame only....
  • 1 0
 You could get same geo and specs on the Glen, and it's still lighter than most other carbon frames, at a lower price.
  • 4 0
 Question to armchair engineers and real bike engineers: does the flex during linkage action affect the LR due to the resistance of the material when flexing ? does it affect both compression and rebound behaviour of the bike ?.
  • 3 0
 Hhhhhhmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
  • 3 0
 Not leverage ratio, just actual spring force across the travel range. The spring force curve could be up, down, both, so it's up to the kinematics guy to decide what he wants (and the carbon guy to decide layup and starting position and determine what's best for the carbon).
  • 2 0
 Not the leverage ratio (=LR?) but the spring rate in both directions
Real armchair engineer
  • 4 0
 Armchair bro-scientist here. I guess it does speed up rebound since the rear triangle will want to spring back into it's normal position to release tension in the fibers. That's actually congruent with that interview about faster rebound trends. And obviously it adds resistance to the feel of compression too, but you could probably compensate for both via settings, and of course all of that was taken into account by the real engineers behind the frame. Now keep in mind I'm not speaking from a place of qualification or experience, but if had to guess I'd say that if you took out the shock and compressed the frame as it is, the flex wouldn't feel like friction or inefficiency but rather like a very smooth and linear leaf spring, which it is essentially, so it'd simply take on a small portion of the shock's job, both ways. Anyway, I'm thinking heavily about getting me one of these so I may see come August.
  • 3 0
 @MartinKS: you engineer armchairs? rad
  • 2 0
 @nhlevi: it works like an extra spring. so you will run your main spring softer to compensate and get the same feel/sag
  • 4 0
 You might want to check this video. Even though it is in german you can get a feel for the flex stays and their influence on the rear suspension:
videos.mtb-news.de/52987/ihr_fragt_wir_antworten_last_tarvo
  • 2 0
 @GipsyKing: Good spot! Did I catch it right that he's saying it adds nothing noticeable to the suspension?
  • 2 0
 @nhlevi: yep, there's barely any influence and the angle of flexion that the stays have to perform is only about 1°
  • 1 0
 @GipsyKing: Ah noice. But since everyone's over the top with Last bikes the flexion wouldn't really matter on the bottom line ey
  • 2 0
 Tldr: Im pretty sure the flex of the fork has an bigger impact. You could work out the combined spring rate but the math is to messy to work it out by hand.

You get a system with 2 parallel springs (they both have to compress at the same time) and a damper. You could combine the springs easily in one theoretical spring by 1/c* =1/c_frame + 1/c_shock. The only problem is that the springrate of frame has a different leverage curve than the shock link so the math is a bit messy but every good cad/fem program out there can work that out.

So it shouldn't change much as long the frame is flexible enough to enable the movement, the flex of the fork has an bigger impact
  • 1 0
 Wait

What if we used swappable carbon frame elements like leaf springs in a suspension design that uses flex to function, and then just ran a coil shock damper without a spring?

Get the no friction, linear rate of a coil or in this case carbon leaf springs, but with none of the added weight
  • 1 0
 @Civicowner: you could do that. F1 is doing that with a torsion spring and a damper.

With bikes the problem is the limited space available. Also you could damage the whole frame instead of just deform the spring by a small amount
  • 1 0
 @Civicowner: I'd really love to see someone come up with a multi-leaf suspension design. Like a Lauf fork but with a proper damper. But bloodshot pointed out the main concerns. I've also been fantasizing about a magnetic spring, potentially even electromagnetic as they seem to work really nicely in cars. But then that'd be yet another gadget to remember to charge.
  • 4 0
 As much as I love Guerrilla Gravity, having now owned two of their bikes (currently on the Trail Pistol), it's a shame they chose the shock placement they did, as it precluded their ability to have a big internal storage compartment like Last is doing with the Tarvo and now Cinto. There are some even some design cues that remind me a lot of GG's front triangle angular details.

Last is also using a more traditional style of layup and construction, so while GG is trying to keep things affordable thru robotic layup and thermoplastic style manufacturing, Last is aiming for that "hand built premium" pricing angle.

If GG didn't exist, I'd be saving my pennies for one of these.
  • 5 0
 That shock placement is the precise reason I was unable to pull the trigger on a GG. I'd really love to buy GG because even if only half of what they say about the recyclability and performance of their carbon is true, it'd still be far better than most of the competition. But man, internal storage tho..
  • 5 1
 Sooo beautiful. And really lightweight! Yes weight has been overrated a long time, but still, I really dislike the newer trend of companies going "Ahh you know, we build bikes to last now so +2kg is nothing really and new geo and stuff". Last shows it does not has to be that way.

Look at price
Nope
  • 3 0
 Fantastic looking frame!.. I can't help but think that where the article says "It uses a full complement of sealed Enduro Max bearings", it is misquoted and should actually say it uses full complement Enduro max bearings (meaning high load bearings will no race and more balls). Or... if it uses only Enduro max bearings, maybe it should say "It uses a full complement of full complement sealed Enduro Max bearings." Now that's a sentence a nerd like me can enjoy.
  • 6 1
 Debating prices? A Stumpy Evo frame is 3699€ in Germany... so well, 3999€ for german made craftmanship is NOT overpriced
  • 3 0
 that last is without shock AFAIK!
  • 1 0
 @striveCF15: if you buy a 4 k frame 500-1k for a shock won't change a lot.
  • 5 0
 Holy moly that's a beautiful bike.
  • 1 0
 The ending leverage ratio is below 2. I don't think I've seen that previously, but maybe I've just missed it. Seems like the trend recently is to start above 3 and end in the mid to upper 2s for a "supple initial stroke" and adequate ramp up to prevent bottoming. Anyone aware of other bikes that have a ratio that low or have comments on the upsides/downsides?
  • 2 0
 Foes has only been doing low leverage ratio shocks on their bikes for about 20 years. The work well.
  • 1 0
 Probably bc they reused the front, but mtbs have the fastest suspension speeds so I guess it's fine
  • 1 0
 Ecxellent looking bike and it's great that it comes in pink if you so choose (custom colors apparently) but I wonder how many people out there want something so light?

Sometimes (okay, all the time) when I am pedalling my 35+ pound bikes up the trail I want something newer and lighter, but if I am going to spend that much on a Carbon frame I would rather thenm not make it as light as possible. Save the featherweight bikes for the racers, it would be nice to have the option to be able to buy a lighter version for "Race Days Only" but I don't want the lightest possible thing...
  • 1 0
 Great looking bike (although the rear suspension is VERY progressive) and I particularly love this anti-squat plot. It gives useful information, illustrating what anti-squat does throughout the gear range at a reasonable sag vs. showing how it changes throughout the travel. To every other company: We don't need to know what the anti-squat value is at the precise moment we bottom out, nor what our pedaling force is going to do to our suspension while the wheel is completely unweighted.
  • 4 1
 Love the look, love the weight, but what does it help? They don't sell/ship to the USA!!!
  • 4 0
 heaven forbid the carbon la-up guy gets a hair in that $4800 frame.
  • 1 0
 Only bald guys for hire ^^
  • 3 2
 Last cinto and tarvo possibly the best looking frames on the market. That clean front to rear triangle line like the spur and Izzo is super. I've a bit of a chubby for Bold too though.
  • 1 0
 Spur then cinto just for looks. Don't like the look of the izzo.
And bold... I dont like internal routing so a shock inside a frame.... Pls no. (and you have to servics the shock more frequently because the oil inside will get hotter)
  • 2 0
 While the content and prose of their owners' manuals leaves much to be desired, the Germans do know how to make beautiful stuff.
  • 1 0
 I've always thought last made very polished frames. If they would just make a longer and slacker bike I'd be riding the tarvo right now.
  • 3 0
 Man I wish my dad hit me with this cinto as a kid instead of the other one
  • 2 0
 Such a clean looking bike! That would be a great quiver killer if its ride holds up to its looks.
  • 2 0
 Beautiful frame and geo seems spot on. Good job! If only I could afford one...
  • 3 0
 This was the last bike i was expecting to release
  • 2 0
 Rider size for an XL is 1,95m, or almost 6'5". O.O With a Reach of 528mm, they've done a good job on geo for tall riders.
  • 3 0
 I looks like a sextoy. Sorry, like a german sextoy. Don't ask me why.
  • 1 0
 77 degree effective seat tube angle. We're approaching unicycle geometry. Probably feels wonderfully balanced on descents, not so sure about climbing with it.
  • 3 0
 stunner!
  • 2 2
 Looks sexy, but there's something about having the bb way behind the down tube/ seat tube junction that just looks kinda strange.
  • 1 0
 Love the look, love the weight, but what does it help? They don't sell/ship to the USA. ????
  • 2 0
 i cant tell if its unique or looks alot like other bikes ive seen.
  • 1 1
 the rear looks like a Pivot and the front like a Guerrilla Gravity
  • 2 0
 Last Tarvo with EXT. Dreambike.
  • 2 0
 Is that a MIPS shower cap?
  • 2 0
 Perfect Pinkbike for Pinkbike site
  • 1 0
 Nice!!! Jörg and Jochen I just say, your bikes get more and more sexy over the years... damn it I just orded a new frame...
  • 1 0
 stil can't understand how mass produced by slave labour mainstream "boutique" frames can cost +3K??
  • 1 0
 Not so much interested in the bike, but I'd love to try the suspension package
  • 1 0
 @henryquinney correct, you may be.
  • 2 4
 Frame looks almost like an old 2010 Specialized Stumpjumper without the Horst linkages and the top tube to seat tube brace. Guess it's a pretty nice design that some companies have been copying for quite some time.
  • 1 3
 looks exactly like a pivot switchblade
  • 1 0
 Looks rad, but frame cost is $4700.00 USD. Whoa.
  • 2 1
 How expensive is it..... Doesn't matter if it's in stock it will sell!!
  • 2 0
 Pinkbike. Hell ya.
  • 1 0
 But will it be the last, pink Last bike on Pinkbike?
We may never noSmile
  • 1 0
 I wonder if they'll make.... Any more..... YEAAAHHHHH!!!!!!
  • 1 0
 lovely looking frame.....
  • 1 0
 shouldn't the colorway be black and yellow?
  • 1 0
 inverted forks on a mtb are a bad idea.
  • 1 1
 High Roller front, Minion Rear?
  • 1 1
 nice bike im not digging pink colour.
  • 13 0
 I think you're on the wrong website.
  • 5 0
 @Vrooom666 doesn’t like Pinkbike?
  • 1 1
 It better be filled with gold or you are getting ripped off.
  • 1 1
 oh look, more fruity bikes
  • 1 0
 A pink bike on pinkbike
  • 2 4
 Yummy. Toss some axs bits and Fox Factory on that pink bike and go!
  • 5 2
 No. The pale shock and fork are perfect. Sexy
  • 4 1
 @Monsterman156: The pale shock and fork are also the best suspension out there, no idea why anyone would replace with a Fox product.
  • 1 3
 @Imabigboy82: most of us would never be able to utilize the performance benefits so why pay the premium?
  • 3 0
 @giantkeeper: what if i told you that working suspension is noticeable to all riders, not just for pros?

What if i told you that you could have more traction, control, stability and less fatigue
  • 1 0
 @Civicowner: Frankly, I have little interest. I like what I ride and ride what I like. Not sure how this turned in to a suspension pissing contest. Is it because I said "bike" and not "frame" in my initial post? Boring
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