First Look: The Shout - Trust Performance's New Long Travel Linkage Fork

Sep 4, 2019
by Mike Kazimer  
Trust Shout fork


Trust Performance's 'Message' linkage fork made waves when it debuted last year thanks to its unique look, sky-high price, and long list of claimed performance benefits. The fact that Trust was founded by industry veterans Dave Weagle, Jason Schiers, and Hap Selig didn't hurt things either. Now, that fork is being joined by a new longer travel sibling, the Shout.

The Shout has 178mm of travel, but because its axle path isn't entirely linear (Trust call it 'contour travel') it should be able to replace 29" forks with between 160-180mm of travel, or between 160-170mm of travel on a 27.5” wheeled bike.

It's constructed with a single piece carbon chassis and steerer tube, and uses a twin-tube, thru-shaft damper that's housed in the right leg, along with two air springs, one in each leg. How much does it cost? The Shout will leave your wallet $1,975 USD lighter.


Shout Fork Details
• 178mm contour travel
• Air sprung
• Carbon chassis, aluminum pivots
• Externally adjustable rebound, low-speed compression
• Axle-to-crown: 580mm
• 250-hour service interval
• 15 x 110mm Boost spacing
• Lifetime bearing warranty
• Weight: 2170 grams (claimed)
• MSRP: $1975 USD
www.trustperformance.com

Trust Shout fork

bigquotesShout is long-travel suspension, designed to match the performance capabilities of today’s long-travel enduro bikes. Dave Weagle

Just like the shorter travel Message, the Shout uses a trailing, multi-link design that allows it to maintain the same mechanical trail number throughout its travel, which is said to provide very consistent handling at the beginning, middle, and end of the stroke. The trail number may remain the same, but remember that the Shout doesn't have a 1:1 leverage ratio like a telescoping fork - it has an axle path and leverage ratio that's closer to what you'd find on a rear suspension design.

An aluminum lever allows riders to choose between three compression modes: firm, medium, and open. Both the medium and open modes are independently adjustable, which makes it possible to fine tune the feel of those settings to suit the terrain and a rider's preferences. The firm mode operates a little differently than a typical lockout – it only engages after the fork goes through 20% of its travel. That means that the initial portion of the stroke is available to take the edge off the chattery sections of trail that can feel uncomfortably harsh with a traditional lockout.

The Shout comes with three "Huck Puck" volume spacers installed in each air spring, and up to two more can be installed on each side to create additional bottom out resistance, a procedure that only requires two Allen keys. There's clearance for up to a 29 x 2.6” tire or 27.5 x 2.8”, and claimed weight for the fork is 2170 grams.

Trust Shout fork
An air spring is housed in each leg; setup begins by inflating each side to match the rider's body weight.
Trust Shout fork
There are three compression settings, with additional fine tuning options available for the mid- and open positions.


Mike Levy went over the details and backstory of the Message fork in extensive detail, and you can read about Trust Performance's origins here. The Message's final performance report was a bit mixed, pun intended. There were scenarios where its handling, especially in the corners, put it above its traditional telescoping peers, but it didn't deliver the most comfortable ride. For a 130mm fork that's not the end of the world, but the expectations for how the Shout should feel are going to be even higher considering the amount of travel and the terrain it's designed to handle.


Trust Shout fork

Ride Impressions

I only have one single lap on the Shout so far, although it was a good long one, beginning from the top of the Garbanzo Zone in the Whistler Bike Park and heading back down to the base area nearly 4,000 vertical feet below.

The fork, which was mounted to a Yeti SB150, wasn't the absolute final production version, but its handling certainly piqued my interest, especially during high-speed bermed turns. Most of us unconsciously prepare for the front end of a full-suspension bike to dive a bit in that situation, a response developed from years of riding traditional telescoping forks. That wasn't the case with the Shout; it felt as if the handlebar was staying in the same position, but the front wheel was sucking up all of the braking bumps the wheel was rolling over. On the rougher terrain the Shout felt calm and composed, and I didn't experience any undue harshness in my hands or forearms. It was uncannily smooth, a sensation I hadn't been expecting after hearing various reports about the shorter travel Message.

A production version is set to arrive any day now – I'll be mounting that up and putting it to the test this fall in order to see how it stacks up against the other top competitors in this category.







226 Comments

  • 360 6
 guys if none of us buys it for the next 6 months it'll drop to $975
  • 14 11
 Or if they take off we´ll find OEM into production bikes for this price. So really wanting all dentist buy these now...
  • 19 9
 Sorry. I just bought two, and a Message also. I got an email for $250 off of the Message so that made it super affordable.
  • 10 8
 They dropped the price of the Message after sales were doing well.
  • 10 3
 I'll Trust you to Shout this Message...
  • 18 2
 This just in...Weagle is being sued for patent infringement by a praying mantis.
Let's go to the our reporter live on the scene:
media.giphy.com/media/fSONfbG5ieaEo/giphy.gif
  • 8 2
 Anyone a little bugged by the names for these? I think they named it the shout because of how loud the price is.
  • 5 0
 @rcrocha: What's the email? I'm guessing that's their next fork?
  • 2 0
 @rcrocha: jesus... send some of your money over to me dude i can't even afford a new telescopic fork
  • 1 1
 @ProvoMtb: Yeah, completely. All feel super pretentious
  • 10 0
 @lawrence: Pretty obvious what the next fork will be:

1. Message (Trail)
2. Shout (Enduro/AM)
3. Scream (DH)
  • 12 0
 @B650wagon:
4. Whisper (linkage rigid fork so people that ride cross/rigid bikes can find a way to spend more money on the fork)
  • 1 0
 agreed with ya, gonna wait till $100.
  • 3 0
 Will be hilarious if Rock Shox and Fox have to copy this design because it works so much better.
  • 178 6
 It's new...and different...I don't like it....it looks like prawn claws... I will suspend my interest until such a time as it gains traction. At which point once it's level pegging with the likes of Fox and Rockshox and everyone is using them, I will reluctantly purchase a bike that has it fitted. From then on I will most likely be very impressed with its performance and state that I was one of the first to realise its potential and was a big fan from the start. lots of love Pinkbike comment cynic
  • 10 0
 They say it has great traction Wink
  • 15 0
 Prawn claws has really got me. I'm trying to look busy at work and I can stop laughing...
  • 1 0
 @hamplanet: naw, prawns was the message. This is fiddler crab. Or lobster. lol
  • 19 5
 I'm all up for innovation............. but damn that thing is fugly...........
  • 23 0
 District 9 vs Elysium
  • 11 1
 Looks sick! Love it. Would love a spin on one of these things.
  • 6 0
 Hahaha! The Prawn Fork!
  • 8 0
 Paint it green call it the praying mantis.
  • 2 0
 Comment gold here XD
  • 119 3
 I'd be super interested but I'm in a market for a 179mm fork, so sadly no dice
  • 35 4
 SRAM says best they can do is 178.99. Take it or leave it.
  • 3 0
 This one got a public LOL at a very awkward moment.
  • 104 6
 That would explain the call from my dentist this morning suggesting I get a check up.
  • 1 0
 Right up my alley!
  • 59 2
 like a bulldog licking chilli off a cactus
  • 48 0
 I have genuinely no clue what this means, but I love it.
  • 13 0
 @mackster23: it’s a Brit thing. ‘Like a bulldog chewing a wasp’ refers to something pretty ugly. I’m guessing ‘licking chilli off a cactus’ is the next level lol
  • 11 18
flag WAKIdesigns (Sep 4, 2019 at 2:48) (Below Threshold)
 I exploded laughter hahahaha
  • 4 0
 Bulldog licking p!ss of a nettle.
  • 4 0
 See also: Like a bulldog licking piss off a nettle.
  • 5 1
 Is there an echo in here?
  • 1 0
 @excavator666: my personal favourite
  • 2 0
 I'd say like Harvey Keitel eating lemons
  • 2 0
 @excavator666: I love that movie too
  • 3 15
flag WAKIdesigns (Sep 4, 2019 at 9:24) (Below Threshold)
 Like a bulldog waiting for a Canadian chopper...
  • 2 1
 @excavator666: so goddamn funny! so goddamn funny!
  • 1 0
 @tobiusmaximum: do you have cactus or chili in Britain?
  • 4 0
 @acali: I’ve got both in my house, have you got bulldogs in America?
  • 2 0
 @tobiusmaximum: as an American, the saying "like a bulldog eating mayonaisse" has a completly different meaning. Big Grin
  • 2 1
 I just started cracking up in class, tried to hold it together in front of my crazy asian professor
  • 1 0
 @tobiusmaximum: Pretty sure, those are the round fuzzy creatures with bushy tails and a black mask of fur over there eyes? Think I saw one digging in my trash last night.
  • 1 0
 @mackster23: Nobody knows what it means, but its provocative!
  • 2 0
 @acali: that’s the ones! Don’t let them near the mycelium!
  • 60 6
 It's a perfect match for 1x13 drivetrain.
  • 44 0
 I want to know what it looks like on a POLE Stamina with FLEXX bars and ZIPP zeromoto wheels
  • 6 0
 Does the "lockout" have something to do with caps?
  • 11 0
 @mtbikeaddict: I was SHOUTing
  • 6 0
 @gcrider: ALL CAPS! LOUD NOISES! So in that light, it could've been called The PB Comments.
But then that would say "Trust the PB comments", and that's rarely a good idea. Big Grin
  • 5 0
 @gcrider: Let it all out!!! These are the things we can do without... Come Onn! I’m talking to you.. Come Onnn!!!
  • 1 0
 You forgot the Spengle wheels!
  • 1 0
 @Notmeatall: and a Tioga Disk Drive Rear Wheel on the back so you can SHOUT and play the bongos while riding your bike.
  • 1 0
 and a CeramicSpeed Telescoping MTB Drivetrain!
  • 1 0
 And MAVIC DEEMAX
  • 32 5
 You know you make me wanna (Shout!)
Kick my heels up and (Shout!)
Throw my hands up and (Shout!)
Throw my head back and (Shout!)
Come on now (Shout!)
  • 5 2
 Shout the front door !
  • 18 1
 Shout Shout Let it all out These are the things I can do without C'mon I'm talking to you C'mon.
  • 11 6
 @PinkyScar: You have a Simple Mind dude.
  • 11 1
 @ImAManCheetah88: You mean Tears for Fears, right?
  • 3 1
 @nozes: Always get the two mixed up.
  • 1 0
 @ImAManCheetah88: nope, he has some SweetBox..
  • 3 0
 Lil bit softer now...
  • 3 0
 Should of called it “careless whisper”
  • 34 9
 HOLY CRAP THAT THING IS FUGLY!! Oscar Pistorius wants his running blades back!!
  • 19 4
 That guy is not going to need them anytime soon, he is busy getting rammed in jail.
  • 1 0
 @BobLogiii: True lol
  • 6 5
 @BobLogiii: still disappointed how much that guy threw away attractive spouse and wealth.
  • 11 6
 @cyrways: You're disappointed? Because he threw away his wealth and spouse?
And what about that poor girl that's now fuking dead??
  • 5 3
 @pakleni: I believe threw away spouse includes that sentiment but sure pander away...
  • 29 11
 I am genuinely interested... it seems that 130 message was a bit of a miss due to Downcountry market having too many weight weenie genes in them. But 2200g for an Enduro/ SX fork seems legit.

If only trust would like to send me one for troll-review... I’d promise to take it all over local group rides for people to see and squish it
  • 29 4
 OMG @mikekazimer please get Waki to do regular product reviews! They would be a complete Alice in Wonderland acid trip gong show, but I guarantee your clicks would be through the roof!
  • 38 14
 Introduction:

The Shout, may shout "I am different, I am expensive, you are poor and conformist and you better fix those fillings, I may give you a good price" but trying different things is indeed necessary, one cannot bounce between Lyrik with shitty bushing fit and a creaking crown of a 36. I want the shout like I want to make love to a dwarf person. Unlike haters not liking it for the looks, the only thing I am worried is that I will like it. So much that I may want to get even more adventurous with my choices, only to find myself wishing to dip a cactus in chilli sauce and put it on Reverb dropper instead of saddle, hoping it will SAG.

The fork:
Unboxing has been a walk in the park, fork comes at 2200g which roughly translates to...
  • 3 1
 @bishopsmike: I picture it in the same style as the "Ozzie Man" videos on youtube
  • 2 5
 @WAKIdesigns: "Dwarf person"?? Really? Are you adding an extra word just to make them sound more important?
  • 2 0
 @bishopsmike: please don’t
  • 2 3
 @Garpur44: I just raise it to hovering with bare arse over lowered spec command post with a cactus previously dipped in tabasco sauce. One shaky finger on the lever and please get ready for The Shout!

(Clong!) Aaaaaaaah! Aaaaaaaaaah! Tsssss! Aaaaaaaaah! Tsssssss! Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa Ghaaaaaaaaaawd! It burns! Aaaah God it butns!
  • 24 4
 Love people pushing the boundaries of design and engineering but goodness the look of this is ghastly...
  • 17 2
 I personally don't mind an ugly product if it performs well. But I do mind the types of personalities who will try to strike up a conversation about the ugly product and add 3 hours onto every single ride when I'm out to ride, not socialize.
  • 3 2
 You can just flip the bird and ride away. Simpler and faster. Now if you are locked in the gondola and it stops for hours because of the wind or some random issue, you are fucked.
  • 5 0
 or as Brendog said. :" I am here to make money not friends".
You can use that as a base.
  • 18 0
 Can’t wait for a 197.8mm DH fork called Scream.
  • 16 1
 Some of the greatest designers in the industry and the best they could come up with was "Shout"?
  • 12 0
 Maybe it just isn't a silent fork. Some forks are silent, some are huffing and puffing but this one is clearly shouting with every hit it takes. A bit like womens tennis.
  • 3 0
 Hollaaaaaaahhhhh!
  • 19 0
 Cause Fox 36 is so creative. Who gives a crap what it's called.
  • 3 0
 It appears that their first alternate -- "Wheeze" -- didn't make it past the first round of focus group testing...
  • 12 0
 This fork really needs bright green color on a green bike so it completes the praying mantis look.
  • 8 1
 I know engineers gotta innovate so fair play for inventing this.
My question is why other racing disciplines haven't developed a similar design or if they have, why haven't they been widely adopted? Motocross or MotoGP racing for example where suspension is key?
To the untrained eye it resembles the suspension on a Speedway bike, not known for their versatility.
  • 2 0
 I’d personally rather see stronger or one piece crowns and needle bearings, a la cannondale but two legs, instead of bushings at a modest weight increase.
  • 10 1
 Motocross and motogp are very different sports then ours. While they all have two wheels what you use the forks for is pretty different. It didnt take off in motogp because you couldn't weight the front contact patch adequately. MX may see a little bit more of a perk but riding techniques where steepening the head tube angle intentionally are still there. Mountain biking though; may be it's perfect home. With consistent head tube angle and resisting ro dive, it suits our weird sport pretty well.
  • 2 0
 Don't some BMW adventure bikes have a linkage fork? I seem to recall hearing something about that once.
  • 4 0
 @spaceofades: The BMW R1150/1200/1250/1300GS models use a telelever system, it's a combination of telescopic stanchions and a wishbone/shock absorber. Have a look at www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cfrvd5FyWSs for an explanation, you can skip to the 2:55 mark to avoid the other stuff.
  • 1 0
 @Blackers: and if I remember correctly they had that system just for the sake of difference. It was absolutely worse than any other classic system.
  • 2 0
 @Steventux The forces on the forks are different from downhill mountain biking in the other sports you mention, and motor bikes are much heavier. The lighter weight of a bike could be what makes this a better design because the suspension is engaged easier than with telescopic tubes with more stiction.
  • 2 0
 @Archimonde: Telelever and Duolever have both received pretty positive reviews overall.

The main reason linkage forks aren't used in MotoGP is that the packaging constraints mean they can't get the weight of the bike far enough forwards - some of those things have the front wheels buzzing the radiator. Linkage forks have been used in MX with success (Roger DeCoster in the 1980s) but were abandoned for weight and cost at the time. Also hard to get a lot of travel out of them because the links need to get longer and longer, which in turn takes up more space.
  • 5 0
 The big thing with 2 wheel motorsport is front wheel traction, because that is really the primary thing that is keeping the bike up right - if you loose the front wheel traction, especially in a corner with trail braking, you are going down. Rear traction is less important - dirt bikes, wsbk bikes, and motogp bikes all drift when coming out of corners. Anti dive, which linkage forks aim to use, basically stiffens up the suspension when braking, which means you get less traction. Bimota Tessi had a prototype with anti dive linkage, and it never gained popularity because the front response wasn't as confident as traditional telescopic forks. With mountain bikes, there is more leeway, so you can make anti dive work to your advantage, because you are not usually using the front brake when turning. Having spend like 10 minutes on the Message, I can see how for flatter trail work, the anti dive works better for more precise cornering. However, I have doubts about the Shout, because anti-dive means less compliance, and you don't want that for an enduro bike.
  • 1 0
 @spaceofades: They do, but the design is different. Its not about trail or anti-dive, they are focused more on unsprung mass reduction and less bending.
  • 4 0
 @phops: The Trust forks don't actually have significant anti-dive in the first half of the travel, in fact they're in pro-dive for some of that, similar to a telescopic. The idea of anti-dive (or at least less pro-dive) however is MORE traction - you keep the fork in a softer part of its travel with more travel available, with less contact patch load variation due to the centre of mass moving around. This is achieved on road bikes quite quantifiably (look at the old Britten as an example), but it's disconcerting to the rider because you expect the front end to dive and it doesn't. Having ridden a Motion E18 fork with very strong anti-dive, the initial impression is that the fork doesn't work under brakes, but when you pay attention to it, it's actually extremely good at keeping the front wheel on the ground under hard braking, without harshness. The Structure Cycleworks bike is much less extreme in that regard, but still very good under brakes.
  • 2 1
 @phops:

And yet the Britten won a lot of races...

The big issue with linkage forks is not one of engineering, but one of familiarity. If you start racing bikes pre teens on teles and are then asked to adapt to a fork in your 20s where mass transfer and HA changes are fundamentally different you're not going win races. And pro teams rely on results to attract and keep sponsors. Typically, you get half to one full season to prove yourself... If you don't, you get dropped... So no one is going to take the risk given the lack of time available to adapt.
  • 2 0
 @VorsprungSuspension: Steve, have you ridden Message, Motion and Structure as well? How would you compare them to each other?
Besides different anti-dive behaviour of these forks, they greatly differ in axle path as well. Structure must be totally different.
  • 1 0
 @rhinochopig:

A motorcycle winning a few races isn't proof that linkage front suspension works. Technology is out there, and teams innovate all the time. If it was a viable alternative, it would be on bikes today. Take the rotary engine for example - Norton built a 700cc rotary bike that pumps out 200 hp, more than some 1000cc I4 bikes, with way less ew While seems good on paper, it turns out that the more frequent power pulses from the rotary are actually worse for traction than wider spaced pulses of the inline. Or more recently, I4 seemingly has the advantages over V4 in weight and compactness, but V4s are winning more races.

Also disagree about familiarity. Riders use prototype components during races all the time.
  • 1 0
 @VorsprungSuspension:

The physics don't quite add up with your explanation. If you have anti-dive, your effective suspension is firmer, since you have both the spring and the anti-dive effect forcing the wheel down. Even if your anti dive is preventing your suspension from diving into the higher spring rate, there is still a force that is resisting the suspension from compressing, and when the wheel encounters a bump, it will transfer more to the handlebars than if you didn't have anti-dive. So the advantage of anti dive is not really a spring rate consideration as much as a geometry consideration in keeping the head angle steeper, which works well for trail bikes that have short travel.

However, for enduro bikes, the modern longer travel air forks are quite linear due to larger negative chambers, especially without volume spacers, and some people run coil forks, the advantages of which you guys state on your website. So even if the front end dives, you still have plenty of compliance at a softer spring rate, and the bikes are long and slack enough to not have to worry about the geometric trail. So you don't want anti-dive ruining this, especially in the latter part of the travel where the air suspension starts to ramp up.

As for motorcycles, especially sportbikes, the situation is a little bit different. You want the front end dive not because of feel, but because you want to reduce the trail and make the bike easier to tip into the corner. With the exception of small cc bikes that are set up for more lean and maximum corner speed, most sport bikes prioritize exit on the power out of a corner, where they make up the lap time, which requires very good front end stability since you are on the throttle as you are leaned over. As a result, trail braking is required for good turning so that you reduce the trail/wheelbase by diving the forks which makes the bike turn in better.

Keep in mind that back in the Britten 1000 days, the tire situation was much different. Corner speeds were way lower because the tires did not grip as well laterally, so riders like Mickey Doohan used to ride all crossed up in corners. A bike like the 1000 could have worked against the compeition given how bikes were ridden. Now, in motoGP, guys are dragging shoulders because the corner speeds are significantly higher, and require much more lateral offset of center of mass for balance. And at high lean angles, any small disturbance to the front can result in you going down.
  • 4 0
 @phops: your understanding of the physics of anti-dive is somewhat incomplete. Net force - not absolute force in any direction - is what compels motion of the suspension. When your are in a state of balanced extensive (eg anti-dive) and compressive (eg increased normal load) forces earlier in the travel, net forces induced by bumps can move the suspension with, at worst, no increased force over a traditional system - they actually move the suspension with REDUCED force on anything that isn't completely linear (ie 99% of forks out there right now, which are air-sprung, or anyone running their coil forks not crazy stiff). For systems with a particular anti-dive profile (ie decreasing anti-dive throughout the travel) you can further improve this, because the increase in spring force will be countered by a decrease in anti-dive force, leading to a net force profile equivalent to that of a LOWER spring rate. This can be achieved with anti-squat in the rear as well, which is actually exactly what dw-link does and is explained in their patents.

Anti-dive also reduces motion of the CoM relative to the wheels, which has several benefits, including less low-frequency oscillation requiring damping and less lag in the load transfer (and thus grip available) to the front wheel - this is only really critical on roadgoing vehicles, not so much MTB. However, the benefits there are pretty small compared to weight distribution (packaging) and outright weight considerations for MotoGP etc. There are some Moto2 teams using linkage front ends however.

However, the biggest advantage of anti-dive, particularly for off-road applications, is that you considerably increase traction during rebound events (for systems utilising any counter-rotational aspect of the axle-carrying link to generate the anti-dive) which critically is the only time that tyre contact with the ground can ever be lost or substantially reduced, because the rotation of the wheel itself causes the extension of the suspension whenever there is reduced vertical load on the axle. That is why they generate quantifiably improved grip on rougher terrain - there is better contact with the ground and reduced variation in contact patch load. For roadgoing applications, linkage forks need to be very laterally stiff to maintain good grip under brakes however, because any flexural chatter can lead to variations in CPL that can't be overcome by the spring force since (if there's 100% anti-dive) there may not be any substantially increased spring preload on the wheel. If they can do that - and the Britten fork did, as does Duolever - then they can offer considerable improvements in braking distance and maintaining slip.
  • 2 0
 @VorsprungSuspension: I'd be interested in a complete Vorsprung review of this fork. I've enjoyed nerding out on your previous videos and have found them informational and entertaining. Please.
  • 1 0
 @trails801: Definitely! Steve's descriptions and explanations are probably the best I've read. Weaggle was helpfull, too, back in the days, but he was always hiding key points so one had to find that out by himself.
  • 7 0
 I love the way people think about the look of this fork. I mean, if you go for a traditional look, the fram should be really in line with a motorcycle frame: One shock directly driven from the swingarm to the seatpost, a traditional front triangle and a telescopic fork.
Yet here we are with 4 bar, DwLink, single pivot, Linkage Driven shock, NaildR3ACT, McPherson struts and all sorts of black magic heckty that delivers very intersting flavors to the ride.
This is the first linkage fork thing that the linkage thing is not in the headset area. This alone makes this thing way sexier than other comparable front suspensions.
Thumbs up for Trust people. Would have one if it didn't cost close to 9 thousand money in brazil.
  • 1 0
 Well, there aren't many direct driven rear shocks in MX or street bikes either beyond the absolute cheapest bikes. They're all linkage driven for some of the same reasons they are in bicycle suspension. Reduce brake influences and manage the spring curve.
  • 2 0
 @cueTIP: Agreed, but only when you inspect the MX bike, you could tell a difference. From 5 meters away and a glance, they all are look a like. All vanta-blacked out, you can tell a difference from a trek, polygon, mondraker, Comencal and YT DH rigs from 5 meters away. Not the same result with a CRF 250 R and a KX 250 F.

My point is, we have som much diversity when it comes to frame, why not take advantage from engeneering and have some diversity for the front end too?
  • 8 1
 "it felt as if the handlebar was staying in the same position, but the front wheel was sucking up all of the braking bumps the wheel was rolling over"

Color me reluctantly interested!
  • 1 0
 Sounds like it doesn't bounce off impacts as much and instead fully absorbs them. It actually does what a fork is supposed to.
  • 9 0
 Imagine this humiliator of a fork mounted on a Polygon.
  • 2 0
 If I had money to burn I'd put one on mine
  • 1 0
 ... If H R Giger art pieces featured bicycles....
  • 1 0
 Ha! Polygon Humiliator
  • 1 0
 With Spengle wheels. I'd love to shred a rig with these specifications!
  • 5 0
 I've been on this fork for a few months and really enjoy it. In a way, it handles like it has less travel (a good thing) and plows like it has more travel (also a good thing).
  • 4 0
 Serious question: Did you buy the fork for retail or was it given to you try?

I feel like reviews of a fork this expensive need to be done by people who have paid actual money for it to be taken seriously. It’s kinda like reviewing a $20k bike, that you didn’t pay for...

And the question I have for anyone that paid real money for it: Would you buy another one when the new version of it comes out?
  • 3 0
 This is truly a WTF, without telescopic fork moment. Mike, I only hope you are going to contrast and have a shootout with Structure cycles integrated frame variation of this concept. That and a Proflex 857 and Girven fork for good measure!
  • 2 0
 No love love for Whyte PRST?
  • 3 0
 I've been rocking a Message all summer and it is LEGIT! Seriously, the looks are stratifying (I love it myself) but people need to overcome the looks and just try the damn things. They are serious traction factories. Especially on climbs and corners. Keep loose, square your shoulders up to the corners and let 'er rip. You are simply rewarded!
  • 6 0
 wheres the video of compressing it?
  • 12 0
 Slo-mo huck to flat please PB
  • 5 0
 I don't know about shouting, but after seeing that my eyes are screaming. Razz
  • 5 0
 Always been for function over looks, 100% of the times, every time...but I've just found the exception with this fork.
  • 2 0
 Bike Rumor is predicting the this coming year as the year of the linkage fork. With your closing statement on what you experienced in performance without the diving we are all interested and are looking to hear, feel and ride more. Thanks.
  • 1 0
 Well the night's begun and you want some fun Do you think you're gonna find it You got to treat yourself like number one Do you need to be reminded It doesn't matter what you do or say Just forget the things that you've been told We can't do it any other way Everybody's got to rock n roll yay Shout it, shout it, shout it out loud Shout it, shout it, shout it out loud
  • 2 0
 Waiting for bike brands to design frames around this fork. If the head angle increases so much when diving then this it´s a hell of interesting point to have a really allrounded bike...
  • 1 0
 Doubt it will happen. Head angle increase is not as big of an issue as people make it seem. Its not like mountain bikers are trail braking into corners a la motogp style.
  • 1 0
 @phops: I mean we can have steeper HA bikes which pedals better. No need for 65 maybe 67 and equals like a 64...
  • 2 0
 @PauRexs:

Head angle needs to be slack for certain reasons besides geometric trail. Wheelbase is arguably more important than geometric trail, and also, slacker head angles align the fork more with the vector of impact to the wheel, so you get better suspension action and less bending of the fork.

The message works well for shorter travel bikes, because it lets you keep the geometric trail that would decrease with the head angle collapse, but it does so with a price - it moves the wheel back, putting more of your weight on it in the process. For trail riding this is not really that bad, since you arent sending huge rock gardens at speed. But for enduro, where the longer wheelbase gives you that sweet stability where you don't feel like you are going to go OTB, you don't want the wheel moving back.

As for pedaling, thats not a HA issue as much as a design issue. Just have a long front center to make up for slack head angle. Hill climb guys with custom long swingarms on their mx guys have known this for ages. Pole and Nicolai got it right the first time, others are starting to catch on with the steep seat tube angles.
  • 1 0
 @phops: So now with longer reachs it wouldn´t be that of an issue the wheel moving back and going OTB? Here they just say the opposite... that in berms the bike looks much more planted and higher bars...
  • 1 0
 @phops: I like to trail brake into corners. The hard part is letting it go early enought to maintain momentum.
  • 2 0
 @PauRexs:

Again, it depends on the ride. If you take a regular trail bike and put a trust message on, its gonna improve the handling on your local trails due to all its advantages.

With enduro, the requirements are a little bit different. Enduro bikes with their 180mm forks are meant to tackle rock gardens like you see on world cup dh circuits, albeit not at the same speed. For this, you want to minimize the weight over the front, so it doesn't get caught in ruts and under braking you are more balanced. The whole mullet bike thing is also partially about that - having shorter chainstays with 27.5 wheel allows riders to get more over the rear wheel.

The big complaint with the Message was that it wasn't good over chundery terrain that has repetitive hits. This is pretty much on par with what enduro is.
  • 1 0
 @phops: Nicee insight!Thx
  • 3 0
 Would like to see a comparo against the Manitou Mezzer. I believe the Mezzer weighs less and is half the price but is conventional.
  • 6 0
 $1975.....jesus
  • 2 1
 marketing wise thst is a perfect name for this fork...Shout, as in, look at me, look at my bike, I'm progressive, I'm ahead of the curve. lots of riders might like the appeal of this fork to up their parking lot pre-ride show game.
  • 1 0
 I would have called it the Mantis. Sounds like this fork does what it claims. Bikes can easily cost over 10,000$ these days. This fork will never be on a budget bike. I wonder if it will gain popularity or end up in the " what were they thinking ? " Pile.
  • 2 0
 Twice the price of a Mezzer, that's a lot of dough, BUT, I'd buy it .... just need to work a little extra and convince the accountant (wife).

So where can we demo this thing? Outerbike Moab?
  • 3 0
 I'm pretty excited about this. I'd love to try one someday. I rode a buddy's message around in the parking lot and it was definitely different.
  • 2 1
 The axle to crown length on this is bigger than a Fox 40, WAY bigger than 36 or Lyrik. Seems like a total change in weight distribution would be expected on the bike with that lofty a front end, even before the fork starts doing its thing. How does that not matter when slapping it on frames not designed for that??
  • 2 0
 What are you talking about? The 29 inch Fox 36 would have an ATC of 587mm if it could be run at 180mm, roughly 7mm LONGER than this fork. At 170mm it is 577mm which is a 3mm difference.
  • 1 2
 @cueTIP: I ride 27.5 bikes. I’m very open to be proven wrong here (I want one of these myself), but I doubt I could slap a 170mm 29er fork on my 27.5 bike and expect to be able to weight the front end as well as running something with a lower axle to crown.

The market for this is, by definition, people like me who want to put it on their existing bike. It’s already a bit of a leap of faith here to invest in one, just wondering how the company justifies a single A2C for such a wide range of bikes (160mm 27.5 to 180mm 29er). Maybe the ride is just so different to make that number not super relevant for ride feel. If that’s true I want to know why.
  • 1 0
 @psychobikere: Then don't stick it on your bike. I had no issues upforking my 27.5" bike from 150mm to 170mm with the commensurate increase in ATC. However, I'd love to slap one of these onto my 29" bike.
  • 2 0
 Everyone needs to stop talking about price rather than performance. If it rides better and it really does deliver on that alone then you know you'll buy it. I wanted to see some clips and a compression shot. Come on PB!
  • 4 1
 Stick this on a matte black megatower, holy hell would look awesome!!!!
Might make me....https://youtu.be/VLnWf1sQkjY
  • 1 0
 @oldschoolpl510: Amazing, perfect match. Design wise looks like something you might’ve found in Holland a hundred years ago.
  • 4 0
 Bring it on more innovative stuff on the scene!
  • 3 0
 I get funny looks with my C-dale Lefty. Imagine the puzzled looks you'd get with this thing.
  • 2 0
 I love the lefty.
  • 5 1
 Its ugly and I want to try it!!!
  • 3 0
 If I can push this thing harder into corners and faster through chunder, I'm all about it!
  • 1 0
 I enjoy a marvellous Turner DHR frame that deserves this fork in it's prototype carbon aluminum type. Dave W PLEASE make that cheaper type a real posibility. Thanks in advance !!!!
  • 4 2
 I'm waiting for the inevitable PB pun-meisters to start going on about Trusting us and Shouting Messages...
  • 4 2
 And still no head to head comparison of trust message against motion e18 fork !
  • 2 1
 E18 must move to bearings instead of bushings to be competitive. They are lighter and cheaper but use bushings!
  • 3 0
 @fluider: Motion changed from bushings to bearings a while ago, all forks ship with bearings.
  • 1 1
 @VonFalkenhausen: Good to hear about that. You bought one? How do you know?
  • 3 0
 @fluider: It was a running change made early in production to go with all bearings. It has been reported in various reviews and forums. They have been converting early production forks from bushings to bearings for some customers and reviewers. I don't own one but I have been following the development and I am waiting for them to release multiple spring weights, I may become a customer after that. They have just today reduced their pricing which is nice. I am also interested in the Trust forks, I have always liked linkage forks and I have been waiting for someone to develop a truly modern one for a long time, now we suddenly have multiple choices.
  • 1 1
 @VonFalkenhausen: yes, the time is suddenly interesting. Do you know bearings sizes used? Or at least pivot sizes?
  • 2 0
 @fluider: I do not have any other details, but you could reach out to Motion, they seem to be responsive to customer questions.
  • 3 0
 Can't wait to hear how it rides. Too bad they cost so much.
  • 1 0
 Have they fixed the flaws from the Message? If I'm remembering right there were some issues with the brake hose routing point from the PB review?
  • 2 3
 Imagine forks have been like this since the beginning of mountain biking. Now imagine you are coming up with the current configuration (legs and stanchions that is) to a trade show. It would be a revolution in suspension.
There is no way I am putting such a complex thing on any of my bikes. And, besides being complex, it's so UGLY!
  • 4 0
 We had the old AMP linkage, Girvin linkage and Lawill Leader forks. AMP and Girvin forks would blow through pivot bushings at a mad rate. But riders liked how they worked. I keep reading that the headangle remains constant through travel which is impossible. The TRAIL remains more consistent. Until the linkage folds back at the end of travel unless it doesn’t go that far or the way the linkage moves adapts for that. I’d like to see a slo mo of the fork working.
  • 1 0
 I personally find it really ugly, but if it offered a significant riding advantage I'd ride one. I'll probably not find out for a long time.
  • 3 0
 It needs to be raced, pro enduro, survive a season, then lets talk.
  • 3 0
 Too bad it costs as much as a complete bike.
  • 3 0
 The key is to get even uglier bike frame.
  • 2 0
 I'd like to see one of these on a Chromag Doctahawk, seeing as how they claim linkage forks work really well on hardtails
  • 1 0
 Pinkbike should make some Frankenbike made up of the latest whacky technology and run it down A-Line.

-These forks
-Telescoping Drivetrain
-What else?
  • 1 0
 Let us know how the climbing performance is! So many of the recent bikes lose front wheel traction on steep, loose, seated climbs.
  • 1 0
 Eah but its fit only to Unno frames, or some others with raw Carbone finish.
  • 2 3
 They can SHOUT their MESSAGE all they like but I would place more TRUST in a truly compelling argument against the status quo. Maybe we have to wait for the downhill version to get that...
  • 1 0
 Has anyone seen a trust fork at the trails/park or anywhere in real life? I have yet to see anyone riding with onw.
  • 4 0
 I've seen one but it's in the other side of the world. (Singapore). Believe me, it's not that bad looking in person. But I still prefer the looks of a telescopic fork.
  • 1 0
 @enduronuke: I haven't seen one yet and I get about as far as trips to parks, Europe. I wonder if its just price.
  • 1 0
 Weight, cost and performance wise this seems much more on target than the Trust. Wishing them luck.
  • 1 0
 Love all the new tech and it will help the industry. But hjust imagin crashing an entire carbon front fork.
  • 2 0
 I’m interested but 2k for a fork is steep!
  • 2 0
 How do you make sure both sides have exactly the same air pressure
  • 1 0
 You don't need to worry that they are exactly the same, just getting them close to the accuracy of your typical crappy pump is fine.
  • 1 1
 They should have called it "The Mantis". This is like Android running on an Apple device; Android being the fork and Apple being the Yeti.
  • 1 2
 A friend of mine has The Message on his SS hardtail. Loves the fork, and it certainly does rail bermed, flat, and off-camber corners. But he says he does miss the comfort and plush-ness of the Fox 36.
  • 1 1
 I wonder why moto doesn’t do this??? Wait BMW does and did...and a few others guys did, it’s best left for touring bikes...hmmmm
  • 1 1
 Since I don't race professionally, so don't care about "how good something performs" and since I'm not wealthy, that kind of money for a fork is just dumb.
My take.
  • 5 0
 Ahh, but there are those people who either are wealthy or do appreciate a high performance fork. So the idea that this fork is dumb for the money is dumb to you. Not to everyone.
  • 1 1
 @cueTIP: Yes that is totally true.
  • 1 0
 I tested one in my track and we love it can't wait to try the L.T. one good job buddy ;-)
  • 2 0
 SHOUT! SHOUT! LET IT ALL OUT! THIS IS A FORK I COULD LIVE WITHOUT! c'mon
  • 1 0
 I tried one in Moab at Outerbike. It most definitely did not suck. The question is not if, but when.
  • 1 0
 I just really wanna see the ultimate 'dual crown' full mantis mode version
  • 3 2
 Sorry but I could never ride something that looks that goofy.
  • 1 0
 Lawill leaders. I'm old. They were awful.
  • 1 0
 Shout, Shout, let it all out. These are the things i can do with out....
  • 3 1
 Yes! Finally! Big Grin
  • 4 3
 Enough with this "fork" please
  • 3 4
 Dude 1 : "Dude, billys girlfriend is friggin huge, and has acne, ugly and she's not nice"
Dude 2 : "Yeah, but she can cook and sew her own clothes and keeps the house clean"
  • 1 0
 I’d need a jersey printed up that said NO QUESTIONS...
  • 1 1
 Why does it create a 47° head angle? Looks like someone hucked to flat and bent the fork.
  • 3 0
 It doesn't change the head angle at all compared to any other fork. You do realize the head angle has nothing to do with the appearance of the fork linkage and everything to do with the line from the bottom of the head tube to the axle right?
  • 8 8
 Don't shout the messenger, but this thing is ugly as hell. my eyes hurt!
  • 2 2
 The Holy Grail. Shout it out I say unto thee, Shout.
  • 2 2
 And the pics are on a Yeti, again?
  • 2 0
 Last time it was an evil..?
  • 1 0
 @sdurant12: Actually there were both last time
  • 1 0
 @mtbikeaddict: wasn't it on a trance 29?
  • 1 0
 @arrowheadrush: That was Levy's review, not the press release
  • 4 3
 I want it.
  • 1 0
 Now I'm more interested.
  • 1 3
 That on a Zerode Katipo...stuff of dreams. Such a pity I never went to study dentistry....
  • 1 0
 the prototype katipo currently has a motion linkage fork bolted to it....
  • 2 2
 Now we're talking
  • 4 6
 Jeff Kendall Weed rides with one, he knows everything about mountain biking and is so cool. SOOOOOO COOOOL
  • 1 2
 I’d rather use a girvin flexstem
  • 1 1
 Lawwil Leader revisited
  • 4 6
 trust its ugly
  • 1 4
 More to hate! This thing sucks on a scale unrivaled. GTFO Trust.
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.037448
Mobile Version of Website