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First Look: Thule’s New Epos Bike Rack

Jun 21, 2023
by Christie Fitzpatrick  
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The all-new Epos rack is available in 2 and 3 bike format, sporting a 160lb weight limit for the 3 bike version and 132lb for the 2 bike.

We’re busy at Eurobike eating wurst and checking out all the new product releases. On my way, I took a sneaky detour via the Thule factory in Hillerstorp, Sweden, to meet the brains behind the new Epos bike rack and see it in action. If you’re still umming and ahhing about which bike rack to choose this summer, your hesitation may have paid off, as Thule’s new hitch rack - the Epos - has made serious headway in both functionality and design.

Built upon the concept of its predecessor, the Easyfold XT, the Epos utilizes advancements in materials, construction and design to correct some of the previous rack's pain points. It’s available in 2 or 3 bike format and fits all types of frames and geometries, including e-bikes, mountain, road, gravel, and e-bikes, as well as your super slack DH rig.


Continuing their commitment to making access to the outside easier and safer, the new offering from Thule is designed with flexibility and ease of use at the forefront. It uses individual telescopic bike arms, equipped with pivoting heads and reinforced straps. This allows the arms to be fitted to multiple points, thereby allowing it to hold any type of bike via rear wheel or frame. The Epos is a high-capacity carrier, carrying bikes with a weight of up to 66 lbs each.

It folds flat to allow convenient storage when not in use, as well as trunk access when bikes are loaded. The Thule Epos 2 Bike is priced at $999.95 USD. It's also available in 3 Bike option for $1099.95 USD for when you take that always-third-wheeling friend for a ride.


Thule Epos Bike Rack Details
• Load capacity: 132lb
• Max bike weight: 66lb
• Fits all frame designs from 20mm to 90mm diameter
• Fits frame sizes from 16" to 29"
• Bike spacing: 9.8"
• Fits tire sizes up to 3.2" (up to 5" with accessory strap which is sold separately)
• MSRP: 2 Bike: $999.95 USD / 3 Bike Model $1099.95 USD
www.thule.com

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The Epos can attach to bikes by either rear wheel (left) or frame (right).

CONVENIENCE IS KING

When no bikes are attached, the telescopic arms stow flat, which makes the trunk accessible even without tilting the bike carrier. The Thule Epos is also fully foldable for easy transportation and storage when not being used. It comes with the option to purchase a folding loading ramp, increasing accessibility for riders of different physical capabilities. The Epos is compatible with a range of accessories, including their Epos-specific Bike Repair Holder (available in Europe), which mounts onto the carrier for ease when pre- or post- ride adjustments are required on the fly.

Thule have resisted the corporate temptation to make peripheral products (like locks) in house, and have again partnered with the experts in the field - this time Abus for an integrated bike lock, much like they did with Hydrapak for their water bladders systems. They have tackled one of the key pain points for bike rack users the world over: they’ve removed the hassle of taking off the front bike to get to the back bike. The Epos is designed for independent removal of whichever bike you need access to, whenever you need to, while still maintaining trunk access. One of the features I particularly love is the newly designed straps (reinforced with steel) which have retainers for stowage while loading and unloading bikes. Adios, fiddling and cursing at straps while trying to hold your ridiculously heavy bike with one arm.

While chatting with the Thule product development team I brought up the unsual 3 bike format, as opposed to 2 or 4. A while ago, the Thule team concluded that trying to fit the mold of a 4 bike rack will always require limiting space, an unfortunate - but inevitable - eventuality due to limitations of rack length. Racks simply cannot be extended indefinitely. Having a hand-in-glove fit, with the pedals positioned “just so” to ensure that bike stacking is awkward but achievable is not a good user experience - and not something Thule were willing to compromise on for the sake of conforming to the more widely accepted 4 bike format.

The Epos's 2 bike max weight load capacity is only two pounds more than its predecessor - the Easyfold XT - at 132lbs, but Thule have significantly improved the stability, explicitly marketing for heavy and electric bikes. The option for mounting either via rear wheel if you don't want frame contact, or by frame of you have a rack or fenders, makes it a great choice for all kinds of bikes.

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The Epos rack at Eurobike today.

Tech Specs
- High load capacity of 66lbs per bike, enabling transport of all types of bikes, including heavy e-bikes.
- Fits all frame designs from 20mm to 90mm diameter
- Generous bike spacing of 9.8", accomodating longer wheelbases up to 53".
- Fits sizes from 16" to 29" and tire sizes up to 3.2" and up to 5" in with accessory strap (sold separately)


Accessories
Thule Epos Light & Plate Kit: Fully functional and integrated lighting kit for increased visibility in all lighting & weather conditions.
Thule High Grade Lock: For added security and protection against the pervasive threat of bike theft, Thule has collaborated with Abus, the industry leader in lock solutions for bikes.
Thule Epos Foldable Loading Ramp: For easy loading and unloading of heavier bikes.
5 Inch Accessory Strap: If you’re looking to transport your fat bike, you’ll need a 5″ accessory strap.
Thule Epos Bike Repair Holder: available in Europe, facilitates extra space for bike repairs on the go.

Author Info:
christiefitz avatar

Member since May 21, 2017
109 articles

161 Comments
  • 129 4
 Rack manufacturers still design racks that require strapping to the bike frame for support? Thats an automatic deal breaker in my opinion. I see these are aimed at the luxury SUV crowd based on the advertisement.
  • 38 2
 Attaching to the frame seems like the only way to secure a bike with full fenders.
  • 7 0
 For real. This is at least better than the style that ratchets down on your toptube, but still... They already make two other styles of platform hitch racks that don't contact the frame, so I'm not really sure what the purpose of this one is.
  • 3 0
 @Ttimer: RockyMounts makes the Highnoon FC that works with full fenders.

rockymounts.com/products/highnoon-fc-2-or-1-25.html
  • 11 0
 @Ttimer: Haven't had any issues with 1Up either and fenders, though they make fender accessories too- if it's like super long. Had a Thule for a long time, but it rubbed on my fork lowers.

1up-usa.com
  • 2 0
 @DaneL: The T2 racks your referring to don't work well with full fenders, this rack is more for the comfort, commuter crowd. This rack also has a ramp option for the elderly so it's easier to load the bikes.
  • 4 0
 It looks like it can hook onto the wheel or the frame, so that gives you more flexibility in mounting all types of bikes. The tail lights and numberplate holder are also nice options for places that require them.
  • 11 4
 @shoreboy1866 It's due to crazy EU safety standards (also why it has lights and an EU license plate bracket). I'm sure Thule figured they need to hold the bike very close to the center of mass (aka the frame) to pass all of the testing at the weight rating, or something like that...
It probably holds a bike 5x better (structurally) than my Kuat NV2, but all of that complexity, frame damage, and PIA bike install is definitely not our North American cup of coffee.
  • 2 0
 @Ttimer: Good point. That being said I can adjust my 1up to work with fenders, either with a foam protector for the rear wheel or by having it contact the tire under the fender.
  • 10 0
 @canow18: Those Crazy Europeans that like it when the car behind can still see brake lights.

But to your other point, before moving to the US I used THule racks, very sturdy - but a little awkward to fit up multiple bikes, some planning was involved.
I'm using a 1up rack here and its loads simpler - if for no other reason than US receiver style and not need to clamp on the towball.
  • 1 0
 It seems like if they just made the back frame like 1.5m tall so the frame clamp could drop down above all the bikes rather that having to feed the clamp arms through the middle of the bike frames that would be much better.
  • 2 0
 Ah, ignore that last comment, just watched the video and see this one has adjustable arms between each bike. I'll get my coat.
  • 5 0
 Who's keen for a Gravel Bike Shuttle? ....anyone?.....Bueller?
  • 1 0
 @eddieantifreeze: Yeah, brake lights are nice, but that's why we drive big SUVs and Trucks with our CHMSL above the bike over here! /s

I admit all of the standards (even the towball) improve safety, but they also drive up cost and tend to complicate the consumers assembly and use. If we had all of those requirements here, the 1UP would cost more than a Kuat Piston Pro X
  • 4 0
 I agree... bike racks that are designed to hold the frame are not being designed with what happens in reality in mind. First of they are much more annoying to set up, they scratch the frame no matter the material that it is contacting directly the frame and are not compatible with all frame designs. New versions that lock the wheel in place and only contact the tires are the way to go in my opinion.
  • 2 0
 I have been trying to understand why we have to fix bike by the frame and it’s mention in the norm that define bike rack in Europe it has to be secure by the frame it can be either a strap or an arm with a pinch.
This is ok when you have to carry one bike but 2 or 3 it’s start to be challenging even more when frame are similar
  • 2 0
 @Ttimer: No, there are racks out there that ratchet down on the front tire while strapping down the rear wheel like the Yakima Hold-up or the Thule T2. Even some of the older roof racks from Yakima and Thule have front tire holds while strapping down the rear wheel on the platform. These all work well with full fenders without touching any part of the frame.
  • 1 0
 @cyclebiker0-0: nope.
That would not work with my MuckyNutz fenders.
Try again!
  • 1 0
 @BarryWalstead: There's no clearance for real mud with those fenders being so close the to tires! Not sure why those fenders need to extend so far front either. Well, you're SOL with those fenders. I'd take them off and put the Face Fender on instead.
  • 2 0
 EU have safety regulations how bikes should be attached, so no vertical racks or one up's Thule do crash testing of their products to meet certification, while majority of America's companies just add more metal and call it a day
  • 1 0
 @CSharp: well as a northwest Washington state rider that rides year round I have never had issues with clearance for mud, and I run big 2.6 Schwalbe tires. So not sure what you're referencing.
The benefits are significant though for the big front fender, as I basically never get mud on my face or any action camera lens or any rocks at my face. All in all its a win for me.
  • 1 0
 @BarryWalstead: I still think the ratcheting front tire lock should work as long as the bar on the tire doesn't go beneath the furthest reach of the tire. You can ratchet down the bar next to the front of the fender. The OneUp should work that that fender. The mud in my area is clayey. So, those fenders will gunk up so bad that the tires won't move, even with the Face Fender type.
  • 1 0
 Strapon
  • 1 0
 In Europe at least it's law to require it affixes to the frame.
  • 71 2
 I don't understand why I would buy a plastic bike rack and have to take a bunch of time fiddling with securing straps and cables all over, when I could buy a 1up rack made of aluminum with user replaceable parts and spend 10 seconds getting a bike on/off for $200 less than this thing.
  • 47 0
 This is for the uniformed consumer that walks into an REI and asks for a bike rack. I don't see many informed mountain bikers choosing this.
  • 45 1
 *uninformed. I would never denigrate those in uniform lol.
  • 7 3
 You would if you had to transport a commuter, city or touring bike with full fenders, even occasionally. Good luck fitting that on a 1Up rack. If only ever used for sport bikes, 1up racks are more practical, I agree.
  • 7 0
 As someone with Thule rack (T2 Pro XTR), I 100% agree with you. I've had the rack for a little over 3 years and it's super flimsy and falling apart. My brother bought a 1up rack a few years before I bought mine, and his continues to work flawlessly. For basically the same price, the 1up is a no brainer.
  • 14 0
 1up racks (and similar) aren't available in europe, I think because we have smaller cars plus we have a worse towbar-mount system (racks have to clamp onto a smooth ball rather than slot into a mount).

Plastic racks might (not certain) be lighter than that style, which helps as the nose weight (how much you can load) on cars over here is often ~75kg. The 5 bike (I can't spot a 4-bike model) 1up rack weighs 35kg, or roughly half the max load, so you could only load a total of 40kg (~85lbs) of bikes onto it (ie 2 bikes max).
  • 3 0
 @hughlunnon: I can see that, though I saw the price above in dollars which is why I compared it to 1up. That said I have a 1up rack installed on my GTI, not exactly a large car. But to your point it does have a 2" receiver.
  • 2 10
flag vinay FL (Jun 21, 2023 at 12:17) (Below Threshold)
 What's wrong with clamping the frame? Seems like your wheel bearings will last a whole lot longer if they don't have to keep the frame from swinging back and forth as you ride a rough road. Other advantage is obviously when taking a mountain unicycle along. You can't just clamp the wheel, you need to hold the frame too. Sure, just holding the wheel may work too but I don't see how it would be better.
  • 4 0
 @vinay: every rack I've used has immediately scratched the paint. Im not one who cares much about minor scratches, but I've had them rub straight through paint on a long drive.
  • 2 1
 @RonSauce: I see. There may be different kinds of paint of course, but I haven't had this issue with my rack (a Thule Easyfold. I've also got two Thule racks that go on the roof (from back when I had a smaller car that wouldn't accept anything on the rear). Obviously there you can't get away with just clamping the wheel and I haven't had paint issue there either. My frame is from steel with powdercoat. Maybe other types of coating are more vulnerable, can't tell.
  • 3 0
 @vinay: WIll no one think of the poor unicylists?!?!?
  • 2 2
 @BrambleLee: Hey, we're not poor! There was just a while when I didn't live near trails and didn't have a car that could easily carry a mountainbike. Here I could put the unicycle in the trunk, go to work, go to hiking trails after work and as by law a bicycle should at least have two wheels, I could ride the hiking trails in the dunes. You need something to get your fix, don't you? Nowadays it is just that when we already have the full family with stuff in the car, I can still put my daughter's and my unicycles on the rack and go riding when away from home. If I could get more clamps, I could actually get four unicycles on a two bike rack but it isn't easy to get that many people motivated to ride along. I don't quite get why...
  • 5 0
 Couldn’t agree more, the amount of plastic on “high end” bike racks these days is ridiculous. 1UP used to be a premium compared the other brands’ price but now it is the opposite. Better build quality + durability AND cheaper somehow
  • 2 2
 @pierceklinke: Which part would you not want to be plastic then? They just want to keep the weight down and I haven't seen any plastic part fail. What I did wear down though is the metal tube under the pedal to tilt the rack. It has rubbed the road so often when riding bumpy terrain that the lower part of the tube under the pedal has ground down. So much so that the pedal lost the stiffness to pull the cable to tilt the unit. Not saying a completely plastic pedal (without metal underneath) would have been so much better. But it still is the metal part failing, not the plastic here.
  • 3 1
 @hughlunnon: There is also the issue of lights and number plate, which the 1up (and similar NA models) don't have.
Lighter racks are also easier to install and remove when needed. Which is important in places where space and fuel consumption actually matter.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: there’s a singular plastic part on my 1UP and it’s just a secondary backup screw to the tilt mechanism. I expect the rack will last a good 20 years, just like my parents’ 1UP which is still going strong after many years. For people who off-road to get to trailheads, I have far less concern that my rack will developed play/wobble over time. I’ve certainly seen quite a few janky plastic Thule, Yakima and Kuat bike racks that wobble even on paved roads. Plus, the plastic fades in the sun and doesn’t look good in the long term
  • 1 2
 @pierceklinke: Sorry, I didn't spot your answer to my question. As for looks, I don't care. Whatever causes the wobble isn't a plastic part in these Thule racks as the structural parts are metal. Should a plastic part crack, Thule will be able to send you a replacement. I checked these 1up racks you mention and they're typically much higher above the ground and don't come with lights and a numberplate. You obviously need to have a visible numberplate and lights when driving on public roads so you'll have to hang a separate bar with those lights and numberplate on your rack or bike, which is an even more annoying setup than the integrated Thule rack you're complaining about. Having the rack elevated higher above the ground obviously helps with ground clearance but it is also going to increase energy consumption. Unless the car in question is already so tall that the aerodynamics sucks anyway even without bike. If I expect to ride a really bumpy road, I won't be going fast and I'm better off putting the bikes on my roof. Lots of ground clearance, no additional numberplate etc needed. Still plastic parts like end stops on the extruded wheel guides and no, I don't see them fail.
  • 2 0
 @animalrkent: Yeah, seems like that will change the rack into one with the license plate and some lights permanently attached so that removes some of the hassle. It probably won't suffice here as I don't think you can get away with having your signaling lights in the middle. But it is just a different market I suppose, all good. The foldable racks from Thule store more compact and have all the lights and numberplate in place. If people don't need that in North America then it adds no value for them. Similarly, if people here don't care whether something is plastic as long as it doesn't break, having everything out of metal adds no value too. One thing I'm curious about though is when you have parked your car in the burning sunlight and everything out of metal has become hot. Has this ever damaged your tire? I haven't had this with a mountainbike but I once had this when I had to take a ferry with my commuter. Apparently my tires held up just fine as long as I kept riding. But after a few minutes of standing still on the black ferry-deck, one tire blew up. I wonder whether anyone has experienced anything similar with these metal rails you use for your tires.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: To each it's own I suppose. But the rack heating up in the sun has never been an issue. Mine sits in a hot parking lot all day when I'm at work and I can easily walk out there and touch it and not get burnt. Never had a tire blow up either from the contact point, it's so small and that piece is hollow, I don't think it would affect it. Randomly, I did have a tire blow off a rim after it had sat in a hot van all day. But i've owned a Thule T2 and now the 1Up and over about the same amount of time now, the 1Up seems to be lasting longer. Worth noting too, the 1Up stands (cradles) for the bikes unhook and pivot vertically to be out of the way when not in use. But of course the EU does have stricter restrictions and kind of like bike tires, everyone has their preference of what works for them. 1up just works for me Smile
  • 2 0
 @animalrkent: Yeah, at least we come to the conclusion that we're happy with what we both have ourselves instead of the other way around. That would have been inconvenient Wink . Cheers!
  • 49 0
 anyone else carrying around $8000 bikes on a $100 bike rack and a $2000 car or is it just me?
  • 6 0
 4k bike, $120 rack, 2k car that looks like a sub $1,000 car lol
  • 18 0
 I respect your life decisions.
  • 10 0
 I know a guy who's $4000 bike fell off his $100 rack. Bike got ran over by a $50000 truck and caused about $10k worth of damage.
  • 4 0
 custom raaw madonna > used rusty kuat on marketplace for $150 > 2005 chevy astro
  • 2 0
 @RonSauce: Was the bike ok? Smile
  • 3 0
 @KJP1230: the frame survived, everything on it was replaced though. Dude still rides it. It is a stumpy if you're wondering that too. It looks rough, but I've seen worse looking bikes.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: was it user error? how did it fall off?
  • 2 0
 @11six: the latch that holds the frame released while going 65mph.
  • 2 0
 @RonSauce: yeah, I've added 2 bucks strap from Dollarama to my 100 bucks rack to avoid frame lock becoming loose Big Grin But that is going over the budget of this topic
  • 48 3
 I'll stick with 1up
  • 30 0
 I'll stick with 7up. It's more refreshing.
  • 9 2
 @bigtim: I'm glad to see you've made 7


up yours
  • 4 0
 @everythingsucks: Classic commercial….
  • 2 0
 The Quikrstuff rack is probably the coolest rack that exists. Super light, no ratcheting mech, all metal, zero tools required. Basically the Bentley version of a 1up.
  • 2 0
 I'll stick with Europe
  • 36 2
 All you Yanks and Maple Leafs overlooking the fact that this is EURObike, promoting stuff we can actually legally go out on public roads with?

Thank you - your friendly European bike friend
  • 13 2
 It is quite entertaining to see the 1up crowd completely missing that.
  • 12 2
 It's also available in the USA, which makes the 1UP comments relevant.
  • 1 3
 @Scout290: HAHA good point. We can still bolt and weld together 3 totally different vehicles with whatever engine, transmission, and drivetrain and slap some 40" tires on it and still manage to get the frankenbuggy registered an many states. Thanks Uncle Sam! I understand y'all are more highly regulated in that regard. I am never running a rack with lights whether they are optional or not.
  • 5 0
 @suspended-flesh: So you don't care whether someone can see your brake lights? Personally, I want to reduce the chance of someone rear-ending me as much as I can, especially when I have expensive bikes on the back that would be the first to get hit.
  • 1 0
 @Fasthybrid: I mean I can still see the brake lights when I have the 1UP on my Element?
  • 1 1
 @Fasthybrid: Understood. My brake lights are totally visible with a 1-UP as is the license plate. I swapped in LEDs for an extra light blast anyway. My aversion to the rack-attached accessory lights is mainly that they look goofy (to me).
  • 2 0
 @suspended-flesh: they only look goofy cuz you are conditioned to think so. If everyone run these your comment would have been the opposite Big Grin

Also I saw people with extra light LED's on taillights - just want to let you know that every single person driving behind you in the night wishes you to die in a very painful manner Big Grin Have a nice day
  • 1 2
 @valrock: To me they are just more goofy plastic junk to break. I built my truck the way I want it and I control what and where my lights are. I run a minimum of what's legal here in the US. Small brake LEDs are up high in the 3rd brake light zone and nobody gives a F what I do. LOL. You probably have DRLs.
  • 19 0
 ooof. grabs the frame?
  • 17 1
 Hard pass
  • 11 1
 "They have tackled one of the key pain points for bike rack users the world over: they’ve removed the hassle of taking off the front bike to get to the back bike."

The world over? In what circumstance do you load up two bikes, then decide you only want to take one off? If that is the case, put the one you want to take off on the outside? SMH
  • 1 0
 If I take both my road bike and trail bike on a trip on my 1up, the MTB has to go on the inside slot for everything to play nice. Having said that, it is zero issue to take just the inside bike off while the outside bike stays on. Thule hasn’t solved anything that wasn’t already sorted by a better and somehow less expensive rack.
  • 12 1
 Needs more plastic and cheap metal hardware that rusts in one year. Why would anyone buy anything from Thule or Yakima over 1UP?
  • 13 4
 Why is there so much plastic on a $1,000 bike rack? And why is still grabbing the frame?

Thule didn't put any though or engineering into this rack and is expecting to sell it based on their name alone.

Anyone who buys this over a 1UP is an idiot.
  • 3 0
 Getting custom made, CE certified taillights is an expensive endeavor. Thanks to EU regulations we'll probably never see one in the wild over here, or a 1UP over there.
  • 3 0
 @canow18: The taillights are a $250 add-on. You could also hang them on a 1UP rack if you wanted to.

www.thule.com/en-us/bike-rack/accessories/thule-epos-lamp-kit-_-903320
  • 14 2
 legendary last pic, a bike rack on a big pickup truck
  • 5 1
 haha yeah, and in full lycra. Not a cohesive visual story.

Then again, looks like it might be a Raptor, which *is* the new mid sized SUV in California.
  • 7 0
 Always makes me laugh, because it’s the norm around here. All these Texans are so busy slapping bed covers on their trucks that they forget that the 8ft bed can be used for something.
  • 10 1
 I use a hitch rack on my f150. Not all the time, but probably half the time. If the rack is already on, its easier to throw my bike on the rack since its lower. I'm not saying its hard to put a bike in the bed, just that the rack is easier. Also, if I'm traveling somewhere with the bikes, I want to be able to put stuff in the bed and secure it with my hard sided tonneau cover. my point is people have reasons for how they use their truck. its ok.
  • 4 0
 @nickfranko: The bed is fulfilling it's main purpose though: Making the pot bellied, suburban office worker feel manly, rugged and rural.
  • 2 0
 Wait till you see big ‘small truck’ utes in Australia with a flat HARDCOVER over the tray and regular roof rack mount bike racks bolted to the cover!!

Would be more funny if it wasn’t so sad.
  • 1 0
 @nickfranko: To be fair, they use the to haul paper towels, toilet paper, and boxes of assorted chips from Costco.
  • 1 0
 @dirtyburger: maybe it’s just me, but that sounds kinda rad tbh
  • 2 0
 @dirtyburger: Seen that here in the states. Whatever floats their boat - it's their truck n bikes.
  • 1 0
 @suspended-flesh: Strewth, no skin off my sack, as we say.
  • 1 0
 As someone that always laughed at those people, i now have a Quikrstuff rack and put it on my truck all the time. Its so fast and easy and only touches the tires. If i put the bike in the bed i either have to lay it down or run a tailgate pad. Both options are far from ideal when a have an awesome bike rack. So now im the douche and im fine with it.
  • 10 0
 After my T2 Pro rusted out and cracked in less than a year and then dealing with Thule warranty I will never buy another Thule product.
  • 1 0
 Rusted out, and cracked in less than a year... wow that sucks. Why was their warranty so bad?
  • 8 0
 That's not cheap but neither is the family Range Rover
  • 3 0
 Can't be caught spending $650 on a bike rack for your Audi and/or Rivian.
  • 8 1
 Another day, and another bike rack that costs more and is objectively worse than the 1up. When will the big guys learn??
  • 1 2
 Do you Americans think the whole world is the US?
  • 2 0
 @lenniDK: Is it not?
  • 3 0
 This rack really is for the ebike crowd that has fenders on the bike. One up style racks or Kuat racks do not work with many Fender bikes. This rack will work with fender bikes and low step bikes. I do believe the retail is way to high. This needs to be a $500 rack.
  • 3 1
 I love my newly designed Rocky Mounts High Noon FC hitch rack. Very versatile. Works with my wife's full fender street/cruiser e-bike(wouldn't on a 1UP) and my mountain bike AND no frame contact. Did I mention it is almost half the cost at $579(-20% if you take advantage of this past but annual spring sale). Also reasonable weight at 39 pounds. PB doesn't seem to review their stuff. Just released this spring and I was lucky to stumble onto it.
rockymounts.com/products/highnoon-fc-2-or-1-25.html
  • 2 1
 Is this a sponsored post?
  • 4 0
 You can make a 1UP rack work just as well by moving the pin connecting the arms lower so it hits the tire and not the fender.
  • 1 0
 @Dogl0rd: No but I wish. Just a rider trying to give them a worthy shout out.
  • 7 1
 Here for the 1Up fan club comments and not disappointed.
  • 2 2
 Is this this the same people wearing trump2024 caps?
  • 6 0
 Lots of plastic
  • 13 0
 Actually it's engineering grade thermoplastic polymer resin structuralizated grade reversed microfilament infused neo-nano particle impregnated semi-organic space age composite plastique.
  • 2 0
 "Has a 160lb weight limit and will fit any bike".

Next line: "The Epos's max weight load capacity is only two pounds more than its predecessor - the XT Fold - at 132 pounds".
  • 2 0
 160lb rating is for the 3 bike, and 132lb is for the 2 bike
  • 2 0
 That's the 2 bike vs. the 3 bike load limits - good catch though!
  • 5 0
 plastic, straps and frame contact, no thanks, I'll stick with my 1up !
  • 2 1
 "They have tackled one of the key pain points for bike rack users the world over: they’ve removed the hassle of taking off the front bike to get to the back bike. The Epos is designed for independent removal of whichever bike you need access to, whenever you need to, while still maintaining trunk access."

How? Every 1-up style rack has been able to do this, with the same restriction that this rack seems to still have of having to lift the inner bike all the way over the outer bikes (made easier with a tilt feature, which most racks also have).
  • 1 0
 Having just moved across the pond from Europe I have to say the square tow hitch system is so much better than that of the UK. I've just bought a car to get going over here and had a $300 tow hitch fitted. I spent hours researching bike racks, pondering, umming and ahhing. At one point I was considering blowing the budget out of the water and getting a Khyber Rack but common sense prevailed and I ordered a Saris Superclamp EX2. Apart from it missing some parts of arrival (Saris customer service have been excellent and quick to resolve the issue by the way, even cross border) it's a solid rack which secures the bikes without touching frames. That was the ABSOLUTE deal breaker on so many racks, either clamps the frame or clamps the wheel but right on the fork arch or next to the frame. I read one comment about the EX2 not being able to fit an adult bike on it at the same time as a kids 20" wheeled bike, I've successfully figured out that is incorrect.

I love it. It's rock solid because it holds the bikes by both wheels, plus ratchet-esque straps on each wheel they're not going anywhere. The integrated cable lock is a bit weedy but I'm never going to leave it loaded unattended, it's just a deterrent to stop an opportunist if you're stopped in traffic. The rack locks to the hitch with a locking hitch pin. I was amazed at how many higher end niche racks don't come with an integrated hitch lock.

I've had a Thule 3 bike rack in the past which mounted onto a round UK tow ball. It was ok. The wheels were secure in adjustable side to side trays and it had moving inverted hoops covered in foam that you tied the bikes to, however with 3 downhill bikes on it definitely felt overloaded. I can't believe that 20 years later Thule still produce a $1000 rack that requires attachment to the frame. As someone mentioned above, there is no way to prevent eventual damage to a frame from a "universal" mount. No matter what materials you use it will ALWAYS damage the frame eventually. Nope.

I caught the headline of this article and groaned because I thought maybe I should have waited and bought the the square hitch version of this, having read the article I had nothing to worry about.

Surprised no one else mentioned the Saris Superclamp, maybe it's not available in a Euro tow hitch version...
  • 3 1
 Wow... Glad they got every electric vehicle they could find for this ad. Marketing budget: Yes. Rack design budget: Not so much.
  • 2 0
 why are all these racks so tiny? modern bikes have LONG wheelbases. Yet you have a brand new rack where the bike MAYBE has like 6 inches of the wheel on the rack at best.
  • 1 0
 This.
  • 2 0
 also, the fact that the bikes are not offset at all means that the bars will smack into each other and cause damage... super dumb design.
  • 1 0
 Or you can get an VelociRax or Alta rack and haul a$$ up that sketchy dirt road with confidence. Maybe some people dont live in the mountains . . . I guess.
  • 1 0
 basket style racks are trash. they allow the bike to bounce around aggressively, and the weight of the bike constantly is trying to roll the wheel out of the tray--flopping the tray to the side hardly makes a difference.
  • 2 0
 "The most versatile bike carrier ever" "Experience the future of bike carriers" Don't let chatGPT do your YouTube ads!
  • 1 0
 My shredder rack was nearly half the price, hangs 4 bikes, custom built and designed for MTB, can handle 4 full ebikes hanging off it no worries.
  • 4 1
 Too many plastic parts! 1up all day...
  • 1 0
 Forget about the rack, I'm most surprised that all the EVs used in the advert make combustion engine sounds when they accelerate!
  • 1 0
 Nothing beats the simplicity and built of the 1up. Not to mention it is modular!
  • 2 1
 Vehicles typically have 4 seats, why only 3 bikes? And attaches to the frame? Strange
  • 4 1
 What vehicles typically have 4 seats? Most of them have 5 seats.
  • 1 0
 @nickfranko: So this is for people who have 2 personal drivers to take turns driving while running shuttles?
  • 2 0
 @nickfranko: if they have 5 seats, they also have 4 seats.
  • 2 0
 Weight of the rack would be nice to know.
  • 2 1
 As a gift to fellow PB'er, today I *won't* mention how many cars I've bought cheaper than this rack ($1000USD).
  • 3 1
 Thule'ttle. Thule'ate. Way Thu much money.
  • 1 0
 ...and the trayth on all their rackth are too thort..... thorry
  • 3 1
 Im dissapointed that nobody has poked fun at the ridiculous name. ePOS
  • 1 0
 Still uses terrible plastic straps. Love my 1UP, will never go back to Thule or Kuat.
  • 1 0
 Almost $700 for this POS? it’s 50% plastic!!! And there’s frame to rack contact.
  • 1 0
 Are we now at the point where riders can be sold a product with “EPO” in the name?
  • 1 0
 Price is insane. But a lot of families have exactly 4 bikes. Back to the design board Thule.
  • 1 0
 One thousand dollars? Am I ridiculously poor or is this price somewhat off?
  • 1 0
 Shingleback here in Aus. No others get a look in
  • 2 0
 Swing and a miss.
  • 10 9
 1up owns the bike rack segment. i think all others should just stop.
  • 1 1
 Not everyone wants a horizontal carry. If I needed a 1-3 bike holder and wanted horizontal, I'd likely have 1up on the list to look at though, but they aren't the only rack to consider by a long shot.
  • 1 3
 They are too engineery and fiddly for the general consumer. Maybe the new versions are slicker though
  • 3 0
 @yinyang: 1up has a vertical carry and roof rack options
  • 2 3
 Respectfully disagree , for four bikes the NSR4 is the gold standard.
  • 1 1
 Definitely not. They get stuck. Bikes wobble a lot and they are very hard to get the bike tight in it
  • 2 0
 @Dogl0rd: lol engineery and fiddly? There literally two things you need to do to secure your bike..
  • 1 1
 @pargolf8: Quikrstuff rack makes the 1up look like a fiddly pile. Quikrstuff should be the gold standard. It’s absolutely phenomenal.
  • 1 1
 @pargolf8: just let someone who has never used a 1up try to use it. They will damage it or try to do something awkward.

Also parts of the 1up get loose and fall off or get tight and jam over time. I've seen people lose the little locks because they didn't know they had to screw them on so far.

I agree it's the best, but it's not intuitive to treat it well and it does need attention.
  • 1 0
 @Dogl0rd: my buddy has one of the original 1up racks with the friction style lock instead of the updated ratchet system. i am guilty of "borrowing" this rack from him for well over a year now. several road trips over 500 miles and nothing on the rack has come loose. maybe you got a bad one or maybe they were just built better in the beginning? after my time with this rack i wouldn't use anything else and don't see why anyone would.

also, not sure why you wouldn't show someone how to use something they've never used.
  • 1 0
 @novajustin: I'm just nitpicking, like I said I still agree 1up is the best.

My friend and I who both have the original model experienced the arms tightening and getting stiff over time. You just need to figure out which bolts to adjust and it's back to normal.
  • 1 0
 The key difference is that it's not a nightmare to get Thule racks in other countries.
  • 1 0
 Best thing about it is the number plate holder
  • 2 0
 ThuUp
  • 1 0
 Only hot girls, as well as me write to me ➤ u.to/mWPGHw
  • 1 0
 Good idea but too much
  • 1 1
 Have I missed it or how does this attach to the vehicle?
  • 1 0
 eBike approved?
  • 1 0
 Nope!







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