First Look: Yep Uptimizer 3.0 Dropper - Bike Connection Winter 2020

Mar 3, 2020
by Dan Roberts  



Recently we included Yep in our look at little-known manufacturers making exciting stuff for their previous dropper posts.

Yep still fit the bill as a little-known. The company is based in the Ticino region of Switzerland and until now have quietly gone about making posts out of their small workshop. They use this small size to their advantage and avidly focus on the details at every chance and to keep a personal relation with each customer.

Uptimizer 3.0 Details

Diameters: 30.9mm & 31.6mm
Lengths: 80, 100, 125, 155 & 185mm
Weight: 498 to 585g depending on model, 27g for remote
Price: 420 EUR incl. remote & accessories
Availability: From March 15th
More info: Yep Components

Yep Uptimizer 3.0 Photo Luigi Sestili

They also continue to make exciting stuff. And with their new Uptimizer 3.0 dropper post they not only looked to address many of the issues that have plagued hydraulic posts, but also to introduce some neat little features that allow even the least confident home mechanic to service the post and also personalise the way the post functions.

The Uptimizer 3.0 comes in 30.9 and 31.6 diameter options and has 80, 100, 125, 155 and 185mm drop options with further options to fine tune the drop internally. The post itself is a hydraulic system using an air spring with an external air valve for easy access. Yep have their own remote to mechanically actuate the post and it can be stopped anywhere in its travel. When fully dropped it’s also locked and the bike can be hung from the seat in this position. Yep also have six colours to customize the post and lever.

With there being a constant search for claiming back a millimeter here or there to reduce the overall length of a dropper post, there is also a balance that needs to be struck with maintaining a good overlap between the bushings in the post, especially when travels now push further than they ever have. Yep did hunt for every millimeter possible, but they also drew a line and kept a good distance between the bushings to reduce the potential for play and to bring reliability into the post. In some cases, they actually increased the bushing overlap, keeping the two parts of the post more rigid, allowing less system play and opportunity for ingress of air and debris, and putting less stress on the internal components.

Yep Uptimizer 3.0 Photo Luigi Sestili
Andrea Chisea, the man behind Yep, was on hand to go through all the details that he'd designed into the Uptimizer 3.0.
Yep Uptimizer 3.0 Photo Luigi Sestili
Yep Uptimizer 3.0 Photo Luigi Sestili
Serviceability is at the heart of the Uptimizer 3.0, with easy access to the post internals for cleaning, re-greasing and bleeding the hydraulic cartridge.

Yep were also conscious to allow the post to be easily serviced. Not in a way that you need two degrees and six pairs of hands, but in a way that any home mechanic could do with minimal tools. Shops should also find it incredibly easy to service the post too.

One of the plagues of a hydraulic dropper post has been the separation of the oil and gas, mostly air, on the inside of the post. If some of the gas gets into the oil then the post can develop unwanted travel and be a pain when you’re out riding. Some posts have measures to address this issue, others have sealed cartridges in them which aren’t user serviceable.

Yep designed their own cartridge that can be serviced at home, with only an Allen key, a syringe and shock pump, in literally minutes - you don’t even need to take the post off the bike as all the access is directly under the saddle. With Yep designing in a more reliable dropper post from the start, the amount of servicing needed should be reduced. But if you do need to bleed the system then it’s a doddle. The post's internal air spring also acts as the pressure on the IFP, so once all the air is out of the post the system isn’t pressurised and there’s no risk of coating everything in the workshop with oil.

The main seal collar on the post is designed to be tightened by hand and gives easy access to the bushings and wiper seals for cleaning and re-greasing. And with the bushing having a split design it’s easy to replace it when it’s worn out without entirely dismantling the post or even taking it off the bike.

With the post off the bike however, it’s easy to get inside the post and get access to the air chamber. The only addition tool it needs are a set of snap ring pliers. With the damper separated from the external post it’s another hand tight fit to separate the two shafts of the damper and get access for a full service.

Yep have a handy step by step tutorial to show how to bleed the cartridge.

Yep also managed to fit in some features unique to their dropper post to enable adjusting the way the dropper functions. A dropper post is essentially a suspension component and so lots of the features from forks and shocks find their way into the post. The air pressure of the system can be adjusted between 150 and 220psi to increase or decrease the spring rate and so change the return speed of the post.

Yep Uptimizer 3.0 Photo Luigi Sestili
The hydraulic cartridge can be easily removed from the post.
Yep Uptimizer 3.0 Photo Luigi Sestili
White air volume spacers can be added or removed to adjust the post feel, just like in a fork or shock.

In addition to that, snap on volume reducing tokens can be added into the air spring to adjust the progressivity of the post. Some users might prefer a more linear feeling to drop the post where as others might prefer a firmer ramp up in force as the post is dropped. The air spring volume of the post is large, given that it uses all the available space between the outer post and internal cartridge. From stock there is one spacer installed and more are included in the box.

There are travel limiting spacers that can be added in to fine tune the post's drop from its stock settings, although these do require a little more disassembly of the post and a pair of shaft clamps. These too come in the box with the post.

With it being such an easy procedure to bleed the system, it’s also just as easy to swap out the stock oil for a lighter or heavier weight to further fine tune the feel of the post on the way up and down. This can also come in handy for users living in the extremes of temperatures where they might need a thinner or thicker oil to keep the post functioning as originally intended. A syringe comes in the box with the fitting to screw into the post, although any current SRAM brake screw in fitting will work. The post is spec'd with 5wt oil but it could be swapped out for 2.5, 7.5 or 10wt oil.

Yep Uptimizer 3.0 Photo Luigi Sestili
The Joystick remote can easily be actuated in any direction and has a bunch of tiny but well thought out details.
Yep Uptimizer 3.0 Photo Luigi Sestili
Yep offer options to personalise your post with colour anodized parts for the seat post and lever.

The Uptimizer uses Yep's own Joystick remote, which can be actuated in every and all directions. Casually hooking or flicking the remote with your thumb or index finger is easy and provides you with more options to get the post up or down when desperately needed. The lever can also be used with other mechanically actuated posts on the market and cleverly allows either the head of the gear cable or the end to be used depending on how the post is set up. If the free end is clamped at the lever, the cut end is also neatly stored away behind a screw on cap, ensuring you never stab a frayed piece of cable right in your finger.

When installing the post there is even a tiny grub screw at the base of the post, where the mechanism lies, allowing you to clamp one end of your cable outer while you set about getting the right outer length. No need to fiddle around with installing and removing the inner cable and needing an extra pair of hands.

We'll be looking at getting an Uptimizer 3.0 in for a long-term review so we can test out the reliability and serviceability and also play around with the unique features that let you adjust and personalise the dropper.







100 Comments

  • 112 0
 Does it go down? Yep. Does it go up? Yep. What do you call it? Yep.
  • 11 0
 Who is on first?
  • 3 0
 @steelpolish: Exactly.
  • 9 0
 @noapathy: No, Exactly got fired last week.
  • 4 0
 I want it just for when people say "that is a rad post." Yep. "Nice post." Yep.
  • 1 0
 Yepikaye … Yep gets more props den stunts den Bruce Willis Beer
  • 1 0
 Nope
  • 49 6
 Having to remove seat = easy access?
  • 37 1
 nope
  • 40 1
 I would MUCH rather remove the post from the bike than the seat from post. Seat angle/placement is much harder to dial than post height.

Kudos though for putting flats on the wiper collar. It's a small annoyance to grab a strap wrench or softjaws to remove other seatpost collars.
  • 6 1
 @Paddock22: I also like the flats on the collar, but I think I'd still use my strap wrench. No matter how careful I am, I know i'll eventually mar the anodizing along the edges of the flats with a wrench.
  • 12 0
 Maybe that's what these saddles with a hole in the middle are for. They still support your weight but have a hole in the middle to access the seatpost.
  • 13 0
 @vinay: True! Hadn't thought of that.

Although you risk getting an oil enema the first time you drop the post if you don't close everything up properly.
  • 14 0
 9.8 is the only post I've used where moving the seat wasn't annoying. The classic front & back bolt in plate system everyone uses sucks. was very easy to loosen the bolts on a 9.8 and then back one side out enough to flp the seat over while still attached.
  • 10 0
 @Paddock22: I just look at the seat with a horizontal bench top behind it to take a mental note and measurement of angle. If you want to be like a wc tech, get a free clinometer app on your phone, place the phone on your saddle and then measure before and after. It's not really that hard. I would say having to measure or mark your seatpost height, and dealing with pushing cables in and out of the frame is harder....but that's just me.
  • 11 4
 Easy access for servicing. If once a year the post have to bled then is removing the seat such a chore? Sheesh. Lazily millennials. Smile
  • 1 0
 @takeiteasyridehard: exactly... I hate removing an intrenally routed post from the bike.
I'd say some people think this is easier and some prefer the other option,
  • 5 0
 @big-red: I use the back of a used sticker - the slippery part of it kinda plastic/paper and put it around the collar - then the wrench. The anodising is perfect then Smile
  • 1 0
 @srru: Holy crap, I could see that working perfectly. Great idea!
  • 2 0
 @Paddock22: tape on the seat rail and angle finder app on my phone. It’s not that hard...
  • 2 0
 Easier than taking the post out and maybe needed a new cable because the old one is too frayed to get back through the remote.
  • 1 2
 @DHhack: I never said it was hard, I would just rather remove the post than the seat.

I also use tape but I put it on the post at my desired height. No angle finder/phone involved.
  • 2 1
 @jesse-effing-edwards: The reverb AXS is very slick as well, best seat mount in my opinion.
  • 3 0
 @Paddock22: Saddles usually come with marks on where they are. And you can get an app on the phone to get the seat angle. So yeah, easyer than removing a seatpost with internal cable routing.
  • 1 0
 @Paddock22: just stick your phone on the saddle before you take it off and measure the angle with one of the spirit level apps.
  • 2 0
 Way better than having to remove the lever or cable, pull the post out, unlatch the cable, remove the seat, and then be able to service it.
  • 1 0
 @cpobanz: I'll check it out
  • 2 0
 @big-red: Knipex.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: nope, their sole purpose is to give you a muddy taint!
  • 1 0
 @Paddock22: you don't need tools to unsrew the collar, It can be done by hand. Flats faces are there only to add some grip
  • 1 0
 if you can service the whole thing really easily after removing the seat im all for it.

its such a PAIN to service the reverb, the transfer and a couple others ive had and forgot the name of. all these require removing the seat and the post from the bike and then... a million other things. The fox transfer is especially annoying as it requires a lot of specialized equipment (the reverb less so, but still).
  • 1 0
 @srru: Also need to remove the saddle only maybe once a year to bleed the system and fill it up with fresh oil , tot a big deal
  • 2 0
 From all the gritty/muddy saddle clamps I've seen, some people would benefit from removing their saddle once in a while to clean the area anyway.. creaking saddles are annoying for everyone involved.
  • 1 0
 @rmalexan: Never realized. How many people are involved with ones creaking saddle?
  • 1 0
 @rmalexan: Yeah, both creaking saddles and creaking seatpost clamps. So many times I thought the creak was somewhere else and it was just the seatpost clamp or saddle. Doh!!
  • 16 0
 I like their approach when everyone else is trying to push new standards and sell us more stuff and more tools, these guys are actually going a step towards us - common users.

I admit having to remove the saddle is a bit of a pain but don't you think if it was possible to make an IDEAL solution with the syringe port somewhere else than under the seat they would not do this? Guys what is a problem of setting the angle of the seat the same way even simply counting threads on the bolts and setting them the same way. Come on guys.... We are men - we used to hunt animals in the jungle to feed families and now we are crying beacuse we cannot deal with the saddle angle? YES it would be better without taking the saddle off but if they did it like this, it must be for a reason. If I need to do this 2-3 times per year - I can live with this. Better than having to bleed the post everytime I accidentaly pull the saddle up or everytime I put the bike upside down...

- I have been watching this brand since they entered the market - after all 3 of my reverbs blew and I have given up on hydrauilc posts ( even bought a Gravity Dropper instead but it was so ugly my mates thought it was a part of my halloween costume). It was 2013 and since then I have had Uptimizer 2.0 from YEP on all my bikes - very happy. I actually service them myself as it is much faster than sending to a service center. With the 3.0 being much easier to service it is even more tempting to get one.


I like small manufacturers because they care, they design and build like if they were doing it for themselves - for their own bikes.

Feck it. I have just preordered two 3.0 seatposts from them. Been using the previous 2.0 verison for years and if this one is even slightly better I'm up for it.
  • 8 1
 Is this some new "Throwback Tuesday" where you pull out an article from four or five years ago and say "remember how much work it was to bleed your post before the Bike Yoke Revive was invented?" Seriously though, how is this a step forward?
  • 1 0
 The first iteration of the revive valve was released to fix a problem the revive post itself wasn't immune (don't know 'bout the last iteration but the first was known for needing a "reset" every time the bike was upside down).
Since YEP inception, I haven't hear but praise for his reliability and it never suffered from such problems.
Personally I've never owned a YEP dropper but it's pretty common in my area, so I'm quite confident stating that feedback.
  • 2 0
 @smithcreek My thoughts exactly. Props to these guys for making a fully serviceable dropper (I had one with a non serviceable cartridge and hated just chucking it when it went bad), but Bike Yoke pretty much has it dialed. I got a Revive last year and have only had to bleed it once- and it happened to be on the side of the trail at the beginning of a long ride. Took longer to get my tool out of my bag than it did to bleed the post.
  • 4 0
 @Becciu: I have a first iteration Revive. I've had my bike upside down numerous times to work on it and never needed to bleed it. Maybe you have to drop the seat while upside down? I don't see myself doing that during the middle of many rides.

I'm sure the YEP is a great post and any post that lets you bleed without full disassembly is good in my book, but an article written by an industry insider, not a casual rider, ignores the fact that Bike Yoke has been around for years and presents the concept of the user being able to easily bleed and service their post as something new and exciting. That begs the question, why?
  • 1 0
 @smithcreek: my OG Revive needs a revive if it's upside down while dropped. That's all it's needed in about 3 years, it still feels like new.
  • 7 0
 420 EUR...YEP that's a sick number, but that'll be a NOPE from me. At least here in the US...too many great posts from companies like OneUp and PNW components for 1/2 to 1/3 of the price.
  • 3 2
 This an easily serviceable dropper for a small cottage company. Some people see value in that and some don’t. You do you!
  • 5 0
 @NickBit: the cottage was just the presentation room on Bike Connection Winter....we work in a propper clean and organised workshop...
  • 1 0
 That cheap OneUp is only rebrand KS eten... Every single cheap dropper is unservisable (also cartridge, not just regreas). I ride reverd and that is one of best dropper. You Can change every single O-rings, like on this. But now I thinking about wireless dropper for same price like this one (Magura Vyron V2)
  • 2 0
 I haven't tried loads of dropper posts in the past. Two Reverb's which ended up in the bin after a few Months. And then I'm using two YEP posts (2014/201Cool and they have been flawless ever since. I send them in for maintenance every 2 years or so. Service is spot on. Dropper posts are the most fragile part on a MTB - but this does not apply to YEP posts.
  • 5 1
 In a world where the OneUp Droppers, Fox Transfers, and Bikeyoke Revives and Divines exist, why do others even try to compete anymore?
  • 3 2
 Well, one reason is to support a local brand.
  • 4 1
 Made in Switzerland instead of Asia and supporting a small brand for keeping the everything inhouse is more important than Some money saved.
  • 1 0
 Some people like the small details like the joystick remote or color-coded hardware. Its good to have options! And TBH, while the OneUp gets a lot of hype it isn't anywhere near the the Revive in terms of feel, serviceability or longevity.
  • 1 0
 Is the longest travel version (185mm stroke) also available with the external cable routing? Initially it wasn't. If still not, I'm curious what makes it harder to make droppers with external cable routing with longer stroke whereas it seems to be possible with the models with internal cable routing.

I'm currently not directly in the market for a dropper seatpost but if I'm eventually going to get one, I'd definitely rather get one of these I can completely service and tune myself.
  • 1 0
 As an owner of a 125mm stroke 1st gen Reverb, the external routing is a pain in the ass because the hose is always moving up and down. Even with 125mm, I always have to reshuffle the hose in the cable clamps to prevent big loops of hose hanging off the bike around the seatpost tube. If the frame is compatible with internal routing, I'd rather that any day of the week, especially if it's a cable actuated dropper instead of the Reverb.
  • 4 0
 @vinay If you are going to get a dropper, buy a Bike Yoke Revive. If it starts to sag you can reset it in a bout 2 seconds with the external revive switch. At home service takes 20 minutes with basic tooling and know how and it is the most reliable seat post I have ever owned.
  • 3 2
 *Heavy Breathing*

- home mechanics everywhere.


Also I had a joystick style dropper lever on a post a few years ago. Post was trash but the joystick was fantastic. I only stopped using it because it didn't work with the direction that the cable threads in both of my newer seat posts.
  • 14 1
 My experience of joystick remotes was terrible. They're really vague and allowed the cable to twist in too many directions causing it to fray and become flaccid. Maybe they're improved since then but I doubt it.
  • 16 0
 @excavator666: Nice use of the word flaccid there
  • 3 0
 @honda50r: I enjoy using the word flaccid at times when describing a band or song...always gets a fun reaction and makes sense
  • 9 0
 @honda50r: I was having trouble spelling flaccid, but then I went on Google and I got it up.
  • 1 0
 @excavator666: Next google check, tumescent.
  • 1 0
 That joystick looks so horrible, though I've never used one. Isn't it vague pushing against a round nubbon?
  • 1 0
 @tgent: I like them because you can set them up anywhere around your bar that you want, plus you can reach it from multiple angles depending on your needs at that moment (not unlike Shimano's two-way downshifting).
  • 2 0
 @jlang002: waiting for an opportunity to use that! *heavy breathing*
  • 1 0
 @excavator666: my biggest concern after googling “flaccid” would be all the google add’s I’d get after for anti-flaccid medication!
  • 3 2
 Wow, happy to see the YEP 3.0 coming to life!

My 2 cents about this product and this company: I've been using the YEP 2.0 for a while and I was pretty happy with it. Might be more expensive than other products but it is amazingly reliable: I haven't had an issue in two years (Two of them for my trail and enduro bikes). As I've sold my enduro bike, I reached out to the YEP Components as I wanted a dropper for my new bike, i've been given the chance to order the 3.0 prior to its release and I do not know what they did with it but it turned out to be the smoothest, play-free dropper I have ever owned (Tried Reverb, Specialized, KS and couple of re-branded OEM stuff).

This small brand is only doing droppers and they are pretty good at it --> keep on pushing this good stuff!
  • 1 0
 Dunno, l bought a brand x 3 years ago, and all I've done is undone the top threaded bit and wiped some grease on the shaft cos I got guilty once that I hadn't done anything to it at all. It simply has not missed a beat. Guess I'm lucky.
  • 4 0
 this vs BikeYoke vs OneUp
  • 2 0
 The best assembling quality for high efficency and functioning. Take care of video instruction and everything is done! Never had nothing like Yep
  • 2 0
 I have been using the earlier version of the YEP post. Such a great product which I can only recommend. Looking forward to getting one of the new ones on my bike soon
  • 2 0
 I've been using this dropper for a couple of month and it works flawlessly. 185mm of Swiss engineering precision. Yeah. :-)
  • 3 0
 Their marketing team are the red and blue aliens from sesame street.
  • 3 2
 Wow pinkbike, I could barely read this article. You know journalistic standards are dropping when the writer starts every other sentence with yep.
  • 2 0
 Yep - things are definitely looking Up. And down.
  • 2 0
 They show already in the product release how to repair it.
  • 2 0
 Moir is releasing one called the "Yeaaaaaaaah"
  • 7 7
 Lost me when they put oil in it. Mechanical all the way, had enough issues with reverb to never want oil in a dropper again.
  • 3 4
 That's like saying you'll never use hydraulic brakes again because you used some crappy 1st gen hydro brakes back in the late 90s.

Give one of these or a BikeYoke a try and I think you'll change your mind. When done right they are hard to beat. I've had a BikeYoke for a few thousand miles and it is as buttery smooth as the day I bought it with a total of maybe 20 minutes of maintenance (re-grease and that's about it). Everything I've read these look to be the same way. It's odd to say it but my dropper is one of my favorite parts on the bike because it works so damn well and requires no effort.
  • 1 0
 @OCSunDevil: Thanks. Point taken. Revised. I won't bother with reverb again. BikeYoke have taken my fancy in the past and maybe reverbs are great for everyone else. If I had constant issues with my hydraulic brakes maybe I would of gone back to crappy 1st gen hydro brakes from the late 90s.
  • 1 0
 Can you summarise?
That's a lot of text
  • 2 0
 Yep, it's a dropper post
  • 2 1
 Summary: Buy a BikeYoke Revive.
  • 4 0
 @PhillipJ: I think you meant "Buy a One Up for half the price and more travel"
  • 2 0
 @goldencycle: you might be right with the current OneUp. With the previous one you'd be buying two so you had one to ride while the other was fixed. Hasn't been out long enough to see if it matches the unbelievable reliability of the Revive.
  • 1 0
 @PhillipJ: Fair enough! Haven't had issues with mine, but can't say no one has!
  • 1 0
 Air or spring in a dropper is the only way to go.
  • 1 0
 Mmmm, joysticks, love that!
  • 1 0
 Bleeding a dropper post, what's that? [gravity dropper turbo owner]
  • 1 0
 Does it have horizontal play? Yep.
  • 2 1
 Nope.
  • 1 0
 Things are looking up!
  • 1 0
 420EU......yep
  • 1 0
 Brilliant remote
  • 1 3
 Huge fail having to remove the seat and making it $400. Why is this so hard for anyone to get right
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