First Ride: 2015 Norco Aurum Carbon

Mar 16, 2015
by Mike Kazimer  
Norco 2015

Keen-eyed observers may have spotted prototype versions of the 2015 Norco Aurum at various downhill races last year, but up until this point Norco had remained quiet about the bike's specifics. That veil of secrecy has finally been lifted, and to find out more about the bike we headed to Idyllwild, California, a small town located in the San Jacinto mountains. While it may not have the beaches and bikinis southern California is famous for, it is surrounded by plenty of steep, loose, and rocky trails, which made it a fitting location to get a feel for the new rig. The Aurum Carbon retains many of the characteristics that made the previous version so popular, including the 200mm of rear travel, but has received updated geometry, 27.5” wheels, and a carbon fiber front triangle.



Aurum Carbon Details:

• 200mm rear travel
• 27.5" wheels
• 63° head angle
• Carbon front triangle, aluminum rear end
• 450 gram weight savings over previous alloy version
• 12 x 142mm rear spacing
• A.R.T. suspension
• Sizes: S, M, L
• Price: $4230 - $9700 USD depending on spec, frame only: $2585
• Available April 2015
www.norco.com, @norcobicycles


Norco Aurum 2015

Updating the Aurum

When Owen Pemberton, Norco's senior design engineer, began working on the new rig he sought to create a bike that was lighter, faster, and more efficient than its predecessor, yet retained a similar suspension feel. At the time, 27.5” wheels were gaining traction (no pun intended), so the decision was made to base the bike around that wheel size, and in order to achieve the desired weight savings, carbon fiber was the material of choice for the front triangle.

The resulting frame ended up weighing 3300 grams, a pound lighter than the alloy version, and Norco's testing results showed that it was the strongest frame they'd ever built. Once the prototypes were ready, Norco set their team members loose on the race course to put a season's worth of abuse on the bike before releasing it for the public, the same process they used with the original aluminum version of the Aurum.

Norco Aurum 2015
The carbon front end is jointed to an aluminum rear end via a three piece forged link.
Norco Aurum 2015
The Aurum's bump stop also serves as a cable guide and protects the frame against damage from resting on a tailgate during shuttling.

The curvy profile of the front triangle is for more than show – it's a design intended to avoid any sharp angles at high stress junctions in order to maintain the strength of the carbon fiber. Norco has included downtube and chainstay protection, along with a unique integrated bump stop that also provides protection for the underside of the downtube during shuttling. A pressfit BB107 (the DH equivalent of a BB92) was chosen due to the larger and stiffer bottom bracket junction that it allows for, which creates more space for the main pivot and the lower shock mount. Rather than going with the 150mm rear end spacing that often accompanies a BB107 or 83mm bottom bracket shell, Norco chose to go with a 12x142 rear end, citing the improved heel clearance, and the fact that the bike was designed to be run with a 7 speed drivetrain. Even the base model version, the Aurum C7.3, comes with an SLX cassette that's been reduced to 7 speeds.

Downhill and bike park riding can take a toll on even the most meticulously maintained bikes, which is why Norco used only two bearing sizes throughout the entire frame. There are releases for each bearing, notches in the frame that allows for access to the outer bearing race to make removal even easier. The derailleur hanger has also been improved, and is now located inboard of the frame rather than being mounted to the underside of the dropout, making it less prone to snagging and getting broken or bent by hungry rocks or roots. In addition, cartridge bearings are now used at the upper shock mount instead of bushings, a change that's claimed to help increase the shock's small bump sensitivity.

Norco Aurum 2015
The extra width that accompanies a BB107 helps to increase frame stiffness.
Norco Aurum 2015
All of the bikes in the 2015 Norco Carbon lineup come equipped with a seven speed drivetrain.

Geometry and Suspension Design

The 2015 Aurum has a 63° head angle, a -12mm bottom bracket drop (which places it 5mm lower than than before), and between a 425 – 445 rear center measurement. According to Norco, the reason for having the rear center measurement grow as the frame sizes get larger is to help maintain the same rider weight distribution throughout the line. It's not the actual chain stay that's lengthening – it's the bottom bracket position that changes, moving slightly forward with each frame size. For 2015, the rear center measurements have been increased slightly, and each frame now has a different head tube length. That change that came about as a result of analyzing how riders were setting up their bikes in the real world.

According to Owen Pemberton, "We polled a cross section of current Aurum riders to get their view on the fit of the bike... What we found was that all riders were running some headset or stem spacers (or a combination of both) to get to their desired bar height. Because the old Aurum employed a single head tube length of 110mm we found that larger riders were needing to run a minimum of 35-40mm of spacers to get to their comfortable bar height (some riders a lot more). It is more efficient to put this height into the frame rather than spacers as it puts less stress on the headset bearings and the fork steerer/stanchions. We found that the combination of a bigger wheel, longer fork and a 120mm head tube length would put the reach/stack point right in the same zone as the minimum people were running on the old bike."

The Aurum still uses Norco's Advanced Ride Technology (A.R.T.), their take on a Horst Link suspension design, and the axle path remains unchanged from the 26” version, but the shock position has been altered in order to make it slightly less progressive than before, in order to allow riders to make the most of the bike's 200mm of travel.

Norco Aurum 2015

Norco Aurum 2015
Norco Aurum 2015

Norco Aurum 2015
  Pricing: Aurum C7.1 Enve: $9700, C7.1: $7000, 7.2: $5800, 7.3: $4230 USD.


Norco Aurum 2015
  Pinkbike test rider Matt Russell collecting his frequent flyer miles aboard the Aurum Carbon.


Riding Impressions
bigquotesWe were able to spend time getting acquainted with the new Aurum on the C7.1 version, which comes with a World Cup worthy build kit that includes a RockShox Boxxer World Cup fork, a Cane Creek DBCoil, and SRAM Guide RSC brakes for $7,000 USD. There's also the option to get the same bike with ENVE's M90 carbon wheels, but going that route will add $2,700 to the final price.

The trails in Idyllwild were a mix of steep, chunky rock moves, high speed dusty corners, with the occasional road gap or booter thrown into the mix. It didn't take long getting accustomed to the Aurum - it's playful enough to whip it around tight turns and get sideways with ease, but maintained excellent stability at high speeds. It certainly feels race ready, and although it'll loosen its collar and goof off when asked, it's all business when necessary, possessing the straightline control that's required on a race course. The weight savings that come by switching to carbon are often what companies stress the most, but it was the Aurum's stiffness that really stood out. This is one stout machine, and smashing through corners as hard as possible didn't do anything to rattle it. Other than an odd duck-like sound that the Cane Creek DBCoil occasionally let out when the spring rubbed the shock body, there were no component issues to speak of. The X01 DH drivetrain was quick and precise, and it never felt like any more than the seven available speeds were necessary.

Our time with the bike was just enough to get a taste for its capabilities, and once bike park season arrives we'll be giving it a more thorough shake down, but by all appearances it seems that the 2015 Aurum is a worthy heir to Norco's downhill throne. With several new additions to their World Cup team including Sam Blenkinsop and Harry Heath, it'll be interesting to see how the bike does at the top level of the sport when race season kicks off in just a few weeks' time.



183 Comments

  • + 147
 Finally a bike that comes with a shuttle guard!
  • + 95
 Like the Evil Undead had 2 years ago...........................
  • + 279
 Android had this 5 years ago ... oh wait, this is not an iphone thing ...
  • - 82
flag bigburd (Mar 16, 2015 at 7:33) (Below Threshold)
 Seems a bit daft making a bike light then adding that guard to it , would make more sense to put a guard on your tail gate , plus it looks ugly !
  • + 48
 A guard on your tailgate wont keep rocks from chipping your downtube
  • + 37
 Wouldnt that make it a downtube guard, not a shuttle guard Wink
  • - 33
flag chyu (Mar 16, 2015 at 8:06) (Below Threshold)
 Operator.
  • + 4
 Even with tailgate pad the frame can get scuffed and marked. If its worn (which doesn't take long) there's not much padding in there. Dh bikes get trashed on shuttles, one of the main reasons I've stayed well away from carbon on my dh bike to date. Maybe with things like this it'll be a bit more viable - doesn't help with your mates handlebar gouging the top tube though does it?
  • + 77
 But again no XL , do these companies think people just stop growing at 5'11" ?
  • + 18
 Yeah the sizing is stupid. Too small
  • + 14
 Big is not big enough, small is not small enough
  • + 10
 I'm still on 4130 frame, my tailgate is Aluminium.....
  • + 1
 Running pretty small..... Large is 17" reach and 23.7" tt. Should be 17.5-18/24.3-24.7ish
  • + 2
 That's why you got to get a lightville. Those thing go fom xs's'm'l'xl'xxl
  • + 10
 Much agreed Bigburd! That's discrimination! lol. I'm 6'4" and NOTHING seems to fit. Been on a large Demo8 4 seasons that wants to pitch me over the bars on every steep descent so my next ride will undoubtedly be an XL V10. Hope the bike manufacturers read this.
  • + 1
 well demos are known to be very short in all sizes. When buying that bike you were ill informed. luckily they have changed that with the new gen.
  • + 4
 @hottroddr , I'm 6'3" , like you I am tall , not very tall , but tall so I would say we should be riding size large frames.

I know several riding mates and non riding mates that are 6'5" plus , they are in the start of the very tall category to me and should be riding frames from the XL range.

If there is one standard that should be forced and I would not complain a bit about it would be standardisation of what each size actually means.
  • + 2
 Agreed that it would be nice to see an XL in the mix but carbon molds are bloody expensive so you can't really blame them. Santa Cruz is supposed to be making an XXL V10 in the near future so that'll be cool. Bloody expensive though!
  • + 4
 Sure they may be expensive but I'm pretty sure just as many people want an XL these days as they do a small.
  • + 2
 I'm 6'4" and it got the Large Giant Glory 2015. It's the biggest bike I have tried, and it feels way better than the large TR450 i had before. The Giant has a 461mm reach. The longest bike I have seen is the Canfield Brothers Jedi with a 470mm reach.
  • - 2
 bikes are getting smaller, wheels bigger. get with the times
  • + 2
 Deepstrut, thx for the update! Hard to keep up man
  • + 1
 @frederick24, regarding 18"reach large glory. Reach #s na on giant site..u sure?
18"reach pretty long for only 24.4 tt. I just demod a large and at 6'1.5", felt lil cramped.
Xl glory=large fury (does giant make that xl glory as shown in geo chart?)
  • + 1
 @jrocksdh I saw the reach on here: www.vitalmtb.com/features/First-Look-First-Ride-2015-Giant-Glory-27-5,764
It think it fells pretty good with the Large.
I don't know about the XL. I saw it on the geo chard but can't seem to find it on the website. I saw someone in New Zealand who got one though.
  • + 61
 Norco is like the kid from your neighborhood that makes it to the big leagues. You can't help but cheer for them because they represent the roots of Freeride
  • + 7
 Norco is classic, everyone i ride with grew up on one
  • + 36
 Norco has come a long way in recent years. At this point, I would certainly put them along the lines of Santa Cruz, Intense, Specialized and the other big money brands as for quality, yet with a far more pleasing price point and top quality customer service.
  • + 1
 except they put race race respond cranks and bars on a $6000 dollar bike. :p
  • + 7
 Honestly, it's not a huge issue, they're like slightly heavier than the atlas cranks.
  • + 11
 I think they put respond bar/cranks because they put a x01 dh cassette/shifter/derailler
  • + 2
 how much heavier than descendants? (good bench mark) I'd like to see a better balanced drivetrain but to each their own. If someone is going to dish out the much money, i'm sure they'll swap the cranks, just sticks out to me.
  • + 2
 Around 150-200g heavier than descendants, so I guess it is a fair bit heavier. But yeah I agree it's kinda a weird crank choice. Rather have an Atlas crank or something.
  • + 12
 so your saying its about 3 to 4 average sized bags of potato chips heavier? Wow that's horrible!
  • + 13
 lol its hilarious and sad how much people these days have become such consumer whores. When I was a kid, I never worried about the gear I wore, I tried my best not to hound my parents for money for flashy bike parts, I didn't complain or give a shit about the weight of my bike. All I ever wanted to do was ride, regardless of how I looked or what I was riding. No its all about ensuring we have good colour matching pyjama suits and brand new components on our bikes. 16 year old kids riding bikes worth more than my car, thanks to there mom and dad.
  • + 5
 I think the argument here is more about the value of the bike than anything else... Its a conversation we should be having more and more especially when comparing between brands. It baffles me that there are so many manufacturers which essentially make the same thing, yet don't price like they are in competition.
  • + 3
 Maybe learn your facts before you speak, we're simply discussing the fact it's an odd choice. Also if you're referring to me about having my parents buy me stuff, I work hard to pay for all of my gear and have paid for both of my bikes this season. People aren't complaining, just curious as to norco's choice.
  • + 2
 don't feed the trolls @david-lemieux lol and yea you're right. its the odd part out from an insanely sick build. I can see why they had to cut some corners considering it's close to other companies alu builds in price.
  • + 3
 Stem and bar are also off, should be atlas stuff on the 7.2. But yeah the price for a carbon bike is crazy cheap.
  • + 32
 $2700 more just for the Enve wheels? does the other one come with no wheels?
  • - 7
flag RyanWensley (Mar 16, 2015 at 7:03) (Below Threshold)
 If you look at the spec you will see that you can add Enve wheels to the top end package rather than the wheels that are specced at $7,000.
  • + 18
 Yes....so they remove a $800 wheelset (guess), and put a wheelset that retails for $2700 on (can be had for 2k) then charge you the full 2700 for the privilege and keep your old wheels too!

Better option is to just buy derby/pro 2 wheel combo for 1200, put them on your 7k 7.1 and keep the old wheels as spares.
  • + 6
 Enve is a rip off. Most ppl in their right mind will never pay that much for wheels
  • + 2
 Enve has 5 year warranty on all of their products. And I dont know anyone who keeps wheels for more then 5 years.
  • - 12
flag ads24000 (Mar 16, 2015 at 12:28) (Below Threshold)
 You pay the extra 2700 and theres not just wheels which is an upgrade there's cranks, stem, forks, shock etc...
  • + 0
 I don't know.. I guess i just think carbon isn't necessary unless you are a professional level racer.
  • + 6
 @ads24000 no, the $2700 is just for the wheel upgrade only.
  • + 3
 Oh yeah sorry haha i was was looking at the C7.2 my mistake
  • + 26
 It's always a shame they put only a Kage/Boxxer RC on Zee specced bikes (most of the time). Honestly, for my needs, Zee is perfectly fine, and I really don't need Saint... but I'd still like to not sacrifice so much on the suspension.
  • + 1
 The Giant glory 2 comes with a r2c rear shock which is brilliant. Comes with a rc boxxer but its prety easy to add a charger damper for like 700$ or so. Brillant idea
  • + 1
 Yeah, I was looking at the Giants. The other bikes that I think come with something similar are a Transition TR500, and an Intense 951 (though that's pretty pricey compared to other zee equipped DH bikes. Not much else though
  • + 1
 You're better off getting a boxxer rc and buying an avalanche cartridge than paying the extra for the higher end rockshox stuff. Same goes for the rear shock, a custom tune goes a long way, even on basic dampers like the fox van rc.
  • + 16
 The frame's bent!! See? The top tube and downtube curve up towards the headtube. Maybe the hot California weather melted the plastic front end.
  • + 1
 Glad someone else saw this and my eyes aren't wonky.
  • + 1
 The fork bumpha
  • + 3
 Lots of bikes have that, same reason why I hate the new Transition.
  • + 13
 that is a very aesthetically pleasing bicycle.
  • + 9
 605mm stack, sorry mate thats too tall for most S size riders
I know its difficult to get low stack with 27.5, but why cant anyone make 27.5" for M and L and 26" for S?
  • + 12
 Blenki FTW !
  • + 9
 4230 seems quite reasonable compared to other bike manufacturers this year, particuarly carbon! love Norco.. always have
  • + 9
 Nice! It's about time PB brought back some hardcore bike porn!
  • + 5
 142mm rear on a DH bike?... Yes please!

Let's bloody get rid of the stupid 150/157mm standard, as nobody should be running a 10sp cassette for downhill riding. I've always wanted to get a DH bike which would fit my dirt jumper's wheels since the amount of abuse they get is in the same category. Now I have two frames to choose from: the new Demo and the carbon Aurum!

Hopefully that also means a shorter XD freehub, so we don't waste the precious flange width-space for a stupid "spoke guard". I've been running "singlespeed" rear hubs on my SC Nomad with a custom 6-speed cluster, and it's awesome
  • + 2
 10sp cassette rider here.
Smile
  • + 16
 It's not 157mm so you can run a million speed cassette... its for hub width, which = stability/strength, correct me if I'm wrong.
  • + 3
 @robaussie99 +1
  • + 5
 If you're talking about hub width and wheel triangulation, most "singlespeed" or short freehub rear hubs have a wider (or same) flange distance as their 150mm counterparts (ex. Onyx DJ vs DH hubs). Don't Chris Kings also use the same hub shell for singlespeed and DH hubs?

But if you're talking about 12x150mm axles being stronger than 12x135mm axles, that's preposterous. How can a longer axle of same thickness be stronger... and not many people break axles in the first place....

The only thing 150mm hubs fixed was when you wanted to shift to the lowest gear because of the chain line (closest to the center). And apparently 150mm rear axle standards came before the 83mm bottombracket standard... Which makes sense if you were trying distinguish between 10x135mm hubs and 12x150mm hubs, which is an upgrade in strength.
  • + 5
 @robaussie99 The point is that with a short freehub body on a 142 you could run 6 speeds, have wide flanges and be able to pedal without clipping your heels on the frame as often.
  • + 2
 you know norco make spacers for smaller hubs...
  • + 8
 They probably should have started a 144mm standard with a 13mm axle. It's the perfect combination and everything else is obsolete.
  • + 4
 Trek was thinking ahead but had a slightly different set of numbers: 148mm. Freaking idiots think a few milimeters will make a difference? Then there's 15x110. Not 20x110 or 15x100, but RIGHT IN THE MIDDLE. Lol and their reason was: wider flange spacing for stronger/stiffer wheels. #someoneneedstobefired
  • + 0
 @theminsta - I think you'll be surprised by how many companies adopt the 12x148 / 15x110 spacing in the near future.
  • + 3
 I'm 100% sure I will be. I'm already starting to get used to new standards every season. I'm going to say what everyone else has been joking about, but we will see 18x116mm front axle standards, 14x146mm rear axle standards, and so on.

But I'm curious as to what your take on these standards is. 12x142mm versus 12x148mm, and 15x100mm versus 15x110mm.
  • + 2
 @theminsta, if the new standards allow for better frame designs, clearance for fatter tires, and additional wheel stiffness, I'm all for it. At the same time, I completely understand the reluctance / skepticism that there's a need for another axle spacing change. It'll be interesting how it all pans out - there are a lot of changes on the way, but hopefully the end result is bikes that perform even better than they already do.
  • + 9
 I'm all for new standards if it has clear advantages for riders, not if it is merely a money-grab for companies. Can you look at anyone with a straight face when you say Boost 15x110mm front hubs are better than 15x100mm? Especially when most of our 20x110mm front hubs are compatible with 15x100mm axles by switching end caps, I find it hard to find any value in the Boost front standard.

And the similar argument applies to Boost 148: 3mm wider on each end? THREE milimeters. My booger is frequently larger than that, and you're telling me that will increase wheel triangulation that significantly, while improving chainlines that could be fixed with a slight collaboration with crank/chain ring manufacturers?

More than half the supporting arguments put forth for "BOOST" seems to be whimsical at first sight. And with any bit of examination, it (personally) looks like something you'd read in an April Fools post.
  • + 4
 All these stupid different standards make me want to sell all my bikes and just get a fucking skateboard.
  • + 0
 @mikekazimer clearance for fatter tires? what do you mean, nobody ride tyre wider than 2.40 today.
except for fatbike, this front 110mm is useless
  • + 1
 to my understanding 142 rear end is a cheaper way to use existent rear ends for new front triangles also absence of xs and xl models could unnecessary for prototype testing or struggling to accommodate existent rear ends for 200mm of travel
  • + 3
 Is it just me, or are all new DH bikes starting to look the same? A bit like modern BMX bikes, it's a nice looking bike don't get me wrong but......Maybe it's my age lol, but when I rode BMX (early-mid 80's) all the bikes had they're own distinctive shape. I'm now on a 2014 Demo changed from a 2012 Nuke' Scalp, now those are 2 very different looking bikes.(bloody lovin' the Demo tho' lol).
  • + 5
 For that price the ENVE edition should come with the ENVE bar, stem, seatpost and wheel combo! Not just the wheels. Tight bast......
  • + 1
 Yeah, its pretty pricey....
  • + 3
 looks like a stinger of a bike! Be interesting to see how it rides. Rented an Aurum last year for a day up at Whistler. Nice bike and definitely super fun around the corners. Having it drift around the berms brought a super wide ear to ear grin to my face! I have a Carbon Wilson so would be interesting to see how the new Aurum rides. Both different animals but I do like bikes...hm...another steed perhaps?
  • + 6
 Looks like a Norco!! And that's a good thing
  • + 2
 The new Norco's, including the carbon Sight and Range, are such great bikes but I worry about a carbon DH frame from them with all the problems with the AM/Enduro models last year. I ordered a carbon Range and had to go find another bike after they recalled all the frames (because of faulty manufacturing) in the late spring and have talked to numerous people with cracked Sights.
  • + 6
 I believe they have changed manufacturers.
  • + 1
 to my understanding 142 rear end is a cheaper way to use existent rear ends for new front triangles also absence of xs and xl models could unnecessary for prototype testing or struggling to accommodate existent rear ends for 200mm of travel
  • + 5
 kind of surprised how short the reach on the large is.
  • + 3
 yeah, for me its surprisingly, for DH bike from 2015, short ...and with "tall head"
  • + 5
 Nice one Matt - sending the road gap like a boss!
  • + 1
 I think that Norco have recently been producing some great DH and trail bike designs. That said, there are a couple of things about the Gravity Tune implementation (balanced front-centre to rear-centre geometry) on this bike that could do with further explanation. Norco, like everyone else uses the same swingarm and rear suspension link components across all of the different sized bikes in a particular range i.e. the same rear end parts are used for the 425mm chainstay small frame and the 445mm chainstay large frame bikes, only the main pivot position relative to the bottom bracket changes. This front-centre to rear-centre ratio says little or nothing about the seat tube angle as far as I can tell but clearly Norco is now factoring in variations in that parameter as well - small frames having a slightly steeper seat tube angle and large frames a slightly slacker angle. The question is, why? Norco, is yet to fill in that detail. The other thing is there are now a lot of bikes out there with increased front-centre dimensions which is offset by reduced stem lengths to keep the rider cockpit around a more or less normal length. Few riders seem to be complaining about this trend so it would be good to know whether Norco disputes this approach - the notion of an optimised front-centre to rear-centre ratio suggests that they do - or whether Gravity Tune has the more modest intent of tweaking the existing Norco geometry without buying in to these broader controversies.

One last observation. Given that DH bikes have traditionally used very slack seat tube angles the steepened effective seat tube geometry of this bike is interesting. It would not be too much to suppose that a further steepening of this geometry parameter for trail bikes will be next.
  • + 2
 Pinkbike needs a mere mortals option, where it shows us the aluminum Aurum instead of the carbon one... you know to keep us mere mortals off the organ donation blackmarket
  • + 1
 Is there any particular (performance) reason for this shock orientation? I have noticed older Norcos have the shock oriented the opposite way. Also, nice touch with the BB and Shuttle fenders!
  • + 0
 They should of released it as a 2016 model, anyone who has a sight or range on order knows Norco is 6 months behind at lease. To say its available in April BS... Norco makes great bikes but getting them one on time is a whole other story.
  • + 3
 Article says rear carbon triangle. Photos clearly depict Aluminum welds. Maybe a mixup?
  • + 0
 That's a nice lookin' ride. Norco does some really nice stuff. I'm not into that slight little bend in the TT, makes it look like it's succumbed to stress or something, but overall, nice & clean just like a Trek. No goofy gimmicks or any of that shit, just legit bidnits.
  • + 4
 wish that it came in black on black
  • + 0
 BB107 is the same as BB95 among the narrower bottom bracket standards, BB30 is a different animal (bearings pressed into the frame, the frame has circlips to position them, the axle is 30 mm, not 24, etc.).

Also, what difference does a 7-speed casette make, if you then use a spacer to fill the freehub? Someone needs to make a 7-speed specific freehub so rear wheels can be centred properly and have the whole flange width used, even with 142 mm hubs.
  • + 1
 "Other than an odd duck-like sound that the Cane Creek DBCoil occasionally let out when the spring rubbed the shock body, there were no component issues to speak of." The spring rubs the shock body? That sounds bad!
  • + 2
 The spring rubs the black plastic shock body protecter
  • + 0
 Im not sure about that paint, looks like someone played around with the MS Paint spray can in their youth and had a moment of nostalgia - not horrible but not great but I got to say that the price seems on point and they signed my favorite rider so I'll let it slide Wink
  • + 2
 This is a great looking bike but if I had the money and needed a carbon DH bike, I think I might be giving Pivot my money for a new Phoenix carbon. Its a sexy bike.
  • + 3
 Where can someone buy that kind of frame protection?
  • + 3
 Take my money ! Take it !!
  • + 1
 more holes/mounts in the frame. can you tap/die areas on a frame to mount stuff? are there strong tubes on the frame to do that?
  • + 1
 I see they've moved the cable routing to the down tube - I hate the cable routing on my 2014 Aurum, it always seems to get caught up in the linkage.
  • + 3
 the down tube protection - very good details!
  • + 2
 Looks really stocky(short) One of the things I like about aurums is how long the frames look.
  • + 0
 So the top tier Norco with the Enve wheels is still around 4g cheaper then the S-works Demo 8, and you can actually put this in your truck. Kuddos to Norco for keeping it real and legit.
  • + 9
 The top tier Norco is actually $700 more expensive then the S-works Demo 8. $9700 as opposed to $9000.
  • + 1
 Hmmm guess Spesh lowered the price by alot! Remember reading the price tag of almost 14g for the new S-works Demo when it came out. 9G for that bike is a smoking deal.
  • + 1
 Spesh never charged that much. Either your bike shop was ripping you off or you saw a new custom blinged out one or something.
  • + 1
 Right get it. My bad. I do remember reading when it first was released publications were giving it a $13,500 price tag. Don't blame me, just reciting what I read months ago.
  • + 2
 Don't think it's quite as good looking as the last Aurum, but that's not much of a criticism.
  • + 0
 Looks much better than the Aurum. The fact that the Aurum's top and bottom tube started to slope downward toward the headtube gave it such an awkward look.
  • + 1
 Rear hub with a big space betwin last cog and spokes. why not move the spoke to the outside to make a stronger wheel?
  • + 2
 142 awesome, however c3 bike spec looks much better then c1
  • + 3
 Thats a sexy frame!
  • + 1
 10 grand for a dh bike wow how much are bikes going to be in another ten years 20 grand fkn ridiculous buy a YT
  • + 1
 Yeah, cheap AND fantastic spec. Everytime I see a DH bike I always think, "thats so damn expensive". Yt is cheaper AND has bos... Thats a massive win!
  • + 4
 Yeah, so much cheaper once you factor in an additional $300 usd shipping, exchange rate, taxes and an import fee (15% on bikes I believe). Plus any potential parts or assembly issues were an LBS would be needed... and don't forget any shipping for warranty issues... and if you need to get the bike rebuilt... I'm sure YET will cover All that, right?
  • - 5
flag ArnoldBabar (Mar 16, 2015 at 22:51) (Below Threshold)
 Well, they have a North American distributor now so that solves that issue. Just because you live in communist Canada doesn't mean those problems exist everywhere else. Either way if I were to spend big money on a bike this would be it!
  • + 4
 The poster's country tag is Canadian, it's not likely they're aware of the importation regulations. YT isn't as big of deal as a lot of people think for us in our gulags up north... but I see you're all knowing of communism because you've been indoctrinated into thinking Canada is bad because one of the core beliefs are that everyone is entitled to the same care and rights... or you're just feeble minded and believe everything you've told In your vast 17 years of experience on Earth.
  • + 1
 Where i live in new zealand postage for a yt bike is 180$nz. And the nzd is weaker than the USD or CAD. I love yt bikes, and they have an amazing price and spec, i think we can agree, this norco is SEXY!!!
  • + 1
 If this is Norco's strongest frame ever I'm about to shit my pants. Norco has never made a shitty frame.....ever
  • + 1
 ok ok, but these are only a small number from their GIGANTIC lineup... I still have faith in them. BTW I have personally broken THREE Specialized Stumpjumper frames and one early FSR frames, even the mightiest have an Achilles heel
  • - 1
 That's a good looking bike. Norco has come a long way and is far from the brand as I knew it in the 90's Look forward to seeing team Norco in the WC this year and with a good bike and riders I'm sure they will do well.
  • + 2
 Norco was always killer and a pioneer company in the sport. What the heck are you talking about.
  • + 1
 that funny bent top tube made me think there was something wrong with my screen
  • + 1
 Carbon wheels will get cheaper eventually.2700 as an add on is restarted though
  • + 1
 just make extra thick carbon in those areas, forget the plates, tailgate safe frames. or just put replaceable guards.
  • + 2
 seems like a decent price on the lower end model
  • + 0
 No but seriously, if you compare it to the Giant Glory Advance 0, they practically are the same except that the Aurum has steeper and straighter angles
  • + 1
 I know it's only a small detail, but I really like the 142x12 hub rear wheel on a DH bike
  • + 2
 this is a norco i would consider getting!
  • + 3
 Love this colour !
  • + 2
 cheapest bike has the best Brakes haha
  • + 1
 Lol talk about taking Transitions 2010 TR450 paint job!
  • + 2
 SEXY.
  • + 1
 Finally! I can pay less for an aluminium one!
  • + 1
 seems like commencal finally made a carbon bike
  • + 1
 def. buying this for stable !!
  • - 1
 Who cares what it rides like, it looks so nice.
Will stick with my cheapo bike though as it is ugly but fast for me (I am slow haha)
  • + 1
 Beautiful
  • - 1
 Norco I love you but PLEASE do away with the left/right split color scheme on the Aurums.
  • + 1
 OH MY GOD. NORCO.
  • + 0
 Will all the new bikes come in a four bar linkage format???
  • - 2
 Why does it say 450g weight saving on the previous aluminum version and then further down it says: the resulting frame weighed 3300g less?
  • + 2
 The total frame weight is 3300 grams, which is 450 grams less than the previous aluminum version.
  • + 0
 Ladies and gentlemen! Presenting the new and improved "Norco Session DH".
  • - 2
 Treko
  • - 1
 I love Dakine, but i think it's time to move on from the tailgate pad... bikes just aren't getting cheaper!
  • - 1
 IMportant, subtle differences, but still looks like an Operator
  • - 1
 Looks like a trek session
  • - 1
 god damn it's fugly compared to the original
  • - 1
 how much is a frame only?
  • + 4
 $2585
  • - 1
 is that american or ccanadian? and what shock ?
  • + 1
 hell of a deal for a carbon frame
  • - 3
 142 rear end? That's... WTF?
  • + 3
 Its gna be an interesting 2016 w/boost 148 standard gaining traction.
Many bikes will be caught out in between standards I think.
  • + 3
 but then theres the new reverse 150/157 wide hub with wide flanges and shortened driver for only 7 cogs...
That's the new dh standard...
  • - 3
 Kind of looks like a Kona.
  • + 2
 I see what you mean, but it does have different curves and shapes. This looks far superior to a Kona. This is bike porn!
  • + 0
 Negative, Kona all the way.
  • - 1
 Gotta disagree, more like a session...
  • - 1
 I wasn't arguing looks gobblehog. I was letting you know I disagree when you say the looks are far superior to a Kona. The Kona operators look way better.
  • - 2
 finally a norco bike with straight frame angles
  • - 2
 12x142mm rear spacing for a DH bike?!
12x150mm FTW!!
  • + 0
 Demo Team Replica has 135mm! More clearance for your feet
  • - 2
 Are these made in the same factory as the carbon Operator?
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