First Ride: 2016 Specialized Stumpjumper FSR

May 15, 2015
by Mike Kazimer  
2016 Stumpjumper FSR


Specialized's Stumpjumper FSR is a mainstay in the company's lineup, a bike that's designed to bridge the gap between an XC bike and a full-blown enduro race machine. Last season saw the introduction of the Stumpjumper 650b, signalling the official end of Specialized's reluctance to enter the mid-sized wheel market. For 2016 any hint of that hesitation is gone, and there are new versions of the 650b and 29” models, a tool storage solution that's unlike anything currently on the market, and even a 27.5+ option that's sure to raise some eyebrows. As the action packed week of Crankworx came to a close in Rotorua, New Zealand, we headed to the outskirts of town for a few days to get a closer look at the updated bikes, as well as spend some time on the trails with the athletes and employees who were instrumental in the design process.



No More EVO

In years past there had been two different versions of the Stumpjumper FSR: the standard configuration, and the EVO, which had slightly more travel and slacker geometry to suit the needs of aggressive riders. The EVO designation is gone for 2016, but the longer travel and relaxed geometry remain - both the 650b and 29” options have slacker head angles than ever before. Dropper posts are also standard equipment on every single version, all the way down to the base model aluminum Stumpjumper FSR Comp. The same goes for wide rims, with every model getting either alloy rims with a 29mm internal width, or carbon rims with a 30mm internal width. There are a total of five bikes for each wheel size, three with carbon front triangles, and two with full alloy frames. Prices for the alloy version start at $2900, and carbon begins at $4300 USD.

With the exception of the Comp model, all of the Stumpjumpers come equipped with SRAM 1x11 drivetrains, and a RockShox Pike fork, either the RCT3 or the RC. Stopping duties are handled by Shimano's proven hydraulic brakes, and Specialized takes care of the tires with a Butcher up front and a Purgatory in the rear.

Specialized Stumpjumper 2016

Frame Details

The Stumpjumper's carbon front triangle maintains a similar aesthetic to the previous model, but now has internal cable routing via channels molded into the frame, and a more svelte look around the junction of the seat and top tube. When last year's Stumpjumper 650b came out it wasn't exactly a new bike - it was the front triangle of the existing 29er joined to a new rear end, with a spacer under the head tube to correct the geometry. That's no longer the case, and there's now a dedicated frame for each wheel size. The bridge that used to be between the seat stays has been removed, and the rear end stiffness now comes from the beefed up linkage instead.

Removing the seatstay bridge also helped create the tire clearance that was needed to go along with the shortened chainstays. Many of the Stumpjumper models are spec'd with 1x11 drivetrains, but for those that aren't, the removable 'Taco Blade' mount that first made an appearance on the Enduro 29 is included, which allows for big wheels and short chainstays to coexist with a front derailleur by way of a chainstay mounted plate.

Specialized
The latch for the SWAT Door can be seen underneath the water bottle cage.

SWAT Door

The last few seasons have seen Specialized release a number of solutions designed to make it easier to ditch the hydration pack, such as bib shorts with extra pockets, a multi-tool that mounts to a water bottle cage, and even a chain tool that's stored in the headset topcap. On the carbon framed Stumpjumper's Specialized takes their SWAT (Storage, Water, Air, Tools) technology to the next level with the inclusion of a secret compartment built into the down tube, an ingenious way of creating additional storage for a spare tube, a pump, and maybe a few snacks (or to fill with rocks to prank an unsuspecting riding buddy).

Underneath the water bottle mount located on the down tube is a panel that can easily be removed by flipping a latch, granting access to the inside of the down tube. To keep items from rattling around against the frame, Specialized has developed a cloth wrap that's specifically designed to hold a tube, and another one for a pump, and there's also a plastic plug in place a few inches down from the lower portion of the SWAT door opening that prevent items from dropping out of reach towards the bottom bracket shell.


SWAT
There's room for a tube, pump, and more inside the down tube compartment that's found on the carbon models.

The addition of this compartment does come with a 200 gram weight penalty, but Specialized's reasoning is that the less hassle it is to get out for a ride, the better, so why not have a bike that's ready to be ridden at a moment's notice? There's no need to scramble around gathering up a pack and tools when everything is already on the bike – just fill up a water bottle and head for the trails.


Stumpjumper 2016

Stumpjumper 650b

The Stumpjumper 650b now sits comfortably in the all-mountain category, with 150mm of travel front and rear and a relatively slack 67° head angle. Specialized has managed to shorten the Stumpjumper's chainstays even further, all the way to 420mm. There will also be a women's version of the Stumpjumper 650b called the Rhyme, which keeps the same frame geometry, but is spec'd with a shock that's been custom tuned for lighter riders, as well as a women's specific saddle and narrower bars.

Ride Impressions: It'd be fair to say this is the most capable Stumpjumper yet, a do-it-all bike that you wouldn't regret taking on a long XC ride, but one that could also be called into action for adventures on more technical trails. I've always found the Stumpjumper FSR to be an easy bike to get accustomed to, and that feeling remains with the latest version. If anything, it's more calm and collected in rough terrain than before, without a hint of twitchiness. I did end up needing to add a bit of air over what the rear shock's AutoSag feature had come up with in order to avoid finding the bottom of the travel on harsh compressions, but it was smooth sailing after that adjustment.

Compared to the longer travel Enduro 650b that's currently on the market, the Stumpjumper 650b is quicker to accelerate when hammering on the pedals, and the handling feels a touch more precise when rapid direction changes are called for. Taking flight aboard the bike wasn't any trouble, and whether it was hitting up the man-made tabletops at the bottom of one of our test loops, or popping over the countless roots that stretched across the trails, the bike had a very neutral feel that made it easy to feel comfortable launching into the unknown.



Stumpjumper 2016

Stumpjumper 29

Like its smaller wheeled counterpart, the Stumpjumper 29 received the slacker head angle / shorter chainstay treatment, and now checks in with a 67.5° head angle and 435mm chainstays (the previous version measured in at 455mm). Travel remains the same as before, with 135mm in the rear and 140mm in the front. For the taller riders out there, Specialized will be offering an XXL version with a reach of 477mm.

Ride Impressions: The ride I took the Stumpjumper 29er on was a long out and back, with a good-sized climb and descent in each direction, and a refreshingly cool lake to jump in halfway through. After being on the carbon 650b Stumpjumper the previous day, switching to the bigger wheeled alloy version quickly brought to light the pluses and minuses of the wheel size and frame material. The ride of the aluminum tubing felt harsher than on the carbon frame, with more feedback being transmitted into my hands on rough, rocky sections of trail. At the same time, the bigger wheels saved me more than once, spanning the distance between two rocks rather than getting sucked in. Riders whose local trails are tighter and more technical will likely gravitate towards the 650b version, while those who live in locales where wide open, higher speed tracks are the norm will appreciate the stability of the bigger wheels at speed.


Stumpjumper 29 Geometry
Stumpjumper 650b Geometry



Specialized 6Fattie 27.5 Stumpjumper


6Fattie

There's a third addition to the Stumpjumper FSR family called the 6Fattie, the first full suspension 27.5+ bike from a major manufacturer. For those that aren't familiar with the concept, 27.5+ involves taking tires that measure 2.8" wide or greater, and mounting them on a wide rim. The result is wheels that have nearly the same height as a 29er, but with a greater contact patch. It certainly catches the eye, especially when the concept is brought to a full suspension bike like the Stumpjumper - the combination of 3.0” wide tires and a Boost 110 fork make it look almost cartoonish, a child's drawing of a mountain bike come to life.

The 6Fattie joins the line of 27.5+ hardtails that Specialized introduced at Sea Otter, and has 135mm of rear travel paired with a 150mm fork up front. While the Stumpjumper 650b and 29 both use Specialized's 142+ rear spacing (12 x 142 wheels fit without any issues), in order to achieve the clearance necessary for the wider tires Specialized chose to go with the emerging Boost standard for the 6Fattie, giving it a 12 x 148mm rear end. Rather than compromise the geometry in order to fit a front derailleur, the 6Fattie is designed to be run solely with a 1x drivetrain. The spec sheet currently has all of the 6Fattie bikes coming with either a 29 or 30mm inner width, but Specialized had a carbon rim with a 38mm internal width on display at Sea Otter, so it wouldn't be surprising to see that offered as an option in the future.

Who is the 6Fattie for? There's really no clear answer at this point, and every company seems to have a slightly different spin on what the purpose of a 27.5+ bike is. Some manufactures are positioning them as being best suited for bikepacking or adventure riding, while others are presenting them as simply another option in the ever-expanding realm of mountain bike possibilities. Specialized seems to be taking the latter approach - with 650b and 29" versions available as well, think of 27.5+ as another flavor to choose from when shopping for a new bike.

Specialized


Specialized Stumpjumper launch



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesOn one of our test rides the skies decided to open up, dousing everyone with a warm summer's rain, and coating the trails with a thin layer of slippery, greasy mud. Trying to chase down Mitch Ropelato and Curtis Keene (the key word is trying) on those unfamiliar trails was when it all clicked - I wasn't really thinking about the bike, I was focusing on riding and seeking out lines that would deliver the maximum amount of enjoyment. A bike that doesn't require constant attention is the ultimate goal, and it seems that Specialized has done that with the Stumpjumper. It's well mannered, predictable, and best of all, there's room for a giant bag of Skittles in the down tube for those really epic adventures. - Mike Kazimer





www.specialized.com, @Specialized


338 Comments

  • 1098 62
 Finally a bike that can fit a small bong and bag of weed inside.
  • 60 21
 Hahaha...secret place to stash your specialist needs...tup
  • 251 458
flag codfather1234 (May 15, 2015 at 1:45) (Below Threshold)
 If you need weed to enjoy mountain biking, you're doing it wrong....
  • 109 11
 You mean you Specialized needs?
  • 53 12
 No more breaking pipes or blunts from the pocket anymore! But actually, safely storing your phone and valuables out of harms way is quite handy.
  • 493 14
 Chain-stay is 420mm. Coincidence?
  • 22 11
 My secret stash of hash!
  • 148 7
 Ok Lance Armstrong.
  • 12 5
 If i could only prop that more, i would
  • 7 4
 that was a good laugh
  • 15 4
 i put mine in my bars..imao
  • 10 4
 I wonder if the boarder officers know about this and will search all bike crossing the borders now. Hahaha
  • 49 38
 @ codfather1234 I dont think think you know a thing about mountain biking.
  • 7 5
 That made me laugh, absolutely brilliant comment.
  • 37 5
 You'll need it too for all the drug dealing you'll have to do to afford it...
  • 24 4
 It's legal where I live. I just spark one before I ride with no need to hide.
  • 20 4
 Should have named it the Specialized Mule or Smuggler or Runner or Supplier....lol
  • 24 43
flag Niner-Life (May 15, 2015 at 7:36) (Below Threshold)
 Brilliant idea! I can't wait to see riders pulling over in the middle of a trail to hit a couple of bowls. lol Specialized is really taking Epic riding to the next level. You haven't experienced mountain biking until you're riding high.
  • 23 10
 paying ££££ so you can reduce frame weight by mear grams, only then to stuff heavy stuff in the downtube.. priceless XD
  • 42 39
 Great joke but I'm with godfather on this one
  • 21 2
 @Jamesb15uk

It's stuff one would or should be carrying anyways, and putting it down low on the bike frame lowers the center of gravity of the system as a whole.

The only downside is if you are trying to impress someone with your lightweight bicycle. It'll weigh a half pound more.

The horror!
  • 4 18
flag lawnweenies1 (May 15, 2015 at 10:05) (Below Threshold)
 400th like biiiitch
  • 5 0
 Glove box!
  • 7 1
 My Apple Pay-enabled Apple Watch is ready. Where do I buy these?
  • 7 3
 can't upvote anymore... its at 420
  • 3 3
 Hahahaha this has 420 likes.
  • 3 12
flag Jubbylinseed (May 15, 2015 at 10:39) (Below Threshold)
 NOBODY UPVOTE ANY MORE!!! There are exactly 420 props...
  • 2 3
 EnduroFan84 - I logged in just to prop you up Wink
  • 5 4
 somebody needs to make a custom bong just for that pocket... you know, for safety.
  • 11 3
 Jamesb15uk the more grams the better Wink
  • 1 3
 Bonus points for a SoloPipe.
  • 105 3
 I haven't smoked weed for more than ten years, I'd green out, getting old I suppose (39). In my late teens/early 20's, I would ride all my local trails, ripped off my tits, all the time. Get nicely toasted, jump on my old M2 Stumpy or early model Heckler, and smash out my favourites loops. I loved it, 'crazy legs', where you'd get into this meditative zone, spinning in granny for the big climb, totally zenned out, before blasting back down again. But then I stopped smoking weed, and did the same loops I'd done a hundred times *stoned*, and saw things I'd never even noticed before. The moss on the rocks, shrooms in late Autumn, the koalas in the trees, the changing seasons, the variations in water level in the creek, the murmur of the lil froggies, and I saw I was actually missing out on the little things, that make life beautiful... Know what I mean? All's I'm tryin' to say is, yeah, it's fun to get stoned, but don't let life pass you by in a haze of dope smoke...
  • 9 4
 you put your weeeeeeed in there, man
  • 12 42
flag Rocky-Urban (May 15, 2015 at 20:24) (Below Threshold)
 Specialized has become the BMW of mountain bikes. Lots of hype, way overpriced, and low end durability. Lucky for BMW there are plenty out there wiling to spend good money on status. Specialized cannot afford to stay in business based on people seeking status, they need to deliver in quality and durability otherwise they will become yet another bicycle brand disappearing from the market.
  • 3 4
 LOL!
  • 7 11
flag m0ngy (May 15, 2015 at 22:37) (Below Threshold)
 @ Rocky-Urban. Totally agree mate, though they were always somewhat overpriced, their prices now are stupid. Bought a Specialized Crux Elite Red Disc the other days, ex-demo for AU$2500. Good deal considering the Aussie retail prices is about $5k. It's a great bike, I love it, but not worth five grand, you can buy a decent car for that.
  • 8 1
 I'll second that. It's fun to light up after works but riding lit is not what it was. I have extremely limited ride time due to my lifestyle so now I try to enjoy each ride session the best I can. For me, personally, I prefer to stay away from the pipe before and during rides. Similar to Mongy, I started riding better and appreciating more when I was clean. Just like when I got more serious about Pre walking tracks I noticed more details in what I saw and felt. I actually became a better riding by walking tracks. I enjoy a nice smoke, just not on my rides any more. After all, the reason I enjoy this wonderful passion is taking in everything around me in all its undisturbed beauty.
  • 4 2
 just because someone mentions that they like to smoke pot and ride doesn't mean that someone live their life completely stoned and rides stoned every single time. you leave it reserved for the occasional time. there are many places that I would not feel comfortable writing under the influence because either the track has obstacles I would prefer to handle sober or the place where you ride is a family friendly atmosphere.
  • 3 4
 this is best comment ever... long life secret pockets!!
  • 7 0
 Specialized S.W.A.T.; Snacks, Weed And Torch
  • 222 5
 TWAT door - Tubes, water, air, tools
  • 63 2
 And if you inadvertently leave it open, it'll be a full of Storage, Hydration, Incidentals, Tools door
  • 48 1
 a nice big hole to stick your tool in
  • 17 12
 Flymcg - you may have just been nominated fot the Comment of the year
  • 35 2
 Stuff the TWAT with your tool and go for an easy ride.
  • 11 27
flag Satn69 (May 15, 2015 at 7:58) (Below Threshold)
 Leave the door open or it will smell like fish and taste like chicken!
  • 30 1
 ^^^ No more trips to Bangkok for you.
  • 22 0
 I think its quite nifty, just need a bladder in the top tube with a retractable hose coming out the topcap*

*can I patent that before specialized release their 2017 TWATER** range

**Toptube Water Access Tube for Enduro Racers
  • 15 2
 Yes kimbers, with hoseless ejaculator system upgrade, where laser guided, top cap mounted nozzle activated via handlebar mounted remote sprays a high pressure stream of water right up into your open mouth
  • 4 1
 im actually surprised you didnt get the TWAT anagram first Waki...i think you better up your trolling game young man!
  • 2 4
 Off course I did Frown
  • 5 4
 The TWAT design is definitly something Cove should have on their G-Spot and Hustler frames.

covebike.com/collections/products/frames
  • 1 0
 Spec already made that on the shiv tri bike im pretty sure haha
  • 185 4
 "Room for a giant bag of Skittles in the down tube"
If ever there were a reason to buy a mountain bike, there it is.
  • 53 14
 my position on 27.5+.... marketing gimmick.
  • 6 2
 I haven't yet seen anyone actually explaining any advantages. There has been speculation that maybe it gives more traction (how much more? does it offset increased weight against a burlier standard width tyre?) but other than that it is just "It's another flavour".
  • 9 2
 maybe there will be some advantages, like forgivingness,braking grip. But this brings equal disadvantages like unpreciseness,weight, rolling resistance. They've tried this concept in Downhill years ago and it didnt worked, so why should it work now, especially for a trailbike thats niot only going down....
  • 17 4
 I rode Treks Fatbike last weekend, rolling over smaller roots and rocks is impressive, riding in straight line in general. But cornering this thing is a joke, there is no incentive to lean the bike what so ever and as soon as you do lean it like you would with regular bike, the tyrestarts to wobble and squirm.
I rode down a mild gradient and inertia became quite apparent already, it's hard for me to imagine riding such thing in the big mountains at speed.

Dear Specialized if you could send me to Vancouver and give me a test bike there I could ride it all week, get used to it and then write a positive review. Riding bikes is fun.

Now as to 275+ it must be the ultimate middle ground - semi sized wheels with semi fat tyres. It's hard to count how best of how many worlds is that.
  • 15 2
 Fatbikes have a purpose though, ultimate grip on soft and loose surfaces. they aren't designed to replace a normal sized bike. I have no idea for what conditions mid fat bikes are designed. Are they supposed to be for a specific circumstance/style of riding like a fatbike or are they designed to replace your trail bike? It seems like designers were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn't stop to think about whether they should.
  • 8 2
 The 6Fattie ride impression seems to be missing in this article?
  • 4 6
 Think about it like this: 27.5 was supposed to have all the benefits of a 29er without the downsides of being a wagon wheel. Same thing with the + sized wheels: all the benefits of a fat-tire bike without the downsides of being a fatbike.
  • 5 1
 @WAKIdesigns Don't fully judge the fatbikes based on one experience alone. They vary pretty greatly from one bike to the next. Some feel like slow moving earth crawlers, and some feel like mountain bikes. Try to get your hands on one with a Bluto, a more trail oriented geometry, and some decent tires set up tubeless. Play with the air pressure and go for a ride in the wet or on natural back-country singletrack. You might have a different experience.
  • 4 1
 From the first article "Mud was not a friend to these tires, but everywhere it was dry, I found grip." i.e. where it was grippy, the tyres were grippy. That doesn't fill me with a new found lust for a mid fat bike. From what I can glean they are more aimed at people coming from 29ers than they are at people who like fun.
  • 3 5
 Oh also this other tire review...these are the tires I've gone with and now have a set of Velocity Dually rims on order to build the wheels for them (already have the tires, and mine actual weights were 932 and 947 grams). The rims are i39/e45 mm width, but there are a couple carbon i45/e50 rim options already available that are lighter for only double the price. I also have a pair of the WTB Trailblazer 2.8s coming to do a 29er conversion to a B+. The Vee 3.25s on a 20mm internal rim inflated to 15psi were 2.8 inches at the casing AND tread, so they didn't really fit anything I tried them in but they were close enough to warrant ordering the WTB's which are 2.8 casing / 2.3 tread to try out afterall even though I've generally not been a fan of their design or construction. And that's the thing about new bike technology a lot don't seem to be willing to accept... putting aside pre-conceived notions and actually TRYING something before passing judgement on it. My Vee's and the Dually rims are for a second lighter summer wheelset for my Salsa Mukluk fat bike.

twentynineinches.com/2014/10/22/vee-tire-trax-fatty-27-5-x-3-25-tires-quick-review
  • 4 4
 @metacomet, I have no opinion on fatbikes in general, just like on 275+ or 29+. I am happy they exist, I am happy I was able to ride one, hence my "report", it was fun to ride. Long live Fatbikes, I will not buy one in my unique set of circumstances it makes little sense. Everyone has such set. Big thanks to #bikeplace Gothenburg aka Trek Factory Store for arranging demo day. Trek Powerfly was fkng amazing though! If I had the money I'd buy one to my wife directly
  • 2 2
 I'm not sure about full suspension bikes and the 27.5+ tires but on a rigid single speed 29er I'm thinking I'd got with a 2.6 or 2.7 front tire on standard everything and it might be nice. I know I'm planning on building some fatter rims up this summer to get some additional bloat to smooth out the rocks.
  • 2 3
 Problem with the articles on the trailblazer is the tire isn't really a good example of a B+ offering. Its designed as a "conversion" tire really, a first effort much like Pacenti's Neo-Moto 2.35s were when needing to get the ball rolling on 650Bs eight years ago. 650B took off because the Neo-Moto was the same diameter as a 26 x 2.7 ( and many frames and forks already existed that had the clearance for such or were close enough to be modified cheaply to clear them safely) and thus made for easier conversions and got a lot of influential people riding them quickly, especially senior bike brand folks...which then quickly took them from one-off in house testing (downhilljill , the former brand manager at Haro bikes did a bike for herself with them and a year later Haro unveiled the Beasley production 650B hardtail) to bike store showrooms. The trailblazer is doing a similar role, letting existing 29er owners try converting to a B+ tire that like many of WTB's tires suffer in the mud... part of the problem of designing tires in california as it suffers through a drought, is that there isn't much mud to be had to test with. Meanwhile its a race amongst brands to see who can get proper purpose built B+ bikes to market first, that aren't simply conversions of an existing model. Rocky's Sherpa comes stock with the WTB 2.8s but they've designed for clearance for full 3.25s like the Vee Trax Fatties that are already available. Panaracer, Kenda, Maxxis, Schwalbe, Geax, and many others are all offering B+ tires in time for the 2016 bikes.
  • 6 0
 @WAKIdesigns In my opinion having no opinion is a good opinion to have. Means you are always open to new opinions. hahaha
Cheers
  • 8 1
 Deeeight, none of these articles actually explain why you might want B+ tyres in general. They all start from a viewpoint of "bigger tyres are better, let's see how big of a tyre we can put in our existing bike" and then compare the tyres, not the concept. I still have no idea who they are for, what problems they are trying to solve or whether or not they actually achieve that.
  • 2 5
 Why : More air volume = more cushion & better grip through ability to use less air pressure to support the rider's weight. And doing so in a bike package that isn't as huge as a fat bike, and also still having easier suspension options as designers can simply go from an existing 29er model and then just increase the tire clearances a bit rather than having to do a whole lot of changes as happens with trying to do suspension on fat bikes.

Who : people seeking the above...
  • 3 0
 I think they just wanna try and sell you more GRAMS Big Grin
  • 3 2
 Word to the wise...price out those fat tires before you commit to + or fat biking. I've heard that you can spend up to $200 per tire, with $120 to $140 being about the median price per tire right now.
  • 2 2
 @WAKIdesigns they just need stronger side walls. the tires are probably rippling and folding all over themselves while cornering.
  • 9 4
 I don't care @TFreeman, they are definitely worth trying, preferably over a few days, not just one ride (mine lasted 10 minutes hahah), there's plenty of conditions like people's riding style and terrains that will be a better match for + sizes than bikes with "regular tyres". It doesn't matter if it is a Fatbike, racing bikes for XC, Enduro or DH, or certain models of each genre - just like tyre patterns, one thing will not work for everyone, hence ALL, absolutely ALL bike reviews that are adressed to worldwide audience are screwed up on some level, because we all have different skills and likes put on different terrains. If you don't live close to lifts or established shuttling community, then DH bikes are fkng stupid, hence one of the main reasons of such explosion of Enduro: 10 years ago a potential Enduro rider, that is a dude with gravity in focus would push the DH bike up instead of riding it up, how smart was that? There are more people enjoying doing mileage, than those who fo give a tiniest fk about cornering and drop offs, so as much as I admire guys like Sponsel (Team Robot), his only way of justifying his position in two wheel world is arrogance. At least he has basis for it, most people here, me included, don't Big Grin Deeeight has this problem that he does sit with the majority but he preaches it to people completely not interested in what he is interested in. It's like those wankers saying MTB is the best outdoor sport, if you like hiking try MTB - fk you. Someone likes or aspires to lean his bike 45deg in loose corner at 20MPH with 10ft gap in the middle of it - deeeight doesn't give a fk, he'll tell him stories from 1980s how many liked what and how there were not enough 29" tyres. Someone likes bike-packing with weird handlebars - dude loving DH, FR doesn't care. I am personally done with evangelism, I do this for pure entertainment Razz
  • 25 2
 so camber became sj and now sj becomes enduro... oh boy I wonder what 2016 enduro would look like Smile
  • 39 0
 A demo with a pike probably.
  • 6 0
 .. or maybe a 2010 SX Trail
  • 6 0
 and a demo becomes a moto 250 4Stroke
  • 1 2
 the status will be the downhill bike left
  • 30 11
 There's one thing I don't get with + sizes. Why do those tyres come with such short knobbs? hypothetically you trade grip based on tread design to volume based grip, where the only win seems to be cushioning? Other than that previous Stumpy Evo 29 was one of the best bikes I have ever ridden. If I ever move to a city near big mountains I buy one.

#iamspecializedfanboi
  • 10 2
 Rolling resistance, plus long knobs would be very squirmy feeling
  • 4 1
 I'm assuming also to keep weight down... Big knobs on an already porky tire would make it super heavy.... So the people marketing it will say you don't need lugs because of the "increased contact patch".... Maybe good for a rigid bike but an Ardent 2.4 has never not been enough tire for me
  • 31 1
 no one likes short knobs
  • 16 5
 I've owned 2 Enduro's and 3 Stumpjumper Evo's in recent years...it's the best "one" bike on earth. The Stumpy is the definition of the word "mountain bike".
  • 6 1
 I've owned 4 Stumpjumpers over the years (still ride one) and agree w donch15. I've considered everything out there every time and keep coming back to the SJ. It's sorta like a Corvette - It's competitive with everything out there, but then when you factor in price the SJ beats em all (and I understand the ethically cloudy ways they get to that price, but somehow I still sleep at night)
  • 5 0
 + tires are designed to run lower pressures. Long knobs + low pressure= lots of folding and squirming, because the tire doesn't support the knob. These tires get their grip from lots of small knobs on a big flexible contact patch.
  • 5 0
 @Donch15 @gtill9000 - I am with you guys. 3 Enduros (26, 650b, 29er) and a SJ Evo 29er. I gotta say though, their little brother - The Camber EVO - is awesome and one of the most under rated bikes in the line up. It doesn't boast the 150-165mm travel that we all 'need' but it delivers awesome performance in a 120mm package. I am riding one this season and it is like a mini enduro. It has a similar feel but handles better at mid range speeds and picks up quicker. If 'All mountain' or long trail rides are part of your routine this bike is totally worth a look.
  • 1 0
 Exactly as Drew said, with more tire contact patch on the ground when run with low pressures, you don't need to rely on the depth of the tread blocks for maximum grip. That being said, different tire makers offer different tread designs in this format just as their is a variety with full fat tires and regular width tires.
  • 4 0
 @lurchh I always get a squirmy feeling when I see deflated long knobs
  • 1 0
 Another totally satisfied SJ owner here. The only problem is worrying about replacing it if/when the time comes - what could possibly be as good? Another SJ probably.
  • 6 1
 650b+ huh? More like 650b-

Oh sick burn.
  • 2 0
 hahaha zepper for the win
  • 24 5
 It still has the wallowy ctd rear shock, that seemingly you can't change. Why mismatch the pike front end with a fox?
  • 20 2
 And those that have ridden will confirm that the Monarch plus Rc3 works fantastically with FSR.
  • 6 0
 I have a debonair plus on my enduro and it is pure magic
  • 2 0
 Wonder why they didn't go with the new fox dual piston float. Guess it might not work with their proprietary autosag function, but that seems like a poor tradeoff.
  • 7 0
 Yeah, probably cause of autosag...which u know isn't needed if they printed sag gradients on the shock like *gasp* Rockshox!
  • 1 0
 My autosag broke the first time I used after a service by Fox. Still works otherwise - I've never had a problem setting it myself. I love my SJ but I never saw the benefit of the autosag
  • 2 1
 So I just got an enduro 29er this week with a RC3 plus debonair, and it feels wallowy to me. I have it aired up to 190 psi, and it still bottoms when I'm pumping it in tight turn, but with that high pressure the back end is skiddish, and slides out on faster, wider turns. I'm still trying to figure it out. Of course it could be the crappy single ply butcher tires on it.
  • 4 0
 I don't own either but I hear 190 psi is way to low on a deponair your own weight is a factor but you should be in the high end of its range 250 - 300 psi.
  • 2 0
 I got a chance to ride these at a specialized industry event in santa cruz on Wednesday and I can say the stump jumper 650 is the best bike I have ever ridden. The suspension is dialed and the new ctd shock is surprisingly good.
  • 2 1
 I'm not panning a product I haven't used, but you industry guys told us ctd was great.

I don't understand the pike up front and the fox out back. I also hate the idea of the shuttle being shock specific it would be a deal breaker for me.

I've ridden the older 26" stumpy and was really impressed but the auto sag fox was far too unsupportive and killed a great bike.

Its a shame not to see the monarch as it compliments the pike so well
  • 2 1
 @pwcutajar You can order a monarch plus from QBP that fits stump jumper frames
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez, I've heard heavier guys have had to go with a firmer tune with the Monarch Plus on the E29 for more support.
  • 2 0
 with the next generation of fox stuff coming next year, it's a shame they didn't spec one of those shocks... it seems this bike would be idea for a float x or the new X2...
  • 1 1
 So the 2016 Specialized bikes are not going to have 2016 fox shox?
  • 1 0
 actually, I guess I don't know. the bike as shown has a float ctd, but is that being discontinued for next year? I think it's gone with the forks, but not sure about shocks. it just seems that with that head angle, and travel, the bike is screaming for a float x or an x2. i suppose a monarch plus would fit, and at a minimum, the vorsprung corset would help...
  • 12 1
 This bike has been around longer than much of Pinkbikes readership! True classic. Wanted one from the moment I first saw JMC pinning one in Dirt all those years ago. The 26" Evo I have is my favourite bike to ride.
  • 1 0
 my feelings exactly
  • 2 0
 Well the name has, not much else.
  • 6 0
 2014 expert evo carbon in 26" is the best bike i had...and i had a lot of bikes
  • 2 0
 I have a decked out 2013 evo 26" and it's awesome. Best bike ever!
  • 2 0
 love my 2013 26 evo!!
  • 4 0
 On my second Stumpy after a very meaningful relationship with a 2006 Enduro. I'm going to baby the livin' crap out of my 26" Stumpy Evo now that she's become a collectors item. With a 160mm Pike and Monarch Plus, what more could a guy want?
  • 21 11
 Sweet bike. cool concept. Only problem is adding weight to the frame is silly if you spent a lot of money to buy a light frame in the first place.
I know a lot of people disagree, and that is cool, but for anyone not already decided think about this: if your body is a spring (and it should be when riding) then weight added to the bike is like unsprung weight and will effect performance more than weight on the rider. Taking a dump has less effect on performance of the bike than adding a pound to the frame. Adding 4-6lbs in water and tools means your sub 30lb bike now weighs 35. I can buy a 35lb bike and get the same performance by keeping the weight on my back, having paid a lot less money.
Just food for thought. I know if you plan to keep stuff on the frame regardless then lower weight is lower weight, and a 35 lb bike gets over 40 with a water bottle on it, but if you are not extremely averse to it you might want to consider just dealing with a sweaty back under a bsckpack in order to get higher performance. That or think carefully before dumping a lot of money on a carbon crank to save weight when your are going to put 4lbs in water right above it anyway.
That is all.
  • 9 1
 It's sort of working as ballast, moving weight down lower for better handling.
  • 8 2
 In my experience, it works the other way around. Adding a water bottle to the frame and the bike instantly feels heavier and kinda sluggish. Putting the bottle in the backpack is better choice.That said it's cool to have the option to put the stuff in the bike and go ride without backpack when you feel like it.
  • 6 3
 What about ryders that dont feel comfortable riding a backpack? Or just prefer to not wear one? This is a good solution. This bike has a fair weight. The compromise of additional 200 grams is not so bad.
  • 13 2
 Agree w taletotell. Adding 5lbs to my 185lb body increases my weight by 2-3%. Adding that same 5lbs to a 28lb bike and the bike just got 17-18% heavier.
  • 1 0
 Well said.
  • 6 0
 its not the weight thats the problem if ur having trouble riding without a pack and adding a multi tool and h2o bottle to your bike, just saying...
  • 20 1
 I Always used to ride with a pack. Every ride, no matter what. But I have pretty much completely moved away from the bag in favor of having a bottle on the frame, essential tools in my shorts pocket, and other minor necessities fastened to the bike. Now I shudder at the thought of strapping that monkey to my back unless absolutely necessary. My biggest gripe with the bag really came down to temperature and added bulk. The bag just does not allow your back to breath well at all, and is like wearing a vest on a hot day. I have found that my body would get much much warmer with the bag, causing me to drink more, and therefore needing to carry much more water. With the bottle, my body stays much cooler and I drink significantly less. A cooler core temperature equals better performance. It was liberating to not have 2+ liters of 98 degree water strapped to my back inside of what would feel like a down vest.
The bigger unexpected surprise was also how nice it was to leave the bag at home on winter rides. Suddenly my body could regulate its temperature and my jacket could breath, keeping me dry and warm which is pretty damn critical when it is between -5* and +10* F in the woods at night miles away from your vehicle.
  • 2 0
 @Metacomet not to mention its near impossible to make a pack an extension of your body, especially if you're tall. You'd have to cut off circulation in order to secure the thing, and it still won't fit right because the pack is designed for someones tiny back who's 5'6''.
  • 1 0
 Eureka !
  • 11 0
 Getting naked right now for a ride. Thanks for the tip.
  • 5 0
 The more important question might be how do I keep this trunk from looking like the average American trunk with tons of junk?

The problem I see with the human body spring analogy is that this type of spring fatigues. The more weight you have to keep on your body, the more your whole body has to support. Why not let the wheels and suspension help you out a bit? I no longer ride with a pack unless it is a long-ish ride, or hot outside and I need the extra water capacity. Anyhow, I like this compartment idea Specialized.
  • 1 0
 To each his/her own I guess. I'd much rather keep my tools and such down to low on my frame. Increasing the frame's sprung mass will theoretically help the bike smooth out the trail so your body has less chatter to deal with in the same way that decreasing the unsprung weight of your wheels does (it's the ratio of sprung weight to unsprung weight that matters). It also helps keep my center of gravity a little lower. But honestly it's such a small percentage of overall weight that it probably makes very little difference either way. The biggest advantage to me is how liberating it feels. Less weight on my back and better airflow for those hot California days.
  • 11 0
 The best way to compare would be to go for a short ride, then take a dump in the SWAT box, then ride the same loop again.
  • 1 0
 I always ride with a Camelback, but I gotta say, that was well written!
  • 1 1
 The center of gravity is between your feet when standing, but when seated I can see it helping to have the weight down low.
I did recently switch to a much smaller pack, and I don't use it when shuttling because it does effect performance, opting instead to keep a drink in the truck.
I guess the takeaway here (besides to each his or her own) is don't worry too much about the weight of your frame since it isn't going to dramatically influence your ride anyway.
  • 9 1
 "Riders whose local trails are tighter and more technical will likely gravitate towards the 650b version, while those who live in locales where wide open, higher speed tracks are the norm will appreciate the stability of the bigger wheels at speed. "

I think that only gets at part of the issue - rider size/body type has a big impact on which version you'll enjoy more as well. I'm squarely in the target population for bikes like these - do-it-all trail bikes that help an OK rider step it up a notch and generally disappear when you're riding. I currently ride a 29er; I've tried different 29ers and 27.5s with 120-140mm of rear travel. Most of them were awesome, with few dogs on offer. Each has its own specific take on balancing the overall package. But the theme that was really clear for me was that at 6'1" and over 200#, I'm way happier on the not-so-great 29ers than even the best 27.5s in this segment. Meanwhile, my girlfriend is 5'6" and built more like an endurance athlete. She also tried a bunch of bikes in this sort of segment - and she was way happier on all of the 27.5s than any 29er.

The roll-over and stability of the 29er mean nothing if you're not big enough to where the additional body English required to throw it around the trail isn't effortless to you (either because you're a great rider - or for most of us, because you happen to be larger and stronger). But if you're bigger, then it's really easy to take advantage of what the 29er has to offer. Yes, there are big riders who are super technical and love the agility of the smaller wheels, but for the rest of us, a 29er makes sense, feels more proportional, and makes riding well a little easier (and thus makes fun more accessible).

27.5+ is a totally different matter - I still can't quite see who's asking the question that these are supposedly answering...
  • 6 0
 Now that is a proper stack on the XL and XXL. Tall head tube, lots of stack. It's incredible that basically no other company does this for the bigger sizes. As if not one person at NameYourBrand realized that tall people are, you know, tall and aren't struggling to get their bars low enough. I will be a Specialized customer as long as this continues.

I continue to ride with a pack so the added weight of the SWAT thing is weird but it might be something I would come around on.

The big question will be if this bike will now accept a CCDBA because I'm done with Fox. No CCDBA fitment is a dealbreaker.

Does this mean we can expect a new Enduro 29 next year as well? But now that the Stumpjumper is very similar to the current E29 maybe the E29 will get an even more Enduroer treatment.
  • 2 0
 Enduro is 17.
  • 1 0
 Well if anything, this announcement will probably trigger a wave of Enduro 29s appearing in the used market. On closer look I can pretty confidently say that a CCDBA won't fit this bike. Look how tight it's tucked into the top tube. Too bad.
  • 5 0
 @alexsin No one on their Endruo 29's will trade it for anything else. Especially when you're getting close to breaking the sub 27 pound mark. The enduro is damn amazing.
  • 3 0
 DBInline is amazing. CC customer service is second to none. With a stumpy I think a lighter weight shock makes more sense.
  • 9 3
 Could do some good pranks with that SWAT hole. Maybe fill your mates bike up with fishing maggots at the end of a trip and wait until the following week's ride before asking to borrow his pump!
  • 10 0
 One of those comedy can of exploding worms would be great
  • 8 0
 2x Kidneys for sale. 23 years old. Light use. Pick-up preferred, Postage negotiable.
  • 6 0
 I'm surprised that neither the article nor the comments have touched on the fact that they've done away with the Brain. Good riddance, in my opinion, but I wonder PB skipped over it.
  • 6 0
 Lovely bikes...only one thing...it's bloody May 2015!! It's no where near 2016 and launching theses new bikes only devalues peoples 2015 ones..Honestly industry just stop it!!
  • 5 0
 Yeah but Specialized has dropped the price on 2015 Stumpy Evos considerably. You can get one for super cheap right now. Talk to your LBS.
  • 4 3
 Actually, Specialized didn't drop the price at all. Your LBS is just taking the hit trying to move old stock.
  • 5 1
 Actually, Specialized did drop the prices on them. They dropped them to close-out prices on several models; not just the Stumpjumper.
  • 11 5
 I like Specialized bikes. I just don't want one. They are everywhere. I don't want to see a 100 others with my bike. Nice stash box.
  • 6 2
 Right? But I have an Enduro 29 and I've never seen anyone else on one, let alone one that's identical to mine.
  • 10 2
 Hipsters. ;-)
  • 1 0
 I have a SX Trail and the majority of people do not know this model in my city/country.
Even the "S" fanboys.
  • 1 0
 I ride an 08 Enduro with the E150 everyone thinks it's a DH bike.
  • 2 3
 sounds funny, but I think trek, specialized and giant are all victims of their own success. They make bikes that are about the ultimate compromise, particularly in the trail bike genre. but because they're trying to be all things to all people then they loose some of the personality that comes with a bike that may have a more extreme compromise, look at transition bikes or commencal, nobody argues that they don't have flaws, particularly when riding uphill, but they have personality in spades compared to the big three
  • 8 0
 No Monarch plus RC3 Debonair? They've missed a big trick here
  • 7 4
 I want, to bad I just bought mine last november. After riding my 2014 Stumpjumper FSR 29er I can definitely recommend this bike to anyone that wants a great all around bike. Or at least try and get one to do a demo ride. Gotta try something new every once in a while. Although, anyone that does buy one, wider bars and a shorter stem are a very good thing to get if you do buy one.
  • 3 1
 I have a 2012 one and love it! And yes shorter stem and wider bars were a must for me. If I was looking for a new bike I'd definitely be looking at this again.. what am I saying, I don't need a new bike but I'm still looking at this one.
  • 10 3
 never expected myself to say it, but I dig the 6Fattie
  • 3 0
 Me too, I'd like to try one out.
  • 3 0
 Looks like the Brain is gone as well from all models.

Was curious in regards to the internal cable routing; Are there any lockdowns or something similar to keep the cables from moving? I don't know if you guys during your review time were able to get that detailed a look.
  • 2 0
 Also... Do i buy a bike now... or wait to buy a 2016 one? How far away until 2016 bikes are in stores? The new standards and cheaper groupsets are making me lean towards a 2016 bike, but i've been needing a new bike for 4 years and am desperate for a dually. Plus... this bike looks aesthetically amazing
  • 6 1
 Buy now. You'll always be chasing the latest and greatest.
  • 2 1
 These bikes should be available very quickly. You won't have to wait long. I'm talking a week or so.
  • 5 0
 I would wait. If you are getting the tweener more reason to wait since the current 650 from spech is a 29er frankenstein. The 2016 650b is totally a 27.5 newly designed bike.
  • 3 3
 ^^^^ meh. Take the thousands that you'll save buying an "old" model and go on a trip to Whistler.
  • 4 0
 hundreds yes. Thousands...neh
  • 2 0
 Agree with @Narro2. & because it's such a Frankenstein, & they're moving away from it after 1(or is it 2) models years, any replacement parts you might need could be scarce. First years of anything new are a cause for concern, in general, moreso if major changes are made after the first run.

A couple examples, in case you're interested: the first hydraulic Avid brake, the plain 'ol "juicy" came out in '04. I bought some & ran them on my DH bike for 3 years or so, time to replace the hoses. I couldn't buy them. They made a running change to hose(&fitting) size after the small run of '04 brakes, & with such a small amount of product on the market, didn't bother to keep replacements for the small hoses on the market.

The very first year of Osprey pack reservoirs came with a custom larger hose size. The flow was better, but none of the quick disconnects, filters, etc on the market would work with them. Now, they've moved to the standard size every other manufacturer uses: try getting a replacement for a worn out bite valve for the old reservoirs: not gonna happen.

At least with Specialized, they're more likely to hook you up with a new frame that leave you in the lurch, but waiting a few weeks to avoid the problem in the first place is the better choice.
  • 2 0
 I'm guessing the week or three wait is for the US? I'm in Australia..
Also, it'd be smart to wait for other companies to release their bikes before making a decision yeah?
  • 3 0
 Yup, wait. Thought you were set on getting a stumpy, the way you asked the question.
  • 1 0
 haha yeah, my bad..poorly worded. Will other ike brands bring out their 27.5" bikes in the next couple of months, or further away?
  • 2 0
 If I could go back in time I might just buy a used nomad instead of a new remedy. The wheel size is nothing special and bang for buck I could be on a lot of carbon right now if I had not bought new. The remedy is a great bike, but new stuff loses it's shine pretty quick.
  • 3 0
 The SWAT storage thing is awesome. I've been wanting this for a while now. I'd love to see specialized implement this on their Enduro and Demo bikes. I'd kill to have one on my Enduro
  • 2 2
 But how well you keep it all from rattling?
  • 4 2
 That ominous hole in the frame reminds me of this story: A cyclist with two big bags on his rack got stopped at the border control. The officers searched all his bags only to find the bags entirely filled with straw. Puzzled they let him pass. The same cyclist crossed the border the next day again, the officers again searched all his bags only to find nothing but straw. On the third day the same cyclist wanted to to cross the border, the puzzled officers took him aside and asked him. " Every time we search all your bags we can't find nothing. We won't charge you for anything, but please tell us the truth, what is it that you are smuggling?" "Thy cyclist said: "I smuggle bicycles!" Big Grin
  • 4 0
 Compartment in down tube? Whoever thought of that one better be getting paid good. He's gonna make Specialized a lot of money this year.
  • 6 5
 I showed my dad the +sized wheel and was telling him about bike companies introducing new standards (he knows nothing about bikes), and when he saw the +sized bike above he said "Wow! That's a REAL mounain bike". and i was like "NO."
  • 3 0
 I love how it's May 2015 and the 2016 bikes are starting to roll out. Does that mean by October we should be seeing 2017 product?
  • 1 0
 One of the best and funniest batch of comments I have ever read on a blog regarding the stash, hash, pipe, 420mm length bars, etc. Solid humor and it really made me laugh. Just bought the 2016 Aluminum Stumpy 650b/27.5 and really like it a bunch. What a climber with incredible traction. Playful and nimble on the way down for sure. Will upgrade the front fork in due time but do like this bike. No SWAT on the aluminum but hey ..... we have all been dealing with lack of these nifty compartments for a long time.
  • 4 4
 Mike this comment is kinda weird!!!
''The ride of the aluminum tubing felt harsher than on the carbon frame, with more feedback being transmitted into my hands on rough, rocky sections of trail.''
I thought that it should be the exact opposite since carbon is a lot stiffer material than alu''

Am I missing something here?
  • 6 0
 Sort of, the way they lay up the carbon means it can be stiff in one direction but then give a bit of comfort in another. When laid in one direction it is stiffer than alu though.
  • 1 9
flag gapos999 (May 15, 2015 at 2:28) (Below Threshold)
 I'm not sure about that boomboom. If that is the case then stiffer bike translates to better accelaration and snappier responce through direction changes. But those are the benefits of carbon frames Vs Alu. Perhaps the harsher ride is just because the 29er has less travel than the 27,5 but that is something I would like to hear from MK who actually rode those bikes.
  • 5 0
 A carbon bike can be made laterally stiff but vertically compliant by changing the way you lay the strands in the matrix. Aluminium has the same properties in all directions and it is only the tube shapes/thicknesses that change the feel of the bike, if you want a stiff pedalling bike in ali you have to have a stiff riding bike.
  • 4 1
 @gapos999: That's the reason, why virtually all road bikes have carbon forks. They are stiff while steering but way more comfortable in absorbing light shocks from bad roads.
  • 5 1
 My experience with carbon parts, especially noticeable with carbon bars, is that whilst they're super stiff and solid they absorb a lot of the vibration from the trail which makes them a lot more comfortable. Definitely noticed the difference when doing a weekends bike park riding with carbon bars vs alu bars.
  • 3 1
 I like that TWAT door, it's a good idea. I like 27.5+ also. I wonder where it's all heading. Just imagine what bikes we'll be riding in ten years.
  • 5 1
 waiting for a dropper post able to inflate tires and shock
  • 10 0
 Yeah I've always felt droppers are too reliable, maybe making them with more ways to break will help
  • 1 0
 Get the weed secret doors to get the joke ;-)
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer are the carbon models actually full-carbon (not alloy chain/seat stays)? They look like it in the picture. Sorry if I missed something but this would be a change worth noting.
  • 2 1
 The S-Works versions are full carbon (the Stumpjumper 29 was full carbon in 2015), bu the Expert and Elite models have carbon front triangles and alloy rear ends.
  • 3 1
 They finally went full carbon, but you have to pay top dollar to get while other brands are full carbon for much less.
  • 1 0
 Only the 29er has a full carbon frame. The 650b S-Works has aluminum chainstays.
  • 1 4
 Just another reason I stopped buying Specialized, plenty of better value choices out there.
  • 1 1
 The new 27.5" is the bike I have been waiting for. I was hoping the travel would have been a little more between the Camber and the Enduro, instead it's very close to the Enduro. This is typical of specialized to always competing against themselves!! I guess now They need to make the Camber in 27.5 with 130-140mm to bridge this gap.

As far as the storage compartment goes, it's ugly as Hell and seems like it will weaken the downtube. Also when the latch breaks, you will have to replace all the contents that get damaged. plus the box looks riveted into the frame ; "S.O.L".!!!
  • 3 0
 So....what's the cellphone compatibility list? Will the glove box accommodate a iphone 6 or phablet?
  • 1 0
 how well will GPS work in it?
  • 2 0
 I have been eagerly anticipating the 2016 stumpjumper, but I'm a little set back by and not sure what to think about this storage in frame thing.
  • 4 0
 Am I really the only idiot who would like to try that 27.5+ thingie?
  • 2 2
 WHAT??

"the first full suspension 27.5+ bike from a major manufacturer."

Pretty sure that Rocky Mountain qualifies as as major manufacturer, yes? Their Sherpa predates this bike.

Not saying this one is not cool, just does not deserve to take the credit for something that Rocky did.
  • 4 3
 When I wrote, "the first full suspension 27.5+ bike from a major manufacturer" I was referring to the big guys, Trek, Giant, etc... The Sherpa was certainly first, but Rocky's a much smaller player in the marketplace.
  • 2 3
 That makes better bikes for the $. I'll take a Rocky any day over a bike made for the masses. There just to many Specialized bikes in my area.
  • 2 1
 Well, if that's how you look at it then I suppose Giant is the only major manufacturer since they make bikes for the others you mention.
  • 1 0
 Sorry, I was replying to "mikekazimer" regarding the "big guys"
  • 1 0
 27.5+ is already a win before they hit the streets. The fact everyone is talking this much about it creates enough buzz to sell them. I ride my fat bike in the dirt all the time and would welcome the in between class.
  • 1 0
 So why no Carbon chainstays on the 650b S-Works like the 29er?
Specialized website also claims that the 650b S-Works has FACT10 Carbon while the 29er has FACT11.
I wonder why...?
  • 8 9
 Personally, I found the SWAT door interesting in the first moment. But then I realized that more and more people are using backpacks anyway, even on short tours - because they want their back protected. SWAT stuff fits in then anyways, so no need for a special place at the frame?
  • 8 4
 Got to agree with this. As cool as the idea is, riding without my pack feels unnatural
  • 15 2
 I've heard of at least one rider who was permanently disabled when his multi tool that was in his pack pierced his spine. Get those tools out the way in the frame and it'll be even safer. Nothing to stop you riding with a pack after all!
(And I've gone the other way, not used a pack in a while and so much prefer the freedom of movement.)
  • 14 0
 I love riding without a pack! You can move around so much more freely on the bike. The only reason I carry one is to carry my gear, I'd use SWAT for sure
  • 21 0
 I completely disagree...I much prefer to leave the pack at home on shorter rides where one bottle is enough. Riding technical stuff without the extra weight on your back is sooo nice.
  • 3 0
 Fair enough Smile
  • 4 3
 Rattle rattle rattle go the tools !
  • 2 1
 I also have a buddy that is paralyzed from an incident with a pack. Went down and the crash pushed his pump into his spine. Paralyzed from the chest down. If you're using a pack, ALWAYS put you pump in the very bottom of your bag, laying sideways.
  • 2 0
 There are certain thing you always want with you and the compartment is great fort that, in the backpack you bring things that you need for that certain ride. I use a back pack but I like keeping the weight down, I rather have the weight down low on the frame. I think its a great feature
  • 3 0
 Its also a more efficiente way to carry the weight, closer to the ground, lower center of mass
  • 2 3
 id argue it's most efficient to minimise bike weight. carried weight it's active rather than passive on the bike
  • 4 4
 Packs suck.
  • 8 0
 Packs may suck but not as much as the people that dont bring drinks and wanna go back to the car every hour ...
  • 3 0
 @EpicStormer pack bouncing around, nearly impossible to make extension of body, vs bolted to bike and extension of body. I think everyones getting over their heads on the physics here. you'd have to start judging the efficiency of your body muscles having to balance and react around a moving object strapped around your chest, back, and shoulders.
  • 2 0
 guess it's down to what you prefer and how good your pack is. my back isn't restrictive and don't move about. I prefer carrying drink in the pack, I notice the bike feels better for it. that's my preference anyway.
  • 1 6
flag Andrew-Cuchessi (May 15, 2015 at 11:51) (Below Threshold)
 @EpicStormer best way to put it is the feel of not using a condom vs using a condom.
  • 5 1
 ^^ sounds like you have done neither
  • 2 2
 Don't worry bigburd, one day you might get to join in on the fast rides m.pinkbike.com/photo/6818815
  • 3 1
 And one day you will get to feel what sex is like with and with out a condom so you can make a worthwhile comparison , nice pic btw
  • 2 3
 Again, don't worry bigburd, once you get a chick to cum enough to where she can't take anymore, then you'll understand.
  • 3 1
 That looks awesome, is there a new camber in the works too? That's the bike I'm after, short travel ripper please!
  • 3 0
 A 650b camber would be nice IMO.
  • 4 1
 The current Camber Evo is a weapon.
  • 2 0
 Loving the super long reach on the XXL, it's about time I owned a proper fitting bike
  • 6 3
 Cartoonish... Sums it (+) up.
  • 7 7
 "I just bought a $5,000 super light carbon frame hung with ultra lightweight parts.

Now, if I could only find a way to cram an extra couple pounds into the frame I just paid so much for."

Said no one ever.
  • 6 0
 Ur going full XC but going to ride with a pack?
  • 3 0
 No ride impressions of the 6Fattie?
  • 2 0
 @zephxiii, there were only display models on hand at the launch - demo versions weren't available to be ridden, so that test ride will take place sometime in the future.
  • 6 0
 I'm guessing all the disadvantages of the + size would be very apparent when directly compared with normal bikes so Spec will wait to take you guys on an all + junket with some sweet schwag and lodging.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer so it looks like they're ditching 142+ hub spacing?
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer ah ok thanks!
  • 1 0
 Not according to their site. Still shows 142+ rear hub, @Andrew-Cuchessi
  • 2 0
 Good to see the Purgatory back on the rear wheel. Wonder if the carbon frame will still whistle in the wind.
  • 3 0
 that's a huge hole in the down tube!!!
  • 3 2
 One year too late, Specialized. If you had come out with this bike last year, it would be sitting my garage. But instead, the space belongs to Giant's Trance SX.
  • 2 1
 Damn this bike looks so sick, would be a perfect replacement for my 7+ year old pitch pro, but I just can't leave 26'' wheels : ( better luck next time!
  • 3 0
 I'm not sure there is going to be any "next time" for 26" wheels from Specialized...? But who knows, maybe they'll do a "retro" Enduro SX in 26" someday...? Smile
  • 2 1
 Fixed:
There's no need to scramble around gathering up a bike and tools when everything is already in your pack – just fill up the bladder and head for the trails.
  • 1 0
 I can't wait for the next bike that maybe call 67+ or something like that. It could run 4" tires, 2.8" and still didn't mess up the geometry.
  • 1 0
 As a rasta looking Adam Sandler would say while demonstrating this bike and it's nifty little compartment "you can put your weed in there".
  • 3 1
 greatttt...I just sold my 26 SJ and bought an E29, and now the new SJ looks perfect... thanks, Obama.
  • 1 1
 I really wish the 29 inch version had the same amount of travel as the 650b. Set up like this they seem like two different bikes; a 650 b am/enduro bike, and a 29 inch xc/trail bike.
  • 2 0
 27.5+ is intriguing... wouldn't buy one right off the bat but would love to take one for a ride
  • 1 0
 Full carbon rear triangle only for 29er S-Works? Because they simply took Epic World Cup's chain stays, but did not develop the same for the smaller wheelsize S-Works?
  • 3 0
 Way to go Specialized.......another great bike by a great company
  • 3 0
 My elite 29 will be at my shop this week Smile
  • 5 2
 :yawn:
  • 2 0
 still have the stupid shock lengths?
  • 4 1
 ITS TWENTY FIFTEEN
  • 2 0
 Well this is the most amazing bike I've seen in a long time.
  • 2 0
 and there's now a dedicated frame for each wheel size but not 26"
  • 2 1
 1st? What about the Rocky Mtn Sherpa you guys rode a few weeks ago. Who wrote this, Specialized?
  • 5 3
 When I wrote, "the first full suspension 27.5+ bike from a major manufacturer" I was referring to the big guys, Trek, Giant, etc... The Sherpa was certainly first, but Rocky's a much smaller player in the marketplace.
  • 1 1
 Fair enough. I'm wondering why they eschewed the Boost on the standard wheeled SJs.
  • 2 1
 @b1k35c13nt15t because what's the point?
  • 1 1
 That makes better bikes for the $. I'll take a Rocky any day over a bike made for the masses. There just to many Specialized bikes in my area
  • 1 1
 Sorry properp, I love the Rocky and all but for me the 150mm fork trumps a120mm fork all day long.
  • 1 1
 @sambs827
Because Boost is coming, if buying a new bike I want the imminent "standards" implemented. I'm ready to build new wheels but I want them for my next bike or two. I'm thinking future. The guys that complain about 26" must be sold on the idea of riding clapped out shit in 2 years. When I go into a shop, I see two wheel sizes. There is no debating it. Choose a bike, buy it, ride it.
  • 4 6
 Specialized, innovating solutions for non issues. My small saddle bag holds everything I need and is't a permanent pat of the frame. When I do go on longer rides and use my pack, the bag comes off in 5 seconds. And yes you can use a saddle bag with a dropper.
  • 3 0
 but the problem is, saddle bags aren't cool
the masses (of mtb riders) do not accept them
I still use them on my XC bike and they're great
  • 2 0
 Guess I'm too old to worry about being cool. Just use what works, well past the age of vanity.
  • 2 0
 Most saddle bags don't work with dropper posts. Furthermore, I've ran a saddle bag for this exact purpose and then 3/4 of the way down the mountain the zipper somehow worked loose and I lost everything inside. I'll stick to the saddlebag on the road bike.
  • 1 0
 Just like anything else, it just depends on the bag. On mine the zipper is on the end, so it has to be zipped up to open. That's not happening on it's own going down a trail.
  • 3 1
 The Boost force feeding has started................
  • 2 0
 Do they do frame only options anymore?
  • 2 0
 Yes, Bikerumor has the info.
  • 2 0
 So relieved they didn't remove FD capability.
  • 1 0
 Looks like a sweet bike and has options to suit everyone. Good work Specialized!
  • 1 0
 Nice looking design, but all set with rear shock limitations due to proprietary mounting.
  • 6 5
 insert special-ed comment here
  • 6 9
 ^HAHAHAHA.....comment of the year!!!!!
Still a fail on the 29er in my opinion. If there going to a dedicated 1X system why the hell not make the chainstays 430 like the Enduro 29er or 420 like 650b??? Dont make them 437 like the chart says. No reason not to with bikes like the Following and the new one from Canfield with 414mm stays being released. Big RED F...
  • 10 6
 I used to be a big fan of short stays as I had this prejudgment in my head that they make the bike more manouverable but then I tried the previous stumpy evo 29 with 447 stays and all that went to garbage as it was a relatively nimble bike when you needed it to be. all numbers together + equipmentmakes a great or poor bike. Having short stays doesn't mean much
  • 2 0
 People on the new diamond back mission say the long stays and shortish frame work like yours never guess. Not saying it's for everyone, but I don't prejudge based on geo anymore. Gotta try it before knocking it.
  • 1 0
 My Scott Spark 29er has 450mm chainstays yet it still feels awesome and not long in the back. My Scale has 440mm as a reference.
  • 3 0
 440/445mm is the sweet spot on a medium/large. Think beyond the marketing....
  • 3 1
 Long chainstays corner so much better on medium to high speed turns and jump a lot more predictably
  • 2 3
 hamncheez - you can or you cannot corner and jump in a fast and confident manner, chainstay ain't going to make difference here... if you can you will adapt to almost anything. It's like this discussion some time ago where people were talking about impact of chainstay length on doing wheelies, come on... someone else said once that slacker head angle makes it harder to OTB, probably same guy who says to put your bum behind the saddle on descents to not do OTB.
  • 1 0
 Except Gwin couldn't ride 420mm and Rossi couldn't make the weight distribution of a Ducati work. If those guys can't ride around poor weight distribution the average rider hasn't got a hope in hell.
  • 2 1
 No he couldn't, he only got top 10 results, while Brosnan got podium. How good do you think is an average mortal with setting up rebound on his fork and shock? You know those things that can shift your weight distribution in non optimal manner with every bump bigger than our keyboards. How good do you reckon are my weight distribution skills in a rockgarden, how big chunk of rock or drop off does it take before I move my ass too far back, making the front wheel jump around a tad too much, maybe magnifying the results of too much rebound on rear and not enough on front? I don't check pressures in my air springs too often... But please go on. You forgot religion Big Grin
  • 2 1
 I cannot see the blink element in this article so I assume there isn't
  • 4 2
 It's beautiful.
  • 2 0
 can't agree with you only more
  • 1 0
 The compartment is an awesome idea. They should have renamed it the Stash.
  • 2 5
 ''When last year's Stumpjumper 650b came out it wasn't exactly a new bike - it was the front triangle of the existing 29er joined to a new rear end, with a spacer under the head tube to correct the geometry. That's no longer the case, and there's now a dedicated frame for each wheel size.'' Hardly fair move for valued customers who purchased this bike last year . Specialized should have waited last year for the sake of us riders . Look at Giant and their 650b Reign development without need to do some tricks with outdated frame mix matches..
  • 4 0
 Sour grapes? It was clear to anyone who read any review of the bikes that Spesh was taking a big shortcut when they released their 650b last year. They made a major mistake by ignoring the new wheel size and ended up behind every other large bike maker. So they bodged a 29 frame on a new rear end and got odd geometry just so they could have a tweener in the catalog and on the floor.

That bike was a stop-gap so they could finish the design of this new bike with proper geometry. No sympathy for anyone who ignored very available info or bought a bike after a test ride. Welcome to life where companies are always working on something newer and better.
  • 1 0
 of course . its totally understandable . I was solely trying to point out that specialized brand is not struggling with profits , so there was no reason why to glue up half finished product 2014 650b bikes. I do respect the brand for what they have done for mtb in general over the 30 years of their existence.
  • 2 0
 What information do you have on their profits?

There aren't many reasons they would have rushed a bike to market other than they were missing out on sales in the new, hot category. The chose to dump all the 26" models early and doubled down on 29" for the Stumpy FSR. All of their comments at the time criticized the 650b and claimed there was no advantage compared to the well designed 29". While they are great bikes, some riders still want/need a smaller wheel.

Most likely they saw a drop in sales that headed to Giant, Trek, and smaller makers with the new size wheels. It takes time to build molds for carbon frames and build stock. So they combed a way to use the 29" frames, a fork spacer and new rear so they could rush a bike to dealers.

Only they know if they were in the middle of the "real" 650b design and got caught just a bit behind OR if they never planned to make tweeners in the first place. Either way it was a big mistake and they are fully committed to the size now. They seem to have a well designed bike worthy of the Stumpy heritage again.
  • 2 1
 ive never been a stumpy fan but this changed that....
  • 1 0
 are they going to do frames????????????
  • 1 0
 Yes, Bikerumor has the info.
  • 1 3
 With the Giant "Lust" and Trek "Lush", I half expected someone to up the ante with a women's "Slut" model. Kudos to S for going in the other direction.
I'm really not sure who those brand's target market really is??
  • 1 0
 Can the B+ Stumpy fit a 29x2.1 tire as well?
  • 1 0
 just another new bike...cool
  • 2 1
 Are they killing the slaughter tire after just a season?
  • 1 2
 I still worry about the durability of the carbon versions, just about everyone I know with a carbon stumpy or camber has had it crack
  • 3 0
 If that actually happened, they got a new frame from Specialized.
  • 1 5
flag graeme187 (May 18, 2015 at 12:43) (Below Threshold)
 It's still a fag to bother having to go through a warranty replacment and a fact which would put me personally off buying one. I know people who've then cracked their warranty replacement too
  • 3 2
 Cant believe its come with FOX rear shock... Totally kills it for me.
  • 2 1
 Can't decide if I'm going to regret going with a 29 instead of a 27.5. :/
  • 1 0
 Should've called the fattie the redwood.
  • 3 3
 Hmmmm....... Good looking ride!
  • 4 4
 Must be nice to have money
  • 2 1
 Meh
  • 1 0
 that looks sooooooo nice
  • 1 1
 Where is the Fatbike option?? ...and the electric?? Razz
  • 1 1
 Why buy the epic now when Spec offer this stumpy?
  • 1 0
 Worst idea yet
  • 1 0
 Looks like a session..?
  • 11 11
 27.5+ = MARKETING !
  • 3 5
 "SWAT technology" - marketing geniuses come up with such fancy terminology to impress. "SWAT" - I say, what?
  • 1 1
 Meta AM v4?
  • 2 4
 looking soooo nice...!
  • 2 5
 New stumpy let the comments begin!
  • 4 6
 over priced and boring
  • 2 5
 4300 for frame" ???? DRUNK
  • 3 1
 $4300 is for the FULL bike. The Carbon comp model.
  • 1 4
 Yes but that is still $4300 for a bike that the masses will have. For 4300 Id build a custom ride. I can stash my stuff somewhere else and have a cooler bike. You cant buy cool you have to build it.
  • 4 7
 67.5 head angle. Awesome. NO 26 Inch. Not interested.
  • 2 5
 PRVNÍ
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