First Ride: 2019 GT Force & Sensor

Jul 6, 2018
by Mike Kazimer  


Remember the GT LTS? That was the bike that truly put GT's full-suspension mountain bikes on the map back in the mid-'90s, thanks largely to the fact that its Horst Link suspension design worked while climbing and descending, something that couldn't be said for many of the other options that were popular at the time. Now, nearly 25 years later, a modern version of that suspension layout is being used for the new Force and Sensor. It's a return to the basics for GT, who for years worked to invent a better mousetrap with their i-Drive and then AOS suspension designs, with varying degrees of success.

If you've been following the Enduro World Series this year the look of the Force shouldn't come as too much of a surprise – Martin Maes was first spotted on it back in March, and since then he's piloted it to multiple podium appearances.
GT Force Carbon Pro Details

• Intended use: all-mountain / enduro
• Wheel size: 27.5"
• Travel: 150mm rear, 160mm fork
• Carbon front triangle, aluminum swingarm
• 65° or 65.5° head angle
• 435mm chainstays
• 12 x 148mm rear spacing
• Sizes: XS - XL
• Price: $5,000 USD
www.gtbicycles.com

The 27.5”-wheeled bike has 150mm of rear travel paired with a 160mm fork, and is available with either a carbon front triangle and an aluminum swingarm, or with a full aluminum frame. You won't find any $10,000 price tags here - GT's goal was to create a line of bikes that were on the more affordable side of the spectrum, while also delivering a fun, predictable ride.

GT
Rather than going with internal routing, GT formed a channel into the top of the downtube for the derailleur, brake, and dropper housing.

Details

When viewed from the side, the Force looks like it has internal cable routing, but that's not actually the case. GT created a channel on top of the downtube where the dropper, derailleur, and brake housing sit, keeping them outside the frame for easy access. It's called the 'Groove Tube', and it's a feature that's only available on the carbon models – it would have been too costly to apply the same design to an aluminum frame.

A flip chip at the lower shock mount allows the head angle to be adjusted by .5-degrees, and bottom bracket height to be altered by 6mm, a change that leaves the leverage ratio and spring rate unaffected. Other highlights include a threaded bottom bracket, a removable ISCG guide, and plenty of room for a water bottle.


GT
There's a threaded bottom bracket, along with removable ISCG 05 tabs.
GT
The flip chip allows for the head angle to be altered by .5-degrees, and the bottom bracket to be changed by 6mm.


GT

Geometry

As is the case with nearly every new bike these days, the Force underwent the longer, lower, and slacker treatment, emerging with a 65-degree head angle, a 465mm reach for a size large, and a 75.5-degree seat angle (in the low setting). The one number that looks slightly out of place is the seat tube length – it's a little tall, considering that the advent of longer travel dropper has made short seat tubes increasingly common. Otherwise, the numbers are modern but not extreme, and they aren't far off from the geometry figures of the new Santa Cruz Bronson or the Specialized Stumpjumper 27.5.




Mountain G23209M 27.5 M Force Crb Pro CYN MD
Force Carbon Pro: $5,000 USD.
Mountain G23309M 27.5 M Force Crb Expert RAW MD
Force Carbon Expert: $4,000 USD.

Mountain G23409M 27.5 M Force Al Elite CHT MD
Force Aluminum Elite: $3,000 USD.
Mountain G23509M 27.5 M Force Al Comp RED MD
Force Aluminum Comp: $2,500 USD.



Tyler McCaul
Ride Impressions
Tyler McCaul getting sendy on the Force.

Trysil, Norway, was where GT chose to launch the Force and Sensor, a small ski town located two hours outside of Oslo. Efforts are underway to expand the area's mountain bike offerings, which currently include an ultra-smooth lift served flow trail, a compact network of beginner and intermediate trails located at the base of the ski area, and a smattering of natural tracks scattered throughout the valley. Growing the mountain biking scene here is a relatively new endeavor, and the trails that currently exist are more mild than wild, but it'll be interesting to see how things progress over course of the next few years.

The ride I took the Force on covered a mix of terrain, everything from a loose, dusty fire road climb to a primitive singletrack descent that seemed as if was used more often by moose than mountain bikers, with enough hidden rocks and roots to keep things interesting.

Luis Arriaz, who worked on the kinematics of the Force and the Sensor, says that both bikes work best with a little less sag than most riders are used to – 22% rather than the typical 30%. That lower sag number helped give the Force an efficient feel when climbing, and the suspension never felt like it was diving too deep into its travel. The shock remains active enough to provide traction on more technical climbs, but without feeling like you're losing precious energy due to excess movement.

On the descents, the Force felt best once it was up to speed, but even then it still felt like it would rather plow through everything instead of popping up and over obstacles. The geometry felt familiar, and the bike as a whole had a solid, sturdy feel, but there wasn't that zippiness that some bikes in this category possess. Of course, one ride on moderate terrain isn't enough to really suss out the nuances of a bike - I'd need some more time to experiment with suspension setup to see if I could get it to feel a little more alive at slower speeds. Even though I wasn't able to get out on anything super-steep, I do have a feeling that the Guide R brakes could be a little undergunned for riders who are really getting after it – it would have been nice to see a set of Code brakes spec'd, especially given the bike's intended use.



The new Sensor shares many of the design features found on the Force, including the Groove Tube cable routing, two position flip chip, and carbon front triangle / alloy swingarm or full aluminum frame options, but it rolls on 29” wheels and has 130mm of travel front and rear.

We're starting to see more and more shorter travel bikes receive geometry numbers once reserved for longer travel machines, and the Sensor is no exception. In the low setting the head angle sits at 65.5-degrees – for reference, that's the same head angle as what's found on the new Commencal Meta 29, a 160mm beast of a bike.
GT Sensor Carbon Pro Details
• Intended use: trail / all-mountain
• Wheel size: 29"
• Rear wheel travel: 130mm
• Carbon front triangle, aluminum swingarm
• 65.5° or 66° head angle
• 435mm chainstays
• 12 x 148mm rear spacing
• Sizes: XS - XL
• Price: $5,000 USD

There are three carbon-framed options in the lineup and two full aluminum versions, along with a frame only option. The Sensor Carbon Pro I rode retails for $5,000 USD, equipped with a RockShox Pike RCT2 fork, SRAM X01 drivetrain, SRAM Level TL brakes, and Schwalbe's new Nobby Nic tires front and rear.


GT
The Sensor uses a trunnion mounted 185 x 50mm shock.
GT
Like the Force, there's a two position flip chip to change the geometry.

GT
Downtube protection to keep the carbon frame safe.
GT
There's plenty of clearance for up to a 2.6" tire.


Geometry

Sensor


Mountain G24209M 29 M Sensor Crb Pro LIM MD
Sensor Carbon Pro: $5,000 USD.
Mountain G24309M 29 M Sensor Crb Expert WRD MD
Sensor Carbon Expert: $4,000 USD.

Mountain G24409M 29 M Sensor Crb Elite RAW MD
Sensor Carbon Elite: $3,000 USD
Mountain G24509M 29 M Sensor Al Comp MGN MD
Sensor Alloy Comp: $2,500 USD.




Joey Floresta
Sensor Ride Impressions
Joey Foresta lays down a smokescreen on the Sensor.

The Sensor has a snappier feel than the Force, and I was impressed with its climbing abilities, even with the flip chip in the low setting. 65.5-degrees is a slack head angle for a 130mm bike, but I didn't have any trouble managing the front end at slower speeds. As reach numbers have grown longer, bars wider, and stems shorter, the idea that a bike needs a steep head angle to be a capable climber is becoming a thing of the past. Yes, a steep head angle can make a bike feel quicker (or twitchier) while climbing, but that doesn't necessarily make it any easier to get up tricky bits of trail. The ride I went on aboard the Force had a sustained section of technical climbing that featured a series of rooty and rocky puzzles that required looking ahead and maintaining a steady cadence to clean, and the Sensor made it through without any trouble.

The Sensor feels more like a shorter travel all-mountain bike than anything else, which makes sense given its geometry numbers. It remained composed on rockier, rougher sections of trail, although you'll feel it if you pick the wrong line - there's only so much that 130mm of travel can do. If this were my personal bike I'd install a different air spring right off the bat in order to bring the fork travel to 140mm and add a little extra cushioning from those bigger hits. That change would also add a little height to the front end, something I found myself wishing for during my test ride. The other change I'd make would be to swap out the Level brakes – once again, those are a little underpowered for the way that this bike wants to be ridden.

Overall, the Force and the Sensor may not be radical departures from the norm, but the return to a more conventional design and a focus on the middle- to entry-level pricepoints may help GT attract a wider range of customers, everyone from beginners to riders who are harboring dreams of enduro glory.








169 Comments

  • + 196
 Tough crowd. They look great, prices are nice, Horst Link, and I'm sure they'd ride just fine. If my LBS stocked these I'd be happy to buy one. People are really hung up on geometry these days. Nearly every bike is sorted and a couple of mm or tenths of a degree here and there really isn't going to affect the stopwatch or your funometer. Dealbreakers are longevity, warranty, and after sales service.
  • + 10
 Totally aggreed ..
  • + 17
 People get so hung up on geometry....I find a good suspension layout paired with a good shock and fork way,way more Important than 5mm more reach. And yes, the said things are more Important.
  • + 18
 @NotNamed: if they develop a bije with Martin Maes and he races top level with it this year, totally charging Sam Hill, it must be a bike with wrong geo... haha... -> key board warriors
  • + 30
 I’m loving the trend of Horst Link bikes without the need for gimmicky and shitty suspension.
  • - 78
flag bohns1 (Jul 6, 2018 at 4:18) (Below Threshold)
 @NotNamed: I'm hung up on looks/aesthetics as well, and well, these are the ugliest bikes I've seen this year hands down!
  • + 22
 @bohns1: wow you really add nothing to the conversation... well done
  • - 37
flag bohns1 (Jul 6, 2018 at 6:12) (Below Threshold)
 @Trailstunter: Just stating a fact! Uh I mean opinion.. The design simply looks dated for a 2019 model! Nothing I'd be spending my hard earn on.. Just sayin.
  • + 8
 Couldn't agree more. The warranty thing is huge. From GT website:

"GT frames 2015 model year and newer (except frames for Freeride, and Dirt Jumping bikes, see below) are warranted by GT Bicycle Corporation, 1 Cannondale Way, Wilton, CT 06897 against manufacturing defects in materials and/or workmanship for the lifetime of the original owner."

NOTE: Gravity/Freeride/DJ bikes for only 3 years.

Ok, for these new bikes then, that box is checked.
  • + 3
 @plume: after the specialized patent ran out lol
  • + 0
 Are prices even that good though? MSRP on an HD4 with GX Eagle and factory fork+X2 is barely more than the Force pro. I know I'd take the Ibis...
  • + 4
 @bohns1: you barely ride a bike from this decade lol your opinion means shit to everyone else.
  • - 11
flag bohns1 (Jul 6, 2018 at 8:16) (Below Threshold)
 @mhoshal: Dude you are a complete and utter douche canoe.. I ride a slash 9.9 project one.. The rides in my profile are from 2010..The last time I ever updated my profile.. Long since sold!
  • + 6
 @cmscheip: @cmscheip: Until you actually try to take advantage of that alleged warranty. GT is owned by Dorel (Mongoose, Cannondale) and I had a cannondale jekyll where the seat stays cracked twice once less than 2 months into owning the bike and once a about 18 months later and both times Cannondale tried not to warranty and claimed they were "crash related" despite the fact that there were no scratches or impact marks on the frame.

They warrantied the first one refused to warranty the second one even though the crack was clearly due to poor frame alignment (leading to rotational force on the seat stays during swing arm movement). So there lifetime warranty is worthless. Basically false sense of security/craftsmanship.

I wont own another Dorel industries bike.
  • + 4
 @ppp9911: Aw man I don't want to hear that!! Dang. Bikes are getting so good that you will absolutely lose the game if your customer service sucks - unreal how these companies don't get it. I just did some quick googling and seems like you're right, a lot of problems with Cannondale warranty (in particular). If I got serious about a new bike I'd do a lot more digging on this first. Thanks for pointing it out!
  • + 1
 @ppp9911 This is why I end up buying used bikes. Most of the time it's like dealing with an insurance company. Guilty until proven innocent. Sucks to hear about when companies are weak on the service front.
  • + 1
 @iamamodel: I do agree to an extent, I think these days almost all bikes are very good the difference is what bike is very good for YOU! I will never buy a bike without test riding it first because although it might be great for someone else they do feel very different when you ride them, even with small geometry changes. that being said geometry on paper will only let you get a slight idea how the bike rides. It really comes down to tires in the dirt to know if its a good bike for YOU!
  • + 1
 they do look nice tho
  • + 3
 @bohns1: only douche canoe around here is you partner bashing a proven brand and a proven design. You are aalso bashing a bike that doesn't look for off your slash so your slash must be garbage and outdated looking too eh? Your a moron!!!
  • - 12
flag bohns1 (Jul 6, 2018 at 13:18) (Below Threshold)
 @mhoshal: and the dumbest comment of the year award goes to! Haha dude! You for real.. You need to book an appointment with your optometrist! This abomination looks nothing like the slash! Not even in the same hemisphere.
  • + 3
 @bohns1: your comments are painful......
  • - 8
flag bohns1 (Jul 6, 2018 at 17:34) (Below Threshold)
 @rockyflowtbay: Is that all you got Huckleberry!
  • + 4
 @bohns1: Nobody likes you Bohns1, you got no friends in life... that is why you throw your garbage here... negative energy...
Go to bed... try to sleep Wink
  • - 9
flag bohns1 (Jul 6, 2018 at 23:20) (Below Threshold)
 @Trailstunter: Seriously! That's what you came back with 10 hrs later! Dude you ride an archaic Trek from like 09! I can't take you seriously.... Negative energy.. All it was was is an opinion.. These new GT are lame with a tired design on basic horst link.. Nothing special here.. Sorry I hurt your feelings! Now go take a toke, but don't choke.. ????
  • + 1
 @bohns1: nope, ride a 2017 YT Capra....n00blet.... you said you did not update your profile and your old bikes are on it.... and now you judge in the same way ... hahaha ... btw it was a 2013 Remedy, awesome bike... seeying how much you get downvoted, nobody takes you seriously ...
  • + 1
 @bohns1: ya and my Sight C9.2 is a tired old design too. But that tired old design is proven, evolved and rips. Up and down. I’ll keep my tired old reliable design.
  • - 6
flag bohns1 (Jul 7, 2018 at 13:32) (Below Threshold)
 @Trailstunter: Haha down votes mean nothing to me man.. Most are kids or early twenty somethings.. Its pink bike! ????.. What matters are the crews I ride with and that's it.. You see you were the one that judged first so I countered you.. Taste of your own medicine if you will.. Keep down voting.. I'll be riding..
  • + 1
 @CircusMaximus: Hey man! Run what Ya brung!
  • - 1
 @CircusMaximus: The question is and more at what ibwas getting at is.... Would you keep buying that design when new bike day is on the horizon??These GT are new bikes ..If you want to re buy that same design and you truly like it then all the power to you..
  • + 2
 @CircusMaximus: glad to hear it, I just grabbed an Optic
  • + 1
 @bohns1: yes I would. In fact I just bought it this season.
  • + 3
 @CircusMaximus: The 9.2 is a way sweeter looking rig than these GT's tho.
  • + 1
 @bohns1: I do agree with that. But it’s the ride that really sold me. Norco upped their game as of the ‘17 model year.
  • + 1
 @CircusMaximus: oh ya big time.. I like their aesthetics as well..
  • + 27
 Never owned at.GT. but always had an admiration for them when i lusted after the the zaskar le, ball burnished ????
  • + 4
 my first 'expensive' bike 1990-1
  • + 3
 The Zaskar was only topped in my books by the chromoly one (psyclone?) and of course, the Xizang!
  • + 2
 Had one!
  • + 3
 First GT was a Performer Pro BMX back in the early 80's. Even have one now (2014). GT has always had a place in my heart and these bikes look a lot better than their previous generation. GT was hot as shit back in the 90's. Glad to see them getting back to where they belong.
  • + 2
 I totally remember the burnished Zaskar! Spent a lot of time looking in mags at that and whatever rig Has Rey was riding at the time.

I’ve never owned a GT either, but these two are hitting a price point that seems refreshingly realistic.
  • + 26
 Sensor Carbon Expert is definitely the name of a razor with like 4 more blades than you need but they look like good bikes.
  • + 3
 Make my day :-))
  • + 20
 Nothing extraordinary in conception but it looks like a solid option : horst link, nice geo, good pricing.
However, GT looks like it has lost a bit of its identity
  • - 14
flag WAKIdesigns (Jul 6, 2018 at 1:56) (Below Threshold)
 A bit? How about everything, welcome to "Another Session" club. B-O-R-I-N-G boooo! boooooo!
  • + 3
 Identity? Not sauggesting you’re wrong but could you explain?
  • + 5
 @WAKIdesigns: better take another joint and go back to sleep...
  • + 9
 @Samuel-L-Jackson:
Look at this: www.pinkbike.com/photo/10414257
That was a uniquely looking bike design. One of a kind. It has a character, own identity. One above? not really...
  • + 10
 @WAKIdesigns: That does not mean they’ve lost their identity as a brand does it? Their new DH bike is better than the previous one is it not? They made an awesome bike, now they’ve made a nice bike. I think their identity is just where it needs to be.
  • + 7
 I've always felt their identity has been around experimenting with suspension designs, doing things that no-one else would dare to do. GT and Canondale have done more for experimenting with what a full suspension design could be than any other brand. I'm thinking the Lobo, the original RTS, the IT-1, I-Drive, the derivative Freedrive, AOS, their prototype HPP DH bike... this looks like they've thrown in the towel and drank the Kool-Aid. I'm sad to see that GT have sacked their Blue Sky thinkers and spent the money on tracing paper.
  • - 31
flag bohns1 (Jul 6, 2018 at 4:21) (Below Threshold)
 @Samuel-L-Jackson: True but they look like shit personally..Especially in 2019
  • + 17
 @bohns1: you keep repeating yourself, go home...
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: Agreed I love the look of the older style GT bikes and always wanted one. These new bikes look very generic.
  • + 3
 @Samuel-L-Jackson: oh, so we are up for a philosophical discussion on the meaning of the word "identity" and how does their DH bike relates to the other DH bikes, please... it looks like everything else sorry. Just another fricking bike. Even Canyon can do better, fk me, even Kelly's can do better - Kelly's! Sht got so uniform that I think Orange bikes look fkng sweet. Strange times.
  • - 38
flag bohns1 (Jul 6, 2018 at 6:10) (Below Threshold)
 @Trailstunter: Suck a dick up till Ya hiccup Homer.. No one was replying to you!
  • - 3
 @WAKIdesigns: can not upvote this enough!!!!!!!
  • + 1
 @bohns1: says the guy riding 2011 bikes lol.
  • + 5
 Actually GT harkened to the past with this bike. The groove tube is not a new naming scheme. GT used the Groove tube throughout their 90's hey-day. Accept it was on the underside of the top tube back than. SO actually identity is still moderately intact.
  • + 6
 @WAKIdesigns: @WAKIdesigns: @WAKIdesigns:
I should come close to your mind, but I still find a lineage between the front triangle of both the old and new force, as well as something in the burly rear-end.

If you check the pivot points position, though being a FSR, you will see that this bike will behave very differently from the canyon, for instance : it has low Pedalkickback/Antisquat and a very progressive ratio, ans I would say, probably a neutral brake-squat.

In a world where most bikes are "superbikes" made for going fast on smooth trails with High AS/PK and linear ratio (orbea rallon, yeti's, pivot's, Ibis, even transition, kona and canyon new line-up of AM bikes), this is a very good différenciation point.

The FSR of GT's will be more free from transmission interactions, meaning it will be a very good technical climber and a tough downhill contender on harsh trails, with a very simple suspension set-up.
Precisely my kind of bike.
  • + 3
 Yeah it seems like a step backward rather than forward. I always liked how I-Drives rode and beyonf that, I admired the ingenuity.
  • - 14
flag bohns1 (Jul 6, 2018 at 9:01) (Below Threshold)
 @mhoshal: Dude those bikes are long sold.. Haven't updated my profile in years.. You're on a giant anyways!
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: design convergence because function is known and important.
  • + 2
 I wonder if moto forums do the same thing. All moto bikes look the same to me but I never hear people bitching about that. Obviously the engine and other proprietary stuff sets them aside but aesthetic is pretty uniform. I could be wrong though. But it seems they've found something that works and instead of fixing what ain't broke they all run it.
  • + 1
 @bohns1: instead of stating that repeatedly, you could have used the time to actually update your profile.
  • + 1
 @CircusMaximus: Why do that when I can state twice from my mobile and continue to shred my bike! Rather than wasting all my time behind a keyboard! A far cry from relentless repetition there bud!
  • - 1
 @bohns1: to repeat yourself is not very efficient for your bike time...
  • - 1
 @Trailstunter: Your saying I'm repeating myself by repeating yourself in saying so! Lol
  • + 18
 "Like the Force, there's a two position flip chip to change the geometry."

I really wish they had one side of the chip light and the other dark.


Luke! Feel the dark side of the Geometry!
  • + 10
 Dark side of the Force!
  • + 13
 If it's the same Luis Arriaz that was the brain behind K9 bikes the kinematics will be well sorted at least. Look like decent bikes at a decent price, mass market stuff, realistically what GT should be all about rather than the quirky Idrive system.
  • + 5
 Yep. Looks like GT next marketing position is below Cannondale, Cannondale being the nerd bikes and GT the tried-and-true option.
  • + 8
 Go Luis ! Bikes look great.

I remember seeing groove tubes on the 1993 “all terra” range of GTs. Those bikes even had three position mount in the fork dropouts.

And splatter paint jobs. We need slapped paint jobs.

Still got my K9 ????
  • + 8
 I really like the groove tube, but I have the same cable layout on my bike and it's a pain in the bum to clean properly around them even without a groove! Still, really nice elegant solution without going internal.
  • + 8
 Canyon dialed it with that "bottom external routing with a hard cover" thing. If they put a sealed cover over the reccessed channel, they'd got it! They even have the threads in there to bolt it on!
  • - 1
 100% killed the bike in 1 sentence. That will look terrible after 1 ride.
  • + 7
 Nice and great to see the new Force, a light-enduro bike or a modern all-mountain... And now waiting for the new Sanction...!
  • + 1
 +1.
Preferably rolling on 29" wheels Smile
  • + 5
 That cable routing is a good idea. I am not a fan of internal, I think making it more easily accessible and still keep it clean looking is pretty cool. Haven't owned a GT since my Interceptor, always wanted a Ruckus back when they first came out. Haven't even looked twice at a GT since then, but these look good.
  • + 4
 Good look'n bikes. I used to race a Mach 1 when I was a kid and I've always had a sweet spot for GT.. As far as internal routing, that hard on is gone. Wrenching my own bike, I think I may actually prefer external routing. Nice Job GT!
  • + 3
 Looks really nice but a shorter seat tube would be good, i'm always between a medium and large and would like to have the option of the longer reach without a giant seat tube that means a can't run a dropper with a descent length, i also think shorter seat tubes and lower stand-overs make frames look way better (mediums always look nicer than larges in my opinion)
  • + 4
 How long is a descent length dropper? Have I been doing it wrong with my 160mm to descend correctly?
  • + 1
 @sspiff: This large GT has a longer seattube than my current bike and I can only just run a 150mm dropper atm, so if I wanted a large Force for the reach number I could only run a 125 dropper, I’d like to be able to run at least 150, if not 170 or so, just limits options is all.
  • + 4
 Why the stupid high top tube though? Don't you know people like standover? It would have been so easy to make the top tube lower. And then probably look a lot like a Kona process.
  • + 2
 Is that to clear your mangina while you're standing flat footed straddling your bike gas bagging? Or do you do some sort of weird riding that requires such clearance?
  • + 2
 @Bahh: I have short legs and a big ol' Easter basket.
  • + 2
 @Bahh: and also like the esthetic of a lower top tube. Certainly doesn't affect riding, though I think the lower center of gravity (marginal I'm sure) is never a bad thing.
  • + 1
 I'm guessing it has to do with keeping the GT triple triangle that all their bikes have
  • + 1
 @diego-b: I get it. It's a GT thing. I'm just not a fan.
  • + 2
 The previous generation of the Sensor and Force looked space age and cutting edge. It was definitely a photogenic bike as well. Head angles are 2° out of date these days but the bikes still looked rad.

These new designs don't stand out at all and it does seem the designers played it safe. Time will tell whether or not this strategy works.

I hope the next Sanction follows a different ethos.
  • + 2
 I actually own the (now) old GT Force Carbon Expert, am mighty happy with it, but I must say I would not upgrade to the newer model.

While I think some of the old geometry numbers make me feel outdated, it is a bike that people constantly ask me details about. The new bike looks pretty "standard, going with what others do" IMO. Where have the huge carbon seatstays gone? And where's that funky suspension design or some sort of? And where the f*@k have the GT Wings gone?
  • + 1
 This is kinda confusing really. We’ve known gt to be the ones putting those weird unusual linkages on their bikes while everyone goes with conventional systems like horst links. But if horst or dw is better then it can only he a good thing but GT loses what makes it unique. For a brand on the downward trend, GT needed to come out with something that would recapture our awe like the old GT bikes of the past. These are good bikes, but for GT and the competition, they may not be enough.
  • + 4
 I was really looking forward to the new Force, but that ST length is a no-no for short-legged people like me
  • + 1
 GT Reborn. Awesome! Awesome! Awesome! Luis Arraiz design's where revolutionary when they came out, K9 had an angleset long before CC even thought about it and the switch 780 handlebars were also pretty cool. I bet these ride like a dream.
  • + 1
 I'm curious with all the time they had to switch over from i-Drive / AOS why they chose the Horst ? Trunnion mount vs the VPP / Smoothlink style that Santa Cruz / Rocky Mountain trended towards. Any insight? Also - why the hell do they seem to hate internal cable routing? I don't get it - I have had two GT's and it's the one major beef I have is the cable mounting. Is it less points of protrusion? If that's the mentality they still need protrusions for the cable mount hardware. It just doesn't make sense to me.
  • + 1
 I'm on a 2012 GT Sensor 29'er (rode one by accident when I rented a mountain bike in Cali, it was a Sensor 29, and I fell in love with it - got a new one when I returned home, lovin' it ever since)...and I'm glad GT has jumped back onto the 29" wheel thing again for the Sensor.....glad I didn't get a new bike, because the new Sensor is just what I'm looking for. Oh, and btw, my 2012 Sensor is the most trouble free mountain bike I've ever owned, and I've owned a few in my 50 years on this planet.....
  • + 1
 @mike kazimer.

Serious question;

"We're starting to see more and more shorter travel bikes receive geometry numbers once reserved for longer travel machines, and the Sensor is no exception"

What 130mm bikes have a 65.5 HA? or are you referring to ETT, Wheelbase etc?
  • + 1
 You just f’d up one of the best bikes ever made. The current model Force rails downhill and climbs with no bob, none. Why would you mess with that? To make a bike that every one else has been making for 10 years and has never been that impressive. Wtf!!
  • + 3
 I get why the lower spec models aren't in carbon, but why not have the choice of the higher spec in alu? And I cannot see a frame only option anywhere?
  • + 1
 For the Sensor, 20mm bb drop plus 22% sag = 48.6mm bb drop. This is more of a 27.5 bb drop. I'd expect the bike to be more stable in straight lines but not as maneuverable in the corners as a 29er with a 60mm bb drop. It would be even more pronounced with larger tires.
  • + 1
 And, I assume, most people will want to over fork it.
  • + 5
 All together now... You know the phrase.
  • + 3
 "in no man's land" ?
  • + 2
 "Yes, It's Not Another Santa Cruz!"
  • + 1
 Ding ding dinn
  • + 2
 But..i’ve a question..
If the new Force has a trunnion 185x55 rear shock...how can i fit an X2..?
Fox make only 205 eye-to-eye trunnion shock...
Only Maes can answer....(?)
  • + 2
 I still have an '87 GT Avalanche with 1st gen Rock Shox Judy forks, complete with a Risse Gem cartridge and springs fitted inside them....
  • + 1
 Anyone notice the Sensor Carbon Pro has one fork in the promo on the PB homepage, a different fork in the test-ride photos and yet another fork (or at least different decals) in the manufacturer photos?
  • + 3
 Missed the opportunity to release the Force on May the 4th...
  • - 1
 Good overall, but the seat tubes are way too long (same as the Jeffsy). 480mm STL on a 465mm reach bike = no... 460 max, lower preferred like 440ish.

Stack is also a bit low, curious what rise bars they are speccing.

BB drop on the 29er a bit low.

Still, huge improvement and no more dumb i-drive.
  • + 1
 everyone's got something to say about something, but what you own or keen to own should be the best bike for you after all...
  • + 3
 Still Waiting For GT Proto Downhill.
  • + 1
 where's the top of the range ball burnished lts 1 model, even if they don't sell many 8k bikes they are something to lust over. as it is its all too sensible
  • + 2
 Where is the 2019 Fury?

High pivot 4 bar with modern geo. What other bikes have these features?
  • + 1
 2020 from the looks of it.
  • + 1
 They should call any high-pivot linkage activated bike RTS. RTS is akin to the modern high pivots, LTS is Horst Link FSR, and iDrive just something special.
  • + 1
 that's a positively bitching bike for $5K. in that nostalgic blue/yellow please.
  • + 2
 Loving that Tonka truck yellow.
  • + 1
 Nice to see the return of the groove tube. Had an old steel fram GT Karakoram from the early '90s with that feature!
  • + 2
 No more AOS or iDrive....thank goodness.
  • + 1
 609 stack in the XL, way too small for me Frown Looks like a ripping bike though!
  • + 1
 My commy meta SX HT had that cable/hose channel under the top tube an was just an annoying mud trap
  • + 1
 How does having the flip chip in high vs low affect the chainstay length? Surely that would remain constant
  • + 6
 They’ve labeled rear centre as chainstay length. When the B.B. drops the rear axle moves a few mm further forward.
  • + 1
 Why is there no cover on the "groove tube". Seems like it was designed for one. Would make a cover if I owned it.
  • + 1
 No internal routing?! SOLD!!!
  • + 1
 No more Sanction? or can we expect a longer travel 29'' Sanction?
  • + 1
 Everybody say it with me now...
  • + 4
 Looks like a Process with a stupid high top tube?
  • + 1
 @FLATLlNE: ya man stand over is severely lacking!
  • + 1
 Looks promising but some of those colorways are hideous
  • + 1
 @GTBicycles Y U NO Long Travel Sensor???
  • + 2
 Agreed. 150mm sensor pls
  • + 5
 Your wish has been granted, it’s called the GT Force@dooganmcdoogan:
  • + 1
 @FarmerJohn: I think they mean they want a long travel 29r
  • + 1
 About time @GTBicycles joined the 29 party ????????
  • + 9
 Disregard the question marks...they were supposed to be "thumbs up" emojis
  • + 1
 Not a big fan of the sensor carbon expert with the tan walls
  • + 0
 A very euro look , very nice ( if your European ) what's the weight . Some of us like to pedal these things
  • + 1
 Does removable ISCG means basically a BB mounted chainguide?
  • + 0
 The best move GT has ever msde getting rid of that gimmicky failure "i drive"
  • + 0
 Finally a GT that doesn't look like a complete dog.
  • + 0
 oh look... another Trek
  • - 3
 BB is 20mm too high. No wonder the bars felt too low.
  • - 1
 LLAT
  • - 2
 Transition Patrol and a Trek moulded together!
  • + 1
 and 30 others..
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