First Ride: 2019 Specialized Epic EVO

Jul 10, 2018
by Daniel Sapp  



Last year, Specialized overhauled the Epic, their XC race bike to boost its technical performance in the wake of modern XC courses. The new version still uses Specialized's Brain suspension technology, although it has been significantly revised to make it more effective.

The crew at Specialized has added the term "EVO" onto several models in the past. Historically, with mountain bikes, it has meant that the bike is going to have a similar frame with a burlier parts spec, and the Epic EVO follows suit. Using the same 100mm travel frame as the standard Epic, the EVO sports a little more suspension up front, wider handlebars, larger volume tires, and a dropper post. This should not only help it navigate technical trails, but it should be more comfortable for long days in the saddle.
Specialized Epic Evo Details

• Intended use: XC/trail
• Wheel size: 29"
• Rear wheel travel: 100mm
• Boost 12x148
• 68.5-degree head angle
• Carbon frame
• Two water bottle mounts
• Sizes: S through XL (medium tested)
• Weight: 27.05 lbs (medium, dirty, with XTR pedals)
• Dropper post
• Available July/August
• Price: $5,800 USD - Expert Carbon (Tested), $3,200 - Comp Alloy
www.specialized.com

Specialized Epic EVO 2018
The Epic EVO retains the Brain inertial lockout system.


In keeping with other EVO models from Specialized, the Epic Evo is the shored up version of their standard XC racer. Rather than developing an entirely new frame for the Evo, Specialized added a longer travel, 120mm fork, wider 750mm bars, a 125mm X-Fusion dropper post, and 2.3" tires. The longer travel fork helps to slacken out the bike and brings the head angle to 68.5-degrees, one degree slacker than the purebred Epic.

bigquotesThe Epic EVO is the answer to the ever-evolving discipline of cross-country riding. The standard high post 100mm race bike is speed focused on groomed tracks and it does that job well, but on the all day cross country excursions in the backcountry that we all love, the EVO is a better fit- you can pedal efficiently with plenty of water and added confidence that the bike can take on some unexpected technical terrain.Brian Gordon - Product Manager

Specialized Epic EVO 2018
SRAM GX Eagle 12-speed drivetrain.
Specialized Epic EVO 2018
SRAM Level TL brakes.


Frame Details

Small details: The frame is kept clean with internal cable routing throughout. There's room for two water bottles on the inside of the frame, and the Epic frame's seat tube is short enough to accept a dropper post with a reasonably long stroke.

Suspension updates: Gone is the FSR four-bar suspension as seen on many of Specialized's other bikes. The seatstay/chainstay pivot has been removed and the Epic uses a flex-stay design. The Brain sensor and remote reservoir is now mounted near the rear axle of the bike and connected through a hose to the shock. According to Specialized's suspension expert Mike McAndrews, this was the best way to get the performance they needed in the space they were working with.

Specialized Epic EVO 2018
The internal cable routing is sleek and rattle free.
Specialized Epic EVO 2018
The shock clevis is a critical part of the Brain system.


Fox Stepcast 34 Performance Fork: Fox's 34mm fork has 120mm of travel on the EVO. It uses Fox's GRIP damper and has 44mm of offset.

Brain: Specialized's Brain shock technology helps control the rear suspension. The shock is designed to isolate feedback from the rider and trail so that the suspension is firm while you're hammering on the pedals, but opens up when the trail becomes rough.

Specialized Epic EVO 2018
The shock no longer has an IFP as it has in the past. That has been replaced with a bladder system that Specialized claims has a smoother and more predictable actuation.


Frame Options / Build Kits

There are two different frames and build options for the Epic EVO. The Epic Expert EVO Carbon sports a Fox Stepcast 34, SRAM GX Eagle drivetrain, SRAM Level TL brakes, and Roval Control Carbon wheels with a 25mm internal width. The Epic Comp EVO has an M5 aluminum alloy frame. The frame is built using Specialized's D'Aluisio Smartweld Technology. It has a 120mm travel RockShox Reba RL fork, SRAM NX Eagle drivetrain, SRAM Level TL brakes, and Specialized Roval Control Alloy wheels, also 25mm internally. Both bikes use the custom RockShox Micro Brain Shock with the Autosag feature.


Geometry

Specialized aimed to make a bike that was more comfortable for long days in the saddle and capable of handling a wider variety of trails with the Epic EVO. The bike has a 73.8-degree seat tube angle and 68.5-degree head tube angle. Chainstays are 438mm, keeping the bike nimble in the turns
.
Specialized Epic EVO 2018





I've been riding the Epic EVO Expert Carbon for almost two months now, so I've had a decent amount of time to develop some impressions of it. The conditions that I've been riding in are standard Western North Carolina summer fare: 85-degrees F and 100% humidity. I usually ride to Pisgah National Forest from my house, so an XC bike with the ability to run two water bottles was a welcome addition to the stable. I also spent a fair amount of time logging miles in the rolling hills of DuPont State Forest down the road.

As harsh as it can be in the summer, I've been enjoying just getting out and riding however long I feel like it whenever time allows. While the trails around here are certainly fun on a longer-travel bike, I've grown to enjoy riding snappier more XC oriented rigs that don't feel like a burden if I end up on a lot of dirt roads, but also can hold their own descending demanding terrain.

PC Mangler
Daniel Sapp
Location: Brevard, NC, USA
Age: 31
Height: 5'10"
Inseam: 32"
Weight: 152 lbs
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Instagram: @d_sapp1

Photo Mangler


Climbing: I've spent a generous amount of time on the last few generations of the Epic. The new one is noticeably better in a lot of ways, but it's most noticeable in the extremes of climbing and descending. I know that a lot of people love to hate Specialized's Brain shock system, but let's be honest here. It was at one point in time, really bad. The Brain suffered a lot of failures, shops couldn't service it, it rode awkwardly, and it seemed like It was a crutch to help manage the suspension feedback on the frame.

Try to compartmentalize your memories of the old Brain shock like a bad relationship, because the new one is different. Yes, there's still some "clunking" that can be noticed when it engages and disengages over roots and rough terrain, but what I noticed this time is that the bike sticks to the ground. The Epic likes to go uphill, and fast. While the wider handlebars and dropper post tend to somewhat obscure the feeling of being on an XC race frame, the ability to drop a gear or two deeper into the cassette than I would normally ride when going up whatever climb is a reminder of its racing heritage. I would say that the Epic hurts to ride at times because it begs to be pushed harder, especially when climbing.

The bike is easy to negotiate through just about whatever when going uphill. While you can feel the Brain doing its thing, it is quickly forgotten. I found that I had plenty of traction whenever I needed it and wasn't losing power to the pedals at other times. I ran the Brain both fully engaged and wide open. The bike does have a little bit of bob when it's open, but not as much as expected. The shock works well so I ran it in the firm position almost all of the time. The bike was equally at home cranking out miles while climbing up fire roads and grinding up steep sections of rooted singletrack.

Photo Mangler


Descending: Riding any shorter travel bike downhill on technical terrain can be exciting. The head angle feels slacker than it actually is and the dropper post allows you to confidently get behind the bike and ride it like a longer travel trail rig. I found myself needing to consciously say, "hey, don't be a dumbass, this is how you're going to get hurt" while riding the bike. I found myself able to descend most trails at the same speed that I would on a longer travel bike, if not faster - until it came to prolonged sections of larger chunder. It gets up to speed quickly and feels comfortable hauling ass when things are smoother and predictable, but launching into more challenging pieces of trail, as fun as it is, can put you over the limits of the bike. You'll remember It is a 100/120mm travel bike.

Riding the Epic EVO is a good experience. Being able to seamlessly transition from climbing to descending and not fiddle with the shock, (no matter how easy it is to do manually on your current bike) is a plus. The bike performs well and I have had no issues with it at this point. It's a great machine to just get on and go wherever. For me, its versatility is what makes it one of my go-to rides at the moment. While it's going to be a little under gunned on some overly rough sections of trail, with a little bit of finesse, it can negotiate its way through without being sketchy in a "hey, this isn't really fun" kind of way, and I still have the efficiency to pedal back to my house. No need to load up the car.


Issues

One area that was under-powered was certainly braking. SRAM Level TL's are a good brake and the set on my bike may have had one of the better brake bleeds I've ever felt, but they were not up to the amplitude for what the bike is capable of. For an EVO style bike, I think that a more powerful brake option (or larger rotors) would better serve the Epic EVO. If it were my bike, in keeping with the SRAM spec, a set of Guide RC's would be a good fit. Perhaps I'll incorporate that upgrade for a long-term review.

Photo Mangler






Must Read This Week

118 Comments

  • + 67
 Nobody who's going to buy an Evo variant of a Specialized bike is going to want a Brain. There is a big market, far bigger than the Epic market, for a 25lb, 110/120mm travel, 67/76, 440mm reach (medium) bike with progressive suspension, SWAT and no Brain. If it isn't in the pipeline wake up Specialized.

Not that I've thought about it much...

Oh and sort your right rear only brake routing option.
  • + 2
 Specialized has the Camber. The 2012 Specialized Camber had 110/120mm travel but the geo was steeper. Since then they upped the Camber to 120/120mm and slackened it. No brain on any of the Camber models.
  • + 14
 @aliikane: I own one. It has now been replaced by the Stumpy ST.

The issue with the Camber is it's too heavy as it shared the Stumpy Chassis. Conversely you could say the geo is too steep for its weight. The suspension isn't progressive enough either.
  • - 20
flag scottzg (Jul 9, 2018 at 23:19) (Below Threshold)
 The disconnect is that a lot of XC bike buyers want a lockout to compensate for a lack of fitness. An automatic lockout is better, and they want a bike that's purportedly more safe when their mtb friends take them out on the intermediate+ trails and they're out of their element. Many buyers in this segment ride to preserve their mediocre fitness and don't care about bikes much.

There's a lot of excellent XC riders too, but they're usually not buying completes from specialized. Spec knows their market.
  • - 18
flag sosburn (Jul 9, 2018 at 23:22) (Below Threshold)
 So much for "innovate or die",
how can they even call this bike an evo with a 68.5 HTA?
  • + 2
 Wholeheartedly agree with everything here. Especially the end there. Moto brake setups (like mine) are harder to get the cable routing perfect and neat.
  • + 10
 @sosburn: Because it's an XC bike. It's a full degree slacker than the standard Epic.
  • + 5
 @scottay2hottay: lol... @sosburn that's why they have the 63.5° Stumpy Evo
  • + 7
 Definitely. Its a no brainer.
  • + 15
 >Nobody who's going to buy an Evo variant of a Specialized bike is going to want a Brain

if that's the case how come they still make it? if there were no sales they would stop
  • + 4
 @aliikane: Specialized *had the Camber... it’s no longer in production.
  • + 4
 They have the Stumpy ST, this is the one you're after then.
  • + 0
 @Asmodai: maybe the bike's suspension is dodgy without it?
  • + 6
 Would you say that bike is a No-Brainer for Specialized?
  • + 3
 @KotsosK: Anyone know true Stumpy ST weights? I have "heard" that the new SJ isn't light, so I'm wondering if that's the only missing piece. The geo numbers are pretty spot-on but if its coming in at 28-29lbs fully built outside of the $10k Sworks model that will turn some folks away.
  • + 2
 @yupstate: We own a small base model ST 29" and its 33lbs off the showroom floor for $1800.
  • - 1
 @Asmodai: Oh there's sales. Marketing is powerful and there are a lot of dentists around...

However, anti-squat can be tuned to provide great pedalling efficiency these days thanks to single ring set-ups. Note the amount of Horst-Linked bikes on the market for evidence of this.

Does Nino need a Brain to win every weekend? He has a remote lockout (which is a far better solution) but hardly seems to use it anyway from what I can see!

I still say the market for a light, slacker, raceable bike is bigger than the Epic market. The dentists think they need an Epic because Gaze rides one, but I bet they would be faster on something more capable/stable. I know I would.
  • + 4
 @jclnv:
your avarage customer is not Nino lol

yes specialized only makes this bike for rich brainwashed dentists

you are delusional and your logic makes zero sens
  • + 0
 @Asmodai: Look it's fine that you bought into the marketing and ride an Epic, thousands do.

I'm just saying there is a huge market for a bike that is more capable than an Epic yet doesn't weigh as 30lbs like a mid spec Stumpy ST.
  • + 6
 @jclnv: Check out the most recent "tech talks with Nino" on Red Bull. If I remember correctly he said they counted him using the remote lockout more than 200 times in a race.
  • + 7
 @jclnv: i dont own and never had a single specialized bike

They are not stupid, they know they target audience.

all this talk about "there is huge market for whatever" (best one is 26") is just pulling shit out of thin air
  • + 1
 @drumhellraiser: Fair anough. I was watching his hand and the weekend and he didn't seem to loosen his grip!

@Asmodai: Yep, short travel, light, slacker, 29" with good suspension kinematics. Not pulling that shit out of anywhere. It's already a growth segment.
  • + 1
 Thee brain shock looks a little skinny and frail. I saw the guy killing it in the video, but he's only 130lbs.
  • + 2
 @jclnv: To me the Stumpy ST is totally different bike than the Camber is. The Camber is a more of an XCish bike while the Stumpy ST is more of trail ripper.

Possibly the newer Cambers are heavier. However, I owned the 2012 Camber Expert and the frame was 5.0lbs. I had it set up with a 120mm fork and a dropper. Final weight was 24lbs but had it built more trail with bigger tires. The Camber was worthy of XC with different tires and no dropper which would easily drop 1.5lbs on it.

I also have an Epic and the frame weight similar to the Camber at around 5lbs. I have it built up a little burlier as well with a dropper and bigger tires. Final weight is similar at 24lbs.

Specialized is just parring down the models because the Camber didn't sell well. The Epic EVO is an easy mod to the standard Epic by adding a dropper and 120mm fork.
  • + 1
 yeah thats what i think as well. this xc evo is basically a trail bike from yesterday (ha), but with brain suspension.
id rather get a camber. or honestly, a stumpy.

27lbs is pretty heavy for xc, too.

imo, the bike you're trying to describe is a mtb alternative to the gravel bike. just like the gravel bike is also going in that direction: an very efficient bike with a bit of travel. i also dont think you can have it 67/76 though - but it'd be definitely more capable than a gravel bike, while it doesnt need to be as racy as a made-for-race xc bike.
  • + 1
 @jclnv: well you could also get a high tower and for spesh ;-) (or get a camber i guess)
  • + 2
 Right here is a market for a 21 lb S-Works Carbon Hardtail Evo with 140 fork and dropper. SRAM everything. With a Ox Blood to Maroon to Crimson metallic paint with matching fork with black stanchions. Glossy black components and decals please. Dark blue metallic would be fine too. Thank you Specialized! That video was hilarious.
  • - 1
 So you're paying $6G's here and only get mid-level spec and a single pivot? This is one of the reasons why I don't even consider Specialized.
  • + 2
 Agreed on Brain. I tested the standard Epic and was flummoxed by it. Totally inconsistent, I spent hours trying to find a combination of inputs and settings that would give a predictable response. The bike was considerably better with Brain turned off, but still not that fun, mostly because the stock tires were so anemic. I thought the Camber was a better trail bike, but the chassis was too heavy. It felt lethargic for a short-travel bike.

I'd add 'big tire clearance' to your list. I've nixed a couple of potential frames (e.g., Intense Sniper) because they can't fit a 2.6. Ideally, I'd even want room for a 2.8. Doesn't need super short chainstays; that's actually a downside with taller folks.
  • + 1
 @aliikane: they are no longer making the camber in 2019...
  • + 1
 @alexdi: Yeah, the brain is definitely not plush. It is suspension more for a good pedaling platform. My 2012 Camber was light and quick @24lbs. I actually miss that bike. It was a tweener bike between XC and Trail. It seems Specialized made the Camber heavier for strength in the later years.
  • + 1
 @gomoe24ridesaunicycle: Sad they got rid of the Camber, but I guess it didn't sell.
  • + 18
 not one.. but two water bottles. specialized got me f'd up
  • + 1
 Seems like they don’t fit properly though. Specialized bike, cages and bottles but the first picture shows that they’ll rub together.
  • + 1
 @bogey: The downtube waterbottle is mounted incorrectly in that pic. There are three screws on the DT and it should be moved up to the top two instead of the bottom two. Bottom one can incorporate the swat box.
  • - 2
 Remove that stupid useless suspension device and there is room for a third one, game changer !
  • + 3
 They fit fine for me. Sure, it's tight but I can run double full-size bottles no problem, no rub. You can move the downtube bottle up and run the SWAT box lower down if you so choose but, you don't have to mount the bottle forward unless you're using the box.
  • + 1
 @danielsapp: Yeah on a second look it is just the seattube bottle isn't fully settled into the cage which gave it the look of rubbing the other bottle.
  • + 18
 @mikelevy is responsible for the creation of this XC monster LOL
  • + 22
 #down-country
  • + 10
 @mikelevy: So, down-country then?
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: Genius! You must have proffits for each #down-country bike sold.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: Genius! You must have proffits for each #down-country bike sold.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: Genius! You must have proffits for each #down-country bike sold.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: Genius! You must have proffits for each #down-country bike sold.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: Genius! You must have proffits for each #down-country bike sold.
  • + 9
 Saw Epic Evo title. Brain read Stumpjumper Evo. Got a bit excited and sweaty. Clicked. Was disappointed.
  • + 1
 Join the club waiting for theirs to arrive Smile
  • + 2
 Tried ordering a 29 stumpy evo the other day and they said I could only order the 27.5 version?? whats up with that?
  • + 7
 Hang on ... that vid is cool ... but are the spesh boys and girls hinting at something by using the no. 26 with a smiley face as the race no. board on the Epic in the latter part of the vid Razz
  • + 10
 2 bottles in the main triangle. Winner winner...
  • + 4
 I guess my question would be, how close can you get a Stumpjumper ST to the Epic Evo's weight? The Stumpjumper ST 29er use a 190x42.5 shock, and a simple stroke spacer could reduce the travel down to 110mm if the extra 20mm really bothers you. Equipped with a Stepcast 34 and lighter tires it might be close, but my guess is that the Epic alloy's frame has 1-2lb edge over the Stumpy Alloy.
  • - 4
flag jclnv (Jul 9, 2018 at 23:10) (Below Threshold)
 The ST shares the same frame as the regular Stumpy so it's overbuilt. They need a dedicated, 29" only bike between the two with similar geo to the ST that isn't overbuilt. Let's get a rider weight limit on each size or no warranty if that's what it takes to keep the weight down.
  • + 1
 @jclnv: that is the interesting thing about the Epic Evo, it's alloy and utilizes a flex-stay design, yet Specialized will repair or replace for the original owner. I think the Epic Evo is craftly little bike, and would be really interested in one...if it fit 2.5 tires.
  • + 0
 @PHeller: The Epic Evo is carbon.
  • + 0
 Stumpy ST is not a good pedalling bike though, regardless of weight. The Camber 2016 Expert was much more efficient under power. This bike fills that void.
  • + 1
 ive got mine running at 27 lbs with enve xc wheels and no water bottle and nothing in the downtube, xc carbon bar and stem. conversely it neuters its trail capability because to be honest the xc stuff just isnt as solid. ill take 3 extra lbs for tubes, water and better impact resistance on the wheels
  • + 1
 @seraph: The Epic Evo Expert Carbon featured in this first look was carbon, but they make the Epic Evo Comp in alloy. I wonder what the weights are for each.
  • + 2
 @PHeller: The Expert EVO Carbon that I rode is a hair over 27 lbs, with pedals. We'll see if we can get a claimed weight for the alloy.
  • + 1
 @danielsapp: your good sir are the most valuable person. 27lbs for a Medium likely means 28lbs for the Large and before long your in Stumpy ST territory. That 27lbs was also a CARBON medium.
  • + 1
 What is the 42.5mm stroke length?! I thought the standard stroke length for 190mm metric shocks is either 40mm or 45mm. Is there any aftermarket shocks with 42.5mm?
  • + 1
 @okavango: I think a lot of companies are using spacers to cut down the stroke. My Transition Sentinel has a similar setup (205 x 57.5 mm)
  • + 1
 @briceps: Right. There is a 5mm stroke spacer and 2.5mm stroke spacer. I think they are either combined or stacked on many shocks. 230x57.5 is commonly used. You can check out my blog post on the subject: www.pinkbike.com/u/PHeller/blog/air-shock-stroke-adjustments-via-bumpers-what-changes.html
  • + 1
 I've got an Epic Comp Carbon non-Evo but with dropper post, wider Carbon wheels, tires and bar and it's still under 25lbs. I picked up a friends S-Works STJ ST and it seemed a wee bit heavier. I would guess a couple of pounds difference between the frame and fork. Weight is not the most important factor, however. I've ridden many times a 28 mile XC course with Enduro race diversions on both my Enduro 29 and Epic non-Evo and boys does that 100mm fork beat you up, but saves almost 30 minutes of an othwise 2:45 ride.

...but, on the Epic I can carrier a lot of water and forego the backpack which is really, really appreciated in Texas heat.

The new Brain is way better than the old one and stays pretty open in the lightest setting on rough trails. I only notice the opening and closing of the shock when It is the firmest 2 or 3'settings.
  • + 1
 @GlazedHam: What then would you say is the nearly 2lbs weight difference between your Epic and the Epic Evo as @danielsapp weighed it? Surely GRID tires, a Fox 34 SC, Manic Dropper, and a few others differences can't make up that 2lbs. Did you weigh yours with pedals?
  • + 1
 @PHeller: I did have bottle cages on mine as well...not a ton of weight but throw in the bars, stem, etc. and things add up.
  • + 2
 Meh, they threw a longer fork on it, wider bars and a dropper. Anyone could have done that so it's not that there's anything wrong with this, it's just not that exciting. More exciting would have been a slightly different frame setup with 110mm and then a 120mm fork so the front end would be slackened but the STA would stay the same.
  • + 1
 This seems like a lazy attempt to hop in board the down-country bandwagon. They need a new frame if they actually want to make something worth buying. Slapping an extra 20mm onto a conservative World Cup racing machine isnt going to cut it.
  • + 1
 thats what the stumpjumper st is for tbh
  • + 1
 @js11: i mean the st is a trailbike
  • + 1
 @danielsapp: The review says, "I ran the Brain both fully engaged and wide open." Then says "The shock works well so I ran it in the firm position almost all of the time." Is this contradicting each other, or am I not understanding something about the shock?
  • + 2
 A lot of people like to hate on the way the Brain works and how it feels when its engaged. You can choose to run the platform either wide open, where the Brain doesn't impact the pedaling, with oil freely moving at all times or engaged, where trail inputs activate the brain and the shock is otherwise "locked out". There are four settings in-between and I ran it fully engaged most of the time. - Hopefully that clarifies?
  • + 0
 While not exactly the same, why not just buy the Stumpy ST? In reality, you can race anything and I'd rather have an over built bike and lighten/steepen it up (the Stumpy ST), than a XC race bike which may just snap in the rough.

#cheaperthankeepingthecamber #iguess
  • + 2
 Clicked on this story thinking it was the stumpy evo 29.
Guess I’ll have to keep on waiting for a review of that slacked out beast!
  • + 2
 I sure do hate when I encounter that inevitable "unexpected technical terrain" and don't have that extra 20mm, no matter what bike I'm riding.
  • + 3
 So basically its the same as the epic just with bigger fork travel and longer bars?
is the seat tube diameter still 27.2?
  • + 4
 Dropper and seatpost is 30.9 as it is has been.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy can we get the actual weight in that text box thingy withnthe specs for all the stuff yall review. Helps sort viability vs a DIY solution or whatever us consumers have to compare it to.
  • + 0
 $6,000 for a bike? Is everyone on here rich? 8 years ago you'd pay that much for top of the line titanium bike, made in the US by seven or someone like that, and here is a carbon bike made in China costing 6K. I'm amazed no one even reacts to this pricing. Not to mention the weight of 27lbs.
  • + 3
 What are those two large grey things mounted to the frame, above the crankset???
  • + 2
 @mikelevy: Genius! You must have proffits for each #down-country bike sold.
  • + 3
 awesome as always Daniel!
  • - 1
 No more brain shocks. It's funny because just about every other "flex seat stay" full suspension bike uses a simple shock with possibly better valving or linkages but somehow this is so much better. I do like their components but as a former employee of a dealer for that brand I will say that their bikes have a ton of problems and I would never buy one. There are lots of other bike brands with a far better reputation when it comes to geometry and durability. Hard pass.
  • + 2
 A rather big media fuss over a bike with just a longer fork and some basic spec changes.
  • + 1
 You do know that a former pinkbike employee is now doing media for Specialized, right? 1+1=2 LOL
  • + 1
 @yzedf: sounds like they are quoting from the “bible” designed for bike testing or something :
P 1+1-1=1
  • + 1
 Am I seeing this correctly that it's the same frame as the regular Epic, just with a different fork/build spec?
  • + 2
 Answering my own question now that Spec has updated their own pages, looks like a 'yes':

"""
The Epic EVO, however, features the same efficient and lightweight chassis, ...
"""

So, if/when a 29" Fox SC 34 is available in the 44 offset (they currently only show 51 for the 29...), you could replicate this pretty easily, especially since they now offer the "ultralight" Epic frameset without a fork.
  • + 1
 @danielsapp Were you able to get an actual (vs claimed) bike weight incl pedals?
  • + 3
 27.05 lbs / 12.27 kg with XTR pedals and some dirt.
  • + 2
 THAT is whats called a "soft tail"
  • + 3
 Down-faquing-country!!!!
  • + 3
 Sram level tl=junk!
  • + 1
 Basically, Specialized just put a 120mm fork and a dropper on the standard Epic and called it an EVO model.
  • + 1
 Risse Racing in Oregon can rebuild all Brain shocks. They may suck but they are repairable!
  • + 1
 Daniel Sapp, anyone told you that you look like Dax Shepard?
  • + 1
 why would anyone buy this over an Intense Sniper Trail? Honestly.
  • + 1
 In 2018, people still buy ovrpriced specialized?
  • + 1
 It looks like you scratched your brain.
  • + 1
 It’s illegal to wear a full face with an XC bike. Are you crazy?
  • + 1
 Epic and Stumpy ST marry, and this will be their kid.
  • + 2
 Can we made 4 bottle?
  • + 3
 Wolftooth is your friend.
  • + 1
 Love that north cakalack scenery
  • + 1
 Sorta like my bike!
  • + 0
 Why no full face?
  • + 2
 85 degrees with 100% humidity. Same reason for no pads.
  • + 1
 @BigballmcCall: 85? That's the AM temp here in TX! Smile
  • + 1
 @huntstyle: Asheville is a little cooler. Hear ya though. High/mid 90’s in Chattanooga.
  • + 0
 looks like scalpel
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