First Ride: 2021 Devinci Marshall - Aluminum, Affordable, & Made in Canada

Jan 20, 2021
by Daniel Sapp  


The last couple of years have shown us that an exorbitant price tag isn't a requirement to get a functional and capable machine, as more and more well spec'd aluminum bikes hit the market. Devinci's new 130mm travel Marshall trail bike and their Kobain hardtail both bring a good deal of performance to the table, selling for $2,099 and $1,699 USD, respectively.

We've had the Marshall on hand for a few weeks now and even amidst winter weather have managed to log some miles on it so we'll go into detail on that bike. We'll also touch on the Kobain, further down, as well.

Marshall Details

• Wheel Size: 29" (M-XL) 27.5" (XS-S)
• Aluminum frame
• 130mm rear travel, 140mm front
• SRAM and Shimano 12s build options
• Sizes XS to XL
• 460mm reach (medium)
• Lifetime frame warranty
• Price $2,099 USD
devinci.com

Both the Marshall and Kobain frames are 100% made in Devinci's Quebec facility, with everything from the welding and heat treating to the painting and finishing happening there. Devinci are able to control their output and production schedules more precisely this way, it enables them to more accurately forecast deliverables.


Frame Details

The made-in-Canada Marshall has 130mm of travel on a 6061-T6 aluminum frame. The bike uses 12 x 148mm Boost spacing for the rear axle, a departure from some of Devinci's other bikes that use Superboost. There is a threaded BB and Enduro bearings on all pivots. Tire clearance for all frames is 2.4". The XS and S frames have 27.5" wheels and the Medium - XL sizes are 29".

There's room for a water bottle on all sizes. Dropper posts are of course standard, with the XS having room for 100mm of drop and the XL doubling that at 200mm. There's compatibility for chainrings as small as a 28t up to 32t and the frame has a lifetime warranty.

The XS size is made with the intent to get riders as small as 4' 11" on the bike, pushing the envelope towards younger riders as well. The smaller wheel size helps riders more easily maneuver the bike and it aids in tire clearance when riders are getting low over the back end.




The 130mm of travel is delivered via Devinci's Split Pivot suspension design. Devinci settled on 130mm as ideal for a trail bike. The Troy has a little more and the Django has a touch less, and 130mm was ideal for people getting into the sport. It's not limiting for riders looking to push themselves and progress, according to Devinci, and it's also not so much travel that the bike would feel awkward and unwieldy on mellower terrain.






Geometry & Sizing


The Marshall is available in sizes XS to XL. The XS and S sizes are built with 27.5" wheels and the larger frame sizes are 29" wheels - there's no option to interchange wheel sizes. Chainstay lengths vary depending on bike size. Devinci believes this offers riders the best feel per size. XS and S frames are 430mm long while M-XL are 435mm.

XS size frames have a standover of 717mm and a reach of 420mm. A medium has a reach of 460mm and the XL stretches out to 500mm. Seat tube angles vary a very slight bit between sizes with a medium sitting at 77-degrees. Head tube angles on all size frames are 66.5-degrees.





Options & Price

There are two different spec options for the Marshall, Shimano, and SRAM. Both bikes are priced at $2,099 USD. Both builds come out to a touch below 35 lbs complete.

The Deore 12s build uses a 12-speed Shimano Deore drivetrain, Deore brakes, a RockShox 35 Silver 140mm travel fork, RockShox Deluxe DebonAir shock, a TranzX dropper post, and Maxxis Minion DHF/DHR tires. (One note here - due to supply constraints when the test bike was sent to me, my ride had SLX brakes, as pictured. Production bikes will be Deore.)


The SRAM SX 12-speed build carries over the RockShox suspension and pairs it with a full SX drivetrain and SRAM Guide T brakes.


Devinci Kobain

Kobain SLX build

Devinci have also released a new hardtail, the Kobain that starts from $1,299. The bike is built in the same factory and, like the Marshall, it's geared towards more entry-level riders looking for a bike they can trust to get them into riding more aggressive trails without limiting them or causing too big of a hit to their finances.

With a 75-degree seat tube angle, 65.5-degree seat tube angle, and 445mm of reach on a size medium, the bike is made to be versatile and capable. The bike is available in sizes S-XL and all models use 29" tires.

The Kobain is available in two configurations, with Shimano SLX ($1,699) or Deore ($1,299) parts. The SLX build has a Marzocchi Z2 Rail 130mm fork and 2.6" Kenda Regolith tires while the Deore fork has a Rockshox 35 Silver and 2.6" Minions.

Kobain Geometry

Kobain Deore build






Ride Impressions

I've had the Marshall with a Shimano Deore build out on the trails for a few rides at this point. Not long enough to do a full review (stay tuned, this bike will be in our upcoming affordable bikes Field Test), but long enough to develop some initial ride impressions.

The bike is simple to get dialed in and feeling good with minimal effort. The bike's angles aren't too extreme in one direction or the other and it is comfortable climbing everything from long gravel roads to technical singletrack. There's not a ton of control or fine-tuning of the suspension to be done, as it is the base level, but the tune that comes on the shock and fork hasn't left me wanting any massive changes on my first few rides. Some riders may feel the need to add a volume spacer in to change the ramp up a touch, but that's a simple task that can be done at home, or at any bike shop.

The bike feels solid and planted on the descents, with a good amount of traction and control, something riders of all abilities will be able to appreciate.

The spec of the Marshall is quite ideal right out of the box. The Deore drivetrain continues to impress, and the Maxxis Minion DHF / DHR II time combo works well on a wide variety of trail types. The TranzX dropper post is smooth and consistent, and although some riders may be looking for a post with more drop it will fit the majority of riders and the frame can accept a longer post.

As I mentioned above, we'll have a full Field Test review featuring the Marshall along with a number of other bikes coming up in the future.







294 Comments

  • 261 11
 This bike and yesterday's Ripley AF should shut up everyone complaining about bikes costing too much. These bikes are 95% of what the average mountain biker needs. Get dorky and throw on light wheels and better suspension if you are pushing the limits.

Great time to be a mountain biker.
  • 177 1
 Maybe it was because of such complaints that the industry is moving towards offering cheaper options.
  • 29 185
flag FMHUM (Jan 20, 2021 at 6:51) (Below Threshold)
 I mean, 2-3K USD is still a lot of money and still worthy of complaining about. It's much much better than 5k for a decent bike, but that's still like half a month's pay after taxes if we're talking median income in the US. Good full suspension mountain bikes are still priced out for many people and take a good amount of saving for many others. When this bike is available at Wal-mart for $150, it's worthy about shutting up about prices.
  • 41 89
flag PhatBrett (Jan 20, 2021 at 7:02) (Below Threshold)
 Wow 2 semi affordable bikes from a total of 20 bike manufacturers. What selection!
  • 52 0
 @PhatBrett:
There are plenty of other brands that offer decent bikes at this price level (Canyon, Cube, Giant, Vitus, etc).
  • 30 1
 @PhatBrett: Just pointing out- that isn't accurate at all. Its just that most companies don't have a special 'budget' model. Of course, they also usually send something pretty highly optioned for testing. Fuel ex 5 2099, stumpjumper alloy 2200, scott spark rc 900 comp 2999, giant anthem 29 2 2300. I don't know how they all stack up, but there are deals to be had and it will be interesting to see the budget test. It's easy to forget these are out there though when the stumpjumper you see tested is 12k.

IMHO, a 2000 bike now is a LOT better than a 2000 bike of a few years ago, so take inflation completely out of it and you've got it good. Even when you look at how weak the brakes are on a 2k ride vs a 7k ride, they are still stronger than a few years ago. They only feel weak because it's so much easier to go faster.
  • 23 0
 @PhatBrett: The new Nocro Fluid 2 has almost the same spec and is at about the same price. Same for the new Stumpy Alloy, Marin Rift Zone, Giant Trance 3, Giant Anthem 2, Trek Fuel EX 5, Vitus Mythique, Cube Stereo 120... etc.
  • 13 0
 @PhatBrett: jeffsy,habit, stance
  • 10 31
flag makripper (Jan 20, 2021 at 8:42) (Below Threshold)
 @ICKYBOD: a couple years ago this would be 1500 with the se build.

Price is going up and value is going down.

Companies have been open about price increase recently.

A good comparison is a giant stance from 2017 vs one from this year.
  • 2 10
flag makripper (Jan 20, 2021 at 8:43) (Below Threshold)
 Meant to delete se build.
  • 17 1
 @Rafe1234: Agree with you on the fact that it looks crude and tbf cheap but hey it is what it was designed to be. Now I don't agree with performance. Deore is way enough, fork can be upgraded to premium specs with a Novypart S-plug for less than 200€, if the bike doesn't pedal well you may need to replace the shock to gain there. Ride the wheels until they are trash and upgrade. But even in stock form I have no doubt this would preform within 5% of a bike 3 times the price. Expensive bikes don't make you fast, they just make you poor. Skills and time on the saddle make you fast.
  • 12 9
 @ICKYBOD: Shit brakes at lower price point is only true for Sram and maybe other brand but take any shimano brakes from Deore to Saint and as long as you have the same number of piston you get the same performance.
  • 18 1
 Compared to the other models listed by commenters here, that Ripley AF is not a good deal at 3k. Not with bikes like the Marshall costing 2k AND being made in Canada. A good chunk of the price of that Ripley must be the Ibis brand name. The price difference certainly can't just be license fees for the DW Link, because the Marshall has a split pivot system, which is also DW tech.
  • 43 1
 they just bitch about the bike being too heavy. people love to bitch on here. i guess i'm bitching right now about people bitching.
  • 4 2
 @Balgaroth: I have a question because i'm in the demo that this bike is aimed for - would you (if you were me) buy this model (Deore) or a used ride that has been upgraded with better specs.
IMO some of these manufactures are reacting to just that - a lot of decent used bikes on this site are gone so so fast because it offers exactly what this manufacture has identified.
I refuse to b some Dbag riding around on a $6k rig while having 5 cent skills - i was on a dam shopping cart combo sewing machine last year and need better.
Ultimately if this new DeVinci model sells then it's worth it, but in your opinion is it resonable
  • 11 0
 @orphan: Buy this. You need to be very savvy to get a good deal on a used bikes. There are lots of used bikes that you will need to put money into afterwards and negate a lot of the savings.
  • 7 0
 @BenTheSwabian: @BenTheSwabian: I'd guess the suspension probably cost a few hundred more on the ripley. also the wheels on the ripley are nice at that price. This bike appears to be a good value, but I can see where the money went on the Ibis.
  • 7 0
 Heavy components might be contributing to the price being so low (bikes are around 35lbs). Not complaining, just adding color commentary since thats why we do in the comments section. You generally get what you pay for and here you get a great, entry-level (but proper) mountain bike for a great price. It comes at the cost of bling and weight, but the person buying this shouldn't care about that.
  • 8 0
 @orphan: Normally I'd say a used bike is the way to go. But right now, used prices are absurdly high.
  • 7 1
 @makripper: Not really, if you want to look at a 2017, the equivalent is the stance 1.

Stance 1: $2100, NX 1x11, fox rhythm fork and float performance shock. This bike: $2100: 1x12 deore, RS 35 fork and deluxe debonair shock. The 35 sectors are a huge improvement over the old 30s and I'd say pretty on par with rhythms. The drivetrain is better. Better geo. 4 pot deores it looks like from the pictures. So what am I missing? This seems equal or better in every single way for the same price?
  • 2 10
flag makripper (Jan 20, 2021 at 10:19) (Below Threshold)
 @ICKYBOD: the stance 1 vs stance 1 is night and day. The one from 2017 is better in every way.
  • 1 9
flag makripper (Jan 20, 2021 at 10:24) (Below Threshold)
 @ICKYBOD: you are comparing 2 bikes from 2 different companies. I was comparing same bike from same company. Thats what you are missing.
  • 9 0
 @makripper: ok, so Giant isn't as good a deal now as then. What I'm saying is that in general- a $2100 bike now is a better value than a $2100 bike from 5 years ago. You said price is going up and value is going down. I disagree and can show you several examples of bikes that were 2100ish in 2016-2017 with a similar model now in the same price range within $100 that are better bikes now.

So for the same price you are getting a more capable bike (better value).
  • 9 15
flag mhoshal (Jan 20, 2021 at 11:27) (Below Threshold)
 @FMHUM: lmao if you can't save for a 2g bike you should learn how to manage your money better but don't make some copout excuse that these bikes need to be 150 bucks at Walmart just because you're piss poor with your spending habits.
  • 7 0
 @orphan: You can definitely buy a used bike with nicer parts, but remember when the time comes you're still going to pay "nicer parts money" to fix them. People buy used German luxury cars for pennies on the dollar, but balk when it comes to replacing the luxury car parts. Don't be that person.
  • 1 1
 @carletonman: - thanks there is that aspect, although you're going to have to replace/fix or upgrade at some point no matter what right ??? and there's also the issue of them saying they are for sale and actually getting your hands on one
I'm lucky that i have some friends/family in the MTB community for advice on what's a good deal or crap -even though they nearly killed me on Fromme or in Squamish last year
I guess the better/skilled you get performance becomes more important then value - this bike and the used route interest me because i'm focused on the value aspect.
  • 3 3
 Apparently there are at least 4 morons who don't know how to manage their money, anymore?
  • 4 0
 @orphan: IMO second hand bike needs to really be a good price or have some recent invoices for suspension service. Otherwise this needs to be taken in account in the price you will pay. I change bikes rather frequently because I have good connections but still go for entry level or whatever has a lockout shock, the rest is upgradable at reasonable cost when the time comes. Up until this year it was difficult to find bikes speced with anything else than garbage, sorry, SRAM stuff. But now with Deore this is no brainer. Last stuff to consider would be Geo but if you are looking at this particular DeVinci I don't feel like finding similar geo on older bikes would prove difficult. Enduro or Downcountry bikes have evolved quite a bit and for that reason I wouldn't go second hand on these bike segments but this DeVinci has a very standard geo so it is not a valid argument against second hand for me. Good luck in your search man.
  • 4 1
 @deiru: all of which I assume are made in Asia. its nice to see NA manufacturing... not that i expect the quality to be better, I don't, but because its good for us here in NA
  • 2 0
 @orphan: I would echo some of the others: buy new. You will get a brand new bike, it has a warranty and you will have a great platform to upgrade parts on when they eventually wear out. If you have the money, treat yourself to a new, very good bike!
  • 2 0
 “With a 75-degree seat tube angle, 65.5-degree seat tube angle“ wow that’s crazy
  • 3 0
 @FMHUM: 2-3K USD is almost twice the month's pay after taxes of many Europeans... There should be riots about bike prices in Europe!
  • 3 3
 @Balgaroth: lol the sram brakes are bad at all price points
  • 1 0
 @englertracing: codes are excellent, g2 rs and rsc are good.
  • 1 0
 @ICKYBOD: compared to what a wet rim brake?
  • 3 0
 Marin,s are killer specked and priced as well IMO . I just picked up a Alpine Trail XR, and up graded the brakes for Codes. Out of the bikes I considered this required the least amount of changes.
  • 90 1
 That Marshal is a freakishly good deal; I am somewhat wondering how they are able to pull that off when most new "affordable alloy" frames are $2,000 alone. Good for them, though. At that price I feel liking buying one as a spare / loaner.
  • 103 13
 This shines a light on the massive profit margin of the bike industry. Devinci gets it - mountain biking is getting too expensive for young people to get involved. It's becoming an 'old person' sport.
  • 22 61
flag Rafe1234 (Jan 20, 2021 at 6:38) (Below Threshold)
 Frame looks a little bit crude and it's probably heavy. Components are pretty much all bargain basement status, which is how it's $2k. That's alright though, gotta learn to walk before you can run and you don't need a $4.5k bike to learn on. I'd say this isn't worth upgrading anything though, just selling to another beginner. Be freakishly expensive to turn into a good bike, better off just buying a higher end new build once someone gets there.
  • 16 4
 Trek fuel ex 5 has the same price and similar components, specialised stumpy alloy costs only $100 more and similar to sx build.
  • 21 2
 @azawad: Is that why I am 20 and broke? Beer

So far it's been worth it...
  • 16 7
 @azawad: Them ditching Super Boost on this budget model helps confirm mine, and others here's, thoughts that Super Boost is just blatantly anti-consumer. There is no reason for it on mid travel trail and all mountain bikes, barely a reason on enduro bikes since most chainstays are 435mm+
  • 8 75
flag Dethphist (Jan 20, 2021 at 7:29) (Below Threshold)
 @azawad: Mountain bikes are a mid life crisis vehicle for people who can't afford or don't know how or to work on cars.
  • 44 1
 This frame is made in Canada too. That's impressive at this price point.
  • 5 2
 @el-brendo: sorry, meant to upvote but fat fingered a downvote instead. I agree with you!
  • 9 1
 I'm wondering how they can pull this off, using a frame that's made in Canada.
  • 7 0
 @azawad: @azawad: Wait until you see the profit margins in the Automotive industry. If you think everyone is getting rich in the bike industry, you'd be wrong. Also on the flip side of the coin... if it didn't make a little money, no one would do it. The bike industtry surely would not have come this far without some profit, I can guarantee that.
  • 3 0
 @BenTheSwabian: back end costs of production delays and quality issues add up. Logistics, etc.
  • 9 2
 @azawad Like @bicyclelifestyle said I don't think the profit margins are as big as you think in cycling and as far as becoming an old person sport, when I was in my 20's (before owning a house) I had a nice car, a pickup truck, motorcycle, a couple nice bikes and money in the bank. Now with mortgage, property taxes, multiple ins. policies and bills to pay I have one vehicle and a couple nice bikes and that's with no kids. I had more disposable income when I was younger. I was also working hard for the things I wanted then which I seem to see a lack of these days. Also I'll add that the '97 XT equipped Canadian-made hardtail with a crap (by todays standard) suspension fork was $2k CAD in '97.
  • 5 1
 @azawad: Care to define this massive profit margin? my understanding is that margins on bikes and frames is pretty low compared to, say, clothing and shop labor
  • 4 0
 @wyric: Stumpy Alloy $3,179 CAD. Marshall $2,599 CAD. $580 CAD difference is significant.
  • 2 0
 @dvp8: it's $100 in US, and probably there will be no price difference in Europe (as no european price yet).
however, it's great that there are plenty of good options in that price category (Vitus, Marin...)
  • 1 0
 @Rafe1234: you haven't even tried the bike... It looks great!
  • 16 0
 @el-brendo: With aluminum sourced right there in the Quebec heartland - a totally grassroots company, for all intents and as much as that's possible in the modern economics of the bike industry! Canada's bike brand of record now, in my opinion (and some may disagree), especially when you factor in that only Quebec can claim a regular historical Canadian place on the World Cup circuit. In other words, this is a serious racing brand making ground-up bikes from Canada's stop on MTB Formula One. Additionally, some of the best engineering talent in the world is in Quebec now (University of Sherbrooke, University of Montreal, McGill, Concordia). Just a great synergy of elements with Devinci. As with Orbea in Spain and Portugal, these are highly skilled, hardy folks driving a brand that's a major source of pride for the local community. As a proud Canadian, it's not hard to get behind Devinci. "Je me souviens," as they say in the province next door.
  • 4 1
 @BenTheSwabian: They pull it off by building it and selling it.
  • 3 0
 @rosemarywheel: cheers on that. I'm double that and double as broke!!
  • 3 1
 Frame only prices are often ridiculously high and in no way reflect cost. Look around and you will see that often the frame only is only marginally more expensive than the cheapest complete bike. Sometimes its cheaper to buy the complete and sell the components than buying frame only.
  • 2 0
 @coletrane-mtb:

Can you please elaborate on why SB+ is anti-consumer ? What do you exqctly mean ?
Like most of 29 trailbikes (SC Hightower for instance and others), this bike is limited to 2.4in max tire width.
SB+ allow less frame design compromises around critical bb/suspension pivot/CS yoke area and to use wider tires, which is a good thing unless you haven't tried yet.
And Devinci states below : " Troy and Django using SB+ spacing have ample clearance for tires 29 x 2.6 and our entry level builds are not super far from the Marshall in terms of pricing."
So you can have your cake and eat it.
  • 3 0
 @azawad: for the record bike shops in particular make quite a little amount of profit selling bikes, they make most of it by selling service
  • 2 0
 @Dethphist:
You are not a smart person and it’s showing.
  • 2 0
 @Dethphist:
You are not a smart man and it’s showing.
  • 2 1
 @blakplastic: Says the guy bothering to respond to a sarcastic comment on a thread about bike prices...
  • 2 0
 @gnaralized: SB+ isn't anti-consumer per se, but it's change for changes sake, which makes the way the industry handles it anti-consumer.

I wouldn't be mad about a change of a de-facto standard, if the succesor is innovatice and offers discernable benefits. But since that's not the case with SuperBoost Plus, I dislike it. DT Swiss said in an interview with Enduro Magazin a while back that they basically think that it is just a design fad, with benefits so miniscule that they are hard to even accurately reproduce.
  • 1 0
 @BenTheSwabian: When the timeline resets and we get our do over, I hope we can skip Boost and go straight to SB+ (but just call it "boost").

For me, it's the coexistence of Boost and SB+ that grinds my gears, not one or the other.
  • 7 0
 @pmhobson: Hi guys. I think that the last couple of comments (such as that by @pmhobson) in the SuperBoost category reflect a moderate and reasonable perspective when it comes to criticizing SB. As a wheelbuilder, I personally try to take an impartial, impassionate stance myself: My view is that yes, as you guys have fairly pointed out, SB157 came seemingly out of the blue after a period of already rapid standards change, and for that reason I can certainly sympathize with those who wanted either Boost *OR* SB - but not both. At the same time, though, we are where we are, and so as a custom builder I have no choice but to work the problem for the customer in front of me. I completely get the desire from Devinci and Knolly and Pivot and others to go wider, too; to their credit, at least they're trying to offer the possibility of wider tires - a consumer-responsive solution to an engineering dilemma in modern MTB - rather than trying to market us into thinking that we were all merely mistaken in wanting 2.5 or 2.6" rear tires and should just take our medicine and accept 2.3 as the new 2.6. LOL. What I will add as a builder, even as one patiently trying to work the problem as handed to me, is that the hub manufacturers need to catch up. You might be surprised at the number of at least remotely affordable hubs that don't come SuperBoost 157 w SRAM XD driver, for example. There's only a handful, for example the new DT 240 EXP, Spank Hex, Tairin, etc. (There are also some super-premium hub models, too, but those likely don't accommodate the buyer of an affordable built bike with SB or someone on a budget looking to get an SB frame and/or new SB rear wheel.) I need more selection to work with to present to my clientele - to the ripper, for instance, who rightfully loves his or her Devinci and wants a new rear stallion to go with.

I will also add from a technical perspective that I have concerns on certain hubs about the effect that the wider bracing angles can have on both the J-bend head of traditional spokes and on the thread-nipple junction in the rim. And this is despite any SB marketing claims offered otherwise at the wheel-company level. Some hubs and rims in SB combos will play nicer than others. I have seen at least one situation so far where the stresses at those areas seems to subtly increase. What is needed is a greater focus on making rims strategically drilled and wider enough to accommodate 157 mm soundly and safely (as well as all wheelbuilders being alert to the need to spec appropriate rims for SB builds). Furthermore, many riders probably need a wholesale recommendation in many cases to go straight-pull over J-bend in SB. As a professional builder, J-bend spokes make the most sense to me and for 90% of my everyday riding clients. I prefer J-bend generally, for various reasons. But if given the license to do a top-down custom wheelset spec based around SB hubs, my first preference would be for a straight-pull design, which would seem to address the arguments on wear physics that I have mentioned. With straight-pull, angles are more direct and nothing crosses and touches in the spokes. But, from here, my logic becomes admittedly circular: I still need more quality and affordable straight-pull SB hub products to work with!

Anyway, just an honest perspective from a guy on the frontlines. This is a useful thread and the above comments certainly have some merit to them. Cheers.
  • 4 0
 @HogtownWheelsmith: This is great insight! Do you think angled flanges as opposed to straight flanges, more biased rim drilling - ESPECIALLY on thick carbon nipple beds that wont allow the nipple to articulate, and better nipple design a la SAPIM PolyAx would greatly increase durability of a SB wheelset?
  • 3 0
 @bicyclelifestyle: Hi, and thanks for the kind words. I can't say it would greatly increase those things - but no doubt it would be of very definite help! You offer an excellent set of suggestions, as good as any I could come up with. What you could potentially add further is just to avoid alloy nipples if possible (alloy is great, until an especially hard rider has at them in conditions of salt and sand and general regular muckiness) and also to avoid straight-gauge spokes. In general on custom builds, I have a no straight-gauge policy. With companies such as Spank (Vibrocore) and NOBL (all of their carbon stuff), they will tell you straight-up: only butted. Butted spokes obviously flex more, as you know, which is why they last a lot longer as an empirical engineering fact, and I suspect that this inbuilt compliance could also assist in keeping SB builds a touch more durable. If you want a specific spoke suggestion, many of the really great wheel companies with outstanding build information available online - ie, Spank and NOBL - will often suggest something like the Sapim Force (or DT equivalent) as the best butted spoke for hardcore MTB applications. It uses a sturdy, triple-taper design that tends to lock and stay locked. It can also accommodate really large riders (it's close to an e-bike or tandem-spec gauge). Finally, rim washers are always recommended generally and for the specific SB issues that we're discussing here.
  • 3 0
 @HogtownWheelsmith:
Many thanks for your insights. What you said about flanges vs straight pull made a lot of sense, especially for 27.5 wheels and hubs with high flanges.
I had a couple of SB+ wheels hand builts for customers, and I can add to your hub list the new hope SB+ pro4 hubs, with SB flange spacing (wider than 150 DH mm), in both straight pull and flanged shapes.
DT produce a true 350 SB+ too, in both straight pull and flanged shapes.
To this point, wheels were built with hubs cited above laced to 27.5/29" DT XM480 with sapim CX rays and DT SWISS SQUORX Pro Head brass nipples, with a wide, spherical contact area. To this point, except a retruing, wheels were faultless, but I will keep an eye on the nipple heads and flange area.
  • 3 0
 @gnaralized: My pleasure, and thanks for what you added - excellent point about the new Hopes (always a great hub option for the money). I should clarify that, at least with my regular supply channels, I can get the 350 SB, as you noted (another great hub), but only in HG. I haven't been able to get it yet in the XD driver. That being said, I would have to think - and certainly hope - that if DT brings the 350s into a new EXP version in 2021, that they won't overlook SB in all the major drivers. Sounds like you used excellent parts for those builds (CX-Ray is the best spoke in cycling, in my opinion), and obviously the proof is on the trails. If they've been faultless so far, then that's as good as it gets. Odds are they will stay that way. Stay safe and keep building!
  • 2 0
 @HogtownWheelsmith: Just chiming in to say that I appreciated the discussion here. Good info.
  • 1 0
 @pmhobson: Cheers, and likewise.
  • 2 0
 @HogtownWheelsmith: I do live next door to the Devinci factory and Rio Tinto (aluminium) also has quite a significant presence here, so I've always first looked at Devinci bikes. The only problem is that the previous generation of the Kobain was their only affordable serious hardtail, yet was outspecced by quite a few other offerings from other foreign manufacturers (such as Trek, Specialized, Marin, etc). If you wanted something else in their range, you either had to go full-sus and spend at least twice as much, or you had their "casual" made-in-China models, the kind of mountain bike under $1k CAD equipped with Tourney/Altus groupsets and specced with Suntour coil forks. I nearly pulled the trigger twice on a Roscoe 7 (once just before the pandemic, and at the end of last summer when the 2021 models came in) and to settle with something from a foreign manufacturer, but I'm really glad I pushed it to later, or else I would have missed the new Kobain.

That said, despite all of that, I've paid a visit to most MBS that were local to the factory and almost none were selling Devinci mountain bikes from the below $2,5k CAD range, so that's something I'm quite disappointed in. They mostly seem to offer bikes from foreign manufacturers instead.
  • 72 2
 These guys are the last big (ish) frame manufacturer that still operate in North America. Really, who else is there?
Guerilla Gravity? Turner? its soooo important to keep manufacturing know-how on the continent.
I would love to see a North American Bike challenge, similar to the euro builds you show cased recently.

Good work Devinci!
  • 13 0
 I believe they also produce ride share bikes as well. They won a design contest years ago to produce a ride share frame, I think the design is licensed to be produced by a number of manufactures, but Divinci still was producing a large number in NA. They are likely the largest bike manufacturer in NA, as far as domestic production is concerned.
  • 8 0
 Don't think Turners are made in USA anymore.

GG and Devinci are the bigger ones still in NA; Lenz, REEB, and Foes are the smaller ones.
  • 110 5
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: Indeed, we do still produce the bike share bikes in-house for many cities around the globe which clearly helps scaling up our NA operation. It just so happens that we just did an article about it on our website this week: www.devinci.com/en/pbsc_urban_solution

And also, not wanting to be rude, but simply to clarify: The name of the company is Devinci. We certainly see it written in a ton of different ways, Divinci, DeVinci, De Vinci, Davinci, Da Vinci, etc... but let's get this straight once and for all : Devinci, simple as that.
  • 6 0
 @pierre22 Keep an eye on the North American Bike Project on Instagram (www.instagram.com/north.american.bike.project) for a possible North American Bike Challenge in the future.
  • 61 0
 Thanks for sharing Da'Winkee
  • 28 0
 @cyclesdevinci: da VINKI?????
  • 5 0
 @cedrico: Sweet! super interested in seeing this challenge come to life...
  • 5 13
flag Dropthedebt (Jan 20, 2021 at 9:55) (Below Threshold)
 @cyclesdevinci:
With a 75-degree seat tube angle, 65.5-degree seat tube angle, and 445mm of reach on a size medium, the bike is made to be versatile and capable.

Is it a tandem? Eek
  • 6 0
 Turner doesn’t make any frames anymore, it seems, and their carbon models were offshored. The aluminum ones were made by a contract factory in Portland, OR which tried mightily to stay in business after the Turner orders stopped coming in (because of the move to carbon) but folded. The factory was called Zen Bike Fabrication in its final incarnation and if you want to own a slice of history some of their last road frames are still available at Cycle Path: shop.cyclepathpdx.com/bikes/zen
  • 2 0
 @melanthius: Thanks for the history lesson! I always wanted to know more about those Zen frames in the shop and never new the alloy Turners were produced in town.
  • 3 1
 @cyclesdevinci: I apologize for the name error. Autocorrect, and this LG phone are my enemy. Everytime it type Devinci it changes it to either "Divinci" or "Should I" neither of which makes any sense.
  • 9 3
 @cyclesdevinci: also, you're probably a lot of fun at parties.
  • 16 1
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: hahaha love it! It was simply a good opportunity to explain it that's all.
  • 1 0
 Yeah I'd love to see this! There are a lot of smart and talented operations still making stuff in NA and it'd be cool to put a bigger spot light on them. Same goes for European. I think it's the time. Most are curious and want to make more informed choices on where our money is going so let's see it Pinkbike!
  • 2 0
 @cyclesdevinci: You should just lean into it and make "The Inquest"
  • 2 0
 It’s got the adjustable seat tube @Dropthedebt:
  • 3 0
 @neilbarkman02: and it seems alerting people to this amazing & radical new design feature has blown minds. The people can't accept facts anymore. even when it's written down for them.
Beer
  • 40 0
 With Canada's biggest aluminum producers close to their factory it's awesome that raw material to finished frame is contained to one part of the world.
  • 28 0
 Solid bike for the price and seems like alot of thought went into it: aluminum frame, threaded bb, enduro bearings, normal 148 hub, sensible sizing, Deore/Slx, size dependent chainstays and big wheels and longer dropper post on the big sizes.
  • 28 0
 In world where more and more companies rely only on crazy expensive asian carbon made bikes, this is a big relief. Great job Devinci!!
  • 22 0
 It's great to see companies producing bikes in North America. The fewer things I can buy from China the better.
  • 7 0
 I'll agree it's a great thing, but avoiding the Canadian tariff of 13% added to bikes made out of country is also a pretty good incentive...
  • 3 0
 I bought my Devinci Spartan Alloy 2015 for the "Made in Canada".

I also bought another "canadian" enduro alloy frame, a Banshee Rune v2, but the "canadian" was only the sticker, below it made a "Made in Taiwan".

I love my Devinci, and we need more cheaper alloy bikes!
  • 25 5
 Hopefully Courtney Love won't get a hold of the Kobain... She has a way of lowering their quality
  • 2 0
 She'd probably kill it...
  • 3 0
 @woofer2609: let's not go down that Hole... Eek

Nevermind.
  • 19 0
 Here we are now, entertain us.
  • 17 1
 “ With a 75-degree seat tube angle, 65.5-degree seat tube angle”
Tell me more
  • 25 0
 On the climbs you install the dropper in the 75 degree tube and on the downhills you put it into the 65.5 degree seat tube. Simple and practical.
  • 1 0
 @ryan77777: I thought it was a flip chip.
  • 13 0
 I was hoping to start "Smells like teen spirit" lyrics chain considering the name of hardtail but decided that "Load up on guns, bring your friends" would be really innapropiriate comment for today...
  • 14 0
 Made in Canada baby! I am getting one if there isn't a shortage. This bike will be the bike of 2021
  • 16 0
 Sooooo.... Ripmeau FA?
  • 11 0
 My wife picked up her ‘21 Django Deore yesterday. It’s a ton of bike and very well spec’d. Devinci pays attention to the details. Value bike contender for sure.
  • 1 0
 Where are you guys located? I was told my '21 would arrive in march. Literally counting down the days....
  • 8 0
 Devinci bikes are absolute tanks! I have a carbon Troy and it is the heaviest of all my bikes, including other all aluminum ones! Regardless, that bike has always hidden its weight well and pedals so damn nice! Absolute bomber on the downhills with tons of confidence. I'd imagine this bike feels pretty portly when lifted onto the bike rack, but probably rips once on the trail!! I'd like to try it.
  • 11 0
 Made in Canada! Aluminum from Canada. Much Canadian this bike is.
  • 1 3
 Sorry but they buy there tubes from the us. unless they built it from the lingot.
  • 6 0
 I'm super excited to get my hands on this bike!! I already talked to my local rep about getting one, just hope its the Deore build not the SX. I can't see another bike out there that can match the value here for only $2600 CAD. Its speced better than a lot of bikes costing several hundred more. It even comes with metallic pad ready disk rotors. Devinci is obviously paying attention to detail while other brands slip junk parts into their builds that need to be replaced in a year (like brakes and rotors).
  • 7 0
 That Shimano build would be awesome with a Z2 fork instead of the RS Silver. At this price point, I'd still go with the Vitus or Polygon. Still a great deal for an NA made frame!
  • 4 1
 Totally. Putting the Z2 on the Shimano build would sell like hot cakes, making it the anti-SRAM model !
  • 5 0
 Fantastic bike for a price many can actually afford, with a little bit of saving. If it came with ISCG mounts for the many that still like to try to stay on the bike when going over that log or stonewall crossing then I would have absolutely nothing to complain about. I appreciate the two wheel sizes too, not forcing a 5ft person to deal with 29" wheels is progress.
  • 7 0
 I love Devinci, such dependable and rugged frames Smile My Spartan has taken YUUUGE hits/crashes. I'm tempted to buy the Kobain for a fun hardtail
  • 2 0
 2018 aluminum spartan bike is such as badass machine. Super burly. The perfect bike park rental fleet bike LOL!
  • 8 0
 "stay tuned, this bike will be in our upcoming affordable bikes Field Test" I luuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuurve the Field Tests.
  • 7 0
 Great package for a great price, ideal for newcomers to the sport. This is how you do an affordable entry-level bike. Stellar work, Devinci!
  • 10 3
 looks like trickle down economics are gaining some traction after all Big Grin Big Grin
  • 7 0
 Now that’s a nice looking ride for not a ton of cash! Well done devinci!!!
  • 6 0
 Well jeeze. Nothing to complain about. Feeling empty and unfulfilled... Guess i'll go bitch about politics on another forum or something.
  • 6 0
 I am so friggin stoked about this bike. Marshall is my given name and I feel I finally found my mini me.;..Shimano makes it 100% dope
  • 3 0
 Wish the hardtail came in an XS it would be a perfect kids bike. I know I am looking for one for my little ripper and there is not a lot to choose from at that price point. I would honestly buy an XS deore tomorrow if there was such a thing.
  • 3 0
 $2k for a full suspension is a great price point. Our LBS has always carried base model Alloy Stumpjumpers and that's what most beginners in the area end up on. Admittedly that's a sweet first bike... But more choice for your first bike is a good thing!
  • 4 0
 Is there a frame only option? Or one for a simillar bike? I am looking for a cheap full suspension trailbike frame with a progressive geometry to replace my enduro hardtail, but all I can find is 3000€ frames.
  • 1 0
 I'd love to see a frame only on this, or the hardtail as well.

Seems like they're doing the same thing that Rocky Mountain is doing though. Where they make an inexpensive alloy frame model you can buy of both the Altitude, and Growler (FS, and hardtail), but the frame only options are either Carbon only, or simply unavailable :/.
  • 1 0
 Privateer und Bird
  • 1 0
 @muerte: While the Bird looks quite promising, the Privateer is more or less a full blown enduro (I already have a Capra) with slightly less travel. But thanks, the Bird might really be what I am looking for.
  • 4 2
 I have a bike (gen 1 Al sentinel) with only clearance for a 2.4" tire. It's pretty annoying. DHFs are 2.5 and I would typically do the buy a new front tire and swap the front to rear routine. DHR IIs are available in 2.4, but not always easy to find in certain casings/compounds, especially with all the shortages going on. I know it's a small thing, but it really does limit one's tire options.
  • 1 0
 My friend has an A1 Sentinel with 2.5" specialized tires front & back without issues.
  • 19 0
 Clearance is always a though one, we feel like we addressed it previously when we explained the use of SB+ spacing on our other full suspension bikes, but overall not all tires are the same actual width despite claiming the same numbers, just like a 2''x4'' is not truly 2 inch by 4 inch. So, some brand's tire may end up larger than others even if both are 29x2.5, a lot comes in to play here. Rim width, tire pressure all have an impact, then comes what we consider ''good clearance'' which can be different from one company to another.

For our clearance, we always aim on the very conservative side to prevent any issues for our customers. We are looking to have 10mm of clearance laterally (with the CS and SS) and 12mm with the CS/SS bridge. So, for example, the DHF 2.5 you are mentioning here would leave us with 8.5mm lateral clearance and 10mm with the CS/SS bridge. For some, this might be plenty and they would ride it like that. But we have to follow certain standards otherwise it gets messy.

If this is a key issue for you, we advise going to your LBS and checking a few specific options with them. Depending on your tire preference, it might be a non-issue!
  • 1 0
 @bishopsmike: I had a 2.5 dhf on it for ~5 rides. It rubbed pretty often, rubbed thru the paint and well into the aluminum before I wised up. But I'm 235 lbs and thus cause more frame/wheel deflection than a lot of riders. Also part of the issue was the stock stans S1 rear wheel. I was having to tighten all the spokes after every ~4 hours of ride time. And that was just aggressive trail riding, no big hucks.
  • 6 0
 @kcy4130: IF you have to tighten spokes every 4 hrs, There's something wrong with your wheel. Like no spoke prep on the threads. Get that wheel retensioned and then dribble in some of that penetrating loctite and let it cure overnight.
  • 8 0
 @cyclesdevinci: Solid answer. I appreciate the numerical candor.
  • 2 0
 @laksboy: Yeah I got fed up and decided I'd tighten the spokes more even if I crushed nipples, then it was ~6 hours. I did crush or round off the wrench flats on a couple of the nipples but doesn't matter now, broke that hub. I'm not sure if it was inadequate clearance causing me to over tighten them or that the spoke angle on the drive side with 29 and 148. On a crank bros synthesis alloy set now, so far it's way better. I'm going to avoid stans. Also on a new deore wheelset that came stock on a hardtail. They are 24 spokes with an asymmetric rim so spoke angle is the same. With my experience with stan and the deore having only 24 spokes I expected to destroy the rear wheel in a few rides. Ten rides in, 20 maybe 25 hours and they're still solid, I checked tension several times and all is well. I'm impressed. Perhaps asymmetric is the future.
  • 2 0
 @laksboy: I should add that all my previous bikes were 26". And I'm the type who would use dh grade rims on trail or am bikes to avoid frequent truing.
  • 1 1
 @kcy4130: I wonder if a carbon frame would also help this problem? Less side flex on the chain stays.

My friend has that same bike in carbon (and S1 wheels) and the clearance is really low. But he's running an Aggressor 2.5 without issues.
  • 3 0
 @mtb-sf: Carbon frames aren't inherently less flexy than aluminum. Depends on design and layup etc. Yeah, I think they just didn't give it enough clearance. Even 2.4s rub when side loaded hard. There's no such thing as too much clearance. Well there is, but it reduces the clearance of the chain ring and or crank arm to outside of chain stay. More clearance without other compromises just makes the designers job a little harder or the bike a little more costly to produce. One of the many reasons I'm glad I don't design bikes.
  • 2 0
 @mtb-sf: And you might encourage your buddy to drop the wheel and have a look Just to be sure. I was a bit disconcerted when I saw how much mine had worn.
  • 2 0
 @kcy4130: Not inherently less flexy, but its probably easier to engineer stiffness into the narrow spot on the chain stay between the chainring and tire with carbon where the layup can be adjusted than aluminum where you are limited in how you can shape the tube while still fitting everything. Some new bikes even have a solid carbon section there instead of hollow, although some bikes have a machined alloy pieces too. That area seems so hard to balance chain stay length, tire clearance and chainring size.

I will look at his frame next time we ride and double check, but he's a beanpole riding an XL frame so I suspect he's a bit better off for that reason too.

FWIW I ride an Alloy Patrol and probably will replace it with another alloy frame at some point, so it's not like I'm a carbon fanboy.
  • 2 0
 @kcy4130: BTW, I just asked him to check and it's fine.
  • 1 0
 @kcy4130: Try a 32H for better durability when the time comes ?
  • 2 0
 @mtb-sf: Good to hear. Yeah altering tubing wall thickness with carbon is easier than al. One more reason why a bit longer chainstays might be becoming more common. The flex one feels from the rear end while ridding, well it's pretty much impossible to tell what percentage of the flex is from wheel deflection and what is from frame deflection, if spokes are tensioned properly that is. Putting a stiffer wheel on will help, but all wheels flex some. I'm more than happy with the sentinel, the worst thing about having to use a 2.4 vs 2.5 kinda shows how much I like it!
  • 1 0
 @vggg: Unfortunately the stans s1 was 32. So is the synthesis al that I replaced it with. Well, the rear is 32, front is 28, tho I'm still on the stans s1 front, cause I might as well wait till rim or tire worn to switch.
  • 4 0
 So why would anyone buy an aluminum Django now? I had a deposit on one, but now.... I might save a few bucks and give up.... nothing?
  • 6 0
 It all depends where do you place value depending on your specific needs. The Django will offer larger tire clearance, a better fork (Revelation vs 35 Silver), better shock with a lockout (Select+ RL vs Select R), SDG Saddle, size specific dropper post, size specific CS length and better hubs. All of this for an extra 500$ CAD. These would all cost a lot more to upgrade on your own at full retail so might be worth considering.
  • 2 3
 @cyclesdevinci: Sorry but having more tire clearence his not an advantage (maybe for the Marketing dept. it his). But not enough his a bike not fully thought.
  • 2 0
 @cyclesdevinci: Thanks for the answer.
  • 4 0
 @inonyme: wtf are you talking about?! lol If you only run 2.1 tires it may not bother you but a lot of people wants to run 2.5 or 2.6 tires nowadays.
  • 1 0
 @cyclesdevinci: Very nice upgrades on the Django, easily worth the $500. I wanted to order a Django, but they are sold out everywhere for 8 months. Sold my 2018 Norco fluid FS in Nov and didn't want to be without a FS bike for the whole spring summer. That's how I found out about the Marshall and have an order for one. It will still be an upgrade in every way over the Norco.

What length dropper post comes on a L and XL Marshall? Don't the chain stays on the Marshall increase on L and XL also?
  • 1 0
 I called Devinci directly and they answered my questions, so I thought I might share if anyone is interested.

- Dropper posts on the L and XL are going to be 130mm. I assume all or most Marshalls (maybe not the XS?) will come stock with the Tranz-X 31.6 x 130mm post. A little disappointing but by no means a deal breaker.
- The chain stays do get a little bigger (5mm) on the L and XL frames to keep a more balanced front to back feel.

I also spoke to SRAM about the new for 2021 Rockshox silver and found a couple of details.

- The fork's progressivity can be adjusted with the use of air tokens.
- The fork's travel can be internally adjusted without the use of separate air springs. I thought this was a nice inclusion.
- Weight for a 29" 140mm travel fork is just under 2400g. A little heavy, but surprisingly not all that much more than a Recon (150 g less) or Judy (only 50g less with spindly 30mm stanchions).
- There is no way to upgrade the air spring to the Debonair and no upgrades available for the damper. That was what I suspected about the damper, but I thought you could put the Debonair from the 35 gold into this silver fork. Apparently not.
  • 2 0
 that is nice start of the year! bile check all points for the 2k price point!
FS ready to shred out of the box, with decent tires and geo? yep there a lot of other brands that offer similar opackages, however that only beneficial for MTB;
  • 2 0
 It's nice that more affordable mountain bikes are starting to develop, although I would rather opt for a Commencal Meta HT AM rather than the Kobain, just personal opinion, but as I said it's nice that there are really good affordable mountain bikes
  • 2 0
 Funny,. My deore django Alloy is due to arrive tomorrow for me. I am not a sram fan so when I saw deore build with revelation on it with new air chamber ( change damper and it's a Pike)I love on it. Last one I could find. I am a little concerned on standover as I am 5.4 with 29 inseam. The standover are way high on these Marshalls and djangos. 735 on djando 29 small, 744 on 27.5 Marshall. Love to here what cycles Devinci cycles can add to this comment.
I am a 100 percent east coast fanboy of Devinci. If it was not for border closed I would drive to factory. It's only 5 hrs or so north.
This is a game changer and hopefully will get more frames done locally. Both Devinci and GG driving a wagon I am loving to get in.
  • 2 0
 Have a deposit down at local shop when price was still 2599$ CAD.
Seems the price recently increased to 2799$ ($2,299 USD) as per Devinci website.
Wonder how it will turn out when it's time to pay the balance at the shop... Frown
  • 2 0
 I noticed the exact same thing the other day and I'm in the same boat as you. I put a deposit down for half the bike. Earlier this week I checked the receipt from my email and it shows that the rest of the $2,600 is still owing. I will not be paying an extra $200 + tax.

Ask for an e-mailed receipt from the shop, showing the deposit and balance owing right away. Don't wait to hash this out in a couple of months when you pick up the bike. You can even blame it on your partner if you want to not be the pushy one. Pretend they want to see how much you actually spent on the bike. Hope it works out for you.
  • 1 0
 @J-Sheridan: Thanks for your input. Actually I already have a paper receipt from the day of deposit which clearly states the owed balance, so in theory (and by law I believe) I should not have to pay extra.
Just heard other testimonies where buyers are called by their shop telling them there is an increase and that they should either be ready to pay it or that they'll cancel deposit and pass the bike to the next buyer (and we know the next buyer is more than easy to find). I have not received such call so I'm hoping my shop's politics to be less rude (least to say) than others have experimented.
  • 4 0
 I was just working on changing some parts out on my Marshall. This new version is a completely different animal.
  • 5 0
 Kobain and Marshall =s Grunge meets 8 Mile.
  • 3 0
 Marshall is a nod to Jimi Hendrix' middle name. The previous Marshall was originally named the Hendrix but got Devinci was sued by the Hendrix' family trust and so they changed it to Marshall.
  • 1 0
 @danoiz: well look at the big brain on Dan...
  • 5 0
 Rad that these are made in Canada too! Way to go Davinci!
  • 5 0
 Yes, bike manufacturers are starting to get it! Way to go, Devinci!
  • 5 0
 Wow that’s sick! Nice looking bike and Canadian made too!
  • 4 0
 I really hope this bike sells well for Devinci and they add an SLX/XT build with a nice fork at the $3K price point.
  • 5 0
 That kobain is rad and super relevant.
  • 5 0
 hardtail looks good, finally a decent geometry too
  • 3 0
 Why would anyone buy a SRAM SX spec version of the Marshall when a Deore version is the same price? Bizarre that they even bothered with the SX version.
  • 6 0
 Maybe its to get over the current supply chain issues? Might allow them to have stock of at least one of them.
  • 1 0
 I'd love to hear what people think/know about the fork on this bike. Looks to be a new model for Rockshox in 2021 with: 35 mm steel stanchions, a solo air spring and a turnkey damper. Unsure if it will take any tokens or if it has any high-speed compression adjustment. I've used a Rockshox recon rl the past 3 seasons and I'm hoping this would be a small improvement. At 200 lbs and also riding more aggressively this season, I found the recon flexed quite a bit and would even bind/freeze up on sharp rock hits.
  • 2 0
 The jump to 35 mm stanchions is always massive - as when Rockshox took the Revelation to 35 mm a few years ago. In my experience anyway, 35 mm and DebonAir tend to make the biggest noticeable differences when feature upgrading with RS (the fancy new Charger dampers slightly less so). Torque Caps are also huge - trust me on that as a dedicated wheelbuilder! Caps (if you have a hub that can receive them) will make your 15 mm fork axle feel DH-like and make it a lot easier to re-fit a fork during service or at the trailhead; you won't stand there fumbling to "thread a needle" anymore. The Silver TK should take tokens. Will not have any HSC - you won't get that until the premium-level RS forks with new Charger. Many folks won't need HSC, though, with the quality of the basic factory tune. Could be a great new fork option for you overall. I believe it's also now spec'd/upgradeable with SKF wiper seals, arguably the smoothest wipers in MTB - amazing, moto-derived buttery wipers.
  • 2 0
 @HogtownWheelsmith: Big thanks for the thoughtful opinion. Sorry, I meant low speed compression adjustment like the motion control damper dial on the 35 gold, recon or revelation. I've never ridden a fork with the turnkey damper, but in my limited research it seems very similar to the motion control I'm used to. Have you had any experience with both dampers? You think the 35 mm stanchions will help with the flexing and binding I was getting with the 32mm recon? I put a down payment on a Deore build of this bike so I guess I'll see in the spring when it shows up. Other than the fork there is nothing to really fuss about, except for the weight being a bit higher than I'd like at almost 35 lbs. That's about 6 lbs. heavier than my hardtail so it'll be a bit of more work to get it up the hill. Hope the way back down will more than makeup for it.
  • 2 0
 @J-Sheridan: My pleasure, happy to provide what I can. Thanks for clarifying. I actually switched from Motion Control into the Charger 2.0 (which was the most current Charger iteration at the time) a few months after I got my Revelation 35 mm in 2018. I would need to check and see if this is still the case, but with the 2018 models Pike and Revelation shared identical lowers, thus allowing the switch of damping internals. (The CSUs - uppers - on each were indeed different designs, and so I swapped those, too, because I also wanted less rake from my fork.) Anyway, I certainly had experience on Motion Control before switching to Charger, as well as on the REBA that I owned before upgrading to the 35 mm Revelation-turned-Pike. My experience with MC was very positive. The adjustments actually work, making an appreciable difference in the LSC. Presumably you have found the same with MC? The only knock I experienced is that there's just a few of those affecting clicks with MC. By contrast, on Charger you get a lot more LSC, plus some HSC ability. But...in exchange for fewer adjustments you get MUCH easier maintenance. Motion Control is an easy damper to service after 200 hours, and I would have to think this new turn-key damping would be the same. Charger, on the other hand, is one of the most advanced and involved tasks in bike mechanics to service; you will need a lot of time and tools to successfully bleed a Charger damper. As far as I'm concerned, it isn't even remotely worth trying without the awesome - and very pricey - Abbey Bike Tools/Rockshox Charger tool. It's too easy to mar the delicate internals otherwise. Overall, I agree with you that turn-key sounds similar at this point, with the available research information.

In terms of 32 versus 35, that's almost certainly the reason for the flex you are experiencing. Going 35 mm is huge, and because stiffness isn't merely just a number and is also other aspects of fork construction, Rockshox 35 mm punches above its weight. The reason the Lyrik and Boxxer historically run 35 mm stanchions as well is because Rockshox manages to make 35 mm very stout. Generally speaking, and even though Rockshox has done this actively on OEM-type forks in the past few years, 32 mm ought properly to be considered as an XC/light trail rider's stanchion size only. Adapting 32 mm tubes to bigger-travel (and bigger user) riding was always bound to come with a flex problem for a brand that does a good job overall keeping flexion at bay. Again, add in Torque Caps to a 35 mm fork if you own hubs/will own hubs that can receive them (two companies making affordable quality hubs with cap compatibility include DT and Hope), and you get that much more out of the big tubes.

In terms of bike weight, you will probably find that it's not such a big deal after all. Remember, you will only feel a hefty bike day in and day out if: a.) you're constantly on climbs; or b.) that weight is "unsprung" weight. So, for example, with my clientele, I'm often tasked with putting effort into getting someone an upgrade new wheelset that is hardly weight-weenie slim but is lighter enough than a present wheelset to reduce this major contributing element in unsprung weight. Could be something for you to factor in - regardless of where you might eventually get your upgraded wheels - in the event that you ever desire more from the new hoops. If the hubs coming with this bike don't offer Torque Cap compatibility and you decide that you will eventually want that from your front wheel, the extra incentive regarding unsprung weight is the reason you would look to an upgrade like the Hope Pro4 or DT hubs with light butted spokes and Torque Caps fitted up front.
  • 1 0
 @HogtownWheelsmith: Wow, another big thanks for providing some of your considerable expertise to the discussion.
  • 2 0
 @J-Sheridan: You're too generous. Happy to help out. Let us know how the fork rides when the time comes!
  • 3 0
 I can't believe how cheap they are considering where they're built. Just wish the Marshall came in something other than boring black!
  • 4 3
 Anyone making 27.5 bikes anymore? Looks like this and the rest of Devinci's bikes are all 29ers. I had the Hendrix/Marshall a while back and with upgraded suspension it was one of my favorite bikes.
  • 1 0
 29’ers are not as versatile, so imo 27.5 should definitely be optional but for some reason have been phased out.
  • 3 0
 Amazing value. From a purely aesthetic standpoint, the frame looks a bit... 2010 MY Giant?
  • 1 0
 As I recall, didn't Davinci build up a big production line to make bike share and citi bikes? Good to see that they were able to convert it over to manufacturing for them once that fad died out.
  • 1 0
 What's the difference between Marshall and Django on similar builds (Alloy - Deore Kit) ?.
I mean both are Trail bikes but have different price tags.
Would like to go for one of them.
  • 3 0
 You get a better fork and hubs on the Django, there's also a 2 pounds difference between both, the Marshall being heavier of course.
  • 2 2
 Welds look like could use some love, i.e. bike looks well-shorted overall, but this cheapens it for me.
Building it locally is ofc a huge thing, BUT, taking pride in what you give to your customers, also is. Have you seen the Alu frames Norco puts out for example, for that price range?

"Oh, duh, its made in Vietnam, dude"
- So what? You want to tell me that people can learn to weld (or sand welds) there but not in Canada or the US?

I personally value craftsmanship and attention to detail, and I wish companies would train their employees to achieve it. I want my bike or car or camera etc to be made "wherever", not to get a sticker and a tax exemption while paying minimum wage to a few people and fudging QC to keep up numbers, but because people believe and support their communities by investing in them.
  • 2 0
 The photographer for this article didn't do a great job showcasing the frame with all those weird orange reflections off the gloss paint. Look on the DaVinci website or other media for a better look at what to expect in the frame.

Sanding welds on a bike frame is a labor intensive process, which in turn adds cost to the frame. Also you have to over build the frame tubes a little bit to account for the loss of material due to sanding, while maintaining the same strength and durability. A lighter, stronger and cheaper frame sounds good to me at the expense of some cosmetics. Find a bike for $2,600 CAD or less, with better parts hung on a better frame. I don't think you can, trust me I've tried.

We all have to prioritize what's important to us. To me I'll take a bike made in my home country (or in North America in general) over one made in Asia with questionable environmental and labor policies. Devinci's factory is located in the same community as the mines that produce the aluminum. So much time and energy saved not shipping raw materials and finished goods across the globe is a huge win for the environment and the domestic economy. This is a BIG selling feature to me, but your priorities could be different.
  • 2 0
 Devinci - any idea when the Kobain will ship to dealers? Will there be a frame only option (the deore version is a very good bargin)? Hardtail fans want to know. Thanks.
  • 3 0
 The first bikes should get to the dealers in March. Ask your local dealer to get a more precise estimate of when they are likely to receive theirs. Unfortunately, no ''frame only'' options for the Marshall or Kobain.
  • 2 0
 I have been toying with the ID of a 29'' trail bike and this guy here might have convince me to jump on it.
  • 2 0
 Lands at an identical price as the 2021 Trek Fuel EX5.
Which one ya'll taking?
  • 6 0
 The Trek has single piston brakes with organic only discs / pads and meh tires... But gratnted, a much nice paint job. I would go for the made in Canada Devinci !
  • 1 0
 My wife liked the ex5 but they don’t exist...until December. No shit.
  • 6 3
 cool price, not for Russia. but welding-quality looks like russian
  • 1 1
 I thought the same- the welds and paint shop of the green Marshall don't look quality. Another drawback for me are the 2.4" max tire clearance, that's good in the dry but don't they have muddy, snowy winters in Canada, too?
  • 9 2
 @chrsei: See our comment above regarding tire clearance, might be worth checking with your LBS depending on your preferred tire for winter/mud use.

We do have muddy, even very snowy winters (especially up here in Chicoutimi), hence why we provide a lot of actual clearance around the tires.

If this is a show stopper, our Troy and Django using SB+ spacing have ample clearance for tires 29 x 2.6 and our entry level builds are not super far from the Marshall in terms of pricing. Make sure to check them out!
www.devinci.com/en/bikes/mountain
  • 2 0
 @chrsei: better than Orange
  • 1 0
 @chrsei: +100500, clearance sux(
  • 4 5
 People complaining about expensive hobbies is so last decade. Unless your hobby is reading it cost money.

A few thousand dollars for many years good times is soooo worth it.

1) Work More Hours
2) Make More Money
3) Spend Less Money of Other Stuff
  • 2 0
 It just means not ordering take-out for a year, more or less. Great trade-off imo.
  • 5 4
 Here in the US, the minimum wage is 7.25/hour. To buy a $3k bike you'd have to work 414 hours to get there, whihc equates to a little over 10 weeks or 2.5 months of work. Which of course doesn't include basic costs of living like food, rent, transportation. Which in reality, no where in the US can someone save money making that little. But even if they could ave every little penny, it would be YEARS before they could get an expensive bike.

Check yourself, dude.
  • 9 0
 @furiousstyles: It all depends on the person and situation too. I’ve heard friends complain that they can’t afford mountain biking but spend thousands on games, shoes, cars. I choose to live modest in other parts of my life and work a side gig to pay for upgrades to my bike so my main income can support my family and future. It really is tough seeing people struggling to afford the bare necessities and a lot of us are far more fortunate than we realized. I’m glad to see bike companies being more value focused. This bike in particular could serve someone long into the future and hopefully be passed on for a great deal to someone starting out and hesitant about the cost of entry.
  • 1 0
 @furiousstyles: Could be worse.

You could be Nacho the polo player introducing the sport of polo to underprivileged children.
  • 3 2
 "Work more hours" also equates to "ride bikes less" so I don't really see the benefit...
  • 5 0
 @bh406:
Your argument says more about the minimum wage than it does the price of this bike.
  • 2 0
 -> Canadian-made bike
-> Canadian bike news website
-> Price listed only in USD???
  • 1 0
 Is there an error in the description ? Looks like the Kobain SLX has the Marzocchi + Minions to me ... and the Regolith goes to the Deore.
  • 3 1
 Nothing against alloy at all, but I'm just not digging the looks. Sorry, not sorry.
  • 3 0
 nice -made in canada ;;;we need more bike made in canada ...
  • 1 0
 I like that the Kobain has a 75.5 and a 65.5 adjustable seat tube angle ????. Jokes aside. Love Devinci and the fact that they are making more models in Canada
  • 2 0
 Does anyone know, are these also made using welding robots? (like their bikesharing frames)
  • 1 0
 I ordered my 2021 django just a few months ago. Why do you have to taunt me so much @cyclesdevinci?? I'm excitedly waiting for it to arrive
  • 4 1
 Your going to have a blast on the Django for sure! As we mentioned in another reply, it also comes with nice upgrade for the 500$ CAD difference so you won't regret it. Make sure to let us know how you like your new bike when you get your first rides on it!
  • 1 0
 It reminds me of my first dual suspension bike: Kona Tanuki. It was an honest bike. Back then I paid less than a 1000. I think the Marshall is well priced.
  • 2 2
 Wow, that is an amazing deal! I would have a hard time choosing between the Marshall and the Ripley AF. Though, its almost certain the Ripley AF would be better at climbing (DW link)
  • 1 0
 How does the DW linkage compare to the split pivot (also a DW design??) on Devinci bikes? I'd like to hear some thoughts on climbing and descending.
  • 3 0
 Making Aluminum Bikes Great Again ......thank you Canada Smile
  • 2 3
 It’s great that they offer a lifetime warranty. That’s why I bought a devinci years ago. Then it breaks and they mysteriously “can’t find” the serial number for my frame in their records. And now Im left with a broken frame and no bike to ride. They might make good bike but their customer Service the worst I’ve ever seen.
  • 2 3
 Devinci lifetime warranty is BS. they systematicly refuse all first claim that are not black or white. Better hope you never used theire bike before returning it for a warranty claim. (if you never dealt with them, STFU you don't know what you are talking about)
  • 5 0
 Thanks for your comment and sorry to read about your issue with us. Our customer service saw your comment and would love to go over your case again. I'm sure they will be able to help. Please reach out to service@devinci.com. Our representative, Danny will be happy to help.
  • 7 4
 Deleted Comment
  • 2 0
 That Kobain SLX build is a steal! Would be a nice play bike for sure!
  • 2 0
 Tubes and welds.... the proper way to make a bike frame.
  • 1 0
 Devinci has made a Kobain for awhile. while this is an all new Kobain, it's still just an update to an existing bike.
  • 2 0
 I love seeing more affordable bikes come to market.
  • 2 0
 Nice to see some aluminum affordable bikes being made
  • 1 0
 Looks solid for the $$$! The paint looks orange peeled to hell though. Hope that was a 1 off.
  • 2 2
 Fit and finish costs money, this pug will be a great bike for budget riders
  • 1 0
 That paint... definitely saved some loot there...
  • 1 0
 The paint quality on the Marshall does look quite poor. On the image of the lower shock mount it literally looks rippled. I've done better rattle-can finishes on a cold day in my backyard.
  • 2 3
 Made with a chainsaw and finished with a hatchet, perhaps a little too rough in the finishes, a few dollars in addition / much more satisfaction.
  • 2 2
 And next year, back to made in some where in Asia. That what they did with the AL troy
  • 3 1
 Curt Kobain.
  • 1 0
 Ach du Sch...., so ein schircher Krapfen!!!
  • 1 0
 I'd like to see a comparo between the RMB Growler and the Kobain.
  • 1 0
 @cyclesdevinci When will these start hitting US dealers?
  • 2 2
 RockShox 35 Silver Frown Charge a couple hundred more and put a decent fork, makes a world of difference)
  • 1 0
 Even a Suntour Aion (transformable to 160mm) would be better. I could find one for 250EUR.
  • 1 0
 $1000 more and the fezzari with DVO suspension looks like a contender
  • 1 0
 With a Marz z1 fork on that, I'd probably buy one
  • 1 0
 @cyclesdevinci Can Kobain mount a water bottle?
  • 1 1
 Looks like a Kona Process
  • 1 1
 Looks like a session? No? a giant trance.... ah yes.
  • 1 1
 Not Canadien enough, there is no puck holder.
  • 2 4
 That whole bike looks like it’s 30mm into its sag. Not a looker.
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