First Ride: 2021 Pivot Trail 429

Feb 23, 2021
by Daniel Sapp  



Back in 2018 we saw Pivot's 120mm travel trail bike undergo some major updates, enough so that it warranted a name change from the 429 Trail to the Trail 429. For 2021 the bike has once again undergone a number of changes, most notably in the geometry department, and the shock is now vertically oriented in the frame as has been the case for other bikes that Pivot has released over the past 18 months.

Travel for the bike remains at 120mm and, as with the previous version, riders can choose between running 29" wheels or 27.5"+. If riders do choose to roll with the smaller wheel size, they'll want to install a taller lower headset cup in order to keep the geometry of the bike in check and the front end where it should be.

Pivot Trail 429 Details

• Wheel size: 29" / 27.5+
• Rear travel: 120mm
• 130-140mm fork
• Full carbon frame
• 66° head angle (lower setting)
• 75° seat angle
• 608mm stack / 455mm reach (medium)
• 432mm chainstays
• Weight: 27 lb (Pro X01 build, size Medium)
• Price: $5,599 - to $12,499 USD ($8,499 as tested)
www.pivotcycles.com

The new Trail 429 has more standover than before, while still providing plenty of room to fit a water bottle inside the front triangle. There are five sizes, XS to XL, with the XS fitting riders down to 4' 11" and the XL serving riders up to 6'7".

All of the models are carbon and there are several different build kits available at the Race, Team, or Pro levels. Each level has the option of a Shimano or SRAM kit. Prices range from $5,599 USD for the Race XT build all the way up to $12,499 for the Team XX1 AXS Fox Live Valve build with carbon Reynolds/Industry Nine wheels.


The Trail 429 Pro X01 build, as shown, sells for $8,499 USD.


Although the new frame is slimmed down, Pivot says it has more torsional head tube and BB stiffness than before.
A nice clean shock junction, and nowhere for muck to collect.

Frame Details

The Trail 429 carries over a lot of updates seen elsewhere in Pivot's line and it sheds a good bit of weight from the previous Trail 429, tipping the scale at 5.9 lbs, nearly 3/4 lb lighter than before on a size medium. All frames are Fox Live Valve ready, there is internal cable routing throughout, and everyone gets a full-size water bottle. There are also two bolts on the bottom of the top tube that can hold a tool, such as Pivot's own, or other accessories. There is integrated frame protection on the chainstays and downtube.

The 157+ Super Boost spacing remains in place, in line with Pivot's other more aggressive bikes. Riders can mount up a 29 x 2.6" or 27.5 x 2.8" tire with room to spare. Pivot holds fast to this spacing, claiming it allows them to build a better and stiffer frame with more rear tire clearance, along with increased wheel stiffness. The BB is the PF92 which Pivot pioneered, and although there are detractors, in our experience it's proven to be completely reliable.

For the derailleur hanger, the Trail 429 utilizes SRAM's UDH, a welcome addition to any and all frames at this point in time. There's Live Valve compatibility on all frames, and although there is a Di2 battery port there's no hole between the front triangle and swingarm for Di2 routing. Riders can run the wire externally but not with the same integration other Pivot frames have.

Internal cable routing through wide windows make it easy to pass cables through the frame.
The chainstay guard features raised ribs that mute chain slap quite effectively.

All frames use a unique size-specific layup and tubing diameters that correlate to frame size. Pivot does this to keep the ride characteristics similar on bikes so that a tall rider has the same experience and frame feel as a shorter rider would. Looking at the tubing, the large has a similar diameter to the Switchblade while the medium and smaller frames clearly shed some heft from the previous iteration of the Trail 429.

Last but not least, it bears mention and some applause that Pivot have done away with the Pivloc handlebar and grip system and have designed a new grip that doesn't require cutting your fancy carbon handlebar. The new "Phoenix Factory Lock-On Grip" is designed in-house at Pivot. It's left and right specific and has a tapered core to fit snugly on the bar. The ergonomic grip tapers from 30mm to 32mm and has a soft rubber compound that is designed to damp vibration.


Suspension

The Trail 429's rocker llink has been flipped, but the amount of travel remains the same at 120mm. The shock is a metric trunnion style, 165mm long with a 45mm stroke. The suspension has been made more progressive and the shock sits higher in its travel to keep the pedaling snappy, and to keep the lower BB height from causing too many pedal strikes.

While the Switchblade can be run with a coil shock, the Trail 429 cannot; even if the shock has a separate bottoming control, that doesn't provide enough progression for the frame, according to Pivot.

The bike is available with a DPS or DPX2 shock, depending on the build. The more aggressive "Enduro" build utilizes the DPX2 coupled with a 140mm Fox 36 fork vs the standard build which has a 130mm Float 34.


Geometry
Geometry undergoes the standard steeper, slacker treatment along with more reach, although keep in mind that we're still talking about a 120mm trail bike here. For a size medium, in the lower setting, the Trail 429 now has a 66-degree HTA (1.3 slacker), 75-degree STA (1 steeper), 455mm reach (15mm longer), and 432mm chainstays (2mm longer). The addition of the 140mm fork in the Enduro package will reduce that head angle by approximately .5-degrees.

The bike is capable of running 27.5" wheels with the addition of a lower headset cup which alters the numbers slightly. Riders can also opt to run the bike in a "low" setting which steepens everything up a bit more by utilizing the flip-chip in the rocker link. The chip can be rotated by simply loosening the bolts and rotating it, which means there aren't any parts to lose trailside.



Ride Impressions
I've only had the new Trail 429 for a few days at this point, but I did spend a considerable amount of time on the previous Trail 429 and still have a Switchblade in the fleet, which helps in drawing some comparisons.

The biggest takeaway is the Trail 429's increased efficiency from the previous model. The older bike was efficient in the grand scheme of things, but I did find it to be a bit overbuilt, especially when pitted against the latest crop of shorter travel trail bikes. The new bike is light, nimble, and quick. The reduced heft is noticeable and the suspension rides higher in its travel and with a lot more life.

The bike is easy to navigate up and over messy bits of trail while holding a line, and it stays planted when faced with off-camber chunder, the suspension staying smooth and supple throughout its travel. On bigger compressions, I struggled to find the bottom of the travel, which isn't always the case on shorter travel bikes that offer a good amount of traction on the top end. The increased suppleness coupled with more progression makes the new bike much more intuitive and easy to ride.

I'll keep riding the bike in the coming months, hopefully logging more miles as spring arrives and the trails de-thaw. My initial impressions of the Trail 429, or as I've started calling it, the "mini-Switchblade" are positive and I'm looking forward to seeing if that trend continues once I'm able to properly put it to test. For many riders, the new Trail 429 will be a more versatile version of the Switchblade that's friendlier on the uphills and easier to maneuver in tight quarters.









296 Comments

  • 694 48
 First comment motherf*ckers....uhhh looks cool I guess...I’m drunk as shit
  • 128 10
 6th comment bitc*hes... I'm so sober I'm going to and have a nice cup of tea.
  • 22 5
 @bigtim: 11th comment and I wanna sleep
  • 17 21
flag Pedal-Bin (Feb 23, 2021 at 2:26) (Below Threshold)
 And you Mutha-F'in nailed bro.
  • 15 8
 on a tuesday morning...good for you!
  • 16 3
 Keep upvoting - this really needs to land in the Comments of the Year.
  • 8 1
 Spit out my coffee, best motherf*cking comment ever
  • 5 0
 @number44: I only tune into the podcast to hear "comment gold"
  • 237 2
 Pivot: "Nobody can get bikes right now, lets just release more"

US Treasury: "Ah, you've been taking notes"
  • 35 20
 Bad treasury puns getting upvotes? Did everyone switch from engineers to bankers overnight?
  • 8 3
 Underrated post
  • 23 0
 Can't resist a good monetary policy joke.
  • 1 0
 Comment of the century?
  • 74 0
 "...de-thaw..."? Just "thaw" no? If it de-thawed it would be back to frozen...
  • 7 0
 A common variant is "un-thaw" which is the same: freeze again.
  • 3 0
 Might be more to do with the vicious freeze-thaw cycle here. When things are frozen, it's great. But when it thaws, it's peanut butter. So maybe he means de-thaw as in both thawed and dried... I dunno, just trying to spin this double negative away =)
  • 12 3
 It means get out of the peanut butter state. I’d prefer frozen or dry.
  • 58 3
 Guess I'll be the contrarian, because I'm super stoked about Pivot coming out with a modern bike that has "conservative" geo. I respect them for not chasing trends and actually making a bike that works in conditions that are other than "climb a fire road to bomb steep chutes", ie conditions that most of us ride. It's a 120 trail bike, most people gonna ride it in undulating, techy terrain, with lots of ups and downs and flatter pedal sections too. For that terrain, having a slightly slacker seat tube angle that puts less pressure on your wrists is what I want.

My current bike is a Jeffsy which is freaking great, I love the damn thing. Except the seat tube angle makes it a freaking pain any time I am not climbing steep gradient or bombing downhill. Which on the east coast is gonna be a good chunk of the time whether we like it or not. A bike with the Trail 429's geo would work so much better in these conditions.
  • 8 0
 I agree 100%. I can't always get to the big day trails so for my locals, the 76.8 degrees on my Reign 29 definitely gets the pressure on those wrists during casual rides. Sharp flat turns are super awkward with the weight on the bars. I used to shit on any bike without a STA of 76 or more, but I get it now!
  • 4 2
 Fair point, but Effective SA should describe / be the result of: proportion of ETT to Reach. Their recent geometry charts all look to me like they just shifted the sizing labels up one size, without actually changing that Top-Tube to Reach proportion. 595 ETT for size small? I guess you've got to do something to your Geo chart to look on trend
  • 1 0
 By chasing trends do you mean refusing to accept short chainstays don't with for tall people?
  • 96 38
 Lost me 157+ rear spacing.
  • 9 7
 Yep, me too unfortunately :-(
  • 15 8
 Was super exited about bike release till i read 157
  • 7 3
 Why...why..? ????. Just to fit unnecessarily wide tires and rims...?
  • 20 15
 the stiff 157 is f*cking amazing
  • 4 1
 Same, too many other good options. I have a real nice set of wheels on my current bike that are the Boost STANDARD, that I'd like to occasionally throw onto my Trail bike.
  • 7 5
 This comment should get BOOSTed to the top
  • 3 4
 @NikolaiB: no, to make it stiff
  • 28 2
 Honestly I'm not a fan of random new standards, especially on what could be the most expensive component on a bike. But having ridden 157, it's stiff as hell and it should have been the standard to begin with. It's based off an existing standard and if Shimano wasn't dead set on trying to save the front derailleur a few years ago, it probably would have been the standard to begin with. So as much as I'd like to sit here and say "no new standards," this one actually makes more sense than the one it replaces.
  • 5 1
 @grldm3: Ditto 20mm axles. They just looked so damn confident
  • 2 0
 @grldm3: not saying 157 is bad because of number, the market of complete wheel-sets - limited for now, yes you can always go custom rote - however that’s anothe story

Plus

Gazzilion front end options;
  • 3 0
 @nickmalysh: it is limited options right now for sure, but I think that's because the industry bought into 148 so quickly which was a mistake. It was reactionary to 27.5's being the trend from 26 and now the shift towards 29er is making things even harder. I think Pivot was ahead of the game because they have been using 157 for years.
I think it comes down to if people want to get one more frame out of their 148 29er wheels then don't buy this bike. If people are willing to bite the bullet now then this is a good option and their new wheelset will be good on their next bike too. I had to retire a set of chris kings when boost came out so I totally get why people hate it when stuff like that changes.
  • 2 0
 @grldm3: Agree. We should really be pissed over boost, not super boost. Super boot makes rear wheels as stiff as 110 front. FU Trek!
  • 2 1
 I was annoyed with Boost now another standard... just what the bike world needs. 110 is a few years old at this point, it really needs to be moved to 115 because that will "make it so much stiffer and ride so much better" Ha! Bottom brackets are getting a bit outdated as well.
  • 1 0
 Trail chainnline´s (55mm) from sram and shimano by the end of the year, and 13 speed in 2022. Wider tyres, wider cranks, wider frames. But you believe hub zenith was reached with the hurried to "Boost" standard......interesting.
  • 51 3
 Pivot - For those who can afford a Yeti, but want to pay just a bit more to flex on these fools.
  • 4 1
 In normal times it was easy to get discounts. I got $1k off my 12spd XT firebird in Feb 2020 by just seeming a tiny bit hesitant about replacing my existing bike. This was a bike that wasn't even on the floor, too.
  • 7 8
 We were looking at the prices today. It's ridiculous. For the price of the frameset, including a fox factory fork and damper you can get a complete Santa Cruz carbon bike here in Switzerland. When you think about it and build the pivot with some of expensive parts you can easily spend about 10k. That means you can buy almost any other bike for 6k (which is still a lot and will give you a kick ass bike) and have 4k left to go to Whistler for a couple of weeks with a good friend. That's crazy. Pivot should be ashamed of them selfs.
  • 2 0
 In my defense, I got mine used on PB (also, it is a Les).
  • 4 25
flag dylansanderson2004 (Feb 23, 2021 at 12:28) (Below Threshold)
 @bjorn989: those cheaper carbon bikes you were looking at are that cheap because the have a fiber glass core with only a thin layer of carbon, that is why santa cruz has c and cc carbon frames, and pivots is pure carbon
  • 1 0
 I was trying to figure out why it was so expensive....
  • 16 3
 @dylansanderson2004: This is the single fullest of shit statement I’ve read this year.
  • 4 1
 @dylansanderson2004: nice try. I understand sarcasm when I see it. I sprinkle it on everything just like bacon.
  • 3 1
 @bjorn989: Have you compared to Santa Cruz? A CC XO1 with half fox factory suspension on a Tallboy is $7000.00 with a shitty reverb dropper, the 429 with full factory suspension and factory dropper is $6700.00-$7000.00. So i don't see your point. They don't make shitty carbon builds, which Santa Cruz does but that doesn't make them more expensive.
  • 44 1
 A Di2 battery compartment without Di2 wiring ports hints at Shimano's timeline for a wireless system.
  • 1 5
flag tomhoward379 (Feb 23, 2021 at 5:40) (Below Threshold)
 They’ve had Di2 battery compartments and blanking plates for wireless stuff for years. (my 2017 429SL did, for example).
  • 6 5
 @tomhoward379: read the original comment again. Youre very close bud.
  • 1 0
 Possibly, or they just haven't bothered with the cost for the internal wiring given low(??) Di2 uptake.

Not sure what the point of having a centrally located battery which is connected with wires to devices which communicate wirelessly would be.

Edit: I answered my question. It would be an awesome experiment in consumer behavior and a pretty solid burn.
  • 1 0
 @tkrug: Yes, it's an odd combination of options that indicates a transitional phase. The ability to mount an internal battery could be to accommodate:

• Those who want to use legacy Di2 systems
• A known future need
• Options for future needs

Wire ports would be present if Shimano had any intention of continuing with a wired system. Hopefully, Shimano's lost market share from being slow to adopt 1× drivetrains has taught them to act quickly on emerging developments and they'll release their wireless systems soon.
  • 2 1
 its still there because it is used for routing the dropper cable
  • 1 0
 @dylansanderson2004: It can help with dropper cable routing, but there are ways to facilitate routing without that opening.
  • 1 0
 @R-M-R: my dad is an dealer for pivot, so we build a lot, i mean a lot and to get the dropper cable trough without it is a f*cking pain on them, it helps heaps
  • 1 0
 @dylansanderson2004: It sure does! I'm just saying bikes can be designed differently, such that the access port is not needed.
  • 37 1
 'Low' and 'lower'? Seems unnecessarily confusing instead of just going with 'high' and 'low' like every other company. Looks like a fun bike.
  • 39 2
 Evil do this and it is kind of annoying.

"What setting is it in?"
"The low one."
"Oh, ok."

90% chance the person asking still doesn't know what setting it is in.
  • 19 0
 Still room for lowest, at next year’s model
  • 21 2
 Low Lower Super Low Mega Low Ultra Low Hyper Low Lowest Lower Still
  • 4 0
 RIP carriage returns
  • 36 0
 The Pirelli strategy. Soft, supersoft, hypersoft, charmin ultrasoft
  • 8 0
 @boozed: You forgot Boost Low between Mega Low and Ultra Low
  • 9 1
 And a 347bb on a 120mm bike is NOT low. They should call it high and medium high... marketing at work
  • 2 0
 @boozed: plaid low
  • 1 0
 @Padded: Super Boost low!
  • 8 1
 I like high and higher.
  • 3 1
 @Tinshield:

> I like high and higher.

high, higher, i-need-a-stepladder-to-scratch-my-arse
  • 1 1
 Lets not pretend that low as a hoe ain't the best setting
  • 31 2
 16 comments and no one is crying about PF bottom bracket?

Maybe times are changing!

(I've has them on 2 bikes, never creaked and lasted just as long as ht2 ones)
  • 4 0
 PF was the only con in my pros and cons list when I was shopping for my current frame. On a previous Stumpy it creaked and creaked and creaked, on my current frame it is dead silent. I have to say my hate for PF has been subdued a bit. Still would have preferred threaded though...
  • 7 0
 I have had three PF bikes:
-Current road bike has over 20,000 miles, original BB.
-Old XC bike which I beat the hell out of, original BB when it was stolen.
-Current XC bike.

I have yet to need to change a PF BB. I have had to change several threaded though with less mileage.
  • 7 0
 Ive owned 3 bikes with PF bottom brackets. No problems at all, although I do prefer changing threaded bbs.
  • 6 1
 im on my third pivot, and the pivot bottom brackets have genuinely been silent and run flawlessly
  • 4 0
 Best fix for the PF skeptics out there (as I was too at one point)--Wheels Manufacturing makes a PF bb where the shell threads together, so it doesn't actually 'press' in, technically. Had one on a bike and zero creaks or maintenance in 3 years of riding. Ran me about 85USD, no regrets.
  • 2 0
 @dylansanderson2004: Chris Cocalis has been known to go to the factory and spend time insuring tolerances are consistently very tight. He’s always been passionate about the invisible details, and I commend him for taking the time to make sure we are receiving a quality product.
  • 21 1
 Now does the new look and feel of Pivot bikes have to do with Turner not producing DW-Link bikes anymore?
I mean this is a classic Turner and before that, Iron Horse look.
  • 1 0
 I wouldn't be surprised if that was related, and had a similar thought when the Mach 4SL came out. My Turner Czar is amazing, and if it broke I'd go with the 4SL.
  • 7 4
 Because now that Dave is out of the FS MTB game, Cocalis can crib his designs with impunity. This is the 29" and more modern version of the 2016 Burner. They are also both designed by Dave Weagle, who designed all of Turners suspension. Turner needs to come out with an aluminum version of this bike that doesn't weigh the 35lbs that every other aluminum bike coming out of the woodwork these days does.
  • 2 0
 Also looks a bit like the first gen Firebird, and some of the other early Pivots with vertical shocks. All the original DW bikes looked fairly similar. Their design change probably had more to do with fitting a water bottle than anything else.
  • 1 0
 Oh Iron Horse. If you changed a couple angles, would still be "new" now
  • 3 2
 I spoke to a Pivot Designer last march at a show when the new Switchblade came out, he was saying that Fox have only just made a shock that would allow them to run what they wanted-needed with a shock in this position.
  • 4 0
 The Pivot Switchblade is the new Sultan. Change my mind.
  • 2 0
 @SlodownU: DT is on the CX and gravel bike kick. I don't think he is coming back. I think he is just enjoying playing on his bikes now.
  • 3 0
 @JSTootell: Given the size and scale of his company, this new move makes sense. And if he’s enjoying what he’s doing, all the better.
  • 4 0
 @TheR: The last several times I have talked with him, he was smiling.
  • 21 2
 Not to be a cheap skate, but why would I want this instead of two Izzos?
  • 11 12
 Three reasons:
1) DW-link far, far, far outshines Horst link suspensions;
2) cannot compare a value-based bike to an ultra-premium bike; different customer / different values
3) Pivot tolerances are to 5 significant figures, design execution wise; I hear no other bike company is close to their tolerances;
4) major FLEX (duh);

Guess that’s 4 reasons...

PS: I be never owned a Pivot, so not a fan boi of them; I have a 2 bike stable: Mojo HD5 and Ripmo V1 (but have owned singlevpivot, Horst 4-bar, VPP, CVA, and Switch Infinity bikes, FWIW)
  • 10 0
 Because when you buy a YT, you need to buy two if them. I have owned 4 of them, currently own two of them and a Pivot so not just talking shit. There are too many YT riders who have lost complete riding seasons due to poor handling of warranty claims.
  • 4 0
 @eric32-20: Regarding #3... Measured to where? In what units? Designing to, and manufacturing to, are two very different things. Designing to X00.0X is easy, making that in the real world is a lot harder, and borderline impossible; depending on what units you are taking about.
  • 5 0
 @eric32-20: Pivot tolerances on CFRP frames are to microns? Really? Really?
  • 1 0
 @eric32-20: My comment was a bit tongue-in-cheek. How about: why would I want a 429 XO for $7000 when I can get a Spur or Ryve 115 XO for $6k or an XX/XO HeiHei CR/CL for $6500?
  • 1 0
 @smartyiak: If you’d be happier with a Ryve or a Hei Hei and an extra $1000 in your pocket then by all means. The Spur appeals to me but I assume the Pivot frame is higher quality, dunno about $1000 better though. I’d be strongly considering this or a Spur if I hadn’t already gotten the new Switchblade last year.
  • 41 24
 Superboost? Nah, you can shove it in your arse...
  • 34 1
 up the arse? won't fit... too wide
  • 6 5
 @SillyTorque: That's what she said.
  • 3 12
flag NikolaiB (Feb 23, 2021 at 11:07) (Below Threshold)
 Yup....retarded
  • 14 1
 I think I heard my wallet scream
  • 13 2
 Pivot has been delivering my shop bikes on release all year long, give them credit, Santa Cruz is a shit storm compared to Pivot right now.
  • 27 16
 Super Boost and Press-fit BB? Nope
  • 9 7
 nothing wrong with press fit bud. clean your shit.
  • 11 3
 @ridingofthebikes: nothing wrong with threaded and same size hubs either. No benefit of press fit over threaded so let's just keep things standard then anyone can pick up a spare anywhere
  • 8 7
 @jenksy: press fit has been around for aaaaaages. my 98 bmx has a press fit. get over yourself.
  • 2 5
 Exactly. I refuse to go onto super boost just based on principle. Boost and threaded bb work great and are the standards.
  • 2 2
 @ridingofthebikes: let's keep crap only because we used it before.
  • 1 2
 @Sluni: Lol threaded bottom brackets came first. so way to put your foot directly in your mouth!
  • 2 1
 When I was racing in northern California local races I'd go through 3 or 4 BBs a year. I switched to a pivot w/ press fit and BB lasted a year plus.

Super boost is a unique design factor. Works for some, not for others. Allows me to ride tougher stuff with stability on less travel so works for me. I do wish my wheels could be more interchangeable though.
  • 7 0
 Remember having to own the latest and updated greatest such as Monster T's, Super Monster's, 6 piston brakes, 3.0 tires, military grade chain guides, 10 inches of travel and god forbid riding a 29'er. This excessively steep/slack angles are a fad that will scale back too. Sure you want what Richie Rude or Minnaar are riding in the ALPs and Dolomites or even what PB is testing in Squamish but does it work in Molehill(wherever you live)... Not so much. Compromise is key and Pivot have it dialled.
  • 9 0
 No size specific cs but size specific layup? Shits too expensive for real. C'mon Chris...
  • 10 4
 Oh Pivot, you just can't let go of those ultra short chain stays huh?

Another bike that needs size specific rear ends. There are going to be two camps in the industry for awhile on this but my crystal is strongly saying that in five years most performance mountain bikes are going to have size specific rear ends.
  • 10 0
 Devinci gets it.
  • 2 0
 Sure hope so! The larger sizes deserve to be as balanced as the Mediums that everyone tests and are so balanced and ideal! Someone on a medium gets an entirely different ride than an XL!
  • 11 3
 can everyone stop complaining about superboost being bad and just start complaining about regular boost being behind the times
  • 9 0
 Looks nice, but I'm still in lust with my FB29
  • 7 0
 I've always liked the looks of pivots and the DW link is meant to be magical, but 432mm chainstays are on XL are a big no no for me.
  • 3 0
 Can’t handle companies not doing longer chainstays on the big sizes like XLs and XXLs out there. We deserve a more balanced ride like the Mediums get! Makes such a huge difference
  • 8 0
 So glad this bike is Super Boost so I can mount a 27.5 x 2.8 tire to my XL bike with 432mm chainstays.
  • 9 2
 So this is basically an Ibis Ripley (near-identical geo) but with SuperBoost and pressfit BB?
  • 3 0
 less reach, slacker seat angle
  • 4 3
 Two reasons I won't buy one.
  • 1 2
 A HEAVIER Ripley with SuperBoost and pressfit BB...
  • 4 0
 I've ridden the Switchblade, its incredible...like really good up and really good down (I think it could have had a 65.5 HTA tho). It makes sense tho as it was an improved clone of the V1 Ripmo which is a BLAST unless you ride ultrahard or want a Coil. This has about the same geo as that but with a slightly slacker STA...which is a bit odd I guess. I also love their new lines too. The SB is a BEAUTY in person, especially that green. This is good looking too.
  • 5 1
 Ibis has offered a Ripley with this geo since 2019. The STA is a little steeper.
  • 5 2
 I wonder if manufacturares agree to have only 1 color in all the bikes produced every season. This season it seems that blue and its shades are the color of choice. Boring af IMO. We need some different colors. Take Marin for example. If bike manufacters cannot make different paintjobs at least make the warranty unvoidable in case of repaint.
PS: Don’t come at me with the cost talk. Just don’t.
  • 10 0
 But what about the cost? Bikes are already too expensive as it is.
  • 8 0
 I think cost would play a part though...
  • 10 0
 What about the added cost
  • 1 0
 True with the blue, but that silver is the shiz! At least they didn't put any neon orange on this new edition.
  • 3 0
 It seems to me that the STA must be such that you are in the proper position for laying down power in the upper third of your post travel. I like the fact that the seat moves forward as well as down for downhill (or seated cruising and admiring the scenery).

I am due for a new bike. My finalists are the Spur and the Ranger, but perhaps this is a new contender. Can't wait to see more info on this bike.
  • 2 0
 @jacobyw: depends on the grades you normally climb, plus individual body morphology. I'm anything but trendy, yet I hugely prefer steep STA for climbing steep grades
  • 9 7
 Sweet bike! Pivot hasnt kept up with the Jones in the geo dept. Good thing cause if you ride anywhere other than big mountains its unwarranted. As far as super boost goes, stiffer, stronger, more durable, more clearance, better chainline, etc. The stiffness and compliance alone is a massive improvment over most noodle rear end. It is the future. Mark that down. as for price. Spesh, SC, Yeti, Norco....any bike now other than direct will have similar tags for middle builds that we will buy.
  • 3 0
 With the Izzo, Ripley AF (hopefully soon a V5), and Spur this segment has some really great competition. I would like to see 76° STA the slackest with preference of 77°. Great looking bike.
  • 2 0
 As an owner of a 2018 Mach 429 Trail I can vouch, mostly, for how well this 2021 rig likely handles. My 2018 is awesome, so I'm sure this 2021 is superb. Having ridden FSR bikes prior, I definitely prefer DW link suspension. I do envy the new matte finishes (my gloss finish is notorious for swirls and scratches), but I also admittedly miss the old carbon frame front triangle form factor. The new one looks too similar to all of the competition on the market. Kudos to Pivot for getting rid of Pivloc, and for making more space for a water bottle; those are excellent improvements. My water bottle is crammed up against the horizontally oriented shock which is notably annoying. All said, the 2021 looks like a gorgeous new rendition of the 429. I'm glad you can still acquire the XT-equipped kit for $5600; I feel that is a very good value package. I am a little surprised Pivot has gone the way of Superboost spacing. My rig has boost spacing which is plenty sufficient for 2.6 29er tires or 2.8 27.5 tires (I use 2.4 in the summer and 2.8 studded in the winter currently). I am also surprised Pivot hasn't been compelled to steepen the seat tube angle as many other boutique bike brands have (i.e. Propain or Deviate). Otherwise, very nice execution. Also, I totally support Pivot's choice of the PF92 BB, I've never had any problems with it snow, mud, water, sand, dirt, fine silt, doesn't seem to matter; no need to replace with it with a thread-on style BB.
  • 45 40
 Still holding on to those 5 year old seat tube angles though... meh
  • 7 25
flag maybenotaprofile (Feb 23, 2021 at 1:55) (Below Threshold)
 Headtube angle is not much better...
  • 8 29
flag Richt2000 (Feb 23, 2021 at 2:53) (Below Threshold)
 Agree. If it was 77 seat angle, 15mm more reach, 65 head angle and 5mm lower bb it would be in a top 3 want list, even with the superboost shyte.
  • 60 2
 Steep seat angles doesn't automatically mean good... one geo setup does not fit all

I'm lucky enough to have 2 bikes one with a 77 seat angle - one with a 75.

On the 75 I have noticeably less upper body fatigue with little if no loss in efficiency or front end grip on rolling terrain, which is what I ride 90% of the time

On strait up and down + steep climbing.. ill take the 77 as it does put you in a slightly better position... so really its personal / terrain preference at this stage. Good to have options to suit how you ride and where you ride.
  • 4 2
 @Richt2000: so you have seen the Norco optic.
  • 2 0
 @Leethal-1:
Yea thats more like it.

@Karve:
I agree, but my knees and back prefer modern geo, others prefer oldskool!
My trails are mostly steep climbs.
  • 14 0
 @Karve: I agree completely. My local trails are hills not mountains, so a lot of switching back and forth between intermittent climbing and descending and slightly slacker HTA work great on these. Most of the population does not live right next to large mountains. We wish we did, but the steepest and slackest isn’t always better for most people’s everyday riding
  • 29 1
 It's almost like not all bikes are designed for super steep and blazing downhill. Perhaps they are designing bikes for a majority of the country who spends their time in tight and twisty low elevation singletrack. This everything has to be lower and slacker is just showing ignorance at this point.
  • 24 0
 @maybenotaprofile: I must suck at riding bikes, but I went from a Stumpy Evo with a 64° HTA to a Ripley with a 66.5° HTA and the first thing I noticed was how much front end traction I had on flat turns and I didn't give anything up on steeper terrain. Slack bikes understeer a lot of your terrain isn't super steep. It's only in the chunkiest rock sections that I feel like I might stuff my wheel on my new bike. That's a trade-off I'm willing to make.
  • 24 0
 The seat tube angles are my favorite thing about Pivot's design philosophy. Not everyone lives in winch and plummet terrain. In fact, I'd argue most people don't. I've discovered that steeper seat angles don't agree with the uppy downy, undulating terrain I ride here in the mid-atlantic. It puts unnecessary pressure on my wrists over the flatter pedally sections for the limited payoff of a 3 minute hump up a steeper section. Especially for a bike like this, which is meant to be a lighter duty trail bike give me 75 degree SA any day. It's the perfect compromise imo. Glad to see Pivot sticking to their guns.
  • 6 1
 @babathehutt: I completely agree, especially for a bike in this travel range. I have a tallboy v4 (65.5ha) and I would steepen it by 1/2 to 1 degree if it took a press-in headset. Even steep alpine riding feels great with 66ha... and the bike will be more fun and playful everywhere else.

Long reach and short stem already adds a ton of stability and confidence compared to bikes from 5 years ago.

I guess that’s why it’s nice to have options! Or better yet, an adjustable frame.
  • 7 0
 Not a negative. I ride with 75.x ST and 67.x HT angle Devinci (110R/ 120F travel) and have never seen any issues. It reacts very quickly, steers better, and climbs just as well as my buddies 'long and slack.' Not everyones riding environs call for massive angles.

It is a short travel bike. It is not going to be chucked down mountainsides very often, if at all. It is a bike for people who ride that in between XC and gravity/ enduro stuff. You know, like probably 90%+ of the bike buying population.
  • 3 0
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: I agree. I love my ripmo AF, but the steeper seat tube angles have been hard on my hands and wrists on longer rides.
  • 10 0
 Meh. 75 seat tube angle + DW link will out-climb most bikes in this class.
  • 7 0
 @jmhills: It's gotten a bit out of hand. Some of us like to turn between trees with no berms. :-)
  • 6 0
 Steep STA only works when climbing steep hills, not for pedaling flowing terrain. This is definitely not a winch up/ bomb down type of bike.
  • 7 0
 Agreeing with most here. This is 120/130 27lb bike remember, not a 170mm enduro bike. This is an every day bike for someone who lives in mixed terrain or a 2nd bike for someone who has an enduro bomber and uses this for the weekday after-work rides around moderate terrain. This bike isn't designed for a 45 minute 50t spin up a hill followed by a 1200ft 10 minute descent.
  • 6 0
 @maybenotaprofile: Headtube angle is a breath of fresh air from the highly unnecessary 62 nonsense. Do you like chopper's bro? 66 nailed it all. climbing descending and maintaining control in all situations.
  • 9 0
 @babathehutt: yup people are catching on. the geo race is over. we've went to far. Shit go back!!
  • 1 0
 @jmhills: That is a great setup.
  • 2 0
 @ridingofthebikes: It is my Marshall in the high setting. We have rocks and stumps and pedal/ BB bracket strikes suck so I keep it on high. Even with 2.8s on it, it pedals and rolls really well. I am comfortable as well. I rode/ raced TT on the road for years. That seat tube angle was ridiculous. On top of that, you ride the nose of the seat so you could put power straight down. It was great for that- putting power down nonstop. For everything else, it sucked. You always felt pitched forward.

I am looking for a longer travel frame right now and everything in the 140R window has seat tubes in the 77.x region. Not sure how my knees are going to like that.
  • 4 0
 @ridingofthebikes: I'm looking forward to getting a gen 1 ripmo at a discount when the dentists jump ship to a slacker rig!
  • 3 0
 @Muggsly: would you prefer if MTBs moved back to a 74-75 STA area in general? with steeper HTAs and more in general "old geo" ? as someone that always finds themself in on XL or XXL frames if availale I always found old school geo put too much stress on frames for me having to run the dropper very high out of the frame and getting a bad peddaling position sitting square over the rear wheel. Wheeling up every climb that got even slightly steeper
  • 2 0
 @jmhills: The new Pivot Switchblade is 75 degree SA as well. Another option to consider is the Jamis Hardline- well reviewed suspension design, 160 front and rear that supposedly pedals really well. It is a 27.5er though.
  • 1 0
 Actual can't be more than 68d. Rearward seat tube bend is absent tho. Nominal toptubes are an inch longer than most other brands across sizes. Better fit for shorter riders
  • 1 0
 @babathehutt: I owned one for a year- it’s a fantastic bike! It’s really well balanced- it does a great job of hiding the fact that it’s a long travel bike until you need the travel. I rode it down some seriously steep and loose terrain in Colorado and Pisgah. The only “flaw” was that the air can needed a full compliment of spacers to not blow through the travel a little too fast. But with three spacers it worked great.
  • 1 0
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: depends on your height and where st measured, as a person with long legs - my seat in dropped position on the bar level (with 180 dropper) so anything slacker then 75 /76 included are put me far behind;

I agree in case actual = virtual, however that is not the case for 90% of manufacturers
  • 2 0
 @nickmalysh: That is the catch. I ride XL bikes as well as I am 6'4". The seat tube thing is always an almost meaningless number to me. It is a starting point but not really enough information there to push one bike over another without a test ride. All bike companies should publish numbers like Banshee does. They give you angle measurements at different saddle heights.
  • 1 0
 @nickmalysh: Yeah, I guess I have the opposite problem of having relatively short inseam relative to my height and it just feels like modern steep STA bikes really pitch me over the handlebars in seated position. This is why options are good!
  • 7 3
 Pivot with the same old tired spec bs. Race "XT" aka we everything SLX. "Team Frame and Crank"
  • 5 3
 I had a 2017 429, needed bushings within a month and two more sets over a year, canadian rep was awful and dodged emails and phone calls from me and my lbs. it was an overbuilt xc bike and nothing more. Never again Pivot
  • 4 2
 "more versatile version of the Switchblade that's friendlier on the uphills and easier to maneuver in tight quarters" ohhh my God !!!! ???? the definitive bike but it's a missed opportunity to drop superboost...!!
  • 3 2
 Have you actually ridden and spent time on a bike with superboost? 30% stiffer over boost is noticeable. Seems most people that complain about superboost just haven't ridden with it and just don't want to upgrade their wheels.
  • 3 4
 superboost is one of the best things that has happened to the bike industry over the last couple years in my opinion
  • 8 1
 @dylansanderson2004: people bitch about superboost being "marginally" better than boost when it's really boost is marginally stiffer than 142. Boost is 16% percent stiffer than 142 while superhoost is 30% stiffer than boost. Boost is the standard that shouldn't have happened...
  • 2 0
 @richter762: I’ve ridden SB157 and did not like the extra stiffness. I’m 150lbs and live in a very rocky area. With both pivot bikes I demoed (past gen switchblade and 429 trail) it felt like I was getting knocked around more than on comparable bikes with ‘regular’ boost. (I’ve had a ripmo v1 and tallboy v4 over the past 2 years)

Some of this could be Pivots overall mission to build really stiff bikes. They do that very well... it just comes down to individual preference.
  • 4 0
 I like the colour, it matches my eyes.
  • 5 0
 oh, makes sense.. maybe that is why I have so many black bikes.
  • 12 8
 Never seen a pivot and wanted one. After today? Yep that still stands.
  • 1 1
 Must be a new high for frame only model — $4000 USD
Part of that must be the RF crank Pivot forces you to buy with the frame only.
Which seems stupid as most people who buy a frame only have all the components and want just that - a frame only.
  • 4 0
 Yeah but with super boost the cranks they already have won’t fit. Not many people are already on a super boost bike when they buy the frame
  • 1 1
 Yeah, I don't understand the crank being included? Why?
  • 3 0
 So I’m a Pivot fan and just bought and received a new Switchblade. Got the cheapest SRAM build so I can ditch all the parts on ebay.

Message to Chris Cocalis - it is beyond annoying you won’t just sell frames like every other company. They still aren’t selling Switchblade frame/crank combos unless a dealer begs for one which none near me would. As for including a crank, please I don’t need an expensive Race Face carbon crank - I already have several. And if someone has a boost Race Face 30mm crank, all you need is a new spindle. Plenty of other superboost cranks out there now. There is no excuse for this.

And during COVID, Pivot can’t ship bikes because of lack of parts, but then they won’t sell frames.

I still bought the bike but if demos were still possible maybe I would have gotten something else. I was able to demo this bike and it fits the bill.
  • 2 1
 Or just buy the Ripley frame, dw-link, better geo, my Enve wheelset already fits it, threaded bb, cranks fit, and I can just buy a frame. .02

Pivot doesn't want people who only buy frames, their pricing, crank bundling, etc, absolutely solidifies that for me. They will select themselves out of the "builders" market, in fact, they are actively doing so, it's by design.
  • 3 1
 @danielsapp trails "de-thaw", eh? So refreeze? "Dethaw: this term generally is regarded as nonstandard and an illiterate term for thaw"
  • 2 16
flag danielsapp Plus (Feb 23, 2021 at 7:05) (Below Threshold)
 Not necessarily, although it can refer to that. It is multi-faceted and more has to do with breaking out of a cycle of freeze-thaw, one way or another, and frustrating those (like yourself) not as well educated on what a de-thaw actually can be.
  • 9 0
 @danielsapp: Ok, so freeze thaw cycle is what you were referring to. That makes sense. Working in a scientific position, words like dethaw drive me nuts. So "not as well educated" is also a bit of a misnomer in this context.
  • 2 0
 This bike gets it. this is so useful. geo perfect, travel perfect. and it looks nice to. way to expensive though... i mean all bikes are so w.e.
  • 3 1
 PB putting Pivot on blast finally, "The Trail 429 Pro X01 build, as shown, sells for $8,499 USD." with a picture of a GX cassette. Pivot been doing this bullshit for years.
  • 8 6
 A new GASGAS costs like 10k, and won the first SX this year. How is this over 12?
  • 5 3
 What would a GASGAS weigh if you took the engine and drivetrain out?
  • 21 1
 Do you really believe that a stock 10k MX bike win races?
  • 4 1
 @nozes: of course it will...... once you upgrade virtually everything......
  • 2 0
 A new GASGAS gets to spread development costs against the 2 other brands that are damn near the same. Add in the enduro models have absolute HOT GARBAGE (xPlor) forks and I get way less worked up about MTB vs dirt bike prices now.

-White KTM (Husqvarna) 350 owner
  • 11 0
 Why do people lose their shit over the top of the line bling build every time? Just get the XT build if you like the bike then, who cares?!
  • 3 0
 My 2021 Beta X-Trainer cost $7,800! For a 300 cc dirt bike, it is nimble and fun almost like a mountain bike.
  • 2 1
 Hahah not a great comparison... about the only thing stock on Barcias bike is the color and shape of his plastics. Factory bikes are insane. Lots of one off parts as well.

Also to answer your question: Economies of Scale
  • 3 1
 @stormracing:

Also not a good comparison. People say this all the time and it makes ZERO sense. Although Barcia is riding a $100k bike, the point is, he COULD ride that bone stock bike around the supercross track just fine. In fact, I'd put every dollar in my bank account that Barcia on a bone stock GasGas could beat Vince Friese even though Friese is on a partially works bike too.

Also, people parrot the economies of scale argument but I'm not sure I buy that either. Do we know that to be true? Keep in mind, there's only like 5 or 6 brands building 450 MX bikes. Compare that to dozens of brands building similar mtbs that rely on the same hubs, spokes, tires, drivetrains, suspension, cockpit, etc. There is no possible way that more WP or Showa or Kayaba forks for mx bikes are rolling down the assembly line than the sum of all Fox 34s or Rockshox Pikes. The only argument I can readily think of is that those MX brands all have other businesses that bring cash flow in and theoretically could bankroll MX development, but I can hear the accountants screaming already.....doubtful.
  • 1 1
 @nozes: Bradley Taft was top 10 outdoors on a bone stock Husky 450 in 2019
  • 2 0
 @agraber: I also think the consumer base is different. Cycling consumer's willingness to pay a higher price has been around for a long time. Just look at consumables for mtb versus moto. Brake pads, tires, grips etc. for moto is way cheaper than the mtb equivalent. Clothing and footwear are other obvious examples. The moto crowd seems willing to pay less in general. Think this has a lot to do with it.
  • 1 0
 @anderimj: agreed.... the market always reacts. If there's un-spent money in a customer base, MTB manufacturers will find and extract it.
  • 31 30
 Geometry from 5 years ago and pricing to rival Santa Cruz or Specialized. Every time Pivot releases a new product I wonder how they are still in business.
  • 51 30
 Coz Pivot makes better bikes than SC or S. Have never seen a broken Pivot and lots are ridden on our brutal rocky trails. SC rattle and fall apart at their bearings. S crack chainstays with their Trek brothers. The beauty of Pivots was that they were over built and that they maintained a more conventional geometry that allows you to pedal longer and further than the Enduro Bro’s with their exploded quads from their 78 degree STA... are Pivot now drinking the cool aid? Fortunately not. Good biometrics and best in market engineering prevails. Chris Cocalis knows his stuff
  • 19 17
 @BenTheSwabian They are still in business because like Yeti and Ellsworth before them they've developed a group of yaysayers/rabid fans/followers that are onboard for whatever they do and spread the word thusly. I've ridden and/or demoed everything of theirs through '19 and simply never cared for the way they ride nor their value proposition. I will say that locally, they seem to attract a certain type of rider that are more into relegating their former XC duds for casual attire yet still ride like getting to the end is their only goal (and their pockets are deep). Fast fun versus rad fun. Not my thing, but whatever turns one on.
  • 31 8
 @professed: I don’t get the Chris Cocalis cult. It’s like car guys who name drop random BMW engineers names to signal how in the know they are. “Conventional geo” just means Chris Cocalis knows his average rider is some big money boomer who, despite having a brand new 11k Pivot, still wears a 12 year old Primal jersey to ride and thinks these new bikes are just too long for twisty trails.
  • 11 3
 @wibblywobbly: it really depends on the trails you frequently ride. Pivots are not great if you live in a place where you climb to descend. But in areas where you have undulating, technical terrain they ride great IMO.

They are overpriced IMO just like Yeti
  • 5 0
 @professed: No Les ever made it to a year unless the rider was over 55 and under 140lbs.
  • 11 0
 Chris C knows marketting.
  • 5 3
 @professed: there's a sucker born every minute
  • 8 0
 I really enjoy the way my Firebird 29 rides, works great as a descent focused only bike in a place with actual mountains. It also works pretty well as is geo wise, but I'm going to try a -1 headset this year. to see if it can get even better. If buying today, it wouldn't be my choice. For the prices Pivot charges, no tube in tube cable routing, no frame storage, bearings without additional seals, PF BBs, the value just isn't there.
  • 6 0
 I have no strong feelings about Pivot one way or the other, but the geometry comment seems unfair.

Kona was on the vanguard of geometry in 2016, and here are the geo numbers for the most similar bike, the Process 111 DL:
konaworld.com/archive/2016/process_111_dl.cfm

There's a five year old bike with significantly steeper head tube, slacker seat tube, shorter reach, same CS length, but much shorter wheelbase, plus a lot heavier, and it was ahead of its time five years ago.
  • 6 0
 @professed: I can show you the Pivot LES in my garage with a crack on the insde of the drive side chainstay right behind the BB if you'd like to see a broken Pivot.

All bikes break.
  • 4 0
 @RR1: my crew out here on the east had to stop using the LES. (aside from reasons regarding the geo) But everyone broke them within a year.
  • 10 4
 @professed: hahaha SC rattle and fall apart? Ok then. Keep talking out your ass.
  • 6 2
 Agree with everything you said. Pivot bikes just work in allot of riding conditions and seem more durable than most other brands. I dont love the press-fit bb (although never had a problem with one). Superboost is a pain in the arse in regards to cranks and wheels not being cross compatible with regular boost frames. Overall i have absolutely abused my Firebird 29 and it keeps on begging for more. The riding position up and down is great. This new bike in the silver looks like a bike I honestly would consider purchasing. @professed:
  • 2 1
 @professed: super well said.
  • 3 1
 @timothyjplatt79: never seen a Les around my parts. Only hubbards would try and ride a hardtail in our terrain. Riders are mostly on firebirds, meta AMs , etc. A few SC megatowers, ibis ripmos, some cracked Strives and of course other regular bikes can be found as well. The Firebirds do very well as you need to climb the nasty stuff we descend.

Efficacy dictates my views. Interesting how the armchair riders think its only marketing. Perhaps get out and ride a Pivot in bad terrain and you will understand...
  • 5 1
 Ah yes, I definitely want a 62° HTA on my 120mm bike.
  • 2 1
 @CircusMaximus: Unfortunately this is true, 2 santa cruz's and both creaked & rattled every ride
  • 1 0
 Is that as far in as the seat post goes? (That's what she said) but seriously That was one of the only gripes I had with my 27.5 firebird.
  • 1 1
 probably not, my switchblade can fit a 210 fully slammed into the frame
  • 1 0
 Did they make the seat stays narrower? I demo'd the last version several times and just couldn't get past the fact that my calves continually rubbed on the seat stays.
  • 1 0
 Super boost Smile
  • 3 0
 I want an SLX build...that is the value sweet spot
  • 1 0
 @danielsapp "de-thaw" that's right you said it! Lol Good to know that you like to rode on frozen dirt down there in the south LOL!!!
  • 2 0
 Great. Waiting on the next gen firebird with a vertical shock so it will hold a water bottle. Snack storage too please!
  • 4 2
 Why on earth is the geo chart in inches? Can someone remind Pivot that it's 2021 and inches are a dumb hinderance?
  • 2 0
 Dear Pivot,
Please make a short(ish) travel 27.5" wheel bike. A Trail 527 perhaps?
  • 2 0
 @ashfordakers It's called the Mach 5.5... It's been out for nearly 5 years.
  • 1 0
 @dan23dan23: The 5.5 is too burly, 160mm Fox 36 is overkill.
I’m thinking 125-130mm rear, 140-150mm Fox 34. Like my old Yeti SB5c but a bit slacker and longer.
  • 4 2
 Looks like a carbon Banshee
  • 3 0
 Looks like bmc
  • 4 2
 More Dan Roberts reviews please.
  • 3 0
 Izzo for the win
  • 5 3
 I respect Pivot commitment to staying behind.
  • 2 2
 i agree, im 6 foot and i never thought i would ever need to do back to back testing between medium and large
  • 1 1
 @dylansanderson2004: seriously, top tube length almost 25" / 630mm... For a Medium??
  • 1 0
 @WoodenCrow: this is so weird. Its like the bike is modern enough, it's fairly long and all that...but the STA is just off for fitment when seated. I don't get it. Ibis nailed this geo a while ago, and they used most of that...but not the proper STA for length of the bike?
  • 2 0
 @WoodenCrow: It's funny. I'm 5'10", kinda long legs, and I saw that and got excited. To get a decent climbing position (upper body) I feel like I have to run a longer stem than bike companies intended when the effective top tube link is shorter than 620 mm.
  • 2 0
 @pmhobson: Always surprising how different our body types and preferences are! I like for a nice
  • 2 0
 ... conservative top tube with more progressive (not crazy) reach and sta for climbing steep stuff
  • 2 0
 @WoodenCrow: Exactly. Which really goes to show you that it's good that companies are putting out bikes that at least someone can complain about. The (MTB) world would be boring if every company's geometry charts looked the same. I want options!
  • 1 0
 Is it just me or does anyone else read Daniel’s posts with a Mark Twain accent?
  • 1 0
 Besides being stupid expensive on a whole l like the bike. The Silver paint is very pretty
  • 1 0
 I don't trust anyone that declares dimensions in centimeters. We use millimeters, we are not savages!
  • 1 0
 "The suspension has been made more progressive and the shock sits higher in its travel"

WUT. Broscience
  • 2 1
 Thoughts on 429 vs Mach 5.5? Appreciated.
  • 11 0
 get the 429 if you want a 29'' 120/130 bike. get the mach 5.5 if you want a 27.5 140/160 bike Smile
  • 1 1
 @huckschwinn: Or the 429 if I want a 27.5+. Woo Woo. I appreciate the reply, although I had that part figured out. Never had a full sus before, love the 650b's on my NP Scout. Demos are a thing of the pre pandemic past. This is a tough nut to crack for this New England rider.
  • 1 1
 @rabbitsmokinintheferns: in new zealand, our pivot dealer has virtually stopped importing 27.5 and is only doing 29, you have to order it out of the states with them if you want 27.5
  • 1 0
 @dylansanderson2004: Interesting. I realize my last 29er was a 2013, so whole different world, but I still feel love for the smaller, nimbler wheel for my local hiking/biking trails.
  • 4 4
 Available 2023, so then it s a 7 year old geometry... At least it s not 32lbs anymore like the old one
  • 1 0
 Just released! Order now for delivery in July!
  • 1 0
 180 mm rotors and EXO tires on the “Enduro” builds?
  • 1 0
 Promoting products(PB water bottle)lol
  • 1 0
 Does Ed Masters know how CRAZY expensive his bikes are?
  • 1 0
 I prefer the Pivot 428 Super Cobra Jet.
  • 1 1
 Only a 10% price increase over the old model. Race XT has gone from $5100 to $5600!
  • 1 0
 So....this or the Evil Following? Seems like a mini switchblade.
  • 3 4
 Shame pivot only make bikes with very high end build kits, even on the aluminum frames
  • 3 2
 Aluminum frames? lmao
  • 2 0
 @swenzowski: not sure if it's different in NA, but in the UK there is a Mach 6 and switchblade in alloy
  • 1 0
 @DanielP07: I think in US they stopped the Switchblade in Aluminum last year. Not sure they sell the aluminum frames in the US anymore
  • 1 0
 @NERyder: pivot discontinued alloy on all bikes a couple years ago
  • 1 0
 @DanielP07: not anymore, they discontinued them like a year ago
  • 1 0
 More vaporware
  • 1 1
 Is it just me or the colors keep getting worse with each new iteration?
  • 1 0
 looks like a turner
  • 6 6
 F*ck Superboost
  • 1 0
 Boom...!
  • 9 10
 They made a Ripley!
  • 4 5
 Pretty slack STA
  • 2 3
 Lost me at Superboost
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