First Ride: 2022 Focus Jam - A Sleek Trail Bike

Apr 22, 2021
by Seb Stott  


Focus has revamped their Jam trail bike with more travel and more aggressive geometry. Focus has also released the Thron, a 130mm stablemate which shares most of the same design features but is aimed at mellow terrain, touring and more novice riders. This has allowed Focus to aim the Jam towards rowdier riding, with an increase in travel from 140mm to 150mm, significantly more reach and a slacker head angle than its predecessor. Focus is keen to stress in its marketing blurb that this is not an enduro bike, with a heavy emphasis on fun factor and what you might call all-mountain terrain. I'm inclined to agree.

Focus Jam details
• Intended use: mountain biking
• Wheel Size: 29"
• Travel: 150mm front and rear
• Aluminum-only frame
• Sizes S to XL
• 435mm chainstay
• 65-65.5-degree head angle
• Weight as tested: 16.2Kg / 35.7lbs
• £2,499 - £4,199 / 2,399€ - 4,099€
focus-bikes.com

16.04.21. Pinkbike Forest of Dean Rider Seb Stott. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography

Frame Details

One of the biggest talking points is the cable routing, which runs through the stem, down through the spacers, the headset and into the mainframe. The brake hose and gear cable (on models which have one) pop out behind the main pivot before running through the swingarm. There are no cable ports at the front of the frame or lugs for external cable routing, so cables have to be run through the headset. This is worth noting because Focus only offers the cable integration stem in this 50mm length and 35mm clamp diameter. So if you want to fit a different stem you'll need a special headset top cap from Acros with holes for cables to enter. Focus tells me their customers rarely swap stems, but I'd have liked to try a 40mm stem.

16.04.21. Pinkbike Forest of Dean Rider Seb Stott. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography
16.04.21. Pinkbike Forest of Dean Rider Seb Stott. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography

To stop the cables getting damaged when the bars spin in a crash, the headset limits the steering angle to about 80-degrees from straight ahead. That's plenty for even the tightest switchbacks but, sadly, not for bar-spins.

Another feature is the tool bag for storing tubes, tools and snacks, which is secured onto the downtube in front of the water bottle on a pair of bottle-cage-style bolts. It contains a strap to stop tools rattling around if it's only half-full. In order to make room for this plus a full-size water bottle, the downtube is strongly S-shaped and the top-tube mounted shock is recessed in the belly of the flattened top tube, which is concave in cross-section.

Focus has also got on board with the trend for "ribbed" chainstay protectors, which is no bad thing as it keeps the chain noise down and it seems to be made solidly. And while I have zero aesthetic taste, I think the brushed aluminium frame finish looks great.

16.04.21. Pinkbike Forest of Dean Rider Seb Stott. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography

Suspension Design

With the new Jam, Focus has moved from a vertically-mounted shock to a horizontal shock design. They stick with a linkage driven single pivot layout, which Focus calls Focus Optimised Linkage Design (FOLD).

But while the old vertical-shock system was digressive up to the sag point then progressive to the end of the travel, the new design is progressive throughout. At the launch of the old Jam, Focus told me its leverage curve offered slower rebound speeds as the shock got close to top-out (lower leverage ratios do reduce rebound speed at the axle, all things being equal), to help the bike stay within its travel and avoid topping-out on rough ground. The disadvantage of this approach was that the lower initial leverage ratio made the suspension stiffer off the top, both in terms of the spring and damping forces, which isn't ideal for traction especially with air shocks. With the new design, Focus has fallen into line with most manufacturers by making the linkage progressive throughout. This minimizes initial stiffness, and the stiffness increases (relative to the shock) throughout the stroke. There's now 23.4% progression throughout the travel, which is on the more progressive side.


The main pivot sits quite low in the frame which results in relatively low anti-squat levels. There's about 77% anti-squat at sag in a 32:16 tooth gear. The 6.0 model I tested has a 30-tooth ring which increases anti-squat values slightly, but it's still on the lower side of the spectrum. That means the bike bobs and slouches into its travel more than most when pedaling.


Geometry

Like seemingly every other bike these days, the Jam has a flip chip to adjust the geometry. This changes the BB height by 6mm and the head and seat angles by 0.5-degrees. The effective seat angle (measured to the top of the seat post at a height of 750mm from the BB) is 76 degrees in the low setting and 76.5 degrees in high, while the head angle is 65/65.5 degrees. Predictably, the reach has grown relative to the old Jam, and there are bigger gaps between the sizes too - the reach has grown by 10mm in the small, rising to 45mm for the XL. The chainstay length is fairly short at 435mm, hinting at the Jam's playful, rather than race-focused, intentions. One figure not quoted in the above table is the BB height, which I measure at 340mm in the low setting.

16.04.21. Pinkbike Forest of Dean Rider Seb Stott. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography


Models and Pricing

Confusingly, the base model Jam is called the 6.8, the 6.9 is a little pricier, but the 6.0 (which I've been riding) is the top-end model. Focus isn't selling these bikes in North America. UK and European pricing is as follows:

Jam 6.0: DE & AT = 3,999 €/ Rest of Europe: 4,099 € / UK: £4,199
Jam 6.9: DE & AT = 2,999 € / Rest of Europe: 3,099 € / UK: £2,999
Jam 6.8: DE & AT = 2,399 € / Rest of Europe: 2,499 € / UK: £2,499


16.04.21. Pinkbike Forest of Dean Rider Seb Stott. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography

Ride Impressions

I've only had the Jam for a week but I've got a few solid rides on it. The RockShox suspension makes setup quick and easy so I could get on with riding without much fuss. At 85Kg, I settled on 230psi in the shock, giving me 27% sag (measured seated) with the rebound six clicks from closed. I ended up with 105psi in the fork, rebound eight clicks from closed, HSC in the middle (two clicks) and LSC 12 clicks.

I'm glad to see burly parts on the 6.0 model, like the Lyrik fork and Code R brakes, even though it might have been tempting for Focus to spec a Pike fork and G2 trail brakes (for example) to save a few grams. The importance of weight is overstated, but it's worth mentioning my XL test bike weighs 16.2Kg (35.7 lbs), which is pretty heavy for a trail bike with EXO/EXO+ tires.

In the low setting, the 76-degree effective seat angle is comfortable enough for most terrain, but I'd definitely prefer it steeper as it can be a bit of a strain to keep the front wheel grounded on the steepest climbs. Obviously, going to the high setting will help a little, but even 76.5 degrees feels a little off the back to me now that I'm used to angles in the high seventies. I realize that this bike is not designed for winching up and down the steepest hills around, but I never find steeper seat angles hold me back even on the flats. Combine this with suspension which bobs noticeably under power and the Jam isn't overly impressive on the climbs. I regularly relied on the lockout lever to hold it up at the back. The low anti-squat suspension is a benefit when pedaling over bumpy terrain, where it's smooth and predictable, but in my experience higher anti-squat only becomes a problem when it reaches extremely high levels.

16.04.21. Pinkbike Forest of Dean Rider Seb Stott. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography

When descending, the low setting is definitely the one to choose, but even then the 65-degree head angle combined with the 50mm stem make the steering feel a tad more upright and nervous than I'd like for trickier trails, especially under heavy braking where the bike is less keen to tip into the turns than it might with a shorter stem. Normally I'd stick a 40mm stem on there to make sure, but here that would require a new headset and a brake bleed. Of course, 50mm stems suit some people but I like to roll my bars forward to get my wrists in a comfortable position and this effectively lengthens the stem a bit more. And while 50mm stems work when combined with really slack head angles, like on the Yeti SB165, I don't think the Jam is slack enough for it to tip into turns like I want it to with this stem length. I'd also prefer a slacker head angle and/or a shorter stem when riding steep and rough descents, so my weight was naturally further behind the axle. In the high setting, I also felt the grips were a little too low relative to my feet, so this made the low setting the only real choice for me.

While the Jam would be a home run compared to trail bikes of a few years ago, when compared to the very latest bikes it's not the best when things get steep, whether uphill or down. And like most bikes with a flip-chip, I want the head angle from the slack setting (or slacker) and the seat angle from the steep setting (or steeper), not one or the other. Again, it's not billed as an enduro bike, but given its mediocre performance on the climbs I was hoping for more on the descents. It's on more flowing trails where the Jam shines. Here the suspension has plenty of support to push against, making it feel responsive and predictable. The short chainstay makes it easy to manual and move around on the trail if that's our bag, so while it might not be my cup of tea I have no doubt people are going to have a lot of fun on this bike.

16.04.21. Pinkbike Forest of Dean Rider Seb Stott. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography



Pond Beaver 2021





144 Comments

  • 131 1
 Brushed alloy = hot
  • 17 16
 To me this is a very good looking bike for a very good price.
The different models serve all the demands of the modern mountainbiker; pedal all day if you like and hit harder trails, too.
The cable routing is very innovative. If you want to do barspins etc. this is probably not the bike you will choose anyway... repairing brakes is a pain in the butt anyway and I think it looks super clean!
Great job Focus! PB haters are gonna hate anyway...
peace
  • 47 2
 @PHOENiX96: thanks, Mr Focus
  • 8 2
 @PHOENiX96: The cable routing is the stupidest idea since 120mm stems on MTB's. Internal cable routing has its hassle factor but I've got used to it on my bike and its straightforward to change cables once you know what you're doing. This on the other hand is a whole new level of nonsense.
  • 1 1
 @PHOENiX96: And then one day for no reason whatsoever, Pinkbikers hated a bike.
  • 1 0
 @headshot: True story, but there are plenty of aftermarket guide tabs that can be attached to the bottle/tool bag mounts to just route cables externally if needed.
  • 100 8
 The integrated headset/cable pass through is the biggest PITA ever conceived. When road bikes started all this supposed "aero" integration, it just basically meant that you are stuck with their factory parts for any cockpit modifications, even headset spacers. Even with electronic shifting, you're still stuck running a brake hose through the headset. Good luck fixing that back at camp on your average weekend MTB outing. This will also require some type of "knock block" to keep the bars from over-rotating and tearing the housings, which, naturally will be a fusible link of some sort, that is designed to fail at some point and will then tear the housings. (Get it?) Good for the industry, bad for the customer. I really like the bike's ascetic, but a hard pass just because you're forced to go with their integrated solution. I'm not saying all cables need to be routed externally, but at least give some options so we're not forced to make very simple changes extremely difficult.
  • 12 65
flag pbuser2299 (Apr 22, 2021 at 6:04) (Below Threshold)
 BOOOORRRRRRIIIIIING, it looks sick. By the time the cables have worn out you'd be ready for a new bike anyway.
  • 48 7
 Disclaimer: I HAVE NOTHING TO DO WITH THIS SHIT!
  • 13 2
 You'd think the industry would know better by now than to create these kind of proprietary solutions to something that can already be solved in dozens of other ways that let us buy whatever stem we want. hard pass...
  • 15 2
 And no EDC tools!
  • 9 2
 It's new. It's selling point. Nothing more, nothing less. Most roadbike riders don't work on their bikes, therefore, hidden cables are not problem. And the bikes looks cool. I'm sure that a lot of mtbikers that doesn't wrench will be thrilled with the idea..
  • 17 1
 @pakleni: except... those road bikers you speak of ride some higher level carbon stuff. This is however an entry level bike. This stem is as neccessary as... Scotts and Cannondales 7 cables (yes 7 cables...) that ispired my drawing long time ago. It will die and AXS/DI2 will hammer the last two nails to its coffin.

BTW if you put three of these stems on top of 4 iron blocks forming a T you summon the Wither...
  • 4 2
 @justwaki: nothing drives me so mad as twinloc does
  • 5 1
 @bok-CZ: Just wait for the 3-lock when they add a dropper
  • 3 0
 @pakleni: Bontrager already makes that thumbie.
  • 3 0
 @bishopsmike: coming back to mtb after 20 years off, the one up tool was one of my favorite discoveries. No way I'm giving that up.
  • 1 0
 Agreed 100%. That detail alone makes this bike a hard pass.
  • 2 0
 @bok-CZ: I swapped the scott remote for a 2012 fox ctd remote. Much cleaner and more user friendly
  • 3 0
 This bike probably was designed to make it clear to the market and to their boss that they want to sell Ebikes only in the Future. Like when a kid doesn't want to play an instrument any longer.
  • 4 0
 Yep, that right there is enough to say no to this bike. Doesn't even look good either. I already prefer external routing but will tolerate tube in tube internal, but this is too far. Leave this shit to the road bikes.
  • 34 0
 So in summary: climbs poorly, descends poorly. Plus it makes internal cable routing even more complicated, without improving aesthetics imho anyways.
  • 10 0
 The raw alloy does look very pretty tho.
  • 20 1
 And more than 15kg for a trail bike
  • 26 0
 all punning aside, it's a nice looking bike but routing the cables through the stem takes my focus away from making this a purchase option.
  • 9 0
 To be fair, it's good looks could cause quite the traffic jam at the traihead
  • 6 6
 You can use any other stem if you want to.
  • 4 0
 @Focus-Bikes: You mean once you have to purchase a new headset ? Sound lads ... sound !
  • 5 0
 @Balgaroth: your flag says French, your wording says British..
  • 3 1
 @Balgaroth: Hi there, you don’t need a new/different headset, just a new plastic top cap for the headset which has the holes for the cables.
acros-components.com/en/products/core/headsets/10275/zs56-headset-cover-integrated-cable-routing
  • 2 0
 @Focus-Bikes: Right, but shouldn’t a headset cover... cover the headset bearings? I live in the UK and it rains a lot here - why should I have to expose my bearings to all that water in order to run my choice of stem? There are literally hundreds of other bikes on the market that don’t have this problem. And it’s a problem created by a solution looking for its own problem. Utter nonsense.
  • 1 0
 ha, I see what you did there!
  • 16 0
 3 different models, 3 different forks, 3 different rakes. Is this some weird Russian Roulette thing but only one of them wont kill you?
  • 9 2
 Fork offset (within the commercially available range) has a pretty subtle effect on handling. It's not as if any bike has to have a specific offset to handle properly.
  • 1 0
 @seb-stott: indeed, but if it has any effect on handling why would you spec your 3 models to handle differently from each other? Different dampers and the like will of course always do similar things, but this is a controlled dimension. Just seems like an odd inconsistency to me.
  • 5 0
 @mashrv1: Sure, but the difference between 42 and 46mm offset is barely perceptible in my opinion (telling 51 and 42mm apart isn't exactly night and day). The three different shock tunes are potentially more of a concern in my opinion.
  • 2 0
 @seb-stott: fair enough
  • 1 0
 @marshrv1: don't forget, much (admittedly, not all) of the understanding that people have of the effect of fork offset stems from Seb's article on BikeRadar. Seb had that actual experience, his article surely was only what he was able to summarize into coherent sentences for us.

In other news, RS make the Revelation 29 with either 42 or 51mm of offset. I suspect a typo on Focus' spec sheet. RS is the outlier on offset in making 42mm variants, nearly all other forks (and RS' new Zeb chassis) offer 44mm.
  • 1 3
 @seb-stott: the other day we just discussed the difference between reach with no spacers and with 4cm of spacers. 2cm in reach could be a deal breaker... a difference between World Championship and 56th on a local race. Maybe difference between lumbar spine surgery and not a tiniest hernia. Some people find it offending that companies don’t provide geo charts for exactly the setup they are running. Companies should provide the fork offset in geo charts... it is important.

NOT
  • 3 0
 @justwaki: I don't always get you. I think you're saying that a few mm of fork offset or (effective) reach isn't the biggest deal. In which case, I probably agree.
  • 15 4
 I love the frame - so simple. But that stem is freaking me out... I drew a thing like this long time ago for laughs. Didn't expect a whacky German engineer to make it happen.
  • 3 0
 does that make you a waki swedish engineer?
  • 2 0
 @mackay66: I am a Polish engineer - SALTY with high corrosion resistance factor
  • 12 0
 Almost 36 lbs?? Is it jammed full of led?
  • 4 0
 Exactly. My DH bike is only 38 with pedals and DH tires
  • 4 0
 If it has 180mm travel, I’ll ride a 35lb+ bike. For a 130mm trail bike, nah mate. It’s two kilos overweight.
  • 1 0
 I'm hoping that weight includes pedals... Add a bottle cage,at least one tire insert,maybe a integrated tool...and this is the more expensive one!
  • 2 0
 @nozes: No pedals, as always, but it does include the (empty) tool bag.
  • 3 0
 @seb-stott: I really can't wrap my head around a 37lbs trail bike.
  • 1 0
 @nozes: Exactly. Sorry, that is way too porky.
  • 16 7
 It looked cool until I saw that cablerouting... You can't buy another stem or do barspins without drilling holes in your frame
  • 6 1
 You can, you just have to change the top cap of the headset to route the cable into the headset and not into the stem.
  • 68 2
 The inability to barspin their trail bike must have cost them a market of literally dozens of riders! I bet the sales team were furious.
  • 10 0
 @L0rdTom: Everyone's a barspinner these days!
  • 1 0
 @L0rdTom: 2 dozens, to be precise.
  • 9 0
 Seb is so right about those HT/ST angles: Who really wants the steeper HT, or slacker ST angle? Why not make it 65/76.5° right away? It's simply the better bike then..
  • 3 1
 I don't thing anyone has ever ridden a 76.5-degree seat angle (on a 150mm bike) and thought "this is too steep".
  • 9 0
 "Focus tells me their customers rarely swap stems..."
I doubt Focus tracks any post-sales data from their customers besides warranty returns.
  • 8 0
 'Focus tells me their customers rarely swap stems'... This tells me Focus don't pay attention to the customers.
  • 7 0
 HARD PASS on the cable slicing , knock block situation...solving problems that don't exist. Creating very real new problems that were solved by the old designs.
  • 4 0
 From curiosity, can someone explain the difference in prices between Germany & Austria and the rest of Europe? I understand that Focus has a home base in Germany, but the price difference with the rest of Europe seems a bit steep, especially considering we have an open internal market (in theory). EDIT: I initially misread the price difference. I'm guessing the 100 euro difference is likely related to the VAT difference between countries.
  • 2 0
 Maybe they direct sale in Germany but use retailers in the rest of EU ? Not sure either and like you this seems odd to me.
  • 1 1
 In Germany we call that economic effect "Preisschwelle".

Example: A chocolate bar of 100g always had to be below 1€ some year ago. Otherwise no one would buy it.
  • 1 0
 @JohSch: It's called "psychological price" which is why you always see prices ending in 9s rather than 0s. You get taught that in first year of business school anywhere in the world. So it doesn't explain why Focus isn't applying the same price across EU despite Germany being in the EU free market.
  • 8 2
 Not every bike has to be a pole: super long, super slack and super steep. The thing is a trail bike. From now on, if it aint got 63.5 Ha it's a xc bike?
  • 12 1
 It weighs 16.2Kg and has a fair bit of pedal-bob so it's definitely not an XC bike.
  • 1 1
 @seb-stott: 16.2 wow that's a lot for a 150 bike
  • 4 0
 Internal routing starting from stem looks interesting, but I forgot it the moment I noticed their full suspension trail bike with touring fenders, front light, and pannier rack www.focus-bikes.com/int/1030551-thron-6-8-eqp?color_combo=94055
  • 3 0
 That bike looks like it's having an identity crisis lmao.
  • 4 0
 So 27.5 is dead and trail bikes are supposed to weight 16kg now, correct?
I'm seriously having trouble finding a trail bike that I want to ride, from any brand at all. Had my hopes with YT but they let me down too, following the monster-truck trend...
Pretty sure my next bike is gonna be a used one. 27.5 and sub 13kg please.
  • 6 0
 "Our current customers rarely change stems and we don't want an new ones"

Solid marketing plan
  • 3 0
 Seb Scott - U da man. Honestly, I had high hopes with your arrival at pb, but goddamn mofo, you deliver the technical goodness. Should be standard in my mind, but you are actually the only one among pretty much all bike reviewers that gets that job done properly. Look at the meaningless shit mtb-news.de posted about this bike. This is gold compared to it. Like the advice for the 30t e.g., would be my first thought, too, but it never crosses the mind of all the other so called professional reviewers. Effin amateurs. Btw will you marry me?
  • 3 0
 Looks like a HEADTUBE with the rest of a bike attached. Is there a 2"-thick steerer tube in there? Or regular 1.5 tapered?

Apart from that, a nice bike with THE perfect paintjob.
  • 3 0
 Wow what a great looking bike. Shame they can't figure out those size-specific chainstays or seat tube angle.
People: we come in different shapes and sizes.
Bike companies: naaaaaah
  • 2 0
 There was a huge down vote when someone posted the obvious... Boooooring .... Getting all giddy over yet another alloy single pivot "yawner" of a bike makes me think of an old song (that and the pithy acronym for their rear suspension) ~ Focus calls Focus Optimised Linkage Design (FOLD) - "You've got to know when to hold'm, know when to fold'm, know when to walk away and know when to run..." I think I'll just walk away from this one... soooooo sleepy, the boredom is huge here... YAAAAWNNN....
  • 7 2
 Intended use: mountain biking. that helps a lot!
  • 2 0
 With a reach number of "in front of you"
Seat angle of "upwards"
Suspension travel of "it moves"
Wheel size "the round one"
It's the perfect mountain bike for mountain biking.
  • 6 1
 Dope bike. Come back to america hunny
  • 1 0
 I guess all that marketing hype about the previous FOLD linkage was all smoke and mirrors then? www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZSeyqDNGCA

It must have been pretty unredeemable since they even ditched the light and compact vertical shock for a horizontal, in an age where anyone except xc marathon bikes are changing to a vertical shock.

But then they give it a 75% antisquat at sag, and that's in a mid-range gear so a climbing gear would actually be lower.

What is the point of this bike?
  • 1 0
 Why would you want to "avoid topping-out on rough terrain"? if the wheel is unweighted, either due to the rider lifting the bike, or the ground falling away as a dip or hole, the wheel should extend to match the ground or as far as possible.
  • 1 0
 "Focus is keen to stress in its marketing blurb that this is not an enduro bike, with a heavy emphasis on fun factor and what you might call all-mountain terrain."

So according to them, enduro can only be done in specific types of bikes, it is not fun, and cannot be done on "all-mountain terrain"?
  • 3 0
 Man in the age of Zeb and 38..... the Lyrik practically looks like a SID on this bike.
  • 3 0
 Kinda getting Foes vibes with that silhouette and the brushed aluminum. Is this a Foes-cus?
  • 2 0
 65.5 head angle and 35 plus pounds... confusing as to what this bike is intended for. Is this a park bike? or a heavy trail bike that can't climb I am confused.
  • 4 0
 16.2 kilo!!!!!!!!!!!!! Frown
  • 1 0
 It's nice to see a real single pivot with a non-regressive shock rate, but that pivot is just too low. Another of the several features that paint it as a bike made for non-discerning riders, or by non-discerning engineers.
  • 1 0
 Just to add: It could be a damn fine bike if those details were sorted out though.
  • 1 0
 "Focus has also got on board with the trend for "ribbed" chainstay protectors"

You mean they just followed the crowd, instead of picking the actual best solution? I'm sure they're glad you think so highly of them.
  • 4 0
 Gives old meta am vibes
  • 4 0
 Nice coin purse.
  • 3 0
 Little bag for a mid ride taco? Noice.
  • 1 0
 i really don´t understand this shit....nothing new at all...still over and over and over again the same shits in whole bike industry....
  • 2 0
 You know things are getting out of hand when a 65 HTA isn't slack enough for a trail bike *face palm*
  • 2 0
 Too lardy. 16kg? There are lighter fat bikes that would thrash this uphill and downhill
  • 1 0
 "help the bike stay within its travel"

Within its travel? No matter what the settings it can't go outside its travel... (assuming correctly sized shock of course)
  • 2 0
 Not sure about the cable solution, but that is a nice looking bike.
  • 2 0
 That TT bend bugs me, looks like something heavy fell on the bike
  • 2 1
 also, no X-up no likey
  • 3 1
 They jamed a lot in there and it will take some focus to read it.
  • 2 0
 when i'm allowed i like to focus on aiming my jam too...
  • 6 4
 Pretty narrow minded view on bikes. I expect more by Pinkbike
  • 5 1
 Expected more? Are you lost?
  • 2 3
 @Peally: maybe more Consumer orientated and not only from a pole fanboy?
  • 2 4
 I ever was wondering where in the world Focus mountainbikes are sold. Never saw someone riding a Focus the last 20 years. Are these bikes that are stuffed into the garage only to see the light of Day once a year on a bike rack?
  • 1 0
 Germany? it's mike kluge's company
  • 1 0
 @tofhami: It was. He sold it quiet a few years ago.
  • 1 0
 It's an Ebike brand for a couple of years now already.
  • 1 0
 @JohSch: Eeeeebit. Yes we have some, besides all the pure Bikes....
  • 1 3
 As someone who will be in the market for a new fun trail/enduro bike this year, that ticks a lot of boxes. Looks fast stood still which is usually a pretty good indicator to me how it'll ride.

Drop the stupid cable routing though...
  • 1 0
 The frame looks like it's using a new standard of reverse taper steerer, where's it's fatter at the top
  • 2 0
 Here's a problem to a solution that doesn't exist! -Focus
  • 1 0
 Great looking bike and great value. Just a shame they have omitted 27.5. As a 29er this would be ruled out for me.
  • 1 0
 @seb-stott is that a phone in your pocket or are you pleased to see me? ;-)
  • 2 0
 I'm never going to buy a bike that has proprietary parts on it.
  • 1 0
 Oh my, this could be the next slope/trail/fr bike. Size S in 27.5 and we're golden!
  • 1 0
 Is it just me or does the kink in the top tube look like someone bent it over their knee & thought that’ll do .
  • 2 0
 Integrated cables into a proprietary stem?

Nah fam.
  • 1 0
 bike does look awesome, however why not to leave some port's cable routing ?
  • 1 0
 Focus is totally out Focus here in USA. This brand gives up on a key market before it even gives us chance. Rip Focus USA...
  • 1 0
 Trek is gonna sue them for stealing the knock block idea.
  • 5 0
 My kids’ Frog and islabikes both have
‘Knock block style headsets).
  • 1 0
 I was looking for this comment, haven't thet looked at knockblock feedback, even Trek is changing it.
  • 1 0
 looks like it's kinda narrowly focused...
  • 1 0
 Looks like the Meta v4 had a baby with the Jamis Defcon.
  • 1 0
 Anyone else who started noticing Focus only through Olly Wilkins?
  • 7 0
 How did you do that? Is Olly Wilkins invisible or transparent?
  • 2 0
 @kcy4130: jesus christ that was so dumb but i absolutely loved it
  • 1 0
 So many single pivot bikes out there now. Short travel and longer travel.
  • 2 0
 Really nice looking bike
  • 1 0
 The stem reminds me of a Waki drawing he did couple years back
  • 1 0
 He's intently Focused ahead. Think the name got to his brain!
  • 1 0
 maybe i´m just burnt out or tired...
  • 1 0
 The main picture (dropper down) it looks like a 20" kids bike.
  • 1 0
 Why!?!! It's only April!!!!!! Thumbs Down
  • 1 0
 Someone welded that headtube upside down
  • 2 4
 This pouch really kills the aesthetics for me. It's cool to see brands going with the frame storage option but there has to be another way!
  • 5 0
 Just take it off? It's two bolts....
  • 1 1
 Looks like a sesh... Wait, no. Commencal?
  • 1 1
 Nope. Those are all four-bar designs. Not many bikes look like this one, actually.
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2021. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.017774
Mobile Version of Website