First Ride: The New GT Sensor Loses Weight, Gains Travel

Apr 25, 2023
by Mike Kazimer  
photo

It's been nearly five years since the Sensor received a significant update, so it was high time GT revised their 29” trail bike. After all, this is the do-it-all category, the home of bikes that have the widest range of possible uses, capable of tackling everything from technical trail rides to the occasional local enduro race, or even a bike park lap or two.

The Sensor's frame still has that distinctive GT look, but the amount of rear travel has been bumped up to 140mm, a change that's accompanied by revised geometry. The Sensor also now has a shorter travel sibling, the Sensor ST, which has 110mm of rear travel and a 140mm fork.
GT Sensor

• 29" wheels
• 140mm travel, 150mm fork (carbon)
• 130mm travel, 140mm fork (aluminum)
• Aluminum & carbon models
• Weight: 32.7 lb / 14.8 kg (Carbon Pro LE, L)
• MSRP: $2,300 - $5,750 USD
• Carbon frameset: $3,500 USD
gtbicycles.com

There are five models in the Sensor lineup – three with carbon frames (except for the chainstays) with 140mm of travel, and two with aluminum frames with 130mm of travel. Prices range from $2,300 USD for the alloy Sensor Comp, and go up to $5,750 for the Sensor Carbon Pro LE pictured above.

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Frame Details

A lighter front triangle and the move to carbon seatstays allowed GT to shave a substantial 600 grams off of the Sensor's frame weight. Where the previous version hid externally routed housing underneath a cover on the downtube, the new Sensor has tube-in-tube internal routing, which thankfully doesn't go through the headset.

There's a generous amount of chainslap protection, and I can attest that it works well – the bike I've been riding is very quiet. A full-sized water bottle will easily fit in the front triangle, and the seat tube lengths have been decreased to accommodate longer travel dropper posts.

The Sensor doesn't have any in-frame storage, or even the two bolts that many bikes have under the top tube for attaching a tube or tools. It's also lacking any flip-chips or other methods of geometry adjustment – what you see is what you get. That's not necessarily a bad thing, it just means the geometry isn't as customizable as it is on a bike like Trek's Fuel EX or Specialized's Stumpjumper EVO.


photo
Plenty of room for a water bottle.
photo
The new Sensor uses tube-in-tube cable routing.


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Geometry

The Sensor's geometry falls into what I'd call extra-normal-modern. The 65-degree head angle is moderately slack, but not extreme, and the 480mm reach for a size large paired with a 77-degree seat angle is a familiar recipe. Compared to the previous version, the reach is approximately 10mm longer per size, and the seat angle is a degree steeper.

The stack height is fairly high, thanks to the longer head tube lengths, a frame design decision that seems to be gaining ground. I'm a fan of the move towards taller head tubes where it makes sense, since it means taller riders won't need to resort to extra-high rise bars or stacks of stem spacers to get their handlebars into an acceptable position.

It is interesting to see that the chainstay length measures 440mm for all 4 sizes – we've seen more and more companies adopt size-specific chainstays over the last few years.


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There's no drain hole around the lower shock mount, so this quickly turns into a swimming pool for slugs on muddy rides.
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The TransX Kitsuma lever doesn't seem to be designed with human hands in mind.

Ride Impressions

My first ride on the Sensor was one of those times where everything went right – the sun was shining, the dirt was perfect, and the suspension required minimal fiddling to get it dialed in. I was able to turn my brain off and just ride, a sensation enhanced by the fact that the Sensor is extremely quiet out on the trail.

One good ride is fine and dandy, but there's always the chance that it could be a fluke – seeing the sun after weeks of rain can create addled initial impressions. So I headed out on the Sensor again. And again. And again. Four solid rides in and my conviction is growing stronger that the new Sensor is a good one. It climbs well, with enough support to leave the shock's climb lever alone, and there's plenty of traction even when set up with 25% sag.

On the descents, the suspension does a great job of muting hits of all sizes. The tune on the RockShox Super Deluxe feels ideally suited to the Sensor's kinematics - it's fluttery off the top to take care of the small bump chatter, and then settles nicely into its stroke when dealing with repeated larger impacts. All 140mm of travel is usable without any harshness or severe end stroke ramp up, and it's possible to add or subtract volume spacers to suit a rider's preference.

The Sensor's relatively high stack creates a better position for dropping into steep trails, making it possible to feel very comfortable when gravity takes over. The geometry may be fairly middle of the road, but it's a recipe that works well, and the result is a bike that feels like a familiar, friendly companion almost immediately.

Spec Check

A RockShox Lyrik Ultimate fork, SuperDeluxe Ultimate shock, and SRAM Code RSC brakes are the highlights of the Carbon LE models. Those high-end components all work well and were easy to get dialed in on my first few rides.

There are a few flies in the ointment, though. The first is the TransX dropper post lever – its ergonomics are atrocious, and it's extremely hard to activate even with fairly low cable tension. That'd be the first upgrade I'd make, ideally before even leaving the shop.

For the wheelset, WTB KOM Trail rims are laced to a SRAM rear hub and a Formula front hub. I've had a couple of disconcerting pops come from the hub so far – that'll be something to keep an eye on; I've had mixed experiences with this hub model in the past.

The XO1 derailleur is paired with a GX cassette and shifter; that's not the end of the world, just be aware that on most of the bikes in the Sensor lineup the derailleur is a level above the shifter and cassette – the 'GX drivetrain' on the Sensor Carbon Pro has a NX cassette and shifter.

The $2,600 Sensor Comp is on the way for inclusion in an upcoming Value Field Test – keep an eye out for those reviews later this summer, where we'll dig deeper into where to spend and where to save, and find out if the versatility and easy handling of the Pro LE model carries over to a version that's half the cost.



Models & Pricing

29 U Sensor Crb Pro LE SGN LG
Sensor Carbon Pro LE / $5,750

29 U Sensor Crb Pro DSB LG
Sensor Carbon Pro / $4,950
29 U Sensor Crb Elite WGR LG
Sensor Carbon Elite / $3,800

29 U Sensor Comp BBQ LG
Sensor Comp / $2,600
29 U Sensor Sport JGL LG
Sensor Sport / $2,300

Sensor ST


29 U Sensor ST Crb Pro ING LG
Sensor ST Carbon Pro / $5,000
29 U Sensor ST Crb Elite SST LG
Sensor ST Carbon Elite / $3,900


Author Info:
mikekazimer avatar

Member since Feb 1, 2009
1,722 articles

215 Comments
  • 318 49
 Wow the new logo is ugly.
  • 24 2
 It's weird they put a different logo on bikes like this and the Force than the one that's on the website, which is still the traditional GT layup. Doesn't seem to make a whole lot of sense. If they are changing their logo, change the website (that's easier than bike paint). If not changing the logo permanently, why, just... why?
  • 28 54
flag asapyohanes (Apr 25, 2023 at 9:40) (Below Threshold)
 Riveting commentary !
  • 21 2
 Did a double take as I thought I was seeing the Georgia Tech logo
  • 30 1
 It is - plenty of ugly logos out there though. This one is one that I can get over.
  • 14 0
 @noodlewitnosteeze: That logo is small enough that one could get a preferred set of quality GT logos (of their chosen font) and place them over this logos if desired
  • 5 0
 The website still has old yellow GT, unless that new one was done to fulfil a dying child's wish the new one needs to go away.
  • 26 5
 Looks good to me!
  • 47 2
 @bikeparkmemes: It's the original 1972 Logo.......the company is now back in California and is currently in 'reboot' mode, thus the reboot 1972 logo.
  • 1 0
 @jokermtb: That's me corrected. I still like the old (new?) Yellow italic logo a lot more.
  • 11 3
 I like it. I also like the frame which I can't say about most gt bikes.
  • 10 5
 I like it. There's motion (looks like an arrow) in the "G" that makes me want to carve berms.
  • 8 0
 I think it is a throwback to their original logo
  • 16 9
 Even if this is a throwback to the original logo, it's awful. Said this before but brands keep sucking all the personality out of their logos in an attempt to appeal to a broader market. Can see it everywhere in modern graphic design. In some cases this is well done and for a genuine reason such as higher legibility when printed at a small size. But this is fooking awful and lazy. Old GT logo had so much personality and had such a fun look to it. - (sincerely a design student who thinks he knows it all)
  • 3 0
 @bikeparkmemes: thats the bike equivalent of the evri logo ( disclaimer you have to live in the uk to get that joke)
  • 11 6
 The worst rebrand since hermes
  • 3 0
 CHILL... it´s just some provisional insulating tape...
  • 1 0
 @jptrialsin: coolarrow
  • 9 0
 @Davebob: Newsflash: There are more people involved in design than just the designer. Also, regardless of training or experience, they all think they can do the job better than you.

Heart - A designosaur who's too old for this shit.
  • 1 0
 @t3rrarium: glad someone said it.
  • 3 0
 That's what happens when you are missing the desired font on your PC. It will default to Arial or sth.
  • 6 1
 Simple, easy to identify, you know it's a GT... I don't know what there is to hate. Everyone else is smattering a gigantic logo down the entire tube, this seems tasteful. If you're only complaint is the logo is ugly, it seems like an easy thing to overlook. Get a couple of stickers and just slap them over it.
  • 3 1
 Didn't like the old logo anyway so it's a cool step to cange the logo. however the change could have been done better, this one looks cheapish

@TwoNGlenn: Burberry however going back to serifes after their short non serif logochange.

www.lbbonline.com/news/is-burberrys-new-identity-the-end-of-the-serif-wars
  • 6 1
 @Davebob: I totally agree to notably bad updates are cotic and ibis. They went from some of the best headbadges in the business to just plain dull ones
  • 8 2
 It's the best looking gt I've seen in over 20 years
  • 2 0
 @Dopepedaler: Yes of course there is, and that's ironically why we get shit designs like this.

Anyway, at least the actual bike look great!
  • 3 0
 If you look at the "new" logo you'll see that it's the same font as one of the original logos from the 1980's. The difference is the old logo had a rondel around it. I'm assuming since GT is trying to do a return to our roots thing, this logo was chosen for that reason. It doesn't make it great, but it does explain it.
  • 4 0
 @iSawThat: gorgeous design.
  • 5 1
 @sack-zement:

I personally liked the old one, but I understand it was time for an update. I’m just a bit disappointed they couldn’t come up with something a bit more unique. The new one kinda looks like a placeholder, it’s inoffensive but very bland, and doesn’t really represent my positive associations with the GT.

Cannondale’s return to their 90s sans-serif wordmark made a lot more sense. Cannondale is a long, visually complex word that benefits from simplicity, plus most people fondly remember their attractive metallic paint jobs with that logotype from ~20 years ago.

Im not convinced people have the same nostalgia for the 1972 logo GT is apparently reviving. I’ve never seen it, and I can’t even find it with a Google search- Clearly it wasn’t prolific, they moved past it quickly for a reason. I don’t think most people will connect that the new logo is a throwback, it really feels like a cynical attempt to follow the ‘simple sans-serif everything’ design trend, but 5-10 years too late. It’s super rare to have a logo that is just an initial without some attempt to connect or stylize the letters. GT has always been quirky, fun, with a colourful moto/BMX style influence. Those are positive and trending attributes they should be leaning into, not throwing away.
  • 1 0
 @Davebob: old school design guy here - you are absolutely right.
  • 4 0
 @bikeparkmemes: It isn’t particularly great logo but GT should be applauded for facilitating bike shop employees easily adding an LB and Q+ in 3” black vinyl lettering from Staples. They’re not leaving any stone unturned on their path to re-relevancy this time. Very inclusive of them, really.
  • 1 0
 @harrisongregoire: im not sure anyone knew it existed first gt for a lot
Of
Forty somethings was probably 89-90 vintage
  • 2 0
 @Compositepro: My first GT was an 86 Pro Performer (yes I am old). Big Grin
  • 2 0
 I like it much better
  • 1 0
 @Compositepro: Yup, you’d have to be in your 60s/70s to remember this ‘72 one. Don’t get me wrong, I know a few folks that age who crush it on two wheels, but they mostly ride road and gravel.

70s style is trending, (films like Knives Out, some teen girl fashion) but you need to have some relevant imagery from that era to pull it off. Ski-Doo and Can-Am spring to mind.
  • 2 0
 @bman33: Nice!

My first MTB was a ~2001 GT Palomar with ‘shocks’ and a steel triple triangle. Ruined a few sets of square taper cranks taking that bad boy off backyard jumps.
  • 1 0
 According to a recent post on IG this logo is only going to be on their 2023 models. A limited edition thing. So for those of you that don't like it, give it a few months!
  • 131 3
 XO1/GX drivetrain, Rockshox ultimate suspension, Code RSC brakes, decent wheels, and a carbon main frame for under $6k - seems like one of the better deals out there these days.
  • 14 40
flag powturn FL (Apr 25, 2023 at 10:49) (Below Threshold)
 Comes w/ crap wheels, dropper, & cassette: add $1000-1500 to bring full spec up to XO1 / Code RSC level. Also the Sensor Carbon frameset is $3500. No deal when Spec Stumpy EVO Carbon frames are currently on sale as low as $2050. Lower end versions of this GT may be a decent value below $4k for complete bike, but for under $7k I can build up a Stumpy EVO w/ true top-to-bottom XO1-level build that is several pounds lighter than the top Sensor.
  • 5 0
 For sure, outside a mediocre wheelset, it is dialed.
  • 6 0
 @powturn: you can get a Bird AM9 frameset with shock for $780. Best deal I've seen in a while. Similar to the Stumpjumper Evo, 150/150 or 160/150mm
  • 2 1
 Was thinking this is quite a good deal/build. Weren't the old GTs outrageously expensive?
  • 4 0
 @wburnes: it's not even any shock, it's Super Deluxe.
Bird frames are excellent deal on any day, but this is a steal, as long as someone's looking at XL or L

Their customer service is also top notch and they can sometimes sort you some discounts on other parts too. Dealing with them is a pleasure
  • 2 0
 @tbubier: The GT Tequesta can be translated to "It costs you" (Te Questa)
  • 1 0
 @dmackyaheard: 'Placeholder wheelset', but yes, agreed.
  • 1 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: there were a handful of Floridians in senior management back in GTs Tequesta days, hence the name but yeah, we used to make that joke in the shop I worked at. Ironically, the Tequesta was not a very expensive model
  • 2 0
 @FarmerJohn: I realize it was a Native tribe in FL, I didn't realize it was taken from that. We too used to make that joke about them.
  • 58 5
 Sram needs to get rid of the HG NX cassette and replace it with a lowend XD cassette. I shouldn't have to upgrade the hub driver to upgrade the cassette. With shimano I can upgrade from a Deore 12 speed cassette to an XT or XTR no problem. I'm fine with the price conscious aspect of specting an NX hub, but the HG interface should be left for the lowest end product (SX) or relegated to 11-speed and below like shimano. Just make a heavy AF XD driver NX cassette.
  • 5 1
 Yep, I keep waffling on upgrading my son's bike from an NX cassette to a GX (because he's only 100lbs and the weight difference is pretty big for him), but the extra cost of upgrading the driver always stops me.
  • 3 0
 @islandforlife: I was tempted by some used wheels recently but the hub driver on hydras is $$$. In this case it was moving from xd to ms, but the point stands. Changing drivers is a deal killer for some. Even a DT driver is $100. That's a good chunk of a gx cassette price.
  • 13 0
 @islandforlife: Just leave it NX. The GX cassette is mediocre, too. The only one I would get is the X01, because despite the price tag difference it lasts so much longer that it's worth it.
  • 15 3
 Nx cassette being regular hg is a pro for me because it makes it cheaper to switch to 11 speed sun race cassette when the derailleur eventualy craps out. And since the hubs on this bikes seem to be trash you are probably sooner or later going to be upgrading them.
  • 10 1
 @islandforlife: Look at a Sunrace cassette. You can get them in whatever freehub standard you need and they are lighter and cheaper than equivalent Sram products.
  • 1 1
 @nickfranko: Ya, it was more about shaving weight for a light kid. But my other option was to upgrade my GX to X01 and give the kid my GX... but again, need to upgrade his freehub which just adds $$.
  • 2 0
 @Acourtney: I've used them in the past on the kids bikes. Looked at them again for his new bike, but their 12 speed cassettes are either heavier than NX or just a little lighter, but still heavier than GX... so not really worth worth it or what I'm looking for. Their 11 speed wide range (mimicking 12 speed) are also heavier and I'd have to buy a shifter.
  • 3 0
 @malca: Agreed, I keep my hubs HG and avoid the XD driver. Ah the simple life
  • 4 5
 @nickfranko: I prefer e13 over X01
  • 1 1
 @eh-steve: once you figure replacement costs of sram vs shimano, the driver is minimal for the switch. And, you get dual action shifting, not all thumbs..
  • 1 0
 @islandforlife: there are lighter options for the HG freehub. From Chinese ones, through quite good SunRace to super light Garbaruk. The latter is lighter than X01 or XX1, though about 25% more expensive than GX
  • 4 1
 Plenty of high-end HG cassettes about. Garbaruk comes to mind, lighter and cheaper than x01 cassettes, also their one piece which is a gripe I have with Shimano cassettes
  • 3 1
 @pooceq: It's cheaper if you add in the cost of a freehub aswell
  • 3 0
 It will probably happen at some point to compete with Deore 12, but realistically the HG driver is a feature of NX not a flaw, at least as far as SRAM and and bike brands are concerned. NX allows brands to spec a drivetrain with most of the 12speed performance of GX at a drastically lower price point, thanks to the possibility of using ubiquitous and cheap HG hubs/wheels. Wheels and hubs are an easy place to cut costs, especially in the less-savvy entry level market.

Shimano definitely did the right thing by making Microspline a constant across all their 12speed groups. That said, I can’t help but notice 11 speed Deore (HG) on almost every affordable Shimano mountain bike…
  • 1 0
 @harrisongregoire: While I agree it's a feature, it was a feature of the past. It eased adoption of 12-speed in a market that was primarily HG hubs. Now that basically any hub can come with an HG, XD or MS driver (even entry level Novatec, Formula and their derivatives) cost isn't really a factor. It's not like manufacturers have warehouses full of HG driver hubs they have to move. Everything has gone lean and there are no stock piles.

By being late to the 12-speed game Shimano was able to make MS a requirement. That bridge had already been crossed.
  • 1 0
 @eh-steve: By ‘feature’ I mostly mean it in the cynical anti-consumer sense. It’s also yet another excuse to sell you a new bike, wheelset or overpriced hub driver at the very least, come upgrade time.

I totally agree with you that there’s no real reason any of the hub standards have to cost any more than each other, but I bet you can still find HG hubs for a fraction of the cost. I’m fairly sure Shimano still requires a licence for Microspline, though XD is an open standard. Plus with the shortages, manufacturers have been scrambling for parts all over Southeast Asia from brands we’ve never even heard of.
  • 1 0
 @harrisongregoire: I'm pretty certain Shimano made licensing MS free to aid adoption. As far as the aftermarket it seems all drivers cost the same. I have yet to buy a hub that isn't part of a wheelset.
  • 34 0
 That color on the Sensor Carbon Pro is real nice. GT's current team (since the "new" Force) are putting in solid work. The HP Force, that sexy ass new Fury, new La Bomba, the kid's bike, and now this revamped Sensor. Nothing mindblowing, but all really solid bikes. And the budget Sensor adds to the solid value bike offerings on the market today.
  • 2 18
flag RedBurn (Apr 25, 2023 at 9:20) (Below Threshold)
 looks like a yeti colour speaking haha
  • 1 0
 Still that same team since they decided to walk away from i-Drive systems so Force and Fury 2018-9 roughly.
  • 33 0
 Although I prefer external routing for brake hoses, I applaud them for not using headset routing!
  • 12 2
 Don't listen to him. Squeeze those fuckers through the bearings
  • 23 0
 This is enlightening. For the 1st time in decades, GT has put something out there that I want to ride. It reminds me of a very long time ago when GT ruled the MTB scene.

Their price points are "back to earth" as well so "thumbs up."

Way to go GT
  • 2 0
 the newer Sensors are incredibly fun bikes to ride. I've replaced over time, nearly everything except the cranks/bb, derailleur, shifters on my '19 aluminum Comp version, and feel it's a great platform to affordably transform over the seasons into a bike you'll really enjoy. Awesome handling and a fun, sporty ride
  • 28 3
 Why is every bike 33lbs now?
  • 52 2
 Every improvement for the past 20 years added weight: droppers, real tires, wide range 1x, etc.
  • 30 3
 I think consumers have been mostly rejecting sacrificing reliability for weight. Yeah, could cut weight with XC wheels and tires, and a short dropper, but now you have a trail bike with rims that will only last a year, tires you'll replace out of the box, and a dropper that is too short for taller riders.
  • 22 0
 @speed10: Also bigger wheels and tires, longer frame, bigger brakes, etc
  • 15 2
 @4thflowkage: 100% this right here. Most consumers are buying one bike to do it all. They don't want things to be breaking just so they can get up the climb .02 seconds faster. The consumers that are really concerned about weight are buying multiple bikes for each specific riding discipline.
  • 12 2
 It's 33 lbs because it has all the parts you would want. It's also nice not having to warranty your rear triangle every other year because said bike company shaved all their weight off there.
  • 3 1
 Bc Industry has learned...(failures/harder riding)
  • 3 1
 @TEAM-ROBOT: Also BB's and chainstays that don't crack/break. The industry seems to be headed to more durability and lifetime warranties, which equals more weight... which is a good thing. I certainly don't notice any difference in how my bike climbs or performs when my water bottle is empty or full. (2 pounds).
  • 10 1
 Replace the mediocre wheelset, and I bet you can get drop some weight where it counts most.
  • 14 11
 @yupstate: If you want a 30 pound 140mm bike, there are tons of them for sale on the buy/sell used page with 26" wheels, dual piston brakes, single ply tires, 19mm rims, quick release thru axles, and flexy rear ends. In fact, they cost way less than this 33 pound bike. An embarrassment of riches if you're looking for a 30 pound bike.
  • 5 0
 The real answer is riding regime shift. XC pro circuit has gotten gnarlier so modern XC bikes have been beefed up to what all mountain bikes were back in the day. In turn that means trail bikes get beefed up to what enduro bikes were back in the day. In turn modern enduro bikes are basically mid 2010s DH bikes with single crown forks.
  • 7 0
 @TheR: ^this. The wheels & that GX cassette are boat anchors. Lace up quality rims around DT hubs & swap the GX cassette for a non-creaking XO1 that lasts twice as long, and you'll easily drop a full pound.
  • 3 0
 Here's hoping the next wave of innovation in bikes is reducing weight while keeping lower cost and durability.
  • 21 3
 Basically we're turning everything into an enduro bike is what I'm hearing. I believe it's the internet forcing a line of thinking that everyone is Richie Rude. Everything needs heavy tires, stronger frames, 4 piston brakes, yadda yadda when that's not really true. I think most people are way over-biked and having less fun. I'm personally seeing people I ride with get slower as they've upgraded their trail bikes to 160mm enduro race sleds because the internet said those bikes were bad ass.
  • 3 1
 @yupstate: I agree with you. Not everyone really needs an "enduro" bike. But that's also just marketing. A lot of people want to have the same bikes that the pros have, even if they will never race a day in their life or do nothing bigger than a 5ft drop.

It's the same thing with people at bike parks riding on DH bikes even though they never touch a black trail. Sometimes just being able to say you have a bike capable of those things is enough for people to buy them.
  • 1 0
 @speed10: *past 10 years
  • 1 1
 @yupstate: Exactly what you said.
If somebody wants a trail bike just to have a stable and confortable ride,the only way is carrying around 5 extra pounds because if the bike has a certain geometry and light components/frame,somebody might take it to the bike park,break it and want a new one.
  • 3 0
 @powturn: I would say overall, for the money, this is a pretty nice build, and the weight is not all that unreasonable. But if you want to cut weight, it’s definitely in the wheels. Overall performance (stiffness and responsiveness) will also be better.
  • 5 0
 @TEAM-ROBOT:

You can buy new 140/130mm , 27.5” bikes with carbon wheels, carbon frames, long droppers, etc. for under $6k.

They weigh under 30lbs with pedals, solid enduro wheels and XT drive trains…
  • 5 0
 @ridedigrepeat: You mean: light, strong, cheap, pick three? That would be nice.
  • 2 0
 @Saidrick: which ones?
  • 2 0
 @scotteh:

Ibis mojo 4.
  • 2 1
 @Saidrick: any others? Let’s keep this list going, kind sir
  • 10 1
 @Saidrick: Sorry to say, but I just checked the Ibis website and it looks like the Mojo 4 with XT drivetrain and alloy wheels is $6700. And I guess that proves my point, that it costs a lot of money to get a modern capable bike that weighs less than 30 pounds.

I agree that not everyone needs a long travel enduro bike with heavy tires for their average ride. Far from it. But most people can only afford one mountain bike, so we have to make a choice: Would you rather lug around a little extra weight and have a bike that's able to ride anywhere when your friends call, even the scary black diamond stuff? Or would you rather have a zippier bike on mellower trails, even if it means you have to nurse your bike down more spicy terrain? I vote for the heavier compromise, but you seem to prefer the zippier one. For the longest time, the trail bike market shared your world view and sub 30 pound bikes were the norm. Unfortunately for your preferences, it seems like the market favors my world view right now. Don't worry, it's the bike industry. Things always come around.
  • 7 0
 @TEAM-ROBOT: Stumpjumper 29 Expert Carbon. Sub 30lbs. Currently $4650 direct from Spec. YT Izzo Core 3. Sub 30lbs. $3999. Core 4 builds are Sub 29lbs and $4500-4999. It is true that sub-30lb trail bikes cannot be had at entry-level price-points, but there are excellent options in the $4-5K range. I bet those willing to invest more than the 3mins it took me to find these options can do even better.
  • 2 0
 @TEAM-ROBOT: I've got my 2019 Sensor aluminum set up as a mini-enduro bike, and for my terrain, it's incredible.... great that GT has expanded this 'option' for the new v2 Sensor, as the refreshed versions are a nice evolution of this 'off the radar' trail bike line
  • 2 0
 @TEAM-ROBOT:

So competitive cyclist is currently selling an SLX for $4,100. When I bought mine, around Christmas 2022, they were selling the XT’s for $5,000.

Add $800 for a carbon wheel upgrade and your under $5k and $6k respectively.

I would argue that bikes have gotten heavier to reduce warranty returns. When it comes to business, it’s always about the money first, 2nd, 3rd, 4th etc.

My old bike was an enduro-ish beast, that wore me out climbing on it all day long, and often left me too tired to really enjoy the dh’s.

Yep, I’ve got a dh bike too for the ski resort days.

As for the lightweight trail bike, it’s pretty good for my area, since ibis is fairly local to where I live. I tried a lot of different bikes before deciding on it, including full on 29”
Enduro, down country, bigger travel trail,( 4 different brands) etc.

I now have a bike that I can ride all day long, up, down, and everything in between. The longer I spend in the forest, the better my day is.

Your mileage may vary.
  • 1 2
 @Saidrick: you can keep it. I’ll take my 36 lb enduro bike any day. But I don’t ride much in California……
  • 2 1
 @stubs179: That's hilarious: AR, max elevation 2753ft weighs in with final word on climbing weight. We call what you ride in foothills.
  • 1 0
 @powturn: AR? Not sure why my profile says I live there? I travel full-time and ride all over the country. My point is 3-4lbs of weight is pretty irrelevant.
  • 16 0
 Decent geo, decent spec for a very reasonable price. No cable tourism except for a slight detour through the frame. This must be a crowd pleaser! But what is the highest rated comment? Something about the logo. The comment section sure has its priorities straight.
  • 15 0
 Best looking GT MTB I've seen. I do miss the classic blocky, italicized, stretched logo ... if for no other reason than to take up a bit more real estate on the down tube.
  • 11 0
 It's staggeringly vanilla... but vanilla is a great flavor. I'd ride the shit out of this bike, after scraping off the ugly logo. Someone on Etsy can print up a classically inspired one... I haven't owned a GT since my 2000 Mach One, but this looks like a bike a lot of people could have fun on.
  • 8 0
 It's their OG 1972 logo, they've relocated back to California and are in "reboot rebranding mode"
  • 15 0
 Strange the AL frames have less travel and shorter reach.
  • 5 0
 im super confused by this, its like the thing warped during heat treatment so they just said "looks good, measure it!"

is any other modern bike like this, where the alloy version is a completely dulled version of the carbon?
  • 1 0
 @HeatedRotor: you could consider the stump jumper alloy with a standard 4 bar vs the carbon with flex stay?
  • 1 0
 @hrubarb: but i dont think the geo massively different like this new GT?
The flex stay design just isnt possible with the Alloy so i would exclude the SJ from this.
  • 13 1
 good looking bike- I don't think the new logo is that bad either.
  • 4 1
 I’m surprised to see so many negative comments toward the logo. Moreover, I think this is the best looking GT bike I’ve ever seen, but it seems they missed the mark in a few places. More specifically, I’m disappointed in the aluminum chainstay.
  • 13 0
 That looks mint
  • 11 1
 Haha - I like the logo! The bike looks good to me.
  • 11 1
 Material discrimination!!! Aluminum matters!!!
  • 1 0
 even the aluminum version got a freshening and frame redesign.....same great ride as the previous alum. version I imagine
  • 8 3
 Honestly, I'd take a bike specc'ed with a Microshift drivetrain over a Sram drivetrain anyday of the week. The Sensor comp looks OK, but the Sram drivtrain just has me calculating how much it will cost to swap out to Shimano or Microshift.
  • 24 17
 Award for ugliest brand logo...
  • 5 8
 Although this new font change from GT is ugly — I'd say that award definitely goes to Atherton bikes. The graphic/brand designer they used must have been their 14 year old nephew.
  • 23 0
 No, Ellsworth is the current title holder and 10+ years. This doesn’t come anywhere near it.
  • 9 0
 @kroozctrl: Not just the logo, probably the bikes too...
  • 1 0
 Theyre small...easy to customize over tho.
  • 10 0
 Goes to Ibis Frown
  • 2 0
 @dmackyaheard: Not so much that the new one is bad, but that they gave up the head tube badge with the move.
  • 2 0
 It's their OG 1972 logo
  • 4 0
 What kind of dropper or dropper lever is it? Couldn't find that info in the article. Want to take Kaz' advice and avoid like the plague, but we need the deets
  • 1 0
 Looking at the GT site it's this: GT Dropkick Dropper Post,
  • 6 0
 Looks like the Brand-X Ascend 1x / TranzX Kitsuma 1x.
  • 9 0
 @jaredmh, yep, that's the one. The post itself, the TransX +Rad, works just fine and has easily adjustable travel, but the lever is less than ideal.
  • 1 0
 @jaredmh: It looks a bit like a TranzX lever I had. I snapped the huge barrel connector off in a crash and promptly replaced the lever with a oneup.
  • 2 0
 Yeah I have a BrandX dropper (same thing). The lever was terrible. Ergonomics not great and then it broke on a ride not even in a wreck.
The post has been reliable but the lever is junk.
  • 3 0
 @93EXCivic: Yeah, zero complaints on TransX posts. I had one for a few years and no issues (needed a clean and some slickhoney at some point). Even the crappy cheap Shimano dropper lever is better.
  • 2 0
 I've used these trans x droppers in the past and had them on my kid's bikes and my wife's bike. Dropper is totally fine, and works wonderfully once you upgrade the lever to a OneUp or something comparable. $50 upgrade is definitely worth it.
  • 5 0
 Levers are sub-$60, so not a huge deal. Install Wolftooth... done
  • 3 0
 Keeping the old-school 1990's triple triangle.......impressive that still is in the mix/made it past the GT boardroom. I wish they would have put the same level of effort into the logo.
  • 1 0
 No splatter paint schemes though...
  • 2 0
 But why, just why would you put an NX cassette on this thing, for sure on a build labeled GX? Makes life so much harder in the future, having to upgrade your hub, wheelset, or at the least the freehub body just so you can put a decent SRAM cassette on.
  • 5 0
 "The Sensor's geometry falls into what I'd call extra-normal-modern." Lol
  • 1 0
 Anyone know who will be carrying GT in Canada???

I have a 2019 Sensor Expert, which I bought from a shop in QC. Lately, I have seen some of their higher end MTB on the SportChek website...wondering if they will show up there...
  • 1 0
 Depends on the store. If you talk to the right person/store they could be able to get it for you, but that’d need to be all in person. So not sure how far you’re willing to drive from QC
  • 3 0
 I've spent a hearty amount of time on this and I'm quite impressed! Sure we could complain about looks or whatever else, but it does what a good bike should: rides great.
  • 2 0
 Been on a '19 Sensor Comp (aluminum) and am pleased GT has done minor tweaks. Fun bike to ride, and looks as if they've made it a hair more capable and modern. Nice bit of evolution vs revolution.
  • 3 0
 Don't know why it needed to bump up in travel. The previous model with 130/130 hit the sweet spot for me. Feels like they're making either the Force or Sensor obsolete.
  • 4 0
 Why is the Alu version like a completely different bike? May as well have given it a different name even…
  • 1 0
 price point definitely, but you could throw a 150mm fork on the aluminum one no problem....
  • 5 0
 such a sweet bike - GT still has the goods.
  • 2 1
 "The XO1 derailleur is paired with a GX cassette and shifter; that's not the end of the world, just be aware that on most of the bikes in the Sensor lineup the derailleur is a level above the shifter and cassette – the 'GX drivetrain' on the Sensor Carbon Pro has a NX cassette and shifter."

I hate this so much. Would much rather have an e13, X01, or garbaruk cassette with a cheaper dérailleur, crankset, and shifter
  • 1 0
 The price point of these bikes doesn't seem that bad but one thing that would be nice is if they're available at the local bike shops. For example, when GT did the marketing for the high pivot LTS Force, it was a strong ad campaign but then you visit, per their website, an authorized dealer, the dealers couldn't order. I'm all for the bikes but make them actually available and not just some models are offered every where but the USA vice versa. I like the brand, own a couple of their bikes but listen to your customers meaning the riders and bike shops.
  • 1 1
 Seems like a slightly more burly (and slightly more ugly) version of a Norco Optic as far as geo, value, and ride performance go. Stoked to see how these perform in the wild. I love a simple, clean bike with middle of the road geometry so this appeals to me quite a bit. Would love to see an Optic with Cascade Link and 150mm Lyrik/36 go against this thing.
  • 1 0
 I think the frame design is beautiful, and IMHO, one of the best looking GT frames I can remember in the past 20 years. And I even f***ks w/ the plain logo. Well, done, GT. Well done. Smile
  • 4 1
 Shame they ditched the cable routing from the previous version.
  • 1 0
 I wonder if 110mm vs 140mm travel makes a difference?
Who would choose the 110mm and why?
Can both the 110mm and 140mm be setup as XC bikes and go head to head?
  • 1 0
 I can imagine this would be a great xc option for riders who don't have frequent flyer status....
  • 4 0
 I would ride it!
  • 5 1
 I like the simple logo
  • 2 0
 Why the different Geo between Carbon and Aluminum!? I prefer AL but don't want that geo.
  • 1 0
 New aluminum version - it's pretty close to the previous version aluminum one. I'm riding the old aluminum beer can version, and it's super fun mini-enduro rig
  • 1 7
flag chakaping FL (Apr 26, 2023 at 1:22) (Below Threshold)
 The 65.5deg HA on a 140mm frame is a bit old hat. The 65deg one on the carbon version isn't much better IMO. Unless they are making these for the people who moan that bikes are all too long and slack these days, in which case that's fair enough.
  • 3 0
 New GT logo is uninspired.
  • 1 0
 1973 called and they answered...
  • 3 1
 Great-looking bike, glowing review, variety of models at some good price points....and the bitching on this site commences.
  • 1 0
 I like how Continental copied the them of Maxxis tires to use white lettered ones for OEM bikes and yellow ones for aftermarket ones Big Grin
  • 3 0
 Rode one last night- it’s awesome!
  • 2 1
 Nice Machiny, Saxy AF !

( I prefer the normal logo !
Full yellow with blue logo would be much better... ! )
  • 1 1
 Plus... I'm waiting for Skills With Phil's review and test ride... Yeeew... !
  • 2 0
 bikes are so good nowadays, sheesh
  • 2 1
 Can't seem to find this, does it use a UDH? Wondering about upgradability/compatibility with Transmission.
  • 2 0
 Carbon and Alloy both have UDH.
  • 2 1
 I was going to buy one but GT took their sweet ass time releasing the new Sensor. I bought a Vitus instead.
  • 2 0
 You had me at 'inclusion'
  • 1 0
 This GT logo on T-Mac bike is awesome -> www.instagram.com/p/Cq_EbRyARNI
  • 2 2
 Looks like a great frame held back by a meh spec (dropper lever and wheels in particular). Put some DT wheels and a better lever on GT and this looks like a winner.
  • 3 0
 They did good!
  • 1 1
 The best looking GT logo would be the one with with the wings, and I like the late 80s Pro Freestyle Tour font and graphics too……Sonny Crockett style for miles…….
  • 2 0
 Who even rides a GT unless you are sponsored by them?
  • 1 0
 Why does only one out of all the models have a coil shock?
  • 1 0
 The Bike looks sick but the logo is hella uggo.
  • 1 0
 So the previous model's seat stays were solid aluminium, right?
  • 1 0
 Is the ST 110mm of travel or 120mm like the site says.
  • 1 0
 120.9mm like calculator says Smile
  • 6 6
 So in lieu of "Looks like a Session", do we now say "Looks like an EX"?
  • 1 0
 Finally!
  • 1 1
 evil wants its ugly-ass offering v1 top-seat tube junction back
  • 1 2
 GT's new Slogan "We passed on a graphic designer and passed the savings on to you!"
  • 1 2
 Looks like a s…s….sessss…..fa faa fuel….whatever….looks good though.
  • 2 3
 Another fleet bike for rental shops
  • 2 3
 Looks like a Process (with a n extra tube thrown in.)
  • 1 2
 oh, the copied the Pyga Slakline just to make it look ugly. ouch
  • 1 2
 I'm going to refer to this bike as the Evil Remedy.
  • 1 2
 No more I-drive?
  • 2 0
 that was 6 years ago........
  • 4 5
 Looks like a Fuel
  • 2 4
 Literally looks like a Trek Fuel EX
  • 1 3
 Looks like a Sess..... No wait: Fuel EX?
  • 2 4
 Looks like a Trek...
  • 5 0
 True, but GT has been doing that look much longer
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