First Ride: DVO Diamond Fork Prototype

Aug 13, 2014
by Mike Kazimer  

DVO first unveiled their Diamond single crown fork at last year's Eurobike trade show, and after a summer of refining and testing, the first rideable (and raceable – Cedric Gracia rode his to a 23rd place finish at last weekend's brutal Enduro World Series race) pre-production versions have arrived. There will still be a few minor changes to the fork before it hits store shelves in November, but the Diamond we were able to ride is a good indication of what the final version will be like.


DVO Diamond Details

• Intended use: all-mountain / enduro
• Travel: 160mm, adjustable via internal spacers to 150 and 140mm
• Wheel size: 27.5", 29" and 26" versions are in the works
• Air sprung with a coil negative spring
• External adjustments: air spring, rebound, separate low and high-speed compression, Off the Top
• Stanchions: 35mm
• 15mm thru-axle
• Colors: green, black
• Expected availability: November 2014
• MSRP: Around $1000 USD


With 160mm of travel, 35mm stanchions and a 15mm thru-axle, the Diamond is aimed squarely at the all-mountain and enduro market, and an expected retail price of around $1000 USD reflects its high end intentions. Befitting a fork of this caliber, the Diamond's adjustments include air pressure, independent high and low-speed compression damping, rebound, and Off The Top (OTT), which changes the initial feel of the fork by preloading the negative spring housed at the base of the fork's air cartridge. The Diamond also has an integrated fender mount, which allows a short fender that covers the latticework at the back of the arch and extends a few inches rearward to be quickly installed. The final weight hasn't been confirmed, but DVO is hoping to shed some grams off the prototype version in order to hit the 4.1 pound mark. Mountain bikers can be a fickle bunch, which is why DVO will be offering the Diamond in both green and
black versions, along with the strong possibility of a black stanchion coating in the future. The first run will be for 27.5" wheels, but a 29" version is on the way as well. The 29" version will also have 160mm of travel, but its lowers will have a different amount of offset and clearance for the bigger wheels.

What's Inside

The fork's air cartridge is housed in the left side of the fork, where a green aluminum cap covers the Shrader valve used to adjust the air pressure. It's common for companies to use the stanchion tubes themselves as the outer portion of the air chamber, but in this case DVO decided to go with a cartridge style set up, a design that allows them to more easily house the coil negative spring. There's a 5mm hex head knob at the bottom of the leg that adjusts preload on that spring, the OTT feature that was previously mentioned.

DVO Diamond first ride
  Compression adjustments are on rider's right, and the Diamond's air spring is found on the left side.

The damper cartridge is found in the right side, with a circular dial to adjust the high speed compression and an almost arrow shaped dial to change the amount of low speed compression. The idea was that the low speed compression could be quickly ramped up with one swipe of the hand, a boon for racers looking to firm up their ride before embarking on a long uphill transfer stage. A small green knob is located on the bottom right side of the fork to adjust the rebound, although the shape for this knob hasn't been finalized. The current design has it tucked well out of the way and less susceptible to rock damage, but I did find it a little difficult to turn – the small shape made it hard to get a firm grip on it.

DVO Diamond first ride
  OTT and rebound adjustments are found on the bottom of each leg, and a quick release 15mm thru axle keeps the front wheel securely in place.

There are several forks out there that use an oil filled bladder that expands when the fork is compressed, but DVO has taken a different approach in their damper cartridge. To compensate for the oil expansion, DVO uses a bladder that is inflated to the ambient air pressure and is then surrounded with oil in a small chamber. As the fork is compressed, the oil is able to squeeze the bladder inwards to make room for the expansion. Just like their Emerald downhill fork, DVO places a strong emphasis on riders being able to service their products, and both the air and damper cartridge are user serviceable.

DVO Diamond first ride
  DVO is working on an integrated fender for the Diamond. This one is 3D printed, but a more durable plastic one is in the works, with the possibility of a carbon fiber version at some point as well.



Ride Impressions

It's been a hot and dry past few weeks in Whistler, and the trails in the bike park are showing the effects of thousands of riders pounding out lap after lap. The trail crew here does a commendable job, but there's only so much you can do in the battle against brake bumps and blown out berms when there's no rain, which means that trail conditions on the mountain are rougher and dustier than ever. Wheel swallowing holes and brake bumps abound, trying to rattle bikes and riders to bits, and creating the perfect proving ground to try out a new fork. Before diving into the initial impressions, it's worth noting that this is still a pre-production fork, and there will likely be changes before it hits the shelves. As such, this is far from a comprehensive review – it's more of an initial overview detailing my first impressions of the fork. We'll have one for a more in-depth test once they roll off the production line in the fall.

Setup - I started with 130 pounds in the air chamber, and a click or two of high and low speed compression, a good base setting to begin getting accustomed to the fork's ride characteristics. The Diamond's design does use slightly more pressure in the air chamber than what a RockShox Pike or Fox's 36 would use, but it's still not extraordinarily high. Other than that, once I had the initial sensitivity set via the 5mm adjuster on the bottom of the left leg and dialed in the rebound to my liking I was ready to roll.

Sensitivity - Hand fatigue is a good indication of how well a fork is doing its job in the bike park – if you finish a run and need to peel each finger off the bars, or if it feels like arthritis has suddenly set in, those are signs that your suspension could use a bit of help. Luckily, my hands never turned into immovable lobster claws, even after riding at top speed through hundreds of yards of brake bumps and water bars. The sensitivity throughout the stroke didn't feel quite as supple as the current benchmark, RockShox's Pike, but it wasn't far off the mark. Where in a blind test it would be easy to imagine that the Pike housed a coil, rather than an air spring somewhere in its stanchions, the Diamond has a decidedly air sprung feel, although the OTT feature does help allow for more initial suppleness than would typically be expected.

Air Spring / Damping - Where a fork rides in its travel, and how it deals with repeated hard impacts are two of the most important factors to consider in order to determine whether a fork is up to par. The Diamond did well in both categories, and it never felt like it was riding too low in its travel or diving unexpectedly. It stayed in its sweet spot, that middle portion where the bike's handling isn't compromised, and where there's enough travel left in reserve for the really big impacts. The initial portion of the stroke was quite smooth, as was the ramp up, but I would have preferred to be able to eke out slightly more travel before that ramp up began. John Pelino, DVO's general manager, said that they have been working on the air spring curve to adjust this for the production version. Racers have been favoring the more progressive feel, but riders who spent most of their time riding at a more casual pace would likely benefit from a more linear stroke.

Torsional Stiffness - I'm on the lighter side of the rider weight spectrum, but that being said, the Diamond's stiffness didn't give me any reason to complain. Whether I was pushing it at full speed into a tight berm, or navigating through a sequence of rocky shelves that forced the fork to use all of its travel, the Diamond was as solid as its namesake.


Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesCompetition in the bike industry is a good thing for the consumer, as it means that more and more options to choose from. By the looks of things, DVO's Diamond should be another viable contender in the 160mm category, a fork that can take on the roughest trails without skipping a beat, with a couple trick little features that help set it apart from the others. That being said, competition in this category is fierce, with the RockShox Pike and FOX's 36 currently sitting in the top positions. We'll get our hands on a full production model as soon as possible to truly put it through its paces and see how it stacks up against the others over a longer period of time. - Mike Kazimer


www.dvosuspension.com


294 Comments

  • 94 28
 27,5" forks can be used with 26" wheels. What I cannot forgive is the 15 mm axle, 20 mm like a man please.
  • 73 8
 Honestly, I can't feel much of a difference. I was a 20mm proponent for so long and finally switched to a pike this year and don't really feel a difference...and i'm 235 pounds.
  • 39 4
 i dont think anyone can feel a difference to be honest, at least you shouldnt be able to, if you can then theres something seriously wrong! haha! i think annimax is reffering to the fact that 15mm sucks ass because you have to dick around buying hubs with a 15mm axle. everyone is running 20mm, only penises run 15mm :p haha! i'm just kidding Wink
  • 10 6
 Annimax, have you ridden the new generation of 15mm axle forks?
  • 8 2
 yeah i can see it being a problem with hubs...luckily, unless you buy really crappy hubs, the conversion kit is included or like $12
  • 37 3
 Considering the weight difference is negligable, the question is why WOULDN'T you want 20mm?
  • 23 3
 I don't see any point to the 15mm axle
  • 11 4
 Erm, you do realise 27.5 forks and 26 forks have different axle offset? So putting the wrong wheel size in would make it handle weirdly? The thing that pinkbike have been rattling on about for the last year or so?
  • 8 1
 off-set.... yes it can make a difference but you'd be pushed to notice from 26-27.5.
The major offset impact is when going up to 29, where the wheel contact point shifts significantly rearward so the offset compensates for this to get the same handling.
Usually a 26" QR fork will have an offset in the 39 to 42mm range. A 26" 20mm TA fork will usually run around 42 to 46mm offset, and a 29er fork will usually 45 to 46mm range with 46mm being the most common.
E.g. Mazocchi are all 44mm offset even with 26" and Manitou are 41mm for 26", 44mm for 27.5.
And some specific 29er frames are setup for 51mm offset forks.

The biggest impact to fork offset is actually the Axle type chosen during design.
(15mm allows shorter offset than 20mm when having the axle on the front of the lowers)
I'm running 27.5 Mattocs with 44mm offset and 26in wheel.

Unfortunately for the diamond, I can only see the OTT adjustment being anything innovative.
  • 20 4
 We've been told everyday in the last years that 650B is the best wheel standard, which is still not proven, but when obviously 20mm is the best axle standard, the industry is not giving it to us, the customers. This only proves that the industry is not producing what is best for the sport, but what is best for their pockets. We are all sick and tired but all these standards, that just have the purpose to make us buy more of what we don't really need. Does someone really knows how many seatpost clamp standards we have? And it's just a seatpost clamp size. It doesn't make you faster.
  • 10 3
 So if 650b is unproven as the best wheel size, wheres your data proving 20mm is best as an axle size? I know I wouldn't be fussed about buying a 15mm fork, why? Because I spend just a little extra and bought wheels with hope hubs, so for 12quid I can convert either end to almost any hub standard. That, and 15mm is lighter for almost as much strength and stiffness, so why its an issue I dont know. Personally, I think foxs new 36 that can take either axle is a brilliant idea
  • 8 5
 mentalhead, i agree, they are really shooting themselves in the foot here, im not going to piss around replacing bits to make something fit, im not made of money! i just buy the stuff that actually works on my bike. no way am i buying a new hub, then lacing up new spokes to make a new wheel just so i can run a nancy boys fork axle. fuck that, i'd buy a 20mm anyday, because i know i can sell that shit later, or if needs be i can use pretty much any other wheel
  • 8 3
 see thats the thing inked up metalhead (smilar names going on above this) its ALMOST the same stiffnes and strength. so yeah why provide data stating that 20mm is the best when you literally just said it was yourself? you know how you can run any axle with your conversion kit? thats a 20mm hub, thats why, you cant convert the other way round. so the weight difference is moot, your axle may be lighter but your hub is now heavier. why bother? just use 20mm and be done with it. its stiffer and more universal. job done.
  • 3 0
 But wheres all the sexy marketing and sales going to come from if everyone sticks with a proven standard that has already saturated the market.......
(15mm, 27.5 just a couple of examples)
Not that I'm slightly synical!
  • 4 2
 Right, and what if 20mm is over built and over heavy, and 15mm is all we needed in the first place? Almost the same but for less weight is a very good thing in a lot of circumstances. And so what its a 20mm hub, its the smart thing to buy, because it can be converted. Read what I said again, its not that im gonna go out of my way to buy a 15mm fork but I wouldn't be bothered if the fork I wanted had a 15mm axle because I did the sensible thing and bought a hub that could be used for either. Nowhere have I said 15mm is better, and I know for the last 5 years ive run 20mm forks, but for instance, im looking at the new pike, and I know that the damper and bottomless token performance increase over th old damper will be worth the 15mm axle.
  • 4 6
 And you just contradicted yourself very badly, you said you need to mess around with changing hubs but then say a 20mm can be converted. So as long as you weren't a cheapskate and bought a shit 20mm hub, then a 15mm hub is easy to sort
  • 11 10
 What the f*ck is people's problem with progression? When disk brakes first came out, people said theyd never catch on, same with full suss, carbon fibre, the lot. How silly do they all look now? 15mm is a progression over 20 in the fact its lighter. 650 is a progression over 26 in the fact it rolls better and has more traction for a given tyre. If you dont like stuff changing, stop mountain biking, because your gonna get awfully upset in years to come.
  • 11 1
 15mm is not a progression over 20mm. Just because something slightly newer, it doesn't mean it's better.
  • 10 1
 Why is 20mm better over 15mm axle? Physics. It's stiffer. What is the weight penalty you get for that stiffness? You can judge by yourself. It's invisible by any means. And you, inked-up-metalhead, sound just like a PR department, sorry to say that. As for the wheel size debate, there are pros and cons for each wheels size we have when you compare them. So that's why you cannot say which one is best. As for the axle diameter, I don't really see a cons for the 20mm axle standard, but I'm pretty sure 18mm axle will be much better. It will have the stiffness of 20mm axle and it will weights almost like a 15mm axle. I think we all need 18mm axles. That will be progress for sure.
  • 16 0
 Hmmm.... I feel as though with a 15mm axle I'm just not getting the rolling stiffness I want, yet with the 20mm it's just a bit heavy and doesn't roll as well. Hopefully someone will come up with a 17.5mm standard that will be the best of both worlds....
  • 7 0
 I hope Giant didn't read bigtims post!!
"OVERAXLE" arriving at a store near you!
  • 1 0
 i was in need of a replacement front wheel on my holiday in the French Alps. could i find a 15mm option? nothing in Les Gets or Morzine... i had to hire a whole bike
  • 7 4
 Yes it is. We are in a sport driven by racing, so in racing a 15mm axle being lighter for almost the same thing is progression. I still am yet to read any one of you telling me whats bad about 15mm as a standard? Thats like saying every car should have a v8 because its automatically better than a v6. In a lot of circumstances, the 15mm will be perfectly fine and add up to a lighter package on a whole. None of you seem to be understanding what im saying, which is that 15mm is not an issue if your smart about it. Its like with bb spacing, 83 for dh 68/73 for everything else, but surely as 83mm is stiffer and stronger all bikes should use that standard? And rear axles, might as well all be 157s.what, your trail bike is now half a pound heavier? But it's now overbuilt so dont complaint. You still are? Oh. But its stronger, thats the most important thing, right? Hey, while we're at it, lets all go back to '04 and ride 60lb monsters because they're stronger,
  • 6 0
 Why would you want something which is only very slightly lighter (a few grams) which isn't as strong? 20mm is better. It's stiffer and stronger for a weight penalty so miniscule that it's not worth mentioning. Do you run single ply 1.9 tyres too "because they're lighter"? Got a nice 600mm handlebar?
We do undertsand what you are saying, we just don't agree with you.
  • 3 7
flag inked-up-metalhead (Aug 13, 2014 at 4:47) (Below Threshold)
 Its all about adding up to a lighter bike on the whole. Aluminium and Ti bolts are only a few grams lighter, but people still buy them. Air suspension is only a few hundred grams lighter, why bother eh? Ultralight chainrings just wear faster, they should all be pressed steel. Carbon bars are negligible amounts lighter, theyre a waste of time too. And what if 15mm had come first and 20mm was just a beefier dh version, as it is with wider bb shells and hubs? Would you still be complaining then? It seems to me people are scared of things being made lighter in case its not strong enough, but if it was overkill in the first place (which 20mm is for trail riding) then why not save the weight?
  • 7 0
 Air suspension is significantly lighter than coil suspension, but what's most important is that you can set it up for your weight without a need of purchasing new coil if the stock coil doesn't fit your weight. There is reason 20mm came before 15mm and the reason is that people needed it. If you look at how standards developed, you will definitely see how the things are being made - "less stiff" standards to match the need of lighter parts, "heavier" standards to match the need of stronger parts.
Then suddenly you got "the best of both worlds" everywhere, which is completely equivalent to "worst of both worlds", if you think about it for a moment. And these new standards are rarely reasonable. They don't make your bike better, but they make the companies richer for sure. Want new frame? Buy new fork to fit it. Then buy new wheels to fit both, your new frame and your new fork. Is your bike much better now? No. Did you spent a lot of money to got a bike that is not much better? Yes, you did. Economics at its best.
  • 2 1
 If I ever become a weight weenie to the extent that I buy lighter bolts for my frame, you have my permission to shoot me in the head.
If I was that concerned with weight, I'd stop going to the gym and just run all the time. Trouble is, I'd be weaker ; )
  • 7 3
 Look at the axle thing the other way, dudes. Let's assume for the moment that the performance/weight differences between the axles don't matter (they don't really). Releasing the fork in 15mm is the SMART thing for them to do, to serve the MOST CUSTOMERS. People who already had 15mm hubs can run it no problem. People who have 20mm hubs can run it for an extra $10, which is insignificant when you're spending $1k for a fork. 15mm is the standard that makes the most sense at this point because it performs so close that nobody can tell, and it doesn't f*ck anyone over.

You guys are always bitching about backwards compatibility.... this IS backwards compatibility. The industry is moving to one standard, and they're choosing the one that WON'T make you buy a new hub and rebuild your wheel. Buy the hub reducers and shut the f*ck up, you crybabies.
  • 4 5
 Thank you bkm303, thats exactly the point I was trying to make. I fail to see any form of problem with a fork being 15mm axled unless you cheaped out on a shit 20mm hub.
  • 3 3
 Amd mentalhead, 20mm was needed for the DH guys because 9mm qr wasn't strong enough for them. Not trail riders. Its only more recently that trail or am forks have had a 20mm axle, and the only reason they got that was it was better than qr but nothing else was available. Now the right standard for trail and all mountain has come along so most manufacturers are using it.
  • 5 5
 15mm is only a small improvement from 9mm QR anyway.
  • 6 4
 @Dobbs59 now I *know* you guys are on crack. Going from QR to 15mm is a MASSIVE improvement. Going from 15 to 20 is technically an improvement, but it's so small that nobody will ever notice.

But that's still not the point. You guys are always talking about how the *evil bike industry* is changing standards to make you buy new shit all the time... well in this case they've done exactly the OPPOSITE of that. If they had chosen 20mm, all the 15mm crowd would need new hubs and wheel rebuilds. They chose 15mm and now you have to buy a $10 part. Boo f*cking hoo. You still get to use all your current hardware. DVO did right by its customers here.
  • 2 4
 Yeah now I know you're an idiot. Have you ever actually ridden a bike? 9mm qr flexes like mad compared to even a nutted 9mm axle, and compared to a full through axle its a wet noodle. A through axle being a through axle makes more of a difference than a 25% reduction in diameter
  • 4 2
 bkm303, why are you still saying that 15mm is better for rebuilds, when this standard should not even exists, as it gives nothing to the customers that 20mm standard didn't gave them already. Your logic is completely wrong. To go 15mm -> 20mm I need at least adapter. To go 20mm -> 20mm I need nothing. If there were no 15mm axles, then there wouldn't be a 15mm hubs, so we shouldn't care how to fit them. Can I say it more simple? If you got a 14mm standard it will still be easier to rebuilt to 15mm and 20mm, but you don't need it, do you?
  • 2 2
 "Yeah now I know you're an idiot."
I can empathise. I've been sure you are an idiot since you first piped up.
  • 4 3
 @mentalhead your example is irrelevant because 15mm axles already do exist. You can't go back in time and un-invent them. So what's the point complaining about it? Again, it's a $10 part for one group, or a $100+ hassle for the other. DVO chose the one that was better for people's wallets.

There was *always* going the be a smaller thru-axle standard anyway, because XC racers were never going to adopt the 20mm axle. The trail/AM market was bound to get caught between the XC and DH standards. But again.... if they both exist and you have to pick between the two, it's good (for DVO and the mtb population in general) to pick the one that doesn't require a major extra investment by the consumers.
  • 3 0
 Lost me at 15mm axle. At 210 pounds I can barely feel the difference, but what I'm more concerned about is durability. Even rockshox crappy maxle system has fared better than the 15mm
  • 2 1
 "Even rockshox crappy maxle system has fared better than the 15mm." Maxle comes in 15mm and 20mm for the front, so I'm not sure what you're saying there.

Are you saying you or anyone you know has failed a 15mm axle? Googled it and couldn't find anybody claiming to have a broken one. Never heard of any longevity issues.
  • 3 0
 Saying my 20mm maxle did better than the 15mm fox, sorry for the poor wording. THe 15mm didn't break, but the metal rod that goes through it is bent.
  • 2 0
 Oh that makes sense. Sounds like more of a problem with Fox's tightening mechanism, which is basically a QR skewer. I've done the same thing to my bike rack on my car by tightening down the cam when the skewer rod wasn't well lubricated (crusted up road salt all over it). The merits of the different axle attachment systems can def be debated (pinch bolts vs Maxle vs Fox vs Qloc2 vs HexLock vs LockX etc), but they're all the same between 15mm and 20mm and I've still never heard of a 15mm axle actually failing.
  • 2 0
 I agree, I think pinch bolts vs expanding through axle makes more of a difference than 5mm of diameter. That being said, when was the last time you saw a 15mm that uses pinch bolts? I think they are far superior.
  • 4 0
 15mm was not invented for the good of the sport. It was developed solely to monopolize the OEM market by two huge players. Pure speculation but it appeeared to me that Shimano and Fox pretty much killed a great (at the time) 20mm standard. F&^% 15mm for the bullshit reason it was ever even brought to market.

People can argue all they want that "15mm is just as good" (and I would assume in most cases for most riders it is), it was still regression.

The bottom line is given two otherwise identical forks, but one with a 15mm and one with a 20mm axle, and at same price, what percentage of the time are riders going to opt for the 20mm over the 15mm?
  • 4 4
 "15mm was not invented for the good of the sport."

Interesting claim. Still doesn't matter AT ALL in this discussion because 15mm is already here, tons of people have it, and it's not going anywhere.

"given two otherwise identical forks, but one with a 15mm and one with a 20mm axle, and at same price, what percentage of the time are riders going to opt for the 20mm over the 15mm?"

That's an easy one. It's an aftermarket fork, so people are going to pick the one that matches their current front hub, so they won't have to throw down a wad of cash for that too.... which brings us back to my original point: a 15mm fork works for ALL of DVO's potential customers, but a 20mm does not.

You guys sure are worked up over buying a $10 reducer. Or maybe you just want to punish all the people who bought the axles you don't like. Either way, business-wise it's a no-brainer for DVO to make this fork 15mm. It's compatible with the most hubs and it's the direction the trail/AM segment is going.

Hilarious that the 20mm crowd are probably the same guys complaining about their 1-1/8 head tubes not having backwards compatibility with modern forks. A company finally gives you backwards compatibility with the old standard and you shit on them for it.
  • 3 0
 i'm worked up about the stupidity of what is 15mm and why it came to be. Next to all front hubs can run all axle sizes: no issue there. "It's all about business", that's all.

Was someone shitting on someone for offering backward compatibility with steer tube diameter?

It's OK. The 36 will get everything back on track. Back to the future....
  • 1 0
 I wonder if when the DVO hit's production this fall if the prototype axle size is all that they offer...it is all about business afterall.
  • 5 2
 oh my gosh everything needs to chill out...if you buy a trail fork, it's 15mm!!! get used to it!!
  • 3 0
 RAGE
  • 4 1
 yeah but why did they even invent 15mm? its like 20mm was there, and it was pretty decent. then some company came along ans said "hmmm, how can we make ours different?" dont make it different, make it the f*cking same! you should have to go and buy a reducer just do you can enjoy a less stiff fork. this fork still looks awesome, i just wish it had a proper axle
  • 1 0
 Reminds me of the mega-overdrive-supernova Giant 1.25-1.5 head tube.
  • 1 0
 I don't see the fuss over this whole axle and wheel size thing for this fork. It was only made in 650b so it could be given to the enduro racers ASAP. By the time the production fork rolls around (ayy) 26 and 29 will probably both be available. Also who gives a shit about 15mm axle. The $12 to get a conversion isn't what's going to make you broke, and as stated above, a 15mm axle theoretically allows for a 2.5mm shorter offset than a 20mm
  • 1 0
 Nothing special is it? When's the USD rudeboy coming out?
  • 5 0
 The main reason 15mm axles are shite is that you can't put one on a Thule roof rack with the 20mm tube to clamp the fork to. That's why I want all my bikes to have 20mm axles. Add to that the ridiculous argument of weight saving and it's easy to see the pointlessness of this standard. Anyone who believes anything other than that it was made to sell more units is naive at best.
  • 1 0
 @jaame Rocky Mounts makes a roof rack attachment that's compatible with both 15 and 20mm. It clamps into the tray the same way the Thule thru axle adapter does, but it actually opens up and clamps onto the axle so you can lock the bike to it. It's a great system, no complaints. www.rockymounts.com/DriveShaft_bike_rack_adapter_p/1081.htm
  • 3 0
 If FOX did anything right for 2015 it was making the Fork lineup both 20mm and 15mm comparable. Arguably its really the extra length of the axel, as much the diameter, stanchion diameter and tapered steerer that combined make a much stiffer front end that transfers energy from the bars to the front wheel most effectively. If it just came down to the 5mm axel diameter, well wouldn't really count for much. "Dear Industry" please follow FOX example and let the riders decide. DVO take note. give them candy.
  • 2 0
 thats all true, though i would like to also point out that 20mm has more shear strength due to having a larger cross section (even though both axles are hollow) this is extra piece of mind in my book
  • 30 2
 You can run a 27.5 fork with a 26 inch wheel on a 26 inch bike without any problems whatsoever. I did that all last season.
  • 28 47
flag nouser (Aug 12, 2014 at 18:53) (Below Threshold)
 Do you want a medal?
  • 8 35
flag jlev (Aug 12, 2014 at 18:55) (Below Threshold)
 LOL!
  • 6 2
 Same here.
  • 3 0
 On Bike Rumor they said, "DVO Plans on offering models for all three of the common MTB wheel sizes." It sounds like they'll probably make 26", but their plans could be changed. Here's the link: www.bikerumor.com/2014/08/12/first-look-new-dvo-diamond-am-fork-nears-final-production-plus-diamond-and-emerald-dh-fork-weighed
  • 4 5
 The only "problem" is crown to axle length -> head angle. If you want to keep it the same you'll have to get 27.5 fork with less travel.
  • 4 0
 Why doesn't the article mention 26"? Either if the trail and axle-to-crown height is reasonable for 26", or if a 26" is planned or not in the future. Talk about the 'elephant in the room', half the comments are about it.
  • 9 3
 I recommend running a 29" fork with 26" wheels to give plenty of clearance when riding through mud,bog etc... its a winner just like meeeee
  • 32 3
 24, 26 , 27.. I'm not sure why it matters. I remember a couple of years ago I had this great idea. Why not take a 27.5 er bike and put a 24 inch tire on the back. it had never been done before. So I was running a local bike shop that did customs and decided to customise the shit out of a giant glory. I got it all together and realised that we had an issue. f*cken glory. That bottom bracket is low as shit. How the hell am i going to fix this shit. I called over one of the marketing guys and he was all like 'what the heck is the matter with it?" I tried to explain it but John the marketer was just not getting the concept. Finally after trying to explain it 20 times I needed to get the f out of that shop. So I took a way behind the old outhouse in the back and had a few drinks.. When I got in John called me over and said 'you know Rambles. The problem isn't the design but its your shitty attitude and you are not seeing the big picture. We are going to make an 'a' version and a 'b' version. the 'a' version may have an issue with the bottom bracket scraping the ground but that wasn't what it was made for. it was made for super steep flat trails. the 'b' version comes with an extra clear coat on the bottom bracket to keep the scratches to a minimum and there is also a sock that we specially designed to go over the bracket to protect it. this version is the bike park version. we also let the customer custom pick their paint."

I looked at him stunned. I had always thought of him as a socio-path but now I knew for sure. I looked that bugger right in the eye and said 'I think i may of heard something more retarded before but I'm not sure when." as it turns out his mother was mentally handicapped and I got fired for creating a hostile work place.

Last I heard that bike was a huge success. They may of killed a few people but business was good.
  • 26 0
 rambles... living up to his name
  • 9 0
 i actually read that. not bad.
  • 3 1
 26 aint dead !
  • 2 0
 Yeah baby! We are proud enough to say that!
  • 25 4
 that is a sexy fucking fork.
  • 32 0
 Thanks!
  • 3 3
 It's cool for sure but I think the green will date pretty quickly like everything, is there a stealth option with green highlights in the future at some stage?
  • 3 0
 @skippy888

in the article:
"Mountain bikers can be a fickle bunch, which is why DVO will be offering the Diamond in both green and
black versions, along with the strong possibility of a black stanchion coating in the future. "
  • 1 0
 I'm I blind or it's not the same green?. Check the difference between the lowers/crown and the dials.
  • 1 0
 @Pichy: The dials are CNC alloy then anodized. The lowers and crown are painted, it is very difficult to perfectly match the anodizing color to the paint with the exception of black or white colors.
  • 2 0
 That fork in green with a day glo green knolly chilcotin! Holy shit that would look sexy!
  • 1 0
 A friend of mine works in a furniture factory and there they have a machine that can scan adn replicate any colour you want. I know it's difficult match ano with paint, but I know you could do better. Also the little fender would be nice if it offer some cover around fork seals to protect them from mud projected by wheel. Otherwise is nice to have another option for customers to choose. Keep going!
  • 1 0
 Where is this furniture factory and how do I send my fork in? Looking for fire-engine red to match my 951 Razz
  • 14 3
 Given the hype around DVO..... that article is a whole load of "meh". Seems like Mike was pretty underwhelmed.
  • 2 1
 Agreed. The production fork might be totally rockin, though!
  • 13 3
 We feel the write up was a bit too "meh" too! Based on CG's response, who is our biggest critic, he loves it! The production fork will be toned down a bit with a more linear air spring which may be better for test riders.
  • 7 2
 But CG's paid $$$$$$$ to be your biggest critic and to love it?
  • 13 1
 Yes he is paid but he also wants the best for him and for us, so when he asks for something to be modified or changed, we obviously consider it.
  • 12 1
 its easy to get "meh" about forks, every manufacturer is the best in town. for me, if it looks cooler than everyone elses, its got decent travel amd it doesnt break then itl do. adjustability is cool as well. but to be honest who actually adjusts that shit? ive got a boxxer team and if im honest, i got the manual out once, i adjusted it and then literally never touched the dials again, the 2 bottom dials fell off, didnt really affect my life at all. it all feels the same to me.
  • 1 0
 i forgot to add,m this fork looks pretty fucking awesome. so its a winner on that front.
  • 8 0
 can you put in the steeze remote CG has it on his bike? I want whip on the left side, table on the right side...
  • 1 0
 You couldn't be more right!
  • 1 0
 I'm just going to say it, I think the market for this fork is limited to those who want to ride a fork with DVO branding. Maybe they should have looked a little closer at developing a viable inverted design.
  • 8 0
 @ZeGermans: Its more than just the DVO branding, its a bummer PinkBike didn't have more time to go into other details that set us apart from the other guys. Items like the adjustable compression loader that can be easily removed and tuned by the rider is a feature that isn't available on a Fox or Rock Shox. We are use a unique bladder system that offers better more reliable performance than a simple expanding bladder. The OTT feature that many of our current Emerald riders love is also found on the Diamond. We are working on an inverted design as well, stay tuned.
  • 1 1
 The inverted design is supposedly still coming.
  • 1 0
 Why hasn't CG been racing with this the whole time?
  • 2 0
 Gah, ninjad by the company themselves.
  • 1 0
 Props to DVO for coming onto Pinkbike and responding to comments. The thing is, as a new company, with new products - going head-to-head (price wise) with the very top end of the market send a very clear message: "we are as good as/better than the best forks on the market". That's a bold claim, and I think we all admire your confidence....... the question is: "is that actually true? or is it just marketing?". I hope it is true - more competition/choice is a good thing.
  • 1 0
 jeff051177: thanks for the kind words, we have been in the suspension business a very long time and know what it takes to make products that are not only as good as the other big guys but better. Its not only marketing but we ride and test our products to compete with the best of them. Cheers, DVO
  • 2 1
 hmmmm.... do you see the irony in that response? Until there are some real-world reviews, anything you (or somebody you pay) says about the magnificent performance of your new fork IS just "marketing".

Sorry, my previous post seemed a bit harsh - I know a little about the history of DVO and think that what you are doing is great. Looking forward to seeing reviews of the production fork.
  • 2 0
 Jeff: Collectively here at DVO we over 100 years of suspension experience. The founder of DVO was also the founder of Marzocchi MTB Suspension so theres plenty of experience here.
  • 1 0
 Great - looking forward to reading a good review.
  • 1 1
 @jeff051177 I'm not paid by DVO, but I was lucky enough to get some time on the fork and I can tell you that it isn't all marketing. It is hands down one of the best forks out there, and I can't wait to get some more time on it.
Im not a brand loyal buyer, so I will buy from whoever has the best product and at this current point, DVO is definitely one of the best.
Their product, customer support, and technology are top of the line.
  • 9 2
 DVO, question about your damping system. It says that the bladder that's surrounded by oil is inflated to the ambient air pressure. But the thing is, the ambient air pressure changes depending on what the temperature is, and what altitude you're at. Doesn't that affect the damping characteristics?
  • 7 1
 Any change in air temperature may not have any effect on the damping. The air that is inside the bladder is surrounded by oil which remains quite cool, but, hypothetically speaking, if the air were to expand it would apply more pressure on the oil which would further limit cavitation. The function of our design is quite similar to how a bladder works in our rear shock.
  • 2 1
 He was talking about ambient air pressure, not the temperature...two different things , me thinks Razz
  • 3 1
 @themountain: he mentioned "ambient are pressure changes depending on what the temperature is and what altitude you're at" & if there is any effect on the damping. Temperature changes can be caused by the environment (external) or heat generated by the friction (internal).
  • 1 4
 obviously you need glasses...read his comment again ..... the ambient air pressure changes depending on what the temperature is, AND WHAT ALTITUDE YOU ARE AT..
  • 3 1
 No I don't think I need glasses here buddy but thanks for insight.
  • 9 2
 I guess judging by this review that the Manitou Mattoc is better than the DVO Diamond. Who would have thought? The worst thing about this fork, the price... for no increase in performance against its competitors.
  • 14 1
 This fork is a prototype with an air spring specifically tuned for Cedric and our other top athletes. It has a pretty strong mid-stroke ramp for support in the steep, rough terrain at the EWS this past weekend. The production version will be tamed down and a bit more linear. You won't be disappointed with the performance I promise!
  • 5 0
 This is exactly how the Emerald feels. It was tough to get used to for a bit, but after some time on it, I'm alot faster on stuff I've been riding for years. You gotta ride it like a man, though. It seriously makes you faster. I love it
  • 1 0
 I prefer the "ramp up" to come from more compression damping (yes I know it's no ramp up per se). It gives a less rubbery feel, rather super smooth one. But I guess it's a matter of taste.
  • 10 1
 There will be a "26 version.
  • 6 0
 I think we all agree that competition in the marketplace is good. For that reason alone, keep up the great work DVO! Looking forward to a test day with a fully DVO equipped bike.
  • 6 0
 Yes competition is good and we like to compete! Thanks for the support and we look forward to working with you in the future!
  • 2 0
 Can it compete with the Pike in the $$$ department?
  • 4 1
 @Dobbs59: As the article states, we are aiming at the $1000 dollar price which is quite competitive with the other guys.
  • 1 0
 Cheers DVO. Nice bit of kit by the way.
  • 5 0
 After the recent Manitou Mattoc review i was under the impression that it's as good as the pike or the fox, why isn't it presented as such in the "alternatives " section of the review ?
  • 7 0
 Because its against the laws of bike journalism to say that anything is as good or better than the Pike or the Fox. Its also all about stanchion diameter, so unless someone comes out with a 37 or 38, it will suck compared to the Fox or Pike, because on a 6" travel bike with tubless tires in the mid-20 psi, you twatwaffles can feel the front fork flexing.
  • 3 0
 I thought this too, if I remember the Mattoc wasn't quite as sensitive on small chatter but Manitou's damping was better than Fox or RS's offerings when you started ride... Yet it gets forgotten - and what about BOS or Marzocchi's 350 (or whatever its called) never getting a mention but no doubt being even more sensitive
  • 4 0
 It seems we should of had a more linear feeling fork set up for Mike but the forks we have here at Crank Worx are prepped for our racers who need and asked for a very supportive mid stroke which is required for his type of terrain when charging hard. The Diamond can be set up to feel very linear and cushy which will increase the small bump sensitivity.
  • 1 0
 I've gotten burned a few times on replacement parts for Manitou... I'm optimistic about their new stuff, but honestly they have to prove that they aren't going to abandon their products the second they leave production, people don't stop riding your parts when you stop making them.
  • 12 4
 Much green, so money
  • 4 0
 wow
  • 8 3
 Bummer I won't get to ride one for some time...I guess I'm a dinosaur on my 26'' SB-66...Slayosaurus Wrex
  • 8 0
 there will be a 26" version so don't worry!
  • 8 6
 Sounds like its a few years too late, both the pike and new 36 are amazing. This sounds comparable to the previous generation of forks like the old RC2 and lyric. too progressive for trail riding, not frictionless, and still a bit porky.
  • 20 2
 The Pike and the are good, but we feel that the Diamond offers a great package of adjustability, durability, and performance. The 36 just came out, we will be in production next month, not too late in our opinion.
  • 2 0
 DVO, question about your damping system. It says that the bladder that's surrounded by oil is inflated to the ambient air pressure. But the thing is, the ambient air pressure changes depending on what the temperature is, and what altitude you're at. Doesn't that affect the damping characteristics?
  • 4 0
 The bladder design in the Diamond is quite like the bladder in our rear shock, the Jade. If air temperature increases it will only put more pressure on the oil which helps reduce cavitation, which is a good thing. In regards to the Pike and Fox expanding bladder designs, there is a greater chance of the ambient air temperature to increase because the air is directly against the inner walls of the stanchion tubes. When they heat up from the sun, ambient air pressure will change but will only increase pressure on the bladder and help pressurize the oil, both of which are good things.
  • 1 0
 So I understand the temperature piece, since the temp inside the fork is going to ramp up with use. However, I'm still wrapping my head around barometric pressure changes. I would think this would be a concern *if* the bladder is somehow interacting with the atmospheric pressure. However, the design clearly states that the bladder is a) sealed and b) inside the stanchion, surrounded by oil, which is the medium it IS interacting with.

As I understand it oil isn't particularly affected by atmospheric pressure changes, at least not in the operating ranges of the fork (where humans don't die of oxygen deprivation or vacuum).

So seems like what's being said is that the bladder itself isn't pressurized like the air spring would be?
  • 2 0
 Hey kevmocal: its hard to really describe the entire effect of atmospheric changes over a PB thread but there is more effect on the air spring to these changes than on the damper. Changes in altitude does have a sometimes dramatic effect on this and thats why its good to bleed or equalize the pressure if you go from sea level to high altitude. If you have have a chance to see us in person, please feel free to come by and our booth and we can show you our bladder system and give you the full run down. Cheers, DVO
  • 2 0
 @DVOsuspension, great to see that your actually monitoring the comments and giving informed replies to people genuine questions, and even the 'roll your eyes' at them questions.
Will be considering this for my next fork for sure in the coming year or two, based upon your replies and the quality that will be supplied (based upon peoples reactions to your emerald!)
  • 1 0
 Thanks and appreciate your future relationship with DVO. Its important for us to talk to everyone and hear their feedback, its also important that everyone knows we care about the products! Cheers, DVO
  • 2 0
 my reason for buying @DVOSuspension lies in their amazing customer service and support of thier customer and rider base. the guys at the dvo tent didnt even know me, and they treated me like a friend,not a consumer and thats more than you can say about most of these huge corporations, its not as if their product quality doesnt live up to rockshox or fox like the article may suggest, the emerald literally destroys every fork i have ever rode, the ott and fast ramp up, tunability, and overall attention to detail makes the fork a winner, and i have no doubt that this new diamond fork holds just as much quality and attention to detail as they always do, dvo is the definition of class!! RONNIE FOR PRESIDENT, DVO FOR LIFE!!!!
  • 2 0
 Thanks Tannerstolt! Appreciate the fact you took a chance on our products and we are stoked it feels amazing. As far as customer service goes, we are here for our customers and care about how the product is working. Cheers buddy and feel free to stop by anytime.
  • 3 0
 DVO response on this thread is awesome. When was the last time you saw a huge company respond DIRECTLY to critics and questions? Great job DVO staying in in tune with the market!
  • 1 0
 Thanks buddy!
  • 6 1
 Wow I like to get one to test it on my track.
  • 4 2
 Will the 26" be available with 1 1/8" straight steerer? intelligence states most riders on 26" are on older bikes being they aren't available anymore and a lot of older bikes had straight steerers...
  • 7 6
 We will only be offering the Diamond in a tapered steer. Due to the 160mm travel and long axle to crown length, the tapered is stronger and stiffer than a 1 1/8th steer.
  • 5 4
 that's a big shame, I will go for the new fox 36 then to replace my 2010 fox 36's
  • 3 4
 I think its silly how straight steerers have been virtually eliminated, so many people are still using them
  • 2 1
 @mark3: Does the new 36 offer a straight 1 1/8th steer option?
  • 1 1
 Yes, Fox does offer 1.1/8" steer tube. Also 26", 27.5" and 29" versions. However they are a much larger company. They maybe able to afford keeping that many option.
  • 3 1
 Just check their web site and it seems they do offer a 1 1/8th steer on the 36 with 180mm travel. Man, that's a huge lever arm/axle to crown!
  • 1 0
 I'm still running 1-1/8th on my bike. With a 160 fork on it, I feel it flexing a lot at low speeds. It's terrifying sometimes hah. If my frame accepted a tapered steer I'd have changed mine out already. Here's to hoping I break my frame before this fork hits the market. Just need an excuse to tell my frugal side (pronounced wife) it's time to get a new bike!
  • 2 1
 I have rode my bike with fox 36 x 160 forks down some very rough dh trails as fast as I dare go and I have never felt them flex at all, I have got saint brakes on and can do endo's with no fork flex at all either, I would like to try these dvo forks but unfortunately dvo wont do a 11/8 straight steerer, bummer
  • 1 0
 @mark3 - Maybe it's just my fork. I don't really want to use the "M" word here with the DVO guys chiming in though Wink

I only notice the fork flexing at low speeds and it seems to come from near the crown. I am rather heavy though, so I'm sure that plays into it.
  • 2 0
 I think I read somewhere about the 'M' forks doing that on someone elses bike, btw,sorry I thought you had fox forks
  • 1 0
 No worries about mentioning the "M" word here but we appreciate your concern! The main thing to be concerned about when using a 1 1/8th straight steer is the interface between the steer and crown, its a huge lever arm and creaking can occur within days of riding. We prefer to stay safe and use the larger tapered steer tube.
  • 1 0
 I have also have never noticed my 1/18th lyriks flex any more than my tapered x fusion Vengeance fork however i know a lot of people that have bent tapered steerers in crashes but i do not know of anybody bending a modern 1/18th fork steerer, Why is this?
  • 3 0
 It says the fork can be adjusted down to 140mm and 150mm. Does this reduce the travel while maintaining the same fork height or does it reduce the overall height of the fork?
  • 5 0
 The overall fork height is reduced.
  • 1 0
 How progressive can the fork get? I can see the 140mm version competing with the 140mm pike DJ
  • 2 1
 The integrated fender surely is a neat thing! But clearance appears a little on the edge, like a 26" fork with a 27" wheel. It might just be the camera angle? I hope so because it's a Maxxis tyre, not the widest in town. I guess some Schwalbe mud tyres would quicly be a problem in mud.

Otherwise surprising the Pike and 36 are always mentioned as reference when the Bos Deville keeps being ignored. I'd put this Diamond at the same level of expectation than I have for BOS. Let's see when the final production forks come out if we hear and read a full comparative test. Would be great!
  • 2 0
 We're not ignoring the Deville - we just haven't been able to get our hands on one to review, and it's not for lack of trying. They're difficult to come by in North America.
  • 2 0
 Theres plenty of tire clearance, it may just be the camera angle.
  • 1 0
 Suspensionwerx in North Van has a wall of them, there must be a NA distributor. But it seems generally the reference keeps coming back to the Pike. It is the queen of small bump, but maybe I'm the only one that feels a lack of HS compression (instead using Rapid recovery to keep the fork high). I found, personally for agressive riding and racing I had to go pretty firm on the Pike to get genuine support (you know when you have oh shit moments), whereas having a fox RC2 shimmed to my weight and riding style, so much more confident inspiring. Not as smooth for sure of the top....but I guess that's what sells forks. I think I'm the only person on PB that sold his pike in favour of a fox (push rc2 34) lol!
  • 2 0
 Thanks for the answers guys. I hope you manage to ride a Deville, would be interesting to get another opinion than te one of a famous british paper magazine (Dirt) who puts the Deville stlightly ahead of the Pike (I guess so slightly that a dude like me wouldn't notice the difference). Switching from a 36RC2 to the Deville I've been very impressed in terms of damping, though comparison is tough for the 36 as the fork was a couple of years old. It felt less stiff than the 36 but not up to a point where it would feel like a noodle. I didn't try a Pike yet but that should come soon.
  • 1 0
 @Mikekazimer, BOS are difficult to get a hold of full stop. I own a Deville and a Stoy and neither has ever been back to BOS for work, always J-Tech since J-Tech actually answer their damned emails. Fantastic damping though.
  • 2 0
 Other possibility: grab the bike of Anne-Caroline Chausson. I'm anyway curious to know how this new Ibis works... Wink
  • 1 0
 I want one! Sounds like a great fork for those who like to push a bit harder. Nice to see something exciting and new with some innovative features. I mean how tough would it have been for fork makers to integrate a mudguard??
  • 2 0
 Thanks supermike306! The set up we have here are for the raacers who are pushing these enduro forks hard!
  • 1 0
 "Racers have been favoring the more progressive feel, but riders who spent most of their time riding at a more casual pace would likely benefit from a more linear stroke."

This is the exact opposite of what SRAM and Pinkbike claimed was necessary regarding the RS-1/ Pike forks and bottomless tokens.

In my mind a "racer" favours low sag and a linear stroke to eek out the travel when required whereas a average trail mincer favours more sag but needs a more progressive mid to end stroke to prevent the fork constantly blowing through its travel.

Any thoughts on this?
  • 1 0
 I think they're basically saying racers like hard suspension (fast but not comfortable), whereas casual riders prefer more comfort. Bottomless tokens give you the ramp-up at the end, but allow the early stroke to stay plush/linear; a balance of comfort and progressiveness. I think they're pretty much saying that race suspension isn't comfortable or forgiving enough for the mass market.
  • 2 0
 The Diamonds that we have set up here are at Crank Worx are set up for hard, fast charging conditions. Our OTT "Off The Top" system allows you to have a softer initial feel with a supportive mid stroke that isn't hard. The Diamond can also be set up to have a more linear cushy feel without having to add any air biscuits.
  • 3 0
 You said air biscuits
  • 1 0
 Correct me if my logic is wrong (far from being an expert in this area) but to my experience, progressive tunes aren't all that great for beginners since they will need to put lots of sag to use all the travel, resulting in very little midstroke support so a more linear curve would help them with both midstroke support and using full travel. On the other hand, faster riders will put more air in to get more overall support and the progressive curve will tend to prevent bottoming out better while getting decent small bump sensitivity. I find that on more linear forks, if it's set somewhat hard to prevent bottoming out, the small bump sensitivity usually goes down the drain.
  • 1 0
 Hey PLC07: your logic is spot on here! More tame riders like the linear cushy feel and the hard charges want a fork that is stiffer and offers more ramp, hence the whole air biscuit thing. That's why we developed the OTT system to allow the fork to feel stiff in the mid and end stroke while having great small bump sensitivity. Cheers, DVO
  • 1 0
 Seeing as how the other big guys now make great performing product, I'd be looking to increase long term performance and reliability. Forks these days have minimal lubrication oil which causes wear on the upper tubes and bushings. 2 years of hard use and a 1000 fork can be worn to the point of deteriorated performance. Are the upper tubes' coatings more durable? How are the seals made? How much lubrication oil is in the lowers? How often does thatunique air spring need to be serviced?
  • 1 0
 Hey Krispy! Yeah we gave the editor a full run down on all the high quality parts that go into making the Diamond and how it sets us apart from the other guys but it didn't make it into the article. As you know with the Emerald, we use only the highest quality parts and use a generous amount of oil and durability and reliability are high on our design feature list.
  • 1 0
 Have been following DVO for a while and the development of this fork specifically. Looking pretty interesting. Honestly, it's nice to see you're not dealing with a Canadian distributor... it makes products too expensive, they stock next to nothing and they are a pain in the ass to deal with. The direct route is always preferable.
  • 1 0
 Thanks gtrguy!
  • 1 0
 Stanchions make way, WAY more of a difference than axle for stiffness.

I've extensively ridden a 32mm stanchion 15mm axle fork, a 32mm stanchion 20mm axle fork, and a 35mm stanchion 15mm axle fork and the 35mm stanchion fork was by FAR the stiffest. Once you actually have an axle (instead of a QR) the difference isn't even there between 15mm and 20mm.

I'm not saying that 20mm is bad, but complaining about 15mm is stupid.
  • 1 0
 Alias530: stanchions do make a lot of difference in stiffness but more for transverse & torsional loads at the crown. If you really want to increase torsional stiffness at the wheel it is best to have the axle locked down by pinch bolts and not a QR. This entire debate between 15 and 20mm axle dimensions isn't really relevant if you are talking about torsional stiffness when using a QR.
  • 14 10
 Stopped reading at "27.5, 29".
  • 27 1
 there will be a 26" version as well
  • 8 1
 #f*ckyeahsandhighfives
  • 2 0
 I'm really close to pulling the trigger on a Fox Talas 180. The main thing holding me back is the black and orange and yellow and gold. My bike is white silver and green. Your fork looks deadly is there any chance you have a longer travel version with travel adjustment on the horizen?
  • 6 1
 If you can get your hands on xfusion over there, The low maintenance Metric @ 180mm it's far superior to any Fox product by a country mile(check reviews), and it looks awesome! Different colored carbon fiber guards are also included in teh box.
  • 1 0
 I want the Fox Talas with adjustable height down to 140mm for climbing and general trail duties. I want white or green, anything but black. I've found a new old stock white fox talas 36 180 oem fork for $761. Usually Talas are black and float are white but the oem is white plus no ugly gold stanchions. The metric has no travel adjust feature and is black with red accents so no go I'm afraid. @ $1000 this DVO has a lower msrp than Fox@ $1400 and it looks way better.
  • 1 0
 Stopped reading at 27.5 too. But then I saw this post. Thanks
  • 2 0
 Well maybe Talas has improved, but mine 5 years ago was $1200 in the toilet. Creaky, seriously problematic, an expensive tune was good for maybe 8 hours, terrible small bump compliance and a diver. Truth is, travel adjust and lock out are gimmicks bro, and a HUGE compromise to long travel single crown performance. I typically climb 9-15km road or long steep tech track with no issues on a Metric @ 180mm. It's gonna bounce when you stand, but then you're doing it wrong anyways.

Do you really want a 180mm fork that climbs... or shreds? should be a no brainer. Sometimes colors don't always work out.
  • 1 0
 I want it all. Which Talas did you have? I'm looking at a 2012 but have seen some used older types which had worse reveiws but are cheaper. I don't think the style has changed damper wise till the new ones since the 180 came out.
  • 4 1
 DVO said in an article on bikerumor that they would make a 26" version as well.
  • 3 1
 The fork looks like it would be better suited for a 26" wheel anyways, the arch in the fork looks way too close with 27.5 wheel...
  • 2 0
 We offer the same tire clearance as the other guys, must of been the camera angle.
  • 1 0
 Doh... I guess I got use to looking at my current 26" fork than can also run a 27.5 ... But then now I don't see why you would need to build a 26" specific fork unless it was for DH. Oh well, just send my one of those sexy green 27.5 forks and I'll let you know if a 26" wheel works on it...
  • 5 2
 That Pike must be an awesome freakn fork!! Im stoked for the review of the new Marz.. 350 or whatever its called
  • 3 0
 OOHHUUUNNNGHGHGHNYEEESSSS black stanchions. Sexiest damn thing on a suspension fork. I want several.
  • 1 0
 nice looking fork with adjustability. however, the fox 36 is £900 in the uk which has a similar rrp to this while the pike is £500 and the mattoc 550ish.

look toward to reading about the production version though.
  • 1 0
 the pike's RRP is not £500, thats the price on chain reaction cycles, the rrp starts at around £700
  • 1 0
 the RRP of a fox 26 is $1050 compared to the DVO $1000. costs £900 for a fox 36 over here in the shops hence the likelyhood the DVO will be around the same hence my comparison to the shop prices of the pike and mattoc.
  • 1 0
 If it's a $1000 in the USA then by the time they get shipped to the UK and all the greedy middle and tax men take their cut, they will more than likely cost between £1200 and £1300
  • 1 0
 DVO how about this self service? You will supply shops with spares? I mean not only seals and oils, but orings (if they are different than standard orings what we can buy in the local shop) and stuff from cartridge?
  • 2 0
 The Diamond is designed to be easily serviced and tuned by the riders. We will also have a lot of service and tuning related information to assist anyone who wants to take the time to work and tune the fork themselves and of course spare parts, shims and o-rings will be readily available.
  • 1 0
 I would not bother trying to compeat with the Enduro market. The UD Emerald fork is the fork i dream about. Please make a fork that has 180 mils of travel and can take whatever I throw at it.
  • 13 12
 Here's my idea, left half is like this: green lowers, black stanchions, green uppers. Right half is the opposite. How cool would that be?
  • 60 6
 Not very.
  • 10 10
 hahahah^^^^^
  • 3 0
 There will be a 26" version
  • 2 0
 Hey DVO, when will the 29er version be ready? Also what travel will it have?
  • 2 0
 We are testing the 29" version now and it will out towards the end of this year. The travel will be 140-160mm, internally adjustable. Cheers, DVO
  • 1 0
 Will DVO be available through any bike part distributors? It would be sweet if our local bike shop could start selling DVO stuff.
  • 1 0
 US and Canada goes directly through the DVO office in Valencia, CA
  • 1 0
 When the Diamond comes out QBP and BTI will also handle the distribution for the USA.
  • 1 0
 F*ck yes, that's what I want to hear. Make sure you guys give employee discount on pricingWink thanks for the reply!
  • 1 0
 I have a legitimate question that does not pertain to axle diameter.
Why is the author comparing a pike to a fox 36. Isn't the lyrik more on par with the big 36?
  • 3 1
 I want to ride one of those so bad!!!!
  • 4 0
 Awesome, we look forward to having you ride one!
  • 2 1
 Look people, there's a lot of words on that fork that mean stuff... you should care about it!!!
  • 1 0
 Agreed!
  • 2 2
 Sure you can run a 27.5 fork with 26 but that's not its function and it does affect the ride and ride height of your bike. And that's beside the point lol
  • 5 4
 a*sholes, STOP posting your stupid comments...Some of us appreciate each others helpful advise! >>>JUS SAYIN!
  • 1 0
 Agreed!
  • 1 0
 Nice fork DVO! Sounds like the fork works great! As do all the others you guys make!
  • 1 0
 Thanks Nik!
  • 1 3
 Looks good , I'm not convinced that its going to be worth twice the price of the pike, though that integrated fender is an excellent idea As said above though mud clearance is an issue, especially for racing in the uk, the pike doesn't have the biggest clearance itself If only all these forks were designed for ukge races on fresh cut trails on a wet welsh mountainside And let's not talk about this years Megavalanche!
  • 3 0
 How is the Diamond twice the price of the Pike?
  • 1 1
 No-one pays MRSP for an RS or Fox product. 5 minutes on Google & you can find them heavily discounted (even up to 40% off) for current MY product.

Competition is great, but buying this means you're paying an awful lot for something that's not really any better it would seem than other stuff out there, without a huge backup and support network.

Still, I'm sure it will look great strapped onto a carbon Santa Cruz, on an Audi estate, in a UK trail centre car park, then gets wobbled round a red route by an overweight middle aged guy proclaiming this and his new ENVE's have made him go 20% faster, before blowing out of his ass on the merest incline.
  • 1 0
 Pikes are 380 quid from German sites posted to the uk

Not sure of the diamonds rrp or discounted price in Europe ?

Certainly fox stuff doesn't get discounted as much as RS

Neg prop away but my points are valid, unless dvo stuff gets discounted heavily here ? And as for mud clearance the UK's had the wettest winter on record this year the Alps too have been a washout , mud clearance matters, the best damping in the world won't matter if your wheels won't turn in your forks or frame. As I said though the integrated fender looks great !
  • 1 0
 Looks very nice but why didn't you look (for the first time in history...) at fox and made 15/20 interchangeable dropouts?
  • 2 0
 Thx EnduroriderPL: interchangeable drop outs have been used in off road motorcycle suspension for years and years now and it is a cool option. With the massive demand for enduro products at 15mm we felt that it was best to have a dedicated 15mm axle for the Diamond. We are coming out with more products soon and will consider it for the near future!
  • 1 0
 @DVOSuspension: it's always good news to see that producers actually read what people have to say. I strongly believe that riders should have the option of choosing what type of axle they prefer. It's similar to choosing disc brake size: you can go from 160 all the way to 203mm because in well-designed frame there is enough room for it.

As a premium brand it would be cool if you let me choose what I want or just go with 20mm Smile
  • 1 0
 Hi EnduroriderPL: I think you will like the next fork we will be bringing soon, stay tuned and yes DVO is listening to the riders. Cheers!
  • 1 0
 @VOSuspension: You bet your sweet little ass that I will Smile
  • 2 1
 I just think the fork goes perfect with our Process 153 DL! @DVOSuspension Go talk with our bosses to get a deal!
  • 1 0
 Thanks KonaChina!
  • 1 0
 casting looks like ROCKSHOX, underbridge like MARZOCCHI, tubes like FOX and overbridge like FOX, so beautiful Smile
  • 1 0
 Wish I could Afford these, they are the most beautiful things I have ever seen... EVER!
  • 1 0
 Thank you very much!
  • 1 0
 Been riding DVO Emeral black for six months. Though, superb comfort and lots of traction. No going back to Foxrs.
  • 1 0
 Thanks for supporting DVO wakaba! We appreciate you!
  • 1 0
 DVO needs to be at least comparable with BOS, otherwise I'm not interested.
  • 1 0
 @DVOsuspension
Can you tell me the axle to crown length for the 160mm version?
Thank you!
  • 3 1
 it looks like money
  • 2 0
 Thanks man!
  • 3 1
 Looks absolutely mint
  • 2 0
 Thanks buddy!
  • 2 0
 Its green. I like it
  • 2 0
 Us too!
  • 1 0
 Looks good DVO! Hmmm, now I want to build a green bike.
  • 1 0
 Thanks buddy!
  • 1 0
 How is rebound and slow compression damped? Via orifice or with shims?
  • 2 0
 We use piston and shim stack system, the only way to go!
  • 1 0
 Thats good! Then Ill be waiting for real world pricing and more reviews and maybe next spring Ill have new fork
  • 1 0
 DVO iv got a question, when can we expect it in the uk / europe
  • 1 0
 We will be shipping the end of September and most likely it will be in Europe soon after. Cheers!
  • 1 0
 Anything in the pipeline for dirt jumping?
  • 1 0
 Not at this moment but we will consider it!
  • 1 0
 Very Nice Fork. I hope will get it in Europe soon
  • 2 0
 Thx buddy! The Diamond will ship globally very soon.
  • 1 0
 That green just says "look at me!"
  • 1 0
 Yes for sure, with all the stealthy products out there its nice to have a brighter option. We will have an all black version too.
  • 1 0
 Shine bright like a diamond!
  • 1 0
 i only care how much to pay this!!!looks great!
  • 1 0
 Awesome, cant wait to see that. Keep up the good work guys!
  • 2 0
 Long term review?
  • 1 0
 I got my DVO diamond, so sick.
  • 1 0
 Mud guards cool
  • 1 0
 pike killer!!!
  • 2 0
 Oh yes!
  • 1 0
 Mine is on order, KOB
  • 1 2
 well...another fork...this one is green, so what??
  • 1 1
 @themountain: we feel its not just another fork but rather another sweet ass fork that rips on the trials and offers great reliability, tune-ability, performance all backed by a company that cares about their customers. Now thats not just another green fork in our minds....
  • 1 0
 well..your reply sounds like any other advert from the business. :/
  • 1 0
 It may sounds like like that! But its words from the owner and I promise you won't be disappointed! Cheers, DVO
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