First Ride: Forbidden Dreadnought V2 - More Travel & Longer Chainstays

Apr 9, 2024
by Matt Beer  
photo

The final piece in the trinity of Forbidden’s updated frame design comes along with a redesigned Dreadnought V2, their enduro powerhouse bike. Like their Druid trail and Supernought downhill bikes, the Dreadnought takes on a multi-link rear triangle but remains a high-pivot suspension design. This layout opens up tuning the kinematics with more independence and incorporates refined pivot hardware.

On top of that, the travel has been boosted to 160mm out back and there are geometry changes to expand the Dreadnought’s downhill capabilities. But, there are also tweaks to aid its seated position and the overall weight, which shouldn’t be scoffed at for a bike of this nature.
Dreadnought V2 Details
• Full carbon frame
• Wheel size: Mixed or 29"
• 160mm rear travel, 170mm fork
• High-pivot suspension design
• 63.1 / 63.5° head angle
• 77.1 / 77.5° seat angle (S3)
• Sizes: S1, S2, S3, S4
• Weight: 15.6 kg / 34.3 lb (S3, actual)
• Price: $8,499-11,999 CAD, $6,499-9,299 USD
forbiddenbike.com

The Dreadnought V2 is only available in carbon (which isn't surprising, since Forbidden hasn't produced an aluminum bike yet). All three build kits use a SRAM/Rockshox throughout, beginning at $6,499 USD / $8,499 CAD, but a frame/shock/chain guide option is available for those wishing to custom build their own.

Forbidden Dreadnought V2
Forbidden Dreadnought V2
photo

Frame Details

Following the lead of the Supernought DH frame, the Dreadnought features interchangeable dropouts. The Dreadnought frame kit and complete bikes are available in either 27.5" or 29", zero-offset dropouts. Aftermarket +/-10mm dropouts for the 27.5" wheel or +10mm sets for a 29" will be available shortly (pricing TBA). They with also serve as a direct mount for a 200mm brake rotor.

Besides the bolt-on dropouts, another identifier separating the looks of the second generation Dreadnought and the Druid is the custom MRP lower pulley. Forbidden called for this component due to the larger amount of chain growth brought on by the extra 30mm of travel. The fixed position eliminates user error or slippage, should it tag any protruding trail features.

Standard protocols for Forbidden, like water bottle and accessory mounts inside the front triangle, plenty of rubber frame protection, internal cable routing, and serious chain security are in place.

On the frame specifications, the seat tube measures 31.6mm, the BB is of the 73mm BSA type, and the rear wheel runs on a 12x148mm, like the Supernought.

Forbidden Dreadnought V2

Suspension Design

Replacing the single, high-pivot design of the 1st generation bikes, the Dreadnought V2 sees a floating chainstay member introduced. This allowed Forbidden to unlock a more independent series of kinematics.

The anti-squat is now raised to a high 137% (at 30% sag w/32-51 tooth gearing), more than most idler equipped-bikes. The leverage curve is now straightened while beginning and ending higher than before, which should make it easier for lighter riders to move to a light enough coil spring.

Forbidden Dreadnought V2
Forbidden Dreadnought V2

Forbidden Dreadnought V2
Forbidden Dreadnought V2

One caveat to this multi-link design is that the axle path is no-longer entirely rearward. At the 135mm mark, the rear axle begins to arc forwards, but we can attest that it doesn’t detract from the Dreadnought’s high-pivot bump-erasing qualities.

As mentioned, the rear wheel travel has been bumped up to an even 160mm from 154. That’s controlled by a 205x60mm stroke shock. In our case, the X0 Ultimate kit comes with the trunnion mounted Rockshox Vivid Air - a shock we’ve rated highly in the past.

Forbidden Dreadnought V2

Geometry

Forbidden has adopted one of those sizing charts, like Specialized, Trek, and many others, using a digit and letter to identify size. Four frame sizes exist for the Dreadnought V2; S1, S2, S3, S4, spanning reach numbers from 430 to 491, nearly all in 20mm increments. In my case, I chose the S3 frame (I’m 178cm/5’10” for reference) with a reach of 471mm.

The real numbers to talk about in detail here are how the front and rear center lengths are balanced. That makes up Forbidden’s “One Ride” concept of keeping the ratio between the front and rear center measurements the same, regardless of frame size. That theory was applied to the Dreadnought V1, however, it’s changed slightly on the V2 frame.

Forbidden Dreadnought V2
The front to rear center lengths remain at the same ratio across all sizes when the zero offset (stock) dropout is in place.

If you compare the Dreadnought V1 to the V2, the chainstay lengths have been stretched significantly, even in the new neutral setting. Those have extended from 446 to 460mm (V2, stock).

On the other hand, the reach has been reduced from 479 (V1, MX) to 471mm (V2, MX), while the stack increases from 634 to 645mm, leading to an overall shorter front center (V1 834mm, V2 829mm).

In terms of angles, the head tube angle remains a slack 63.1 degrees (63.5 for the 29er). Tightening up the theoretical top tube length, the seat tube angle gets a degree steeper at 77.1.

All of those reach, stack, and angles skew slightly when toggling between rear wheel sizes.

Forbidden Dreadnought V2
"Bloody Sabbath" and "Fatty T"

Models and Pricing

For a cool $9,299 USD / $11,999 CAD, the X0 RS U kit is a no expense-spared parts list consisting of Rockshox Zeb and Vivid Air Ultimate suspension, Sram X0 T-type drivetrain, OneUp V3 Dropper post and the powerful Maven Ultimate brakes. Crankbrother Synthesis 11 Carbon wheels, the usual Maxxis tires, Fizik Terra Alpaca X5 saddle, and a Burgtec carbon steering combo round out the package.

Sliding down a price bracket, the GX RS S+ comes in at $7,299 USD / $9,499 CAD and, as you might have guessed, includes the RockShox Zeb, Vivid Air, and Mavens in their Select+ and Silver trims. Likewise, the drivetrain is of the T-type, but the heavier GX model and the wheelset sees alloy rims laced up.

Next up is the GX RS S that takes a similar path, moving to the base model RockShox and SRAM components, reverting to the UDH mounted GX AXS drivetrain. For $6,499 USD / $8,499 CAD, it isn’t as attainable as other brand’s entry-level price points.

All builds and sizes use 165mm cranks, 200mm rotors front and rear, and come with either MX or 29er wheel choices.

Forbidden Dreadnought V2
Dreadnought V2 X0 RS U - $9,299 USD / $11,999 CAD / £9,299 / €10,099
Forbidden Dreadnought V2
Dreadnought V2 GX RS S+ - $7,299 USD / $9,499 CAD / £7,299 / €9,099

photo
Dreadnought V2 GX RS S - $6,499 USD / $8,499 CAD / £6,599 / €7,899
Forbidden Dreadnought V2
Dreadnought V2 Frame kit - $4,299 USD / $5,499 CAD / £3,899 / €4,399

25.03.24. Forbidden Bikes. Rider Alex Storr. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography andylloyder

Ride Impressions

This literally was a First Ride, as Forbidden’s engineer, Ollie Blight, made the hop over from the island that morning to deliver the bike and sample the ideal spring conditions with me. I tweaked the controls, set the rear sag to about 30% on the Vivid and left all of the adjusters in the neutral setting, excluding the hydraulic bottom out, which was open.

The Dreadnought V2 builds on what the 130mm-travel Druid V2 can do very well, track the ground extremely well. Tack on another 30mm of travel and stretched geometry means it’s not going to hang about. To put it simply, the first lap was a heater.

There are two turns at the bottom of a classic Squamish trail that are easy to enter too quickly, drag brake and sit upright in, balling it up properly. On the Dreadnought V2, everything changed. I was in the middle of the bike with total confidence to go faster. There’s a lot of wheelbase, but also tons of grip and stability to push the tires into.

We’ll need more time to lure the Dreadnought V2 into some jankier trails and pilot through larger jump sets, but even with flat pedals, it didn’t need much encouragement to change direction or pull over obstacles. Part of that could be the smaller, and therefore lighter, rear wheel which can change direction faster. That said, getting the Dreadnought into a proper manual takes a good yank on the bars.

Another bonus that can muddy a brilliant bike is noise; it’s dead quiet. I didn’t come to think of it immediately, but after reflecting on the ride, the Dreadnought V2 mutes trails. All that’s heard is the pitter patter of the tire treads and the buzz of the hub.

One small downside is the wee amount of drag from the extra pulley wheel, which the Druid V2 doesn’t require. During our long-term test with the Devinci Chainsaw, another high-pivot bike that tackles bumps well, I removed that chain tensioning arm in favor of less drivetrain friction. I’ll be experimenting with the lower pulley on and off, to see if that 1% makes any difference during the full review of the Dreadnought V2.

Editor’s note: Technically, it is forbidden to remove the lower pulley on the Dreadnought V2 in accordance to Sram’s Transmission guidelines and not something either company recommends.

Author Info:
mattbeer avatar

Member since Mar 16, 2001
375 articles

209 Comments
  • 388 1
 I asked my wife if I could get a new bike, and luckily she said "It's forbidden", so I got one of these.
  • 71 1
 My (actual work) boss got a little annoyed when I snapped ye old clavicle two summers in a row, and told me bikes were Forbidden... sent her back a pic of my Druid on the ground where I fell with it's FORBIDDEN written on the downtube visible.
  • 55 5
 These jokes should be forbidden.
  • 42 1
 I dreadnought tell these jokes to anyone outside the Pinkbike comments section.
  • 8 0
 @jonathanreid9: Just Druid
  • 19 0
 please report, are you still living with your wife?
  • 9 0
 @mmiloou: well, he's still living...
  • 20 0
 @mmiloou: yeah, she's good. When she saw it she said "wow, I really need some time" and walked off, so I've orded her some new pedals, bless her heart.
  • 6 0
 @Wolfman7: Why restrict the audience to just one President?
  • 1 0
 @LemonadeMoney: I see what you did there
  • 1 0
 @LemonadeMoney: Don't beat around the Bush!
  • 2 0
 This needs to stop, god forbidden people haven’t took it to far unlike the Maven launch comments
  • 1 0
 
  • 3 0
 Supernaught'y jokes there...
  • 96 1
 That is a good looking bike.
  • 18 8
 awesome colours!!!
  • 46 4
 @RedBurn: Get yourself a matching Ronald McDonald Kit to go with your Flag and everything.
  • 12 22
flag jesse-effing-edwards (Apr 9, 2024 at 11:01) (Below Threshold)
 @likeittacky: McDonalds is delicious.
  • 6 2
 @jesse-effing-edwards: Their wicked plan continues to work
  • 8 0
 Should have gone all in on the classic Klein yellow to hot pink fade.
  • 1 1
 @RedBurn: they always kill it with the color fades.
  • 2 0
 @RedBurn: Nah that's that Flum Watermelon Sour peach colorway lmao
  • 3 0
 I've seen the orange-red one in person, looks sick!
  • 1 1
 It is a proper monster truck.
  • 7 0
 @likeittacky: where are my 2007/08 TLD kits when I really need them.....
  • 1 0
 @likeittacky: our national jersey color is tiffany’s baby blue…
  • 1 0
 @kiddlivid: Ha - I still have two Ruckus shorts reserved for hunting season.
  • 1 0
 So good with the red zeb.
  • 45 3
 Whoever did the graphic design killed it.
  • 15 1
 I don't actually know if this is positive or negative Smile
  • 8 0
 @korev: big positive! It’s clean as hell
  • 8 65
flag Sycip69er (Apr 9, 2024 at 9:37) (Below Threshold)
 Careful the PC police get squeamish with such violent words. Stick with "exceptional job by them"
  • 51 3
 @Sycip69er: Nice work making up an issue so you could whine about it.
  • 19 0
 @Sycip69er: thank you for policing the PC police.
  • 3 1
 I hate gradients on bikes so I can not like it. My brain just keeps wondering why the headtube would be red or blue when the rest is yellow or grey. I like the shape though.
  • 31 1
 The Druid V2 is stupid fast. This thing must be pretty nuts. Need a black frame option though.
  • 7 1
 Just take a dangerholm que and strip it to bare carbon
  • 10 1
 Agree. Sick bike but wouldn't buy either of those colours. Need a stealthy black or a grey or something. The yellow one looks like a cheap tequila sunrise and the other is the same colour as the mold that grows on old bread.
  • 10 2
 Look like disposable vape colour schemes
  • 21 1
 Looks great. Anyone else not loving build kits on bikes currently? Sram transmitted adds too much cost. And anything below that level has lower level suspended and brakes. Sram must be doing a hell of a deal for bike companies on build kits.
  • 5 0
 Agreed. Not to forget that Transmission is also a lot heavier than the equivalent mechanical drivetrains (and the older AXS).
  • 15 0
 I was thinking the same thing. All three builds come with axs/t-type. I would rather see basic GX mechanical and better suspension parts on any bike.
  • 2 0
 @gnarnaimo: I'm probably going to swap/sell my t-type before I even ride it and go back to mechanical. Debating the mavens over my mt7s though.
  • 24 6
 Let's go! Chainstays done right
  • 18 0
 Happy to oblige!
  • 16 1
 @ForbiddenBike: I can’t manual for shit on my bike with 430 chainstays so I guess why not just go all the way.
  • 6 0
 @Grady-Harris:

To an extent, that is true.

Also want to call out that often bikes with longer chainstays, have a much taller stack height. And while the longer chainstays make it harder, the taller stack makes it easier (as you're already more leaned back). Not that they totally cancel each other out, but, they sort of do to an extent, at least IME.

I'm not good at manuals on my Banshee Titan... but I also wasn't good at them on my Kona Process. But I got on the titan thinking it would feel "impossible", but figured it wouldn't matter to me. Turns out, not impossible, and not as much different as I thought it might be because of the taller stack.
  • 5 0
 @ocnlogan: while it’s true that it’s harder to do a bit of a front wheel lift with a long chain stay Bike, actually doing a long manual down a fire road or on the trails is pretty easy still. It takes a little bit more work to get it going but then the sweet spot from the long chainstay lets you hang out there. I found that my titan and my high pivot Norco range were actually some of the best manual bikes I’ve ever had but they do take extra work to do it. Same with the geometron.
  • 7 2
 @Grady-Harris: Not to be a dick, but if you can't manual with 430mm chainstays it's probably not the bike.
  • 7 0
 475 is kinda a joke imo. That is almost a full 2" longer than one of my bikes.

Not against having options, I think I would have pulled the trigger on the last gen except I really wanted my rear wheel to be in the same area code as my front wheel. 1330 wheelbase is just unhinged.
  • 2 0
 @CobyCobie:

Ignoring the chainstay bit for a moment, is the wheelbase all that weird?

An XL Transition Spire is 1322mm, an XL Rocky Mountain Slayer is 1325mm, and an XL Knolly Chilcotin is 1327mm.

And a k3 Pole is a whopping 1343mm.

I’m not disagreeing that it’s a long wheelbase, but it’s not all that different from some of the bikes in the same class.
  • 2 0
 Plus the chainstays on this bike grow +14mm under average sag. So a size medium is having a 460mm chainstay length while cruising along, and that number only increases by about +10mm at bottom out. The XL has a sagged chainstay of 490mm, 500mm @bottom out. ouchies?

The front/rear center ratio conversion (with sag added for the rear chainstay#) is around 1.71 - 1.76 for this bike. Ideal range for 'normal' bikes seems to be 1.82 - 1.88. @1.71 it means you're weighted abnormally further back on the bike...then to set you even further back the headtube length is only 105mm (should be 120mm as I'm still going to be running 5-15mm of headset spacers and a 40mm rise handlebar, at 5'8" tall.)

...Forbidden..what in the hell yall. This bike requires a whole new approach to riding, almost.

Cool..I hope.
  • 3 2
 @ForbiddenBike: Can the S3 chainstay be put on the S4 Front Triangle? Im6ft 2 and I'm sick of bike companies not having long chainstays but 475 seems excessive. 460 is about optimal for XL bikes.
  • 7 2
 @Jordmackay: the change is made in the front triangle, not the rear triangle, all sizes use the same stays.
  • 1 0
 @Jordmackay: Its also worth pointing out this change pushes your weight a bit further forward, the aim is to get you central on the bike. This means you've got plenty of front wheel grip to push it turns and give confidence when the going gets tough. This is all based on rider feedback on the V1 bikes. If you're based in Scotland we do have demo days coming up - Cyclehighlands 25th/26th May (we should have an S3 and S4 bike available) and then potentially one in Innerleithen in August with Tweed Valley Bikes! Its worth looking at the bike as a system, rather than numbers in isolation, and ultimately getting a demo ride in!
  • 1 17
flag Jordmackay (Apr 10, 2024 at 3:43) (Below Threshold)
 @podderz: Are you retarded
  • 1 6
flag Jordmackay (Apr 10, 2024 at 3:48) (Below Threshold)
 @Tobs: Yes I'm aware I've tried a million variations and although balance is important hence I wont run a CS less than 445 with a 500 reach bike, my home trails are rarely flat out and have many switch backs and winding turns through the woods. Did someone actually tests these bikes over 6ft 2 as agility will be sacrificed pretty extensively with such a long CS. The 27.5 does help though so kudos for this I just think you've gone too far with that CS length and the wheelbase is pretty significant unless you're at the bike park. I don't know another modern bike that even has a 160+ CS on a reg / non high pivot bike.
  • 1 1
 @Jordmackay: The Reach and Stack numbers mean that this bike simply isn't for people 6'2"and above.
  • 6 0
 @Jordmackay Podderz isn't wrong, that is indeed how we change the RC length, by repositioning the BB. It was the same with V1 bikes. The measurement is rear centre not chainstay length that we're talking about here. No worries, the option is there if you get curious and want to give it a try!
  • 5 1
 @Jordmackay: I'm not sure this is the place for comments like that. Maybe just get yourself out for a ride and enjoy the bike you have. There's a lot of neg in your comment history.
  • 4 0
 @podderz: Some folks use the internet as sort of a insecurity, punching bag place. I think often people don't realize how it makes them look.
  • 1 5
flag Jordmackay (Apr 10, 2024 at 14:42) (Below Threshold)
 @ponyboy24: how not? People have different proportions and different riding styles. 495 reach is perfect for me and it has the stack to match. Some people that are 6ft 2 ride bikes with 475 reach its personal preference. But 6ft 2 isn't even that tall. All bike companies should cater for people who aren't 5ft 7 and build like ironing boards
  • 2 6
flag Jordmackay (Apr 10, 2024 at 14:44) (Below Threshold)
 @gnarnaimo: people who care about random opinions in the comment section are the real losers. f*ck me the worlds gone soft
  • 1 0
 @Jordmackay: so because the XL v2 dreadnought has a really short reach and relatively low stack, then every big guy should adapt their personal preference to match?
  • 2 4
 @ponyboy24: f*ck you on about? your first statement is dumb and I asked you to explain it?

How is 495 reach not for someone who is 6ft 2?
  • 15 1
 I don't love the McDonalds colorway or the fact that they don't seem to offer any options with a non-electric drivetrain. However, based on my experience with the v1 Druid I have no doubt that this is a pretty great bike. And Forbidden's support is pretty good if you do ever encounter an issue.
  • 29 1
 But realistically, when’s the last time McDonald’s was running those colors? That’s the throwback, pre-McCafe colorways that make you feel young and free. Ride it like you Hamburgulared it.
  • 2 0
 @speed10: I'm lovin' it!
  • 10 2
 @mattbeer just skip the transmission rear deralleur!
that's the reason for the extra pulley since they solved their not working clutch with somthing that can't move much at all and can't take the chain growth!
  • 2 0
 @LDG I’ll leave that to the customers to decide what drivetrain they choose, but we will be testing the XO RS U build.
  • 1 0
 @mattbeer: I'll likely stick the GS, but still curious about the results with/without tensioner.
  • 6 0
 Looks awesome, surprised at relatively short reaches. For such a 'big' bike in so many ways, they're not all that long. That shot of the bike carving a turn is fantastic - tires dug in deep in dark dirt, bike cranked over, you can see the compression in the fork... that's good stuff.
  • 23 0
 Apologies for the copy/paste but this is relevant here too:

It's worth looking at reach and stack together. Or looking at the front center to assess the size differences, and the wheelbase to see the overall size of the bike. Essentially the front end of this bike is a little shorter (5mm), while the majority of the change was in the rear. This was done to bring the riders neutral position more to the center of the bike. The main geo goal for this bike was to increase stack on the larger sizes, and shift the weight distribution more central. This was consistent rider feedback from the V1. Of interest, the -10mm dropout will give a similar weight distribution as the V1 - for riders that prefer that handling.
  • 3 0
 @ForbiddenBike: I am so stoked on the Geo Changes. This is exactly my "issue" with the V1 and noticed a lot of people on size L V1s would run super high stack (myself included) to get more upright and centered.

I already got one on order, it can't come soon enough!
  • 4 2
 @ForbiddenBike:

I like the measurement of "Span" (which you see on other brands geo charts from time to time).

It is the hypotenuse between reach and stack numbers. Basically, how large the frame is in a single number, instead of two.

The size Large Dreadnought V2 has a span of 799mm, which is larger than the V1 (which was 794mm). Thats on the larger size for a size L bike, although not the largest I've seen (Raaw Madonna v3 holds the record there, with a span of 819mm, which is only 2mm smaller than the XL Dreadnought v2, for reference).
  • 3 0
 @ForbiddenBike where are the sizes for taller people?!?
  • 1 0
 @Jacker123: +1 on that.

The Reach is very short, but the Stack on the XL is still quite low. If the Stack was increased significantly then I could understand how that could potentially work when your body is in a more upright position. Stem spacers isn't the solution, as you are just further shortening the reach.

How is a big guy supposed to ride this?
  • 1 0
 @ForbiddenBike: any idea if a reach adjust headset or something would work in this bike? Don’t think it’s fitting us 6’4+ folks Frown
  • 3 0
 @sheldonuvic: @ponyboy24 @jacker123 I work for the brand and have been on both s3 and s4 sizes in the past couple months (I’m 6’3) and ended up going for the s3 in the end as it’s a bit more playful for my style of riding. But both fit me well, comfortable pedalling with a 210 dropper in the s3. The reach is shorter but the over all fit feels a lot better than the v1 for me where I felt it was a bit stretched and low for my liking. Worth looking at the whole picture with the geo number, or better yet, we should have some demo bikes in May to try.
  • 1 0
 @sheldonuvic: no they failed on the reach for this bike .
  • 9 3
 I love that they are making an effort to keep the front/rear center ratios consistent between sizes.

Personally I’ve found that ratio is one of the biggest determiners of how comfortable/confident I am on a bike. At least as a taller-ish guy (6’2” in shoes).

My first bike was really imbalanced, but I was so new to riding it took me 3 years to figure out why. That bike was a Kona process 153 with itty bitty 425mm chainstays. My current bike is a Banshee Titan with 452mm chainstays, and it feels more natural/comfortable to me in every way than the Kona did.

I know it’s a personal preference thing to have longer rear centers, and that not everyone will want that. But as someone who has preferences similar to what Forbidden is offering here, it’s nice to see an option catered to my preferences for once Smile .
  • 3 4
 For once? It's easier to get a long CS bike than a short one. Kona doesn't even make the process with 425 anymore
  • 6 1
 @Dogl0rd:

I guess some of that depends on what you consider a short or long chainstay. Personally I see anything under about 435-440mm or so as "pretty short" in L/XL sizes. 440-445mm seems pretty "average", and then over 445mm is getting into "long or longer" range.

And, you're right chainstays are trending longer as bikes are getting slacker/longer, so you're right its getting more common. It used to feel the other way around.


But its not like its "that hard" to find something with short chainstays (at least what I think of as short, I'm sure we don't agree on that). All of these are in my giant bike nerd spreadsheet, and have what I'd personally call "short" chainstays.

Canfield Tilt 425mm
Kona Process 134 427mm
Evil Wreckoning 430mm
Canfield Lithium 430mm
Ibis Ripley 432mm
Kona Process 153 435mm
Kona Process X Carbon 435 or 450mm
Propain Mx builds are 435mm (Tyee, Spindrift),
Ibis Ripmo 435mm
Commencal Meta TR 435mm
Kavenz VHP is 419/425mm static with the +0 dropouts, and ~435/436mm at sag.
  • 3 7
flag Dogl0rd FL (Apr 9, 2024 at 12:20) (Below Threshold)
 1 bike in there at 425 and it's a niche bike I rest my case
  • 4 0
 @Dogl0rd:

I figured we differed in what we thought was "short". No worries.

You're right, bikes with chainstays 425mm or less (particularly 29'ers) are hard to find.

I don't think all bikes should be the same, nor am I trying to say that. Its good to have options. I genuinely hope you can find bikes that you are happy with/get excited about. Good luck on the search.
  • 2 0
 @ocnlogan: thanks I think the geo on this bike looks really interesting honestly and I'd like to try something with properly long stays, especially with a moderate reach!
  • 6 0
 I've been manualing since the new GT BMX video came out in 1987 or so. I can do them on about anything, tricycle, road bike, BMX, MTB, moving dolly, yeah, I might be "one of those guys". So, even though I've past the half century mark, my best rides are when I've manualed some crazy section of trail. In the past 10 years (I'm 5'7", ride medium) I've gone from 435mm to 440mm to 445mm and I can tell ya, the 445mm makes me feel like I've NEVER done one half of the time I try to pull up for one. Bikes are so much longer now, 3" jumps in wheelbase of the 3 bikes above. I should probably look into a size small to make bikes fun again, I mean, that first bike (435mm) feels tiny now, but I can manual forever on it.
  • 1 0
 Sagged chainstay is what you base that front/rear ratio # off of...you guys aren't seeing the real world fitment number of when youre actually riding along. Unsagged chainstay #'s dont tell the whole story.
  • 3 0
 @TokenCanfieldGuy:

You're right.

I have a giant nerdy spreadsheet I use to compare bikes (started during covid, when you couldn't even sit on a demo bike most places here).

I compare the sagged rear center length of high pivot bikes, to see what the actual FC/RC ratios are like. Interestingly, I found that many/most non high pivot bikes, have a very similar sagged rear center length as they do static. Most low pivot bikes seem to have a small amount of rearward axle path, that typically seems to have their rear center length grow from static, then return to about the same length as the static by about 1/3 travel (at least most horst link and twin link bikes I've looked at).

The sagged numbers show the new dreadnought should have way more weight on the front tire than any other bike in the same travel range I've seen (its got a FC/RC ratio of ~1.74. Most bikes are 1.85-1.88 or so. My Banshee with long stays is 1.Cool .

I've never ridden something like this, and would love to take it for a spin and see how it feels.
  • 4 0
 I am 6'2" and tbh I hate the way the bikes with long chainstays feel. All the ones I have tried have felt kind of dead and lacking in pop. I know the long chainstay bike is probably faster and feels more balance particularly on high speed runs but I just want to have fun popping off side hits and snaking down tight old hiking trials. I have been riding a custom built Marino recently with 415mm chainstays.
  • 1 1
 @ocnlogan: Solid brother
When closer to a ratio of 1 where would that position you on the bike relative to the BB? Where would a ratio of 2 put you?
Thank you for clarifying.
  • 11 1
 Woohoo! We're so stoked!
  • 4 0
 A few quick questions for anyone at forbidden:

Any news on if it is still dual crown rated?

I see dropouts for different rear center lengths/wheel sizes, but when I check the geo chart the rear center lengths are identical between wheel sizes. Is this correct?

Can you run a 29in dropout with a 27.5 rear wheel (or vice versa)?
  • 18 0
 1/ Yes, as long as the axle to crown is under 593.7mm - a 190mm dual crown would work.

2/ The '0' or mid dropouts, which are the lengths stated in the geo chart, result in the same rear center for both wheel sizes. This is also true for the '+10' dropouts. The '-10' is only available for a 27.5" wheel.

3/ Technically, yes, but the BB would be too low to ride well.
  • 5 0
 @ForbiddenBike:

THANK YOU!
  • 3 0
 @ForbiddenBike:

Oh, a few other random questions, since I'm sure you'll see this as its in the same thread.

I see all the build kits are with AXS. What is the routing situation like for mechanical derailleurs/shifters?

Are the dropouts wheel specific, or are they length specific? Meaning, is the +0 dropout the same for both the 29 and 27.5 rear wheels, or is there a +0 dropout specifically for 29, and another specifically for 27.5?

That is an incredibly precise axle to crown limit. My Mezzer has 794mm axle to crown height in its 180mm travel setting, would I be voiding the warranty if I used it? (I only its only .3mm... just curious why that super precise number is listed as the limit).

Thanks again for your help. The bikes look interesting. Maybe someday I'll get to demo one, and/or afford one Smile .
  • 5 0
 Aside from a Eurobike/sea otter day, this has to be the biggest new product launch/review day that I can remember on pinkbike. Think some company is gonna wise-up and do Monday or Wednesday launches?
  • 7 0
 New Rocky Mountain Altitude tomorrow.
  • 7 0
 7900€ and select suspension what kind of drinks they having for breakfast
  • 6 0
 Fatty T colourway is incredible. Now I just want one so my bike will match my beer.
  • 4 0
 My wife loves Fat Tug, so I assume this frame is pre-approved. Meanwhile there's a Druid frame sitting in the corner of my work office (hiding from home) waiting to be built up.
  • 5 1
 I have a feeling forbidden is gunna have a LOT of framesets at the end of the year with this pricing. I was considering one for my next bike but it's out of the running now. Rather buy an entire bike for 5500.
  • 1 0
 They can just turn them into complete builds, pretty easy these days given the glut of inventory.
  • 3 1
 Have you seen the joke of a build kit on the base model?
  • 3 0
 @nicoenduro: I would agree that for $8500CAD I’d like to see at least select+ but otherwise seems not too bad. I haven’t tried mavens or t-type, but I’ve always like gx. The one up dropper is a solid choice, same the synthesis wheelset. I don’t think there’s anything on there you’re going to need to swap right away.
  • 1 0
 @gmiller720: that’s the joke, t type and select, not a good one
  • 1 0
 @nicoenduro: have you had bad experiences with t-type?
  • 1 0
 @gmiller720: i didn't hop on the hype train, so not personal experience, but working in a bike shop i had a customer and a guy working from another shop that had in 3 months 2 ( yes, 2 each ) gx deralieurs shutting down and never working again all of a sudden, while riding, warranty was all good, first time replaced with the same and then the second time both upgraded to x0.
regardless, spending all the cash on t type and going with select suspension is a pretty dumb choice, cable and ultimate makes the most sense, better suspension and adjustments go a long way, fancy electronics that do exactly what the cable version does with way more money and weight not.
  • 2 0
 I am glad to see Forbidden adapting a more sensible fit. Somehow, over the last several years, it was all moar reach == moar faster. Which never made sense to me. I always found my best handling bikes had a higher stack and shorter reach, and if you needed more stability it should come from added chainstay length. If I can convince myself its okay to part with $7k, this Dreadnought v2 might be the one to replace my 2021 Specialized Enduro.

Disclaimer: I am just picking bike fit and being a d*ck about it. But thank you @ForbiddenBike for sizing bikes to fit my d*ck.
  • 2 0
 Great looking bike! The update is nice! I’m in the market for a new enduro 29er and this checks all the boxes for what I want. Going to see if I can demo one as well as a WR1 Arrival. Be nice to compare them and then decide what I like more
  • 1 0
 Your height is a factor with the arrival.
At 6’, with a 34” inseam, the xl was too big due to the slack seat tube, and the large was too small due to the low stack height.
  • 13 9
 €10k? Haven't they realised that the charge whatever the F*** you want days are over?
  • 3 0
 At least the top one has some decent components
  • 3 0
 looks ridiculously good, reach is weirdly shorter but apart from that it does look good. Now to see if I sell my v.1 or not for it...
  • 4 0
 Higher stack shortens reach.
  • 6 0
 @podderz is correct. It's worth looking at reach and stack together. Or looking at the front center to assess the size difference. Essentially the front end of the bike is a little shorter (5mm), while the majority of the change was in the rear. This was done to bring the riders neutral position more to the center of the bike. The main geo goal for this bike was to increase stack on the larger sizes, and shift the weight distribution more central. This was consistent rider feedback from the V1. Of interest, the -10mm dropout will give a similar weight distribution as the V1 - for riders that prefer that handling.
  • 1 0
 @ForbiddenBike: The Stack numbers may be larger than the V1, but looking at the XL this Stack number is still quite low. Hard to picture tall riders fitting on this bike...
  • 1 0
 Anyone have any warranty experience with Forbidden? Crash replacement stories? Customer service in general? Wonder how they stack up to Santa Cruz and other high end brands known for solid warranties and CS. The text on their page is titled warranty but reads like it absolves them of any obligation to take care of you if you ride your bike or upgrade it.
  • 2 0
 Customer service (especially Luc) has been awesome. Emailed them before buying and they helped answer questions then sent me extra hardware, chain stay protection, updated mud guard over the last year all for free as well as answering a bunch more questions. You can tell they are super into riding too.
  • 1 0
 Thankfully haven’t had to find out about crash replacement or warranty stuff, but I contacted them about various questions I had when I was building up my Druid and they were always really responsive and helpful.
  • 4 0
 If you're going to use the word "wee", try using "a wee bit". "wee amount" doesn't work.
  • 2 0
 What about "wee knee"?
  • 1 0
 Keep us posted on your findings regarding ditching the lower pulley wheel. I ditched the lower chain guide on my V1 Dreadnought and replaced it with a zero drag Cascade Components guide. With some Velcro to keep it quiet it’s the best of both worlds IMO.
  • 1 0
 It looks like the idlers could both be eliminated if the chainstay dropped below the BB at the front pivot. Assuming, from the clearance cutout for the upper idler, that the front link bottomed out sits roughly level. Perhaps that is ugly, noisy, or causes other difficult design constraints.
  • 1 0
 Whiney Karen’s will note that chainstay lengths are not entirely proportional across the size range (they shrink a bit proportionally as reach increases). Still, they are far closer than any other company I know of.

That said, a +10mm dropout would almost get you there on the S4 if you wanted to match the S1 435/431 front/rear center ratio
  • 4 0
 Can't wait for mine to ship!
  • 4 0
 Every single option is out of stock, how do you buy it?
  • 10 0
 Our first batch of bikes is in stock at select dealers around the world. The second batch is set to be assembled in Canada later this week. Hit up your local dealer for any ordering needs. If you don't have a local dealer, reach out to contact@forbiddenbike.com and we'll be able to sort out some purchasing options.

Dealer finder is here: forbiddenbike.com/dealers/find-a-dealer
  • 6 2
 love the Calgary Flames colourway! Wink
  • 2 0
 Great updates Forbidden! Way to evolve the concept w/o straying from it. Looking forward to trying one in Supernaught guise soon.
  • 2 1
 Nice, love seeing stack and rear center numbers for adult sized people!

I ride a budget Druid ( AKA Banshee Prime), and it simply feels amazing to just sit in the bike and push though your feet as you carve corners.
  • 4 1
 Genuinely curious how the Banshee qualifies as a budget Druid
  • 1 0
 @Glenngineer: geometry is similar
  • 1 0
 @Glenngineer: Quite similar geometry philosophies and both have a duel link suspension design.

Also the Italian mad man Rulezman makes an idler wheel attachment for the Prime and Titan if you want to take it one step further. Although, it's important to understand it only helps limit the amount of feedback you get through your feet, the axel path doesn't suddenly start going backwards.
  • 1 0
 Didn’t realize the Supernought was also 148mm. Add that to the ever growing list of DH bikes making Superboost even more of a joke. (Specialized, GT, Transition, Frameworks)
  • 4 2
 It would be interesting to know the reason some companies are starting to go boost on DH bikes. The convenience of being able to share wheels between DH and trail bikes is nice but depending on hub you may not be able to swap front wheels without an entirely different hub. I don't think the average consumer knows or cares about boost/superboost and just buys whatever bike they see in the shop. With the enthusiast crowd, boost/superboost is certainly a factor. I know multiple people including myself who really liked a bike but didn't buy because of the hub spacing.
  • 1 0
 @WalrusRider: casuals aren't buying 8000 dollar bikes.
  • 1 0
 @WalrusRider: I think companies are realizing that whether you're an average consumer or an enthusiast, we all just want to ride. Backup 148 wheels are everywhere, leading to fewer missed rides. They're finally letting product designers (corporate vomit, I know) dictate things instead of solely engineers, which as an engineer myself, is a good thing, because we will just try to optimize the hell out of everything without thought to the end consumer. 157 solves a problem the pros pushing these bikes harder than anyone else don't have, so is it technically "better" in this case? (engineering mindset vs product mindset)
  • 1 0
 Absolutely love my V2 Druid. Way more capable than the numbers suggest. Their sizing philosophy is bang on for is taller people (I’m 6’3). Thinking the V2 Dreadnaught may replace my beloved Spire soon.
  • 1 0
 What's your take on sizing at 6'3? S3 or S4?
  • 1 0
 @picklesmcgherkin: I actually bought an S3 first and it felt really cramped. Sold the frame and bought the S4. Was perfect for me. Running full 29er.
  • 4 0
 These are approaching 2000s DH bikes for front centre to chainstay ratio.
  • 1 0
 It bothers me more than it should but the graphics & logo on the CB rims not lining up with the valve and being opposite the valve is gonna live rent free in my head for a while
  • 1 0
 @Jordmackay: I'm 6'1" and rocking the V1 35mm stem, with MX wheels. Feels fine for me and my ape index of 6'3".

464mm chainstay at 0% travel, growing to around 480mm at sag and 495mm at bottom out.
  • 3 0
 Very very cool looking bike
  • 3 2
 Never thought I'd live to see "longer chainstays" in an article title, and as a good thing, on PB! It's like seeing "shorter, higher, steeper!"
  • 2 2
 So longer is better for some things, but longer on a high pivot is not better BECAUSE they chainstay lengthens through the travel. What you want is a short chainstay to start, say 420-425, increasing to 435-440 at sag, then it's neither crazy long nor crazy short in the usable travel range.
  • 1 0
 @sanchofula:

Not necessarily.
Totally depends on frame size, or more specifically, front Center length.
435mm at sag is quite short on an xl.
I’ve found 441mm on a large deviate claymore to be spot on in large.
Any of my bikes shorter than that were unbalanced in comparison.
  • 3 0
 The yellow and red colorway makes me want a McDonald's large fry.
  • 1 0
 Am I reading it correctly that the standover height went up ~50mm? The low standover is one of my favorite things about my V1 so hoping that’s a typo.
  • 3 0
 @mattbeer any chance a full review of a Druid V2 is in the works?
  • 1 2
 It's Pinkbike, that's a given.
  • 2 0
 @sanchofula: it's just been a while since the first ride and they said they were going to try to get one in for a full review but not sure that happened
  • 3 0
 @bikehard11 We were able to finally get our hands on the popular bike and in the pink LSD colorway, no less.
  • 2 0
 @mattbeer: good to hear, looking forward to your review!
  • 4 3
 Seeing as the long chainstays seemed to be the most broadly disliked part of the Dreadnought V1, I'm curious how making them even longer will shape out.
  • 3 0
 Where are you seeing that? The long chainstays are one of the best things about the V1.
  • 1 0
 I'm irritated with how badly I want this bike. I just bought my current bike ffs and she ain't no slouch even. This bike though.
  • 3 0
 475 chainstay on a high pivot no less. That’s longer than my reach
  • 1 1
 Amazing bike but £6,599 for the budget option is nuts. Would never spend that amount of money on a bicycle, let alone the top of the line model. Who is seriously buying these?
  • 2 1
 Love the look of these bikes and the long CS… but damn that XL is real short.
  • 3 0
 I think they're reeling in the big size. The V1 Dread in XL was a bit crazy. I bet they want this XL to be accessible to more people.
  • 1 1
 They are almost the same. A few mm shorter reach but longer CS. I just get sad that tall folks continue to have very very limited options although forbidden is pretty small so it’s understandable they don’t have an XXL.
  • 7 5
 I don't care how tall you think you are, your bike is probably too big for you.
  • 3 0
 @alexsin: As we mentioned on another post, essentially the front end of the bike is a little shorter (5mm), while the majority of the change was in the rear. This was done to bring the riders neutral position more to the center of the bike. The main geo goal for this bike was to increase stack on the larger sizes, and shift the weight distribution more central. This was consistent rider feedback from the V1. Of interest, the -10mm dropout will give a similar weight distribution as the V1 - for riders that prefer that handling.
  • 2 2
 @luckynugget: sorry I didn’t mean tall as in 6’2. I mean tall as in the ben cathro’s of the world.
  • 3 0
 Buy buy buy.
  • 2 0
 Can you still fit a dual crown?
  • 2 0
 red zeb spotted. @SRAM, release it rn
  • 1 0
 Now someone needs to test if a 65mm stroke shock is compatible with the Dreadnought to make it a 170ish mm super-enduro! Smile
  • 1 0
 Oooh, I misread it at first. I thought it shipped with a 205x65mm stroke shock, but looks like it is a 205x60 shock after all. I can't imagine you'd hit the seat tube at all with such long chainstays, but maybe there are other clearance issues to worry about.
  • 1 0
 65mm will void the warranty.
  • 1 0
 What's seat post maximum insertion length on these? Druid has a smidge less post room than I'd consider ideal for me.
  • 1 0
 Forbidden does so many things right! Now I just need an alloy version so I can actually afford one
  • 2 1
 If there’s any Forbidden Druid v2 heads in the UK looking to sell and get this, I would be very keen. Size s3
  • 2 3
 Looks great but unfortunately I still can't get over how unnecessarily unfriendly and almost ridiculously secretive Forbidden was in the pits during the prototype phase. The behavior kind of ruined the whole brand for me.
  • 2 0
 You maybe caught the team guys at a bad moment at a stressful race. They're all really nice guys!
  • 1 0
 Same front triangle as the V1?
  • 1 0
 Close, but no. The idler and pivot are no longer in the seat tube, so it's entirely different in that area.
  • 2 0
 It looks like it may share a rear end (seatstay, chainstay) with the Supernought.
  • 2 1
 I am calling BS on the 34.3 pounds. We need to see a picture on the scale.
  • 2 0
 My large V1 MX Dreadnought with Exo+ casing tires and Oneup aluminum pedals is ~15.3kg (~33.7lbs). Full disclosure, I'm not laboratory grade equipment here.

Even still, is 34.3lbs with a double down rear tire really that unbelievable?
  • 1 0
 @Schmolson: I'll admit that wasn't the best reply wording. I should have been more composed to potentially get a real life answer.

I have a medium MX V1 that weighs almost 3 pounds more than your large. I'm not saying it's impossible, but DD casing tires and transmission are not light. Mine is built with a Push, DH casing, and an X01/XT drivetrain.

Obviously speculation in the comments section, and I could very well be wrong, but the dropout system makes me think this frame would weigh more or at least not less than a V1
  • 1 0
 My V1 medium dreddy is 35.6 lbs with pedals
  • 1 0
 The yellow to red fade reminds me of fruit by the foot lol
  • 1 1
 If someone was to buy me that rig my life would be changed forever, not joking
  • 1 1
 Am I reading the axle path chart right? High pivot with idler gears, all for a couple of mm of rearward travel?
  • 1 0
 Looks sweeeet
  • 1 0
 Hubba Hubba!
  • 5 5
 Why pay $4300 USD for a Forbidden when you can get a Kavenz for $3000?
  • 5 1
 Because they are two completely different bikes?
  • 9 10
 I love my Dread...but man change the color fade, it is not it
  • 1 2
 Is it gonna last more than 2 weeks now…?
  • 1 2
 MMMMMM colors.
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