First Ride: GT Fury Carbon Team

Aug 29, 2018
by Alex Evans  



The brand new Fury is GT's latest take on their DH rig offering. The brand has arguably had a dedicated DH bike in their range since the Lobos back in 1998 (although the LTS predated the Lobo, it wasn't a full on, new-school DH bike) that used their proprietary LTS suspension system, based on the Horst link.

As time progressed, GT's bikes adopted the iDrive system that helped reduce chain growth and pedal kickback on their bikes with higher-than-average main pivots. The DHi, that was made famous by Steve Peat amongst others, stood out as a fantastic DH bike in the early 2000's, but it didn't use the LTS suspension system, instead relying on a single pivot design. Fast forward several generations of DH bike (including one that resembled an origami swan) to the out-going Fury model and the single pivot, linkage activated shock Fury still used an updated form of the old iDrive system.

GT Fury Carbon Team Details
• Intended use: Downhill
• Wheel size: 29" or 27.5"
• Rear wheel travel: 190mm (29"), 200mm (27.5")
• Boost 12x148
• Carbon frame (aluminum build options)
• Size: S - L
• Weight: 38.5 lb / 17.5 kg
• Price: Team - $7500 USD (tested) / Pro - $5,500 USD / Expert - $4000 / Frameset - $3,000 USD
gtbicycles.com
On the latest iteration of the Fury, GT has swapped out the iDrive for a modern incarnation of their LTS suspension system with an idler wheel that runs the chain across the high main pivot. The bike takes construction cues from previous models with a full carbon front triangle frame construction and an alloy rear end. However, GT's latest DH bike marks a move towards a unified look across the new Force, Sensor and Fury ranges.

GT Fury 2019

The resurging popularity of high pivot DH bikes is a welcomed trend by racers, consumers and even Pinkbike's own DH bike tester, Paul Aston. And, with GT following this trend of new-school, highly active high pivot bikes we can be sure they mean business in the DH sector. Martin Maes' recent La Bresse win has gone some way to cement our preliminary evaluations about the bike's performance.

bigquotesThe idler pulley in the design is key – this allowed us to optimize pedaling efficiency, increase traction, and eliminate pedal feedback. The result is a bike that lets riders charge confidently over obstacles on the trail.Luis Arraiz, GT frame engineer


Frame Details

GT Fury 2019

LTS Suspension: GT's iconic LTS system is claimed to be a versatile four-bar suspension platform that can be easily tuned for all categories and travel segments of mountain bikes. On the Fury, the LTS was designed to have great bump absorption, predictable performance while braking, and minimal pedal feedback, in order to offer gravity-orientated riders a speed-focused magic carpet ride on anything that can be thrown into its path.


GT Fury 2019
The shock flip chip changes the geometry to better suit different types of terrain. On the 27.5” set-up, the dropout flip chip allows for a 10mm change in chainstay length, making room for different riding styles and higher speed stability. The Fury's cockpit can be adjusted too, using headset cups that are available from GT.

GT Fury 2019
The Fury is compatible with both 27.5 and 29" wheels, although switching between wheel sizes requires GT's 'Switch Kit', which is only included with the frame-only option.

GT Fury 2019
GT Fury 2019
The bike's cables are externally routed in a recess down the top of the downtube to keep them tidy and hidden whilst making it possible to access them easily. GT has dubbed this system the Groove Tube.


Geometry

GT Fury 2019
GT Fury 2019


Frame Options / Build Kits

The GT Fury comes in three models, Team, Expert, Pro, and a frameset. The Fury Team, the top of the range bike and a near replica of the GT Factory Race bikes, will be available in 29-inch wheels only. The Pro model features a blended wheel size offering – 27.5” for small and medium size bikes and 29” for medium and large.

The Expert is exclusively equipped with 27.5” wheels that GT claims will help keep it poppy and playful in the bike park. Racers and riders who want the most adjustability out of their Fury can purchase a frameset which includes a Switch Kit to swap from 27.5” to 29” wheels. So you should have all of the bases covered no matter what sort of riding you're going to do.

The 27.5 M Fury Expert sells for $4,000 USD, the 27.5/29 M Fury Pro for $5,500 USD, and the 29 M Fury Team is $7,500 USD. The frameset only is $3,000 USD.


Suspension

GT's top of the range Fury comes equipped with the formidable Fox Float Factory X2 shock and Fox Float Factory 49 that are both equipped with high and low-speed compression and rebound adjustment. If you're looking for more adjustment, the fork can take a total of 8 tokens, and the rear shock can take up to 7. GT recommend running 17.5mm or 25% of sag at the back end to the most from the LTS system. This sag number is pretty low for a DH bike and this could be down to the high pivot system being incredibly efficient at eating up the bumps, but GT does insist on getting your sag levels very accurate.




After hearing all the hype, watching numerous videos and fantasizing about riding in the world's premier mountain biking destination, your first time in Whistler should and almost certainly will be an incredible experience. With the riding on offer, the conundrum of what bike to ride and bring with you is going to be pretty up there on the list of problems. For the uninitiated, Whisler's filled with a mix of fresh brown pow, blown out technical and gnarly trails and ultimate bike park runs like A-Line, Dirt Merchant and others.

With the amount of traffic the park gets, particularly after Whistler's round of the Crankworx World Tour, it suffers from impressive amounts of braking bumps, holes and bagged out conditions. And despite the gallant efforts of the trail crew, the insanely dry weather Canada has experienced this summer means that it is fair to say the park is pretty rough at the moment. These conditions proved to be ideal to do some initial shakedown testing on GT's newest iteration of the Fury.

GT Fury 2019
Alex Evans
Location: Bath, United Kingdom
Age: 31
Height: 178 cm
Inseam: 82 cm
Weight: 77 kg
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None


GT Fury 2019


I was naturally drawn to A-Line and Dirt Merchant for my first outing on the Fury. After taking tire to dirt for the first time, it became clear almost immediately that the bumps developed on A-Line were smoothed out with almost no fuss, and only the gnarliest and biggest man-made holes proved to be a little too big for the rearward axle path to swallow. Not only that, it was incredibly easy to maintain composed and controlled speed while being able to choose lines and shift weight with little fuss.

The suspension doesn't perform in isolation, though. The bike's long wheelbase produces an incredibly stable platform which is most noticed when descending at high speeds or riding down trails with large natural holes or bumps that throw your weight forwards or backwards. The bike's additional length means the bike is easier to control and keep in check when you're gunning it, and pivoting feelings are neutralised to an impressive extent.

The bike's weight combines with its geometry and active suspension to further the planted and confidence-inspiring ride. While these factors combined do produce fantastic stability, they did mean the bike wasn't especially poppy on tighter, slower trails such as Ninja Cougar or Karate Monkey. To get the bike to shift and change direction quickly it wasn't just a case of dipping elbows and shoulders and looking where you wanted to go. Although I feel this could be mitigated with some suspension setup changes, which would require more time on the bike to really get it dialed in.


GT Fury 2019


First Impressions

It seems like GT has created quite a brute of a bike with their new Fury. I was immediately grateful for the larger 29-inch wheels and extremely supple suspension that turned A-Line's battered path into a plush Rolls Royce ride down a quiet motorway. With little effort the Fury picked up speed and then did a remarkable job of holding on to it - something that racers and amateurs alike are going to love.

Although it lacked the nimbleness of a lighter, shorter and smaller-wheeled rig (don't forget GT do have a 650b option), with a little willpower and engagement the Fury can be made to move swiftly through the tighter trails. It seems unfair to penalise the bike for this, given how confidence inspiring and solid it felt when you really wanted it to be - at max speed, riding washboard-like surfaces.

The few days on the Fury wasn't long enough to form a fully developed opinion of the bike, but did leave me eager for more time on the bike. You can expect a more in-depth review from Pinkbike's 29er DH bike specialist on his home terrain in the near future.


GT Fury 2019







165 Comments

  • + 109
 First GT I’d consider buying since I bought my Lobo
  • + 8
 That would be a great second name for Fury - if they claim to rebirth LTS suspension, maybe it was the right time to call this bike Lobo?
  • + 13
 Love it, GT finally back at pace! It looks wonderful and appears to work okay too!
  • - 10
flag DimitarDimitrov (Aug 29, 2018 at 2:12) (Below Threshold)
 @cunning-linguist: Just remmeber what this dude says . "To wrok okay" you know what "okay" means
  • + 7
 @DimitarDimitrov: I was referring tongue in cheek to the fact it won the last round of the W/C! It’s more than okay!
  • + 14
 Now I know why I'm not confident over obstacles. Coz my bike has no idler.
  • + 3
 @look-out: should def have called it "lobo"
  • + 8
 so next year in the buy/ sell does this go ion the 29er category or the downhill category ?

asking for a friend
  • + 0
 448 B.B. height ? Whaaaat?
  • + 3
 Looks like a Wyn-er in my book.
  • + 1
 @DimitarDimitrov: wrok n wroll?
  • - 4
flag foggeloggliod (Aug 29, 2018 at 22:44) (Below Threshold)
 Does it ride like a session?
  • + 1
 That's kind of a Lo Bo to GT.. Shoulda Yelled Two!!
  • - 1
 @raddog:
The question is...does the session ride like it.
  • + 33
 What do you mean it doesn't have 157mm hub spacing!? Cool to see the two wheel sizes compatible with the one frame, smart design GT
  • - 15
flag nojzilla (Aug 29, 2018 at 0:44) (Below Threshold)
 the jack of all trades is the master of none
  • + 25
 Pretty sad when a WC DH winning frame costs less than a euroduro frame.
  • + 12
 It also sounds like the 27.5 is the better option as an all round bike. Its also the one that won a WC. Unless Maes switches to 29 and DH or Wyn suddenly gets a new lease on speed, its going to stay that way.
  • + 11
 @headshot: the review pretty much is an euphemism itself, trying to minimize the fact if the 29er being harder to maneuver and goofy at jumping. If you look at Ben Cathro's interview with Gwin you'll hear Aaron saying the 29er is much more demanding than the 650b in tight tracks.
  • + 7
 @southoftheborder: I would say go back to what has already put millions in his pockets. The 29er test failed about 5 seconds into his run.
  • + 5
 @ShempHoward: You can buy a fully built aluminum YT Tues with great spec for 600$ less than the cost of just the frame of this bike...
  • + 1
 @nojzilla: True, but a 1 trick pony is a 1 trick pony...most parks I've ridden have a variety of terrain and trails.
  • + 1
 @ShempHoward: I know, how are they going to make back all those R&D costs!?!?
  • + 2
 @Mtb4joe: except here, where talking about a DH bike an wheel sizes over 1.5" difference. I'm not saying GT haven't factored that into the design but, I honestly don't believe any amount of flip chips etc could make up that difference in geometry. Are you actually going to swap your bikes wheels an drop outs, pivot mounts or whatever for a DH run an a jump run on the same day at a bike park? (not sarcasm but a genuine question)
I CAN how ever see the sense in different wheel sizes over the frame size range of a bike for example, small frame 26, med 27.5, large XL 29
  • + 4
 @nojzilla: I think there are a few people out in the world that might swap wheels... Maybe not the same day? A rider who lives in BC for example might spend a day on the jump lines one day, swap wheels at home then ride gnar the next day. However, I think the wheel swap is more of a marketing thing for customers who are on the fence. That is why it's only available when you purchase the frameset.

Personally I think the bike industry does NOT need a different size wheel for different size frame... They would be better served with having a different size chainstay to match the different size frames.
  • + 0
 @nojzilla: the advantage might be in the fact that they can build one frame to accommodate both people preferring 27.5, 29 and people that haven't or can't make a choice.
  • + 1
 @ShempHoward: are you sure about that? Meta 29 and Mega 275 frames cost less... Or are you thinking of some boutique brands?
  • + 1
 @headshot: the "...the one that won a WC..." line doesn't work.
Three wins on 27,5" wheels, four on 29"!
  • + 3
 @etga6657: he was obviously referring to the only GT to win a WC downhill and the one that their best rider choses to ride
  • + 2
 Addressing all concerns, yes very aware of YT frame costs as well as Nukeproof, was referring to the boutique brands whatever than means. The cheaper bikes win more and cost less. Pretty sure YT would build a custom carbon house for Gwin so not too concerned about their costs. I think GT nailed it like a few other brands, make the frame accept both wheels and the customer decides.
  • - 1
 Buying a bike isn’t the same as buying a fantasy dh team - it’s not “always” about points per dollar @MoonboyMTB:
  • + 1
 @pdb18: Same frame (except for different material) as what Aaron Gwin rides and has won many, many world cups on and it has a good spec... doesn't get much better than that. It's also the bike of choice for many of the best freeriders in the world.
  • + 1
 @nojzilla: the frame only which had the ability to go either 27.5 or 29 I read some where comes with an extra setstay or chainstay to make it fit. Some one correct me if I'm wrong tho.
  • + 1
 @kingfish666: Frame only,,, go Custom!
  • + 1
 @MoonboyMTB: i was (poorly) poking fun at your 2017 fantasy team performance. BTW - fellow Hoosier here! Brown County FTW
  • + 24
 If ever there was a bike for GT to bring back the GT wings logo, this is it!
  • + 4
 Toss some Skyways on it!
  • + 15
 It’s spelled Steve PEAT.
And I certainly remember the LTS DH being a proper DH bike at the time! It was a lot further removed from the average trail bike back then, much more so than modern ‘full on, new school’ DH bikes are now.
  • + 14
 It's spelt, spelt.
  • + 24
 @YungSketchy: it can be either way in the modern era, however spelled is technically correct. Spelt is a type of grain like wheat, so I used spelled in order to distinguish the two.
  • - 10
flag applepie (Aug 29, 2018 at 3:15) (Below Threshold)
 @cunning-linguist: Sounds terrible with two L's and an ed. T FTW
  • + 5
 @applepie: that’s nice.
  • + 2
 @YungSketchy: While we are being picky, there is no need for the comma between spelts
  • + 2
 I came here to say that too. There was an actual LTS DH model in 1996. www.pinkbike.com/u/ashleyam/album/GT-LTS-DH-Complete
  • + 3
 A little bit strange that my original comment went from +14 upvotes to -7 in the space of around 5mins.
Perhaps somebody at PB feels foolish about having their mistake pointed out, and wants to keep it hidden down at the bottom?
  • + 3
 @Franziskaner: seems to be a common move on this website.
  • + 2
 @Franziskaner: yeah and how on earth can one mistake the godfather himself! Tut tut.
  • + 15
 Maybe I remember things slightly differently, but the LTS DH was definitely a DH bike. The clue is in the title
  • + 7
 Absolutely. I remember the excitement when a number of brands, including GT, released what might be considered the first proper DH bikes in 1995 (aside maybe from the 1994 Sunn Radical), first to be marvelled at at the Cap d'Ail World Cup. The LTS with the bent seat tube was an object of true DH desire. If I remember rightly Nico Vouilloz rode that first incarnation of the LTS DH with a 80mm Judy DH up front...
  • + 2
 @fjm35: Foes and several others already there, were raced at 96 worlds.
  • + 12
 I like this bike. I looks great,that blue color is beautiful. 29" inch wheels looks great in this bike. One of the best looking DH bikes there.
  • + 5
 This bike has some beautiful lines, for sure. A sharp departure from the monstrosities they've been making for the last decade or so.
  • + 5
 It'd be great to do a vitalmx style shootout with the 27.5 vs 29 fury with different riders and skill levels. It'd be really interesting to see who gets the most out of both bikes and in what conditions both bikes do well in. Also, it could help cut through the malarkey of the bike buying process for the consumer.
  • + 4
 GT bringing back some classic names , LTS and the Groove Tube (their hardtails had this in the 90s), I really want a return to the splatter paint jobs as well. Bikes are a bit conservative with their colour schemes nowadays.
  • + 4
 Arraiz knows his stuff so I expect the suspension kinematics will be dialled - He was the guy behind the K9 Industries bike which realistically was a top notch design let down by the fact they didnt seem to have the resources to push the aesthetics.
  • + 1
 Completely agree. I'm lucky to know Luis and his approach to Mtb suspension always was on top. The K9 DH001 was a bike ahead of its time in many ways.
  • + 7
 good looking GT!
  • + 5
 Luis Arraiz , the designer, knows his stuff. I remember when he was years ahead of most brands when he owned K9.
  • + 4
 not to be too critical-at 38.5 lbs. why bother with the 6th element? just make it in alloy and it's 40 lbs. really beautiful bike though. think it's on my list.
  • + 5
 Great Review, but how does one become a Pink Bike, Bike tester?
  • + 11
 Smoke another editor up with some killers then agree with whatever they are flapping about. the
  • - 3
 How do you get any job...u get out there and talk to people face to face.
  • + 1
 Whenever I see something about these high idler pulleys I feel like I'm missing something. I have a 2017 Tues and previously had a 2011 Giant Glory, 2002 Intense M1, and late 90s Super 8, and only with the single pivot Super 8 have I felt like the suspension actuation is giving me any kind of kickback through the pedals.

Is this something only pro riders are noticing?
  • + 2
 @TrevZ : i think the difference is that this bike has a high main pivot, hence a rearward axle path, large amount of antisquat, and thus lots of pedal kickback. The idler is used to isolate the pedaling forces from the suspension action. I probably didn't explain that very eloquently, but I think that's the gist of it.
  • + 3
 Just to clarify, I should have said that there would be lots of antisquat and kickback, without the idler.
  • + 3
 @thegoodflow: Ah okay that makes more sense. The idler pulley is in response to the position of the main pivot and not something that just arbitrarily benefits all bikes. Thanks.
  • + 1
 @alexcgevans How was it decided to hand the bike over to you on this occasion instead of Paul?
Paul has done, as noted, many of the other DH bike reviews, and in particular all the other recent pulley idler style of bikes. This is fairly detailed and comprehensive for a "First Ride" report, is the bike heading his way for a comparative analysis or will you dive into it in even further depth over the coming months?
  • + 4
 Hi @Zaff - @paulaston will be testing this in more detail over the coming months. Cheers!
  • + 1
 As a non-pro, I have always preferred internal cable routing for its ease of cleaning and aesthetics, however this is probably the best external cable routing I’ve ever seen. Overall, this is probably the first GT bike I would actually own. Kudos.
  • + 1
 So... they hid the cables in a recess in the downtube... it's certainly nice to look at.
But could it be.. just a thought... that you will have to remove the cables out of that groove every time you want to clean it properly?
External cable routing FTW, but like this... I'm not sure if it's the best way.
  • + 27
 Clean it?
  • + 7
 @mcozzy: you're in the UK, aren't you guys usually drowning in mud?
  • + 11
 @Kiwiplague: Yes and they know that cleaning your bike just eats your bearings so you better off avoiding it as much as possible.
  • + 13
 @mcozzy: Germans are always cleaning things.
  • + 1
 @TheR: nahh, thats the swiss but i guess Asterix is not as well known in amerika as in europe.
  • + 2
 @optimumnotmaximum: Doch, kenne ich ihn. Ich denke auch, ich hab das bestimmte Asterix comic gelesen -- Asterix bei den Schweizern, gell? Ich kenne auch die Deutschen. Wie verbringst du Samstagnachmittag? Beim Autowaschen? Wink
  • + 2
 @TheR: well played, nice you noticed the reference. I did not clean my car for ages, but most germans do it every saturday - true.
  • + 1
 @optimumnotmaximum: That was one thing that amazed me about Germany -- always washing the car on Saturdays!
  • + 1
 What size frame did you test?

Still wondering why they decided not to offer an Alloy frame. This $3k plastic version would only be like $1,200 in Alloy and likely in my garage immediately.
  • + 2
 Because at 4000$ for an entry level carbon they didn't need an alloy version.
  • + 1
 Who realistically thinks spending $4k for "entry level" frame makes sense, really??

I disagree about "not needing" an alloy version because GT fans appreciated the fact that they still offered them in their line-up until now. There's still a very large percentage of riders that don't want to spend the premium cost for a plastic frame, especially the entry level or new casual rider just getting into the sport. If they want to go all-in on carbon, thats fine, but they'll be alienating a large portion of their brand-loyal customers who will likely jump to another brand now.
  • + 3
 @NYShred: The article says $3k, not $4k for a frame. The complete Fury expert is $4k.
  • + 1
 Carbon frame(aluminum build options)
  • + 0
 @bman33: Balgaroth said $4k - not me. I was responding to his mention of $4k
  • + 1
 @NYShred: Oops, my bad.
  • + 1
 @bman33: no prob bud
  • + 2
 @NYShred Probably because they couldn't do both in the same year? This happens all of the time. Specialized does the Demo in carbon, a year or two later it comes out in alu. Trek did a carbon Slash, next year the alu one. A brand will almost always enter the market at the top end with marketing wow and bling and then bring out the most cost effective version later.
  • + 1
 @ka-brap: Gotcha, yea that makes sense. Thank you. Hope they make it happen.

@alexcgevans - what size frame did you test?
  • + 1
 @Balgaroth: Balgaroth sounds like a horrible thing to happen to someone.
  • + 4
 @NYShred @bman33 did I say frame lads ? 4 grand for a complete bike with carbon frame isn't far of direct sales and those who still buy bikes from physical shops may appreciate. Is it more clear or should i now explain each word I used in the former sentences ?
  • + 1
 @BenPea: what's up ? Neither in French nor in English I can see something bad related or sounding similar so no clue what you're saying mate
  • + 1
 @Balgaroth:

"Balls: 1. A man's testicles where sperm is produced."
"Le garrot est un dispositif destiné à interrompre la circulation du sang dans un membre"/"A garrote or garrote is a weapon, most often a handheld ligature of chain, rope, scarf, wire or fishing line used to strangle a person."

Sorry, welcome to my mind. Smile
  • + 2
 Should of had Martin Maes write the review, he seems to know what hes talking about.
  • + 2
 The last GT I owned had mag wheels on it, glad they are getting serious about bikes again..
  • - 1
 Why can't i find that frameset option anywhere on the internet?
I was pretty hyped about the bike only to learn the complete offerings are shitty and there is no frame only vailable.
@alexcgevans can you shed some light on this matter? Where did you get that information about the frameset?
  • + 1
 In the 'details' it says alloy options. I wonder if Whistler will still rent the alloy version or if the carbon will be available as a demo upgrade?
  • + 2
 That's actually a pretty good deal for the Expert model. Man, I might have to start saving my pennies.
  • + 1
 Always had a soft spot for GT since my ball burnished Zaskar frame in 1997, however they did suck for a while there! Good to see then back on form
  • + 1
 am i the only one who feels like, the shock is going to get pulled during compression? like instead of the upper link and seat stay folding up, it folds down?
  • + 1
 It's for when you have to ride over braking holes rather than braking bumps.
  • + 5
 It looks that way if you look at the rocker arm shape and not at the pivots location
  • + 3
 How is this LTS system different to FSR?
  • + 3
 Idler or no idler, if FSR was still a protected patent, they wouldn't be able to do it.
  • + 5
 Both are Horst link design, placing pivots changes the attributes of a suspension the same way than FSR on the Demo is not the same than FSR on their XC bikes. Still remains a Horst link, same as YT, Canyon, and so on.
  • + 2
 Marketing BS then basically. I do like the bike though. Probably because it fits into the narrow but widely accepted range of acceptable aesthetics that the average brain can appreciate.
  • + 0
 That's a lot of acceptance.
  • + 1
 @BenPea: it's well price for a carbon frame in local shop, looks good, offers a well proven suspension design whatever they call it, indeed loads to like about it that's why mine will be home in December Smile
  • + 1
 @Balgaroth: It's probably an absolutely killer bike, don't get me wrong.
  • + 2
 Only came here to see if the words were by Martin Maes.
  • + 1
 Those 448 bottom brackets heights should be 338? GT bros might want to fix that!
  • + 1
 Makes me wonder if that was you next to me on the lift up on last day of Crankworx.
  • + 2
 GT Finally getting their isht together.
  • + 2
 Great looking bike and that cable routing is fantastic. Good work GT!
  • + 1
 Great looking bike! I’d actually consider buying one now that the iDrive platform is no longer being used Big Grin
  • + 1
 Not to be that guy or anything, but the bb height in the geometry chart should be corrected...
  • + 1
 I'm going to call my peni...er...man part the groove tube now. Someone at GT deserves a bonus for that name.
  • + 1
 The first ride of the carbon 2019 GT Fury... just won a world cup round.
  • + 0
 Wrong. Not the first ride.
  • + 0
 Hopefully these new Furys dont crack and fall apart like 95% of their old models! fingers crossed ????????
  • + 4
 @barreau57 Are you talking the 2010-2014 Carbon Fury. I've only heard of a small handful of those break/crack. I thought they were over built.
  • + 0
 Nope. The Athertons version, i thought it was a joke how many kept breaking! @kgbdhbiker:
  • + 3
 @kgbdhbiker:
I´ve literally heard of one of the old carbon frames being run over by a car and it was still being ridden afterwards no problem. Those things definitely were pretty much bombproof.
Can´t commend on the aluminium version though.
let´s hope the new ones take after the old carbon version!
  • + 3
 @Loki87: I agree with what I've heard of the last carbon Fury. 2010-2013. Bomb proof overall. Not sure what bikes @barreau57 heard of breaking, dog bones, bearings, sure - possible weak spot as with many frames. But the carbon frame failures - I'm unaware off the top of my head of any actual breakages. That will be key with the new Fury, can it be a super durable carbon frame!!!!
  • + 0
 I dont why you keep mentioning the carbon versions from years ago, im sure they were great. The 2017/2018 versions have been cracking like crazy. @kgbdhbiker:
  • + 2
 @barreau57: because the old model you're talking about is aluminum. So when you said they're breaking like crazy, I assumed since this bike is carbon except for seat stays, I assumed you'd be talking about carbon. Because the previous version of the Fury in Carbon (the ones I'm talking about in 2010-13), we bomb proof. When comparing like bikes or issues, I try to keep to comparable materials
  • + 1
 @kgbdhbiker: Fair enough, just thought GT made their own bikes last year so it would be fair enough to compare the quality
  • + 1
 LOL thought homeboy was riding in jeans.
  • + 1
 What size have you tested?
  • + 1
 Now now, blue black or mmm mm purple
  • + 2
 best looking gt
  • + 1
 Pedals like an enduro bike
  • + 1
 "Down the top of the downtube" haha wooOOaaaAAHHH
  • + 2
 The Groove Tube....
  • + 0
 Seat tube is too long on smaller sizes
  • + 1
 New FURY looks dope!!!
  • + 0
 I don't want to start anything, but... Looks like a session... Wink
  • + 1
 "GT's iconic LTS system"
  • - 3
 graphics are a joke. inside of the GT logo and the BMX GT on the headtube. they are all over the place. and i have no support for Dorel product.
  • - 1
 so its trek commencal
  • - 2
 It looks like a Session, more than before!
  • - 2
 Colin McRae wants his paint scheme back...
  • + 8
 Blue and yellow gt are older.
  • + 2
 @fracasnoxteam: I was riding back when Colin McRae was racing the 555 wrx's and I remember most GT's were chrome or raw aluminium. Not knocking the colour scheme, I think it looks great
  • + 2
 @treggs: GT history with blue and yellow goes back to their BMX roots back in the 80s
  • + 1
 @Balgaroth: Indeed, only the wings missing off such an iconic BMX brand logo. Former GT Pro Performer owner;
  • + 2
 @b4uwereborn: The Pro Performers were "GT Blue," a much lighter shade, but yeah, the race bikes and the logo were blue and gold. You probably know this already, but they now make a Pro Performer 26 and 29er.
  • + 3
 @Balgaroth: I would suggest Sweden has a further back claim to those colours...
  • - 1
 its trek
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