First Ride: 2021 Ibis Mojo 4 - Longer, Slacker, & Lighter

Jun 9, 2020
by Daniel Sapp  


The modern Ibis Mojo (the original model was a hardtail that debuted in 1994) is the all-rounder in Ibis' lineup, with 27.5" wheels, 130mm of rear travel, and an instantly recognizable frame shape. The fourth generation of the Mojo has received several updates, including a new carbon layup, metric shock, revised geometry, and fully internal cable routing.

The carbon Mojo 4 is available in a number of different builds, starting at a Shimano Deore kitted bike that sells for $4,499 all the way up to a SRAM XX1 AXS build that sells for $10,699. The bike I've been testing is the Shimano XT build that sells for $6,099. It is built up with Ibis' 35mm wide carbon wheels which adds $800 and their carbon handlebar that adds $68, for a total price of $6,967 USD.

Mojo 4 Details
• Wheel size: 27.5"
• Travel: 130mm
• Carbon frame
• 65.4° head angle
• 76.6° seat angle
• Chainstays: 425mm
• Reach: 460mm (Size Medium)
• Sizes: S-XL
• Price: $4,499 to $10,699 USD
https://www.ibiscycles.com/





Suspension Design

Ibis have made a number of updates to the suspension on the Mojo 4 to improve its performance over the Mojo 3. The bike still uses a DW-link suspension design, but it now features a metric 210 x 50mm shock to deliver the 130mm of travel. All levels of the bike are outfitted with Fox Factory suspension. The rear shock is a Fox Float DPS EVOL. Ibis' team says they chose to go with that over the DPX2 because the performance is similar, and the DPX2 makes fitting a full-size water bottle a little bit tight.

The frame is designed for use with an air shock, and with a goal of maximum traction, the factory shock is set up with a very light compression tune and it ramps up quickly through its travel in order to avoid bottoming out. The rebound tune is also light, but Ibis claim that the bike still doesn't have much pedal bob due to the suspension design, even with minimal damping.

Gone from the Mojo 4 is the optional "Roxy" tune. While it was an option on the Mojo 3, riders struggled to get their rebound speeds fast enough for the suspension to feel good. The new lightly damped "Traction Tune", as Ibis calls it, is said to be better for riders of all sizes.

Additionally, there is an all-new lower link on the Mojo 4. Unlike the lower link on the current generation Ripmo V2, HD5, and Ripley, it is not cross-compatible with other bikes in Ibis' line.




Frame Details

The Mojo 4 has an all-new carbon layup that is said to provide a better ride quality and is lighter than before. The frame itself is around a half-pound lighter than Ibis' HD5 and no longer is compatible with plus-size tires, although a 2.6 will still easily fit. The reasoning for this is that Ibis claim there was no demand for plus size tires, therefore that option wasn't necessary.

Frame protection carries over similar updates to the HD5's with a plastic fender on the rear to shelter the link from unwanted debris, a metal guard on the lower link, an updated rear chainstay guard, molded rubber swingarm protectors. There is also a polycarbonate downtube protector. Frames are designed to fit a full-size water bottle and are compatible with Ibis' "Pork Chop" frame box.



There is a threaded bottom bracket, internal cable routing throughout, and room for riders to run longer dropper posts. With a removable adapter, the bike is ISCG-05 compatible for those wanting to run a chainguide. There are IGUS bushings in the lower link and then bearings in the upper link.

Frames all feature a seven-year warranty and lifetime replacement for bushings.

Geometry


In keeping with modern times, the bike has a steeper 76.6-degree seat tube angle for better climbing efficiency. The head tube angle has been slackened by nearly 2-degrees, and now sits at 65.4-degrees. The chainstays remain at a short 425mm for all sizes; that's the shortest out of any bike in the Ibis line. On a size medium, the reach is 460mm, an increase of nearly 40mm. The bikes are spec'd with a 37mm offset fork.



Specifications

The Mojo 4 is available in five different builds with both Shimano and SRAM options - Shimano Deore, SLX, or XT and then SRAM GX or XX1 AXS There is also a frame and shock-only option that sells for $2,999 USD. All builds use the same Fox Factory series suspension front and rear and the option of Schwalbe Hans Dampf/Nobby Nic or Maxxis Assegai tires and a WTB Silverado saddle.


The Deore build sells for $4,499 USD and is equipped with a full Shimano Deore drivetrain, Deore brakes, Ibis S35 aluminum rims, and a KS Rage-i Dropper post. The $10,699 USD XX1 AXS build is kitted out with SRAM's wireless XX1 AXS drivetrain, Shimano XTR brakes, an AXS dropper post, ENVE M6 handlebar and stem, and Ibis carbon wheels laced to Industry Nine hubs.


The build I've been testing is the Shimano XT build which sells for $6,099 USD and spec'd with a full XT drivetrain, 4-piston XT brakes, and a Bike Yoke Revive seatpost. It also has the optional carbon 35-mm wide carbon wheels from Ibis and their carbon handlebar which adds $800 and then $68, respectively, bringing the grand total to $6,967 USD for the 28.5 lb bike.



Ride Impressions

At 5'10" tall, with a shortish wingspan and long legs, I chose to ride a size medium in the Mojo 4. I've had about six rides on the bike thus far so my impressions are a bit limited but, I'm getting comfortable and enjoying the ride. All of my riding has been in Pisgah National Forest and other trails in Western North Carolina with conditions ranging from post-downpour loam soup, to blown out rocks and roots.

I set the Fox 34 fork up with 73 psi and have the compression damping wide open and 8 clicks of rebound, from closed. The rear shock has 170 psi to give me about 28-30% sag.

With my long legs, I have ample room to run as long of length dropper post as I would ever desire. and with the post set to my saddle height of 73.5cm, there's plenty of room below the collar for a longer post. With the steeper seat tube angle, I've been running the seat a little bit back in order to get my knees where I want them for climbing.

Speaking of climbing, the bike is efficient and easy to maneuver. I'd occasionally flip the compression lever for longer climbs, but this is certainly a bike that you could happily leave that lever alone for an entire ride without a second thought. The bike doesn't bob all that much, even with the light compression and rebound tunes on the shock, but the Assegai tires are not the quickest rolling, so any bit of gains I could find heading up made me happier.

Descending, the Mojo 4 feels light, lively, and nimble. The short 425 mm chainstays aid it in getting in and out of turns quickly, yet the appropriate 460mm reach gives the bike a very comfortable feel. At speed, there is plenty of stability and predictability. Traction is amply supplied and it feels exactly how I would expect a DW-link suspension design ride to feel. The light compression tune on the shock allows the bike to stay glued to the ground well, moving through the first bit of travel with ease, but then ramping up nicely to avoid a harsh bottom out.

Overall, the Mojo 4 is a quick and peppy 27.5" trail bike that's easy to ride, and even after undergoing the longer and slacker treatment it's still an excellent all-rounder.





203 Comments

  • 141 1
 I can see lots of people letting this Ibis do the work.
  • 10 0
 I was searching for this comment!
  • 5 2
 @retswen: I was shocked that it hadn’t been used before I used it.
  • 4 3
 This bike definitely has some "MOJO", now that it is slacker, longer and lighter...
  • 30 3
 @RowdyAirTime: do we really need, longer, slacker,lower??? Bikes aren't as playful as they used to be
  • 7 1
 I'm loving that this is sticking around.
  • 6 0
 @4thflowkage: I’ve a feeling it’ll run and run just as “looks like a Session” has. That guy on FF will be immortalised.
  • 3 3
 @scottlink: We do. It's hard to admit but we're growing older and older and..
  • 2 0
 @pakleni: Hang on, I think some more time just flew by again and we are even older, and older...
  • 34 0
 For those who missed it, 0:34 of www.pinkbike.com/news/video-friday-fails-120.html

Worth the 10 seconds to watch.
  • 10 4
 @scottlink: some people need “playful” bikes to play, some take 170mm bikes and manual and pop the Sh** out of them. The chainstays are sure short enough on this thing to “play” with.
  • 3 0
 @retswen: thanks I was wondering
  • 4 2
 @retswen: it's the rider not the bike. Lok
  • 5 2
 @scottlink: then ride an old bike... there's plenty of them out there collecting dust.
  • 3 1
 @scottlink: I agree, and great point. I was just trying to be funny saying this bike looks like it has some "MOJO" to it. Actually a playful bike is probably what is most important to me and why I like short travel (115-130mm) trail bikes. Although I have a 27.5 and a 29er, I would like to try the Mojo4, as it really looks like a lot of fun to ride, as I'm sure it would pop off everything you can find on the trail, especially with those 27.5's & super short chainstays...
  • 2 0
 That one was an epic ff Smile
  • 83 0
 My heart wants a Mojo 4 but my wallet is asking for a Mojo AF
  • 22 1
 Same...I was hoping for an AF version with 150f/130r. Pretty much a mini HD5
  • 5 1
 @pumpjumpnflow: that would be so sick!
  • 12 0
 I've found my AF brethren. Really waiting for the Ripley AF to drop. but a Mojo would be pretty rad, too. Trying to picture that frame shape in aluminum...would really be something else.
  • 13 0
 @defineindecline: I'm also hoping for a Ripley AF. And agree, Mojo AF would be pretty acceptable, too. I think the Ripmo is a bit more bike than I need for my local trails.
  • 5 0
 @pumpjumpnflow: I put at 150 mm fork on my Mojo 3 and it is great
  • 4 0
 @pinhead907: exactly. I mean, I dig the price and looks of the Ripmo, but way too much bike for what I do and I already own a bike in that travel bracket that I'm pretty happy with.
  • 11 1
 I don't understand why they can't make 29er bikes look this good... Classic Mojo styling for the WIN!
  • 10 1
 @pinhead907: If Ibis does not capitalize on a Ripley AF they are missing a HUGE market. I mean look how successful the Ripmo AF was?
  • 6 0
 @nmilot92: Well I hope someone from Ibis is reading this...
  • 4 0
 PLEASE don't out a Ripley AF as my wallet won't be able to cope.
  • 1 0
 Mojo AF with a coil shock would have me working out my budget for a new bike... might have to hit up Foes for the frame mandrels though with those shapes
  • 4 0
 @pumpjumpnflow: just buy a used hd3 like i did - its the bike you discribed
  • 1 0
 I'm wanting the alloy HD5 I thought for sure would be coming instead of the khaki pants color treated carbon HD...
  • 32 1
 where that Ripley AF at tho
  • 28 0
 Ha, I was just think that too. I got 3 grand for a bike, not 7...
  • 4 4
 Ha, I was just think that too. I got 3 grand for a bike, not 7...
  • 13 0
 The Ripmo AF is a hard bike to look past if you want a lot of capability for not too much money. I see this bike is offered with a Deore build. I wonder if the Deore kit will make its way to the Ripmo AF? Yeah, a Ripley AF would be very cool.
  • 3 15
flag Supergirl56 (Jun 9, 2020 at 10:05) (Below Threshold)
 how about where the under 2500 ibis???
  • 29 0
 @Supergirl56: in the Pinkbike buy/sell used section
  • 2 0
 I would sell my current Mojo3 and buy a Ripley AF on day one if they offered it. The Mojo is a rad bike, but I really want some of that 29er full squish goodness.
  • 7 0
 Ripley aluminum with Deore instead of SRAM....shut up and take my money.
  • 1 7
flag Yetimike2019 (Jun 9, 2020 at 15:41) (Below Threshold)
 The Ripley AF is a Ripmo. My Large Ripley weighs 28lbs, my wife’s Small Ripmo weighs 28lbs. If you lock out the shock on the Ripmo, it basically feels like a Ripley.
  • 1 0
 @Yetimike2019: your Ripley is heavy bra.
  • 1 0
 @1dude2bikes: by the time I put CC in and heavy tires all my bikes get pretty heavy. 4 piston DH breaks... My wife isn’t exactly a bike or wheel destroyer.
  • 2 0
 @Yetimike2019: well, the point of a Ripley AF would be its price.

The carbon bikes of Ibis are great - I own a Ripley V4 myself - but prices are steep.
(esp. in Europe)
  • 1 0
 @FloImSchnee: price and (if they did what they did with the Ripmo) a bit slacker, longer and burlier
  • 1 0
 @FloImSchnee: very good point!
  • 1 0
 @Yetimike2019: just messing with you. I spent a ton on My V4 and it came in 26.5 with the MM 2.6’s. Rocking 2.35 Ikons now and it spins up nice. Only way to go is 4 piston BTW.
  • 1 0
 @1dude2bikes: I’ll, well I weight my Ripley this morning for fun, and I’m pushing 30lbs, so yeah it’s heavy. Almost all in the tires and foam rings though. I ride this bike pretty dumb, otherwise “skinny” tires sound so much faster!
  • 32 17
 Ibis has seriously stepped up their game lately, but lets talk about that frame design... I feel like its due for a major refresh. The first gen Mojo HD was released in 2005, and it looked great for the first 10 or so years, but here we are 16 years later...
  • 39 3
 I love that design, smooth contours lower the chance of stress risers, and that cross link is still stronger than an empty triangle.
  • 15 4
 I think Ibis bikes are kind of a love or hate in terms of looks. They definitely have kept their identity in terms of looks, but ya I'm not a fan of the look overall and it's changed very little over the years.
  • 1 2
 @cogsci: It could be argued that after 16 years of materials science and carbon manufaturing development, you can make a frame just and strong and lighter without. But I am not a materials engineer. No doubt the brace adds stregth, but is it really needed now?
  • 6 7
 I wonder if their old designer has moved on. The last few frames they've put out just do not have the same level of detail, form development, and surfacing. One of the huge things is the forward shock mount on the new frames look just tacked on. They don't flow into the rest of the surfacing on the frame. Or like there was a last minute change in the shock location and this was the only way they could salvage molds that had already been produced.
  • 6 0
 @bicyclelifestyle: I’m sure they could do away with the brace - they don’t have one on the Ripmo. I’ve a feeling that it’s there more for shock mount position than it is for strength.
  • 18 4
 @NorCalNomad: I’d agree with you. Compared to the Mojo frames, the Ripmo’s look almost ugly. Some designs look cool and perhaps shouldn’t be touched too much. The Mojo is one such thing.
  • 18 10
 @nrpuk: Ripmo AF more like Ugly AF. I know it's an awesome bike to ride, but damn is it ugly and cheap looking. None of the lines know each other, except the small bend of the top tube and it paralleling the shock. Weird points of intersections. And that bend in the downtube just to fit a waterbottle in, YUK.
  • 6 0
 @NorCalNomad: Nope. Roxy is still there and involved in the design process.
  • 6 11
flag MikeyMT (Jun 9, 2020 at 14:40) (Below Threshold)
 @NorCalNomad: Agree 100% These bikes are plain ugly. Always have been. Sounds like they ride great but wont consider one till they do something about the frame design.
  • 3 3
 @MikeyMT: I'm definitely not saying all Ibis's are ugly, just the Ripmo AF, the carbon one is better. I'd say overall Roxy does a really good job, just some weird choices in the last couple of releases.
  • 1 0
 I think the shape has been nicely refined with the HD3, M3 and now M4. The new M4 colours are great which makes a change. I haven't really liked any of the colour schemes from the rest of the range other than black.
  • 17 1
 I thought Deore was supposed to help lower the price
  • 8 2
 Deore for $4500 - awesome. Just great.
  • 6 0
 But according to the spec on the website, that's with Factory suspension. Interesting combo, but it helps justify the price a little bit.
  • 19 0
 @stevemokan: I like it. It's always smart to prioritize Frame and Suspension first, before high-end group sets.
  • 3 0
 Imo, the new deore shifts better than GX. I think it's a steal with the suspension components on the bike. I'd personally swing for the SLX build and the Bikeyolk, though.
  • 21 7
 After 'Taj' bike check - this thing is just booooring
  • 4 1
 This happened to me too, I need a stylus.
  • 4 3
 Can't agree more. Taj's bike has a ton of soul.
  • 12 1
 I don't make enough money to support my Ibis addiction. It is a very serious illness being heartlessly perpetuated by the likes of Pinkbike.com.
  • 8 0
 You should let it work for you too!
  • 12 0
 I've had a Mojo 3 for three years and still love it. This is great, but I don't see any real reason to upgrade.
  • 3 0
 Same here...even if it's just a frame swap I don't see $3K of upgrade goodness
  • 2 0
 Same. I kind of want the updated (longer) geo and room for the longer dropper. But my Mojo 3 is still sooo much fun to ride. At this point, I think it's old enough to be resigned to run it into the ground and start fresh in another 3 or 4 years.
  • 8 1
 Agree. I think the Mojo 3 is a better bike for most riders. This is stupid long and stupid slack. I also dislike really steep seat angles. Sitting on top of the bottom bracket is not a benefit for 98% of my riding.
  • 7 0
 @ReXTless: This is my major concern. 98% of my riding I don't need slacker or steeper and at 47. I'm not going any faster or bigger on the downs. Would I like more stability and control? Yes, but not at the expense of efficient XC terrain riding. I "almost" feel like Ibis (and most bikes) have moved beyond what I need for my trails and riding style. I'm almost tempted to hunt down a Mojo 3 on closeout or used to replace my HD3 so my bike has more pop and play and I gain a bit of efficiency with less travel.
  • 4 0
 @ReXTless: Yeah. I'm 5'10" and "sized up" my Mojo 3 to a size large. (This was before Ibis changed their sizing recommendations that put me squarely in the large size across their range).

With this generation of the Mojo bike, I think I'd "size down" to a medium.
  • 2 0
 @ReXTless: Actually I take back my previous comment. Looking at the effective top tube, the medium does seem like it'd be a little cramped for me. These new school seat angles really change things.
  • 2 0
 @pmhobson: I have used the oneup dropper to get the extra few CM of drop on mine replacing the KS 150 it came with an it makes a real difference. My Mojo 3 is my shorter travel playful trail bike and my concern with the redesign is whether chasing the mini enduro geometry will take away the fun.
  • 2 0
 @Puddings: I'm on a OneUp dropper as well and I share your concerns about loosing the playfulness of the bike. Only way to find out is to ride one, I suppose.
  • 1 2
 @pmhobson: Big mistake. Pole and Geometron are the leaders. Follow their lead. Don't fear your wheelbase being 2% longer.
  • 2 0
 @flattire: Nahh. Those things are way overkill for what I like to ride.
  • 1 0
 @WoodstockMTB: I'm selling my 2017 Mojo 3 .. Full XO1, Ibis Carbon wheels and bars. Great shape for $3900. Shoot me a message if interested. I'm in NY.
  • 11 2
 So many people requesting the AF treatment. Come on, Ibis; gimme that Ripley AF. This COVID money isn't gonna spend itself.
  • 9 0
 I gotta say, I love my Red Mojo 3 with 2.8 tires. In my case I guess 3 is greater than 4.
  • 1 0
 I looked through this article, does it even say if this new bike can clear 2.8" tires?
  • 6 1
 @Endurahbrah: article says "it no longer is compatible with plus-size tires, although a 2.6 will still easily fit". Looks like maybe a 2.8" will no longer fit? I think a 2.6' would be plenty of tire on this bike and anything wider would take away that snappy feeling this bike can offer.
  • 2 1
 @Endurahbrah: You may be able to fit a 2.8" in the fork (not entirely sure), but the new Mojo4 frame is seemingly limited to 2.6".

I settled on 2.6" at both ends with my Mojo3, as well, so that limitation wouldn't concern me personally. I agree with Ibis that 2.8+ isn't really ideal for a full squish bike.

Then again, my 29x3.0" singlespeed hardtail is actually my favorite XC bike, so some plus bikes still have a place IMO.
  • 6 1
 Sort of amazed that the size medium has a 460mm reach my HD4 size large has a 460mm reach and i feel like its a tad to long for me at 5' 10" so now i have to get a size small Mojo 4 to "fit better"? Or will the steeper seatube make it feel shorter. Props to Ibis for the new armor in the rear linkage, definitely should have done that with the HD4.
  • 1 0
 Same, when I saw the reviewer at 5'10" went with a medium I thought what, this geo must be huge. Sure enough looked at the reach numbers and at 6'2" I'd probably go size L over XL, which I've never been able to say before.
  • 18 0
 Steeper seat angle makes a massive difference. Take a look at the effective top tube for a more accurate comparison in the seated position
  • 2 1
 A large is a tad too long for you at 5'10. The medium in this with a steeper seat tube angle should fit you perfectly.
  • 2 5
 @LeoTProductions: But the true measure of Reach is between the BB and top of the steerer tube. Nothing to do with seated position.

I'm surprised they went so long with this bike too. Especially since they have always had very short Reach numbers.
  • 2 0
 Try a medium first, the reach numbers are only a small piece of the puzzle. I've tested bikes that had much larger reach numbers then my current rig and I was shocked at how compact the cockpit felt.
  • 1 0
 @Fullsend2-13 - I agree with what @LeoTProductions is saying about the steep seat tube. When seated, I find that the reach feels much shorter. My most current bike with "new-school" geo (steep seat tube and a longer reach) feels exactly the same while seated as my last bike did, which had a much slacker seat tube and about 30mm less reach.
  • 1 0
 @neologisticzand: what about when going do tho? I feel like my HD4 is more inclined to plow than pop and it feels harder to handle because im more stretched than on a shorter bike, pedaling is amazing tho no problems there.
  • 1 0
 I have bikes ranging in reach from 425 to 450 and rented one with a 470. I am also 5' 10". The STA and stem length can make a huge difference. All the bikes work(ed) for me comfortably.
  • 1 0
 Im the same size and have a large HD4 and it feels a bit short for me. I have short legs (30inch inseam) so perhaps it depends on your proportions
  • 2 0
 Ibis always come up notoriously small. Maybe this is the first proper sized ibis?
  • 1 1
 @friendlyfoe: I'm 5'10.5" and my 470mm reach enduro bike feels like it could be even longer. Slide your saddle forward, run a short stem, and enjoy the wheelbase and stability.
  • 1 2
 @chrismac70:
Likewise 5'10½" and large HD4 is only just big enough with 50mm stem.
  • 2 0
 @Endurahbrah: Agree, I think they exaggerated the reach. For my 184cm (6 ft) I prefer 46-47 cm of reach. Anything longer and I struggle to weigh the front. Plus the chainstays should be longer. Short chain stays with long reach makes bike cornering centre to far in fron of the bottom bracket. Banshee has done a good job with balancing chain stays and reach numbers on theire new Spitfire. AF by the way Smile
  • 3 0
 @dennis72:
Disagree. 480 reach is perfect for me and I prefer shorter chainstays on a short travel bike.

Its a good job some manuf go in different directions otherwise all bikes would be the same except headbadge and there would be little choice....
  • 8 0
 I bet we see a new 5010 next week now, to counter ibis on this
  • 7 0
 Too bad it wont be as nice as the Mojo. In my experience VPP is too stiff on chundery stuff for lighter riders, Compared to Dw-link. Anyone else think the same?
  • 1 0
 @Fullsend2-13: I have the same experience, but it's way of out date. I have not meaningfully ridden a VPP bike (it was a 5010) since 2015.
  • 1 0
 Some people saying 5010 drops next week. Others saying in late sunmer.
  • 5 0
 That has to be the weirdest tire spec..? A "light, snappy" short travel bike with just about the slowest tires front and rear? Even a DHRII in the rear would help. Seems like a major miss to an otherwise awesome bike.
  • 3 0
 It's also got the option for a 2.6" Hans Dampf/Nobby Nic combo
  • 1 0
 After having dual assegai's on my big enduro bike, SC Megatower, I can't imagine running them on any bike short of 160mm travel. They are absolute boat anchors. Switching the rear to a Dissector dropped a full half pound...
  • 8 1
 But did they fix the paint?
  • 2 0
 paint chips like crazy on my mojo3.
  • 7 0
 Seems a good contender for a mullet with a 130mm 29er fork up front. :-D
  • 3 0
 Yes. Mullet all 27.5 bikes, and stop trying to mullet your 29er and destroying the geo with a stupid low bb!
  • 2 0
 @tgent: it's true. Take a 27.5 bike with a low BB and a steep seat tube and make it more better in almost every way by swapping in a 29 front end.
  • 1 0
 @KennyWatson: Not to mention if you do some tinkering with finding the right fork, you can usually get away with nearly matching the A-C to the stock 27.5 fork while keeping the travel within 10mm depending on the brand.
  • 3 0
 Looking at the specs, am I understanding this correct? The Mojo 4 medium numbers look as though it's all around bigger in every way then the Mojo 3 Large? The sizing chart recommendation though has not changed. So if I'd be on a Mojo 3 large wouldn't it make more sense to get a Mojo 4 Medium?
  • 7 0
 Perhaps, I think the Mojo 3 was undersized to a fault. Even for its day it was short. Much like the old Ripley was freaky short. I think this bike is likely a little oversized from my perspective...so a medium might be about right for you unless you are consistently riding some steep gnarly stuff. You'll even see some of larger, top 5 enduro pros sizing down from a large to medium or XL to L with the new longer bikes. There is an agility hit to extra length....tho that's for 29ers so maybe the extra length is awesome.

If you read the Bronson review at Outdoorgearlabs (ultra impartial. Long term riding. They pay for bikes)...they speak to the real pros/cons of the extra length and how it actually impacts on the trail. It's not all positives.
  • 7 0
 Glad to see a shorter travel 27.5” bike being reviewed.
  • 2 0
 Have spent any time on the updated (a yr or two ago) 5010? If so, how do the two compare?

Also, being 5-10 and on the medium, would you put a 5-4 lady on the small typically if you had to guess?

I looking for a new bike for my wife (intermediate rider that rides for fun) and want something that will be a bit more forgiving but still have some pop and climb well. Was thinking this or the 5010 or maybe the Altitude as well.
  • 1 0
 The Thunderbolt would be a great option that would fit in comparison with both the Mojo and 5010. A bit more lively than the altitude. I'd go size small, with Rocky at least, unless she has long limbs, then she might fit on a med. Go try and test ride some, always the best option!
  • 1 0
 Pivot Trail 429 27.5+ should be under your considerations too, also, the Nukeproof Reactor 275
  • 3 0
 Thanks guys, I'll look into those. The Reactor is an interesting one for sure that I haven't spent time considering. I have spent some time on a Ripmo v1 tho and was blown away by their suspension (for trail riding) and was hoping maybe this would be close to that bike but with smaller wheels. I really was hoping itd be a 140/150 bike travel wise since their DWLink pedals so damn well.
  • 1 0
 The 5010 is significantly shorter and steeper than this bike for better and worse. Carbon 5010 might get an update later this summer though if the supply works out...
  • 1 0
 I’m just shy of 5’3” and ride a Mojo3, with the new geo I’d say the small would be perfect for someone 5’4”
  • 2 0
 Great first ride review, but the numbers aren’t quite correct on the pricing: the XT is listed on their website as having a standard carbon bar, so no $68 up charge.

Also, for those that don’t like the color of the bike, check out the other blue choice on the website.
  • 6 0
 Are we on the cusp of a 27.5 resurgence? I'm in! =)
  • 3 0
 Uhhh, Pat Smage got one... wow. www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQBQuD_ofvQ not one to buy into brands based on sponsored riders, but this could see me potentially considering them in the future. Pat can RIDE!!!
  • 2 0
 Great clip. Thanks for the link.
  • 2 0
 Ibis are putting out some sweet bikes. I really hope they make aluminum models for this mojo4 and the hd5. I think theyre missing quite a few sales without an aluminum low cost model. I really want an aluminium hd5 w dvo and slx. Geo seems very fun and better than most for me, plus the lbs sell them
  • 5 0
 But the email said that this was confidential.
  • 1 0
 I have an idea for Ibis. Why don't you focus on making the bikes you already announced and are seriously backlogged on delivering before you start a new production line... Yes I am getting tired of the wait for my order of the V2
  • 1 0
 They've been working on this bike since before Covid hit....
  • 1 0
 @the-lorax: I'm sure they have been working on it for 3+ years. But its not a good look to keep releasing new bikes when you can't deliver on the ones you are already promoting and "released".
  • 5 0
 AF option?
  • 3 0
 That asymmetrical lower link treatment looks really nice. I'd like to add a 27.5 back to into my life.
  • 2 2
 This is the dream bike design and format i used to dream of 8 years ago that companies would produce. Now, through evolution and experience; this bike would be much better suited designed as a dedicated "mullet"- 29'/ 26'' wheeled format.
The characteristics of it would render a ride that remains very playful, yet, has the ability to be more composed when things get fast and chunky, over which 275 alone can't quite retain.
  • 2 0
 Bird Aether 7 would be a cheaper, better spec’d option, and IMO better looking. Nice to see brands still making 27.5 though.
  • 3 1
 I never thought I'd say it but I think they've gone too far with these short seat tubes. All of that exposed seat tube below the collar looks bad
  • 1 0
 I’ve ridden a Mojo 3 for nearly 3 years and loved it. These geometry upgrades will make it even greater.
People who say they’ll stick with their Mojo 3 won’t know what they’re missing!
  • 2 0
 If you don’t already have one on order good luck getting one before September.
  • 4 1
 I see a lot of take-off Assegais coming into the Buy/Sell section.
  • 2 3
 Anyone else find Ibis's naming conventions kind of confusing? Ripley is the trail bike, Mojo HD5 is the all-mountain/enduro rig, and the Ripmo splits the difference, but the Mojo 4 is also a bike that slots somewhere inbetween and looks just like the Mojo HD5, but has much less travel, but also has small wheels. Enough to make you head spin...
  • 9 0
 Mojo4: "27.5 trail bike"
Ripley: "29er trail bike"
Mojo HD5: "27.5 AM/enduro bike"
Ripmo: "29er AM/enduro bike"

Not really confusing once you include wheel sizes, as well.
  • 4 1
 @opetruzel: I think he is confused as to why the Ripmo isn't called the Ripley HD if things were consistent.
  • 7 1
 Because RIPMO = RIPley + MOjo HD5
  • 1 0
 @JRutter: what he said
  • 1 0
 Totally off topic, but can the image size for the header picture please be larger?
It's at 1067px wide now and looks like ass (not the good kind) on ultrawide monitors.
  • 2 0
 The shock yoke being at a slightly different angle than the top tube and seat stay is troubling me.
  • 3 0
 Shimano or SRAM, thank you Ibis.
  • 2 1
 This to me is where 27.5 fits - maximize playful, nimble traits that 27.5 lends itself to, and leave the plow bikes and xc bikes to 29.
  • 2 0
 So which frame size is designed for the chainstay length? 3 out of 4 bikes possibly sub optimal...
  • 3 0
 Love it. Just keep shipping 27.5 bikes
  • 3 0
 good trail bike design is the one which has space for water bottle.
  • 2 0
 So the DPS was chosen because they somehow couldn't design the frame to fit both a DPX2 and a water bottle? Geez...
  • 1 0
 So I don't need a full size water bottle. Does it look like you can fit a shorty water bottle with the DPX2?
  • 3 0
 Updated to do “the job!”
  • 6 6
 Why make the reach longer and longer and keep short chainstays?
It's getting really unbalanced that way (large at 485mm reach with 425mm chainstays)
  • 1 1
 The bike will feel balanced when climbing. The steep seat tube angle puts the rider closer to the center of the bike. If someone felt that their weight was too far forward, they can get a smaller size.
  • 2 0
 I find with the longer reach bikes, you really have to ride over the front to get balanced. Not for me.
  • 2 0
 Firstly, because too many riders think short chainstays are hot Secondly, because of economies of scale
  • 1 0
 I'm still riding my HD3 and 4, was hoping for a 6, the 5 is just ugly, but this may just be worth considering.
  • 1 0
 How dare they. It should obviously start at $1,000 and max out at $5k so everyone can buy it!
  • 1 0
 Take geo from last years longer travel version, apply it to this years short travel bike........rinse, repeat.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, photograph it in the grass, it will make it look lower. Classic custom car trick.
  • 1 0
 might be a great bike with modern geo but... it still looks like its straight out of 2012...
  • 1 0
 Second verse, same as the first...well, same as the 1st, 2nd, 3rd.
  • 2 1
 @pinkbike - what kind of cage and bottle are you using?
  • 1 0
 The bottle looks like a Camelbak Podium.
  • 1 1
 Every poster that wants an AF Mojo 4, it’s called a Bird AEther 7 and it’s been out for awhile.
  • 1 0
 What kind of bottle cage is that?
  • 2 0
 Probably Arundel
  • 1 0
 Looks like my Arundel
  • 1 0
 What tyre is that? doesnt look like an assegai?
  • 1 0
 I don't care about your mojo bin chicken
  • 1 1
 I hope next year's version is longer. And slacker. Maybe a bit lower . That would be radical!
  • 1 0
 Seat mast looks like it's been chopped.
  • 2 2
 4.5k with factory suspension ?

GET MY MONEY
  • 2 1
 It's purdy
  • 1 1
 Thats a good looking bike. Would sure like to have one someday
  • 1 1
 Pro tip: don't record voice over audio in the bathroom.
  • 1 0
 Pray For Mojo
  • 1 0
 want
  • 1 3
 Ibis's have yokes though so they are going to fuck your shock just like every other yoked' bike
  • 1 2
 9 out of 10 dentists would recommend.
  • 39 41
 I swear this bike gets uglier with every new iteration
  • 4 3
 I sort of agree, i love the look of the Mojo 3 tho
  • 4 1
 Did you even like the design to start? I think a bit of seat tube would actually improve the looks. I like the little bit of swoop it used to have, but I appreciate the increased dropper capability
  • 2 1
 @WoodstockMTB: my thoughts exactly. I love how Ibis has gone the opposite of basically everyone else but its lost some of its aesthetics with it being basically level with the top tube like it is now.
  • 3 2
 Downvoted by Mojo owners.
  • 1 0
 Apparently so much that I double post.
  • 1 0
 I'm glad I'm not the only one that thought that and I own an M3
  • 1 0
 @Fullsend2-13: It looks like the medium and small will have that flat transition at the seat post clamp. A picture of what I presume is a large on the Ibis site shows that slight swoop.
  • 2 0
 @WoodstockMTB: oh ok phew, haha i probably wont even be able to fit a Large anyways...
  • 3 0
 Agree 100%. There is just something that looks off with this one. To me it looks like the front and rear triangles don't belong together.
  • 3 0
 Based on the up/downvotes, apparently half agree and half like it. To each their own, I guess.
  • 2 0
 I think they look decent, but I can kind of see where you're coming from. It seems like Ibis is taking the form follows function approach. Their suspension kinematics are widely regarded as some of the best available, and their frames are lighter and more reasonably priced that most other boutique brands like Pivot, Santa Cruz, Yeti, etc. That said, I do think there's room for improvement on most of their paint jobs.
  • 1 2
 @aribr: The front triangle looks great, until you reach the shock mount then it all kind of starts to go to pot. I don't think the grey colour works with the exposed dropper either - it looks disjointed, like someone forgot to add the rest of the seat tube during the mould casting. Either have a proper seat tube, or none and an integrated seat clamp like Whyte
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