First Ride: Ibis Ripmo - Long-Travel 29er

Mar 26, 2018
by Richard Cunningham  
Ibis Ripmo EWS
Robin Wallner broke in his Ibis Ripmo with a third-place podium finish in the opening round of the EWS in Chile. - Dave Trumpore photo


Ibis's newest 29er was supposed to be a secret until today, but Robin Wallner blew that surprise by riding it to third place at round one of the EWS last weekend in Chile. It's called the Ripmo – an in-house reference to the fact that it characterized the best attributes of the 29-inch-wheeled Ripley trail bike, and the 27.5-inch-wheel HD4 enduro racer. "Ripmo" was only supposed to be a placeholder while the design was being vetted, but the name stuck, and after riding it for a couple of days, I can understand why. The Ripley is agile, efficient under power and an exceptional technical trail bike - but it can leave you hungry for more on the downs. The HD4 shreds the downs, but it can make you wonder how awesome it would be if it rolled and pedaled like the Ripley. The Ripmo addresses those wishes and in some ways, it exceeds them.



Ibis Ripmo 2017
The Ripmo's simpler profile reflects the need to clear reservoir shocks, while accommodating a large water bottle - Ibis photo


About the Ripmo:

• Purpose: All-mountain, enduro racing
• Carbon construction
• 29-inch wheels and tires up to 2.6"
• 145mm rear and 160mm front travel
• Longer reach than the HD4
• Key Numbers: 65.9˚ head angle, 76˚ seat angle, 435 mm chainstays, 44 mm fork offset
• 150 mm or longer dropper posts on all sizes
• Large-sized bottles on all sizes
• 4 sizes: S–XL (fits riders from 5' to 6’6”)
• Weights: Frame - 6 lbs with Fox DPX2, bikes from 28.1 lbs
• MSRP: 5 builds from $4099, to $9399 USD
• Contact: Ibis Cycles


Break From Tradition

Think "Ibis" and you'll probably conjure up a vision of a lightweight trail bike that blends technical handling skills with traditional frame numbers. The Ripmo breaks that longstanding Ibis tradition with a leap into the realm of rider-forward geometry – and it wasn't a knee-jerk reaction to the present trend. A tour of the inner sanctum at Ibis headquarters in Santa Cruz, California, revealed a number of well-worn test bikes made by vanguards of the long-low and slack movement. The official word was that the development crew spent the better part of a year evaluating the outliers of "long, low, and slack" before moving forward with a new design.

Ibis Ripmo XX1 2018
The top-drawer Ripmo XX1 build. Ibis offers the frame in charcoal black as well. - Ibis photo


bigquotesSeparately, what we all found was how well those bikes climbed technical trails with the steeper seat tube angles. We discovered that the steeper seat angle solved all the problems with having very long and slack frame by correcting the weight distribution. Once we realized we could keep some weight on the front wheel by moving the rider forward with the seat angle, there was no reason not to make the bike longer.Head of Engineering, Colin Hughes

Ibis Ripmo
Much effort was spent to maximize the Ripmo's tire clearance.

Ibis Ripmo 2018
Tubes guide internally routed housings and hoses. The bottom bracket is threaded.
Ibis Ripmo
The dw-link rear suspension rides on a mixture of ball bearings and Igus bushings. - Ibis photos


Cranking up the Ripmo's seat tube angle to 76 degrees provided additional benefits. With the rider forward and out of the path of the rear tire, a larger, 29-inch wheel could be tucked closer to the bottom bracket and the rear suspension could be increased. The result was a short, 435-millimeter chainstay length and 145 millimeters of rear-wheel travel - all with clearance for full-volume 2.6-inch tires. Inspect the seat tube's profile and it's clear that Ibis and company also shifted it forward of the bottom bracket centerline to further boost tire clearance.


Custom Fork Offset

The final step in the vetting process may have led to the most important ingredient in the Ripmo's handling package. After some experiments with various head angles, the decision was made to use a slightly steeper head tube angle than some of the edgier designers are sporting, and then reduce the fork offset to from 51 millimeters (the suggested 29er offset) to 44 millimeters, which is more commonly used for 27.5-inch wheels. Reportedly, the increase in trail boosts steering stability, while the steeper head tube angle keeps steering forces lighter at the handlebars.


bigquotesWe have a close relationship with Fox and they let us know they were experimenting with short offsets and suggested we try it. It was better.Head of Engineering, Colin Hughes

Ibis Ripmo First Ride
- Ibis photo

Ibis Ripmo Geometry


Full Range of Sizes

Ibis designer Roxy Lo is an avid rider who stands five feet, one inch tall - which offers up a design challenge for a long-travel 29er. on the opposite side of the Ibis spectrum, President Tom Morgan is six-foot, six inches tall. Ibis offers the Ripmo in four sizes from small to extra large, and the design team worked out the essential elements to ensure that neither end of that spectrum would get shortchanged for features or performance.

Tom Morgan and Roxy Lo
Ibis President Tom Morgan stands six-foot, six inches, while Designer Roxy Lo is five-foot, one inch tall. The two co-owners represent the extreme ends of the Ripmo's four size offerings. - Brad Holms photo


All sizes accept a large water bottle and reservoir shocks. The top tubes slope dramatically, and the seat tubes are straight, so full-length dropper posts can be used by nearly every body type. Even the small-sized frame is spec'd with a 150-millimeter post, while the mediums and upwards come with 175-millimeter-travel droppers. Suspension tunes and kinematics also change from small through extra large, so heavier, taller folks get more ramp up and lower leverage rates, while the small sizes have softer tunes and higher leverage rates.


Roxy Lo Talks About Design Elements

The Ripmo is a departure from the curving lines of the Mojo HD4 that it competes with on many levels. The addition of a true size small was largely influenced by Roxy, and as such, it became ta key element of the Ripmo project, resulting in some breakthroughs to maintain the use of a 125-millimeter dropper post, while offering class-leading 29er stand-over height and size-corrected suspension kinematics. I asked Roxy a few questions about the elements of the design process:



Why deviate so far from the Mojo's frame design for the Ripmo?



Roxy: When we create a new bike, Dave Weagle sends over suspension points and seat and head tube angle points. From there, we added clearances for a fork, piggy back shock, and a 26-ounce water bottle. I sketched around those points for weeks trying to get the right gesture. I quickly realized this was a bike that could potentially blend both platforms (which it does performance-wise). The end result is strongly connected to the shock placement and suspension, as well as it's DNA.

Ibis Ripmo small frame construction detail
Ibis has an in-house carbon facility to experiment with new designs. - Saris Mercanti photo

To me, the Mojo focused on the successful swoopy, complex-spline aesthetic and did it in its own way. But the Ripley, T29, and Hakka MX, have given me freedom to explore angular and faceted shapes. ​I felt like the era of straight, aggressive and angular, mixed in with a little swoop, might just be a fun and efficient way to approach this ​new platform. ​A specific model shouldn't define our company aesthetic.

You are at the height which is considered by many to be outside the realm of 29ers, much less a long-travel version. How did you work the Ripmo design to fit you? Were there any major compromises?


Roxy: I am five-foot, one inch and I refuse to be an outlier in this sport. I was determined to ride the Ripmo, so I had to aim for a 27.75-inch stand-over on the size small. To do that, I had to compromise the "angular" look of the bike by introducing a swoop to the top tube. I also dug deep into my design arsenal of swoopy tricks to make sure the size small frame could accommodate a water bottle with a piggy back shock. It also allows most size small riders (including myself) to run a 150-millimeter dropper post.

Would you go back to 27.5?


Roxy: I never left the 27.5! I love my Mojo 3 and am currently running that size tire on my Hakka MX! I'm all about equal opportunity wheel size.


XOXOXOX
- Ian Collins photo


First impressions

I rode the medium sized Ripmo with the SRAM X01 Eagle build (see all of the build options here) with the Ibis crew in the redwood forests above their headquarters in Santa Cruz, California. It's one of those bikes that feels as if you've owned for a year after five pedal strokes. The steering is light and precise. The bike sets into corners and stays put. I can't recall an instance when the front tire pushed to the point where I was concerned, or the tail end drifted out more than six inches beyond the front. It helped that the dirt was perfect, but taking that into consideration, it was just point-and-shoot. What you won't feel is a lag in the steering or the sense that you need to exaggerate the lean to get it around a tight apex. It is remarkably agile without sacrificing the planted feeling that big wheels add to the experience.

Under power, it accelerated crisply, so I anticipated that the suspension would feel a bit notchy. Dw-link suspension with that much anti-squat usually does. Instead, the Ripmo clawed its way up the roots without an upset (some of that goodness may have been the work of its steeper seat angle). Most of the downhills there have repeat climbs, so I had a chance to try some of the key moves both in and out of the saddle. I was a tiny bit stretched on the medium frame's 23.7-inch top tube, but keep in mind that I am on the smaller side of a medium, so it's properly sized in modern terms. That extra length should have set me up for wheel-spin on the steeps when I was out of the saddle, but I never had to worry about grip. I'll chalk that up to short chainstays and fat tires.

XOXOXOX
I used all of the rear wheel travel, but it carries a good measure of momentum over the big stuff. - Ian Collins photo

bigquotesThis is our template for geometry going forward.Head of Engineering, Colin Hughes

You'll know it's a 29er because it pretty much ignores all the nuisance bumps and chatter, which gives the impression that the bike is going slower than it actually is (corners and jumps arrive sooner than expected). With a 160-millimeter fork and its long-for-Ibis front center, you'll be pretty light on the tail end at speed. There were points where I thought I ran out of rear suspension, but I can't make a judgement there because I did not spend the time to fine-tune the shock's damping and spring rate. (I'm sure we'll hear more on that after Mike Kazimer returns a long term verdict on the Ripmo.) What I can say for certain is that Ibis got it right. The Ripmo is calm and collected when you need it to be on the downs, and it gets it done without feeling that you are over-biked everywhere else. - RC






Must Read This Week

306 Comments

  • + 163
 Threaded B.B. and room for a water bottle?! What are pinkbikers going to complain about now?
  • + 150
 The use of bushings
  • + 1
 @raditude: Yeah. After reading that, I'd be waiting at least a year to see if they stand up to proper day use.
  • + 9
 minor downside is the lack of aftermarket forks with 44mm offset. besides that, great bike!
  • + 2
 You took the words right out of my mouth!
  • + 30
 @mikeep: igus bushings have been used for years on several hugh end bikes with no issues. And thouroughly used in the automotive industry. As long as the tolerances for housing the igus bushing is correct from ibis, it will be an absolute fine solution.
  • + 16
 @THomer: mrp offers it, that's all you need anyways
  • + 5
 @mikeep: Depends where they are, how good the frame tolerances are and what kind of angle they have to move through. My Cotic has two bushings at the seat/chainstay pivot and they've been fine. I change them with every other shock service but don't need to, every time I pull them out they look nearly new.
  • + 6
 Im thoroughly confused. Alot of 29" enduro /trail bikes bikes are 140 something rear /160 front , but 29r dh bikes are 200 rear/180 front.
I just dont get this,..unless i misconstrued something
  • + 2
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: in 29? i do have a ribbon air in 29 and 51.
have to check their website again.
  • + 4
 @onemind123: There is a huge assumption that the bike industry quality = to that of automotive. I agree it is a fine solution for some things, if it were a good idea then Rocky, Knolly, and Kona would all still be using them.
  • + 4
 @THomer: oh I just checked again, and they only offer 46 and 51 for the 29. In that case, DAMN YOU OFFSET STANDARDS!
  • + 2
 @THomer: It's true, I own one and run it on a Trail Pistol.
  • + 1
 @onemind123: IGUS bushings have also been used with a great deal of issues by other brands such as Banshee and Turner. I would assume (hope) the bushings are all in the shock linkage since that turns through a small angle, if they're in the main link, well they'll have the same problems as Banshee and Turner with axle wear.
  • + 8
 The price?
  • + 2
 @Fix-the-Spade: that is many years back. bushings nowadays works just find an with many spot that have minimal rotating ratio bearings are nlt better by any means. just havier and do need more room.
  • + 1
 @scvkurt03: what do you own? 29 with 44mm offset?
  • + 11
 @raditude: the only spot Ibis uses bushings is on the shock yoke to the rear triangle. This allows a small amount of compliance as the rear triangle flexes out of alignment with the front, which generally happens while cornering. This helps reduce binding on the shock, resulting in smoother suspension action and longer seal and bushing life in the shock. Other brands use this as well, Canyon in the CF Sender for instance.
  • + 3
 @scary1: my understanding is that it is due to front wheel and frame clearance. 200mm may bring the front wheel into contact with the frame, thus explaining the use of 180mm. And if enough clearance is made for 200mm of front travel, the front end might be extremely tall.
  • + 0
 @raditude: I said the same exact thing. Lol.
  • - 17
flag makripper (Mar 26, 2018 at 9:26) (Below Threshold)
 Ewww carbon
  • + 7
 He said a larger water bottle... But I read " Water bottle with Boost spacing" ... Can't keep up with these changing standards dammit!
  • + 31
 @mikeep: Re: lower link bushings. We felt the same way. So, we tested for 1 year of riding including a ridiculous 2016-2017 Winter season here. So far, so good. To back it up, we're offering no charge replacement for life.
  • + 3
 @scary1:

Because this segment is meant as do-it-all bikes that need to pedal well but descend very well. I think that's where the mismatch comes from, and with a two nyner you can get away with a little less rear travel. I'm part of the market that's way more interested in 140/160(ish) setup as opposed to a full on 160/160 freight train. If this bike had 160/160 i'd write it off for my riding. But as it sits it looks ideal in geo and travel for my style and trails, just like the HTLT.

29r dh is a function of trying to fit 200mm into a dh package. Whatchagonnado?
  • + 15
 @raditude: Lifetime warranty on the bushings. 7 years on the frame. Probably worth the gamble from a consumer standpoint with that kind of backing!
  • - 2
 @raditude: You're not considering the difference in what the manufacturer asks for in terms of quality. Are these the SAME quality bushings that others bike co.'s use? They might, or might not be.
  • + 3
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: Yeah because that 36 Factory fork is just absolute garbage. Why would anyone want a class leading fork?
  • + 2
 @CaptainSnappy: because it's orange, and maintenance periods are about the same as a motocross bike
  • + 0
 @psmithski: I mean most people will have cycled through this bike and be onto the next one in 24-36 months? 48 at the most? Warranties don't cover gap jumps either so meh.
  • + 6
 Ebikes, the price , standards, Trump , we’re all good thanks
  • + 32
 @Fix-the-Spade: Ibis's link design is fundamentally different than what was used by Banshee and Turner, and as such, your assertion that they will be subject to the same issues is incorrect. As someone who still has a clapped out V1 Spitfire frame hanging in the garage, I'm all too aware of the issues that plague poorly executed bushing based linkage designs. In the case of Banshee, tolerances were bad, the bushings were unsealed, and the bushings were under load from the frame's hardware, especially as the rear end took a lateral load. The result was a ton of drag, plus dirt and water ingress, which ultimately led to the bushings spinning in their seats. Game over.

The link that Ibis has designed bottoms out on itself during installation, which ensures that the tension on the bushings is precisely controlled. Furthermore, unlike Banshee, Turner, Rocky Mountain, or the rest of the laundry list of failed bushing bikes, Ibis's link is essentially impossible to install incorrectly. The bushings also fully sealed and run on a DLC treated axle that ensures correct tolerances for the life of the bike. The upshot is that unnecessary drag, contamination, and issues with excessive bushing loading have functionally been eliminated. And that means that if you replace the IGUS bushings once every year or two, you really shouldn't have any issues.

Also, full disclosure, I do work for a retailer that sells Ibis, and I did test ride the bike last week at Ibis Kool-Aid camp. I also ordered one immediately after the ride because it was genuinely the best trail bike I've ridden to date. That said, if I believed that the bushings were going to cause issues, I'd have passed on the purchase, as any issues will undoubtedly affect the resale value of the biggest discretionary purchase I will make this year. Take that for what you will...
  • - 1
 Minor but, external routing for rear brake!
  • + 1
 @THomer: RockShox is offering 42mm as their short offset for 29". There will be a Lyrik RC2, 29", 160mm travel, 42mm offset available for aftermarket.
  • + 12
 @DirtCrab: Turner was in no way a 'failed bushing bike'. I have owned many Turner's over the years, and the bushings were always reliable and rock solid. Turner did bushings correctly, and they did so for more than 20 years.
  • + 2
 Bush-pivots. How many times do we need to go round this circle?
  • + 2
 @mountainyj: re-read the press-release. High loads and minimal rotation describe the Ripmo lower link pivots so they've introducing a new link featuring IGUS bushings. They added bushing to the link.
  • + 5
 @shoreboy1866: Fair point. I suppose I shouldn't make such a sweeping claim based off the issues that a number of friends had with single pivot DHRs. Dave Turner certainly knows what he's doing.
  • + 1
 They'll find something...
  • + 2
 @DirtCrab: I've heard 'but WE got bushings right this time because' so many times that it's almost a meme. I guess you'll find out if Ibis got it right on our behalf.
  • + 1
 @DirtCrab:

DirtyCrabs will your shop have any to demo? I’ll swing by as soon as the PC trails melt out. Size Large please.
  • - 6
flag jawright602 (Mar 26, 2018 at 12:21) (Below Threshold)
 That only dentists can afford it.
  • + 1
 From other interviews with designers of the 29 DH frames the shorter fork travel is to prevent the BB height from getting to high@scary1:
  • + 1
 @Finimac: That's a terrible reason when 29ers have more BB drop than 650b. The drop relative to the wheel axles is far more important than the actual height from the ground when it comes to handling and stability. They make the fork/rear travel shorter for clearance reasons and sometime because of bar height for shorter riders. Any bike designer who says it's for BB height is BS-ing or not worth paying attention to.
  • + 3
 @raditude: bushing are the appropriate spec on frames.. At least 70% of frames I warranty are cracked from seized ball bearing pivots.
  • - 2
 Did the chef boil the frame with his spaghetti?
  • + 0
 @Gregorysmithj1: I'd love to see an example of a seized bearing resulting in cracking a frame on an Ibis, or any other frame for that matter. Failure to maintain, is not a warranty issue. I've gotten 1k miles out of my bearings on my frame before i had to replace one in linkage. Meanwhile, 3 sets of bushings on the shock. One of these things is not like the other.
  • + 1
 @raditude: They are giving lifetime warranty on em
  • + 5
 @DirtCrab: Except Turner didn’t have issues with their bushings, or quality, like those other bikes. I beat the living shit out of 2 Turners with bushings, for years, and on one of the them the main pivot bushing had to be replaced after 5 years of abuse. As long as you greased the grease ports every now and then you were good.
  • - 4
flag richierocket (Mar 26, 2018 at 15:34) (Below Threshold)
 And in all fairness, it's kind of fugly.
  • - 3
 @shoreboy1866: Turner also makes a better DW Link bike than Ibis. Their geometry may be “dated” by current standards, but the RFX is a way better bike than the Mojo. Fortunately it fits me just fine.
  • + 1
 @bigdood: like you cant make an estimated guess. 5k get ya gx eagle and a yari. Step up to 8k you get the heady eagles with a 36. Standard shlt dood
  • + 3
 @SlodownU: Funny you say that, im right in the middle of finishing off my RFX build this week! Cant wait to get it on the dirt. No more bushings, but still awesome Turner quality. My bushinged 5-Spot (still on the original bushings) will be my backup bike.
  • + 1
 @shoreboy1866: The enduro build looks sweet. I may upgrade to the inline coil on my bike. Your gonna love that bike. I’ve demoed a lot of other bikes over the past 2 years, and I’m very happy I didn’t buy into all the industry hype, and got the RFX.
  • + 1
 @scary1: not sure what your question is.
  • + 1
 Bushings can be just fine. Look at all the old turners still laying down the ‘ol procore shredgnar lines @mikeep:
  • + 2
 Ok. ratchet jaw you can stop. You have no published data other than the evidence that you suffer from internet jawjack. Turner bushings were never a failure. @DirtCrab:
  • + 0
 The price ! Big Grin
  • + 1
 It’s certainly been gone around a whole lot less than 29haters and missing water bottle willisweenies@IllestT:
  • + 1
 @THomer: see the new lyrik w the 42mm option
  • + 1
 @raditude: I completely disagree, bearings can seize in one ride and it's unreasonable to expect the consumer to inspect their bearings every ride. I have three broken Cannondale frames from worn bearings currently...
  • + 5
 @Gregorysmithj1: Pshh cannondale... You made your bed, now sleep in it.
  • + 2
 @jawright602: Dude, I'm a blue collared heavy equipment diesel tech... I can afford this!
  • + 1
 @raditude: Knolly still uses them.
  • + 1
 @Gregorysmithj1: Well, it seems either of them can be done wrong. Or right. Time will tell how this one is.
  • + 1
 @pinkdog321: Yes, but not on fugative
  • + 1
 @SlodownU: I'll second that. Never had a creak out of mine and never had to replace a single bushing.
  • + 0
 @Gregorysmithj1: You are welcomed to disagree. I am merely stating the view shared by nearly every major manufacturer of bicycles. Not changing your oil won't get you a free car. Much like stated below, your bikes probably broke due to something else. You would more likely break an axle or hardware long before doing frame damage due to the lack of rotation of a bearing. Even then, you'd have play at best from the frame rotating on friction on a suspension pivot. Even then, to break three frames in a similar manner means that you didn't clear your gap jump. Again, pics, thread, emails, any proof whatsoever would be fun to look at.
  • + 1
 @THomer: I actually don't see this fork on the fox website...
  • + 1
 @Radioface: an mrp fork on the fox website? Wink
  • + 2
 @mikeep: We know they will stand up just look at the older Turner bikes.....they used them exclusively with great success. I've had my Flux for 4 years and have just lubed them.......no play just ride
  • + 1
 @scary1: tires are so big they run into the down tube if you were to run a full 200mm front travel.
  • + 1
 @raditude: I got to feel a rear triangle at Ibis after a year of use and the bushings still felt smooth and the bearings were extremely rough, I'm sold! also life time bushing replacement at no charge! can't be that! also bearings aren't designed for a small amount of movement like a suspension pivot.
  • + 1
 @raditude: Imagine it had bearings instead of bushings. Then we'd all be desperate to think of something.
  • + 2
 @scary1: Seat tube clearance and rear triangle brace. It's a packaging issue and I suspect it's also has something do do with de-stroked shocks.
  • + 1
 @raditude: seized bearings brake frames. Argue all you want I run a shop and deal with warranties and warranty declines pretty regular.
  • + 1
 @raditude: Im not going to be posting pics of broken frames...
  • + 1
 @hans-heim: if the bushings are so good why use any bearings
  • + 1
 @mikeep: ask Turner owners how their bikes have held up using bushings.
  • + 2
 @SlodownU: I'm hoping the Ripmo will push Turner to come out with a new Sultan with 145 rear
  • + 47
 145mm of DW Link plushness with 17.125 stays, 66 HA with light steering, spot on reach numbers, 76 STA to complement the legendary DW traction and still managed a bloody full size water bottle!?

I believe it’s finally time to move on from my Evil Following...
  • - 56
flag srghyc (Mar 26, 2018 at 10:20) (Below Threshold)
 Time to move on? Why don't you just ride your damn bike?!

On second thought, you're right. It is time to move on. We need people like you to keep buying the latest bikes so we can buy your slightly less new (used) bike. Cheers!
  • + 44
 @srghyc: what does it have to do with you, are you the wife?
  • - 33
flag srghyc (Mar 26, 2018 at 12:39) (Below Threshold)
 @imho4ep: I love how seriously people are taking my comment, well, the first line. I'm giving him or her props for adopting new tech and helping bring better bikes to the market.
  • + 4
 @srghyc: ...bought the Following used. But thanks for playing!
  • - 2
 @stillclaimndp: I'll buy it off you when you get the Ibis
  • + 19
 2017 Robin rides un-released HD4 to best EWS finish (6th I believe).
2017 Ibis EWS team wins team overall on HD4
2018 Robin rides un-released Ripmo to best EWS finish, 3rd.

Pretty compelling results. I want.
  • + 49
 So the EWS as a bike marketing tool works then.....
  • + 15
 @mikeep: Yep, the rider has nothing to do with it.
  • + 15
 @mikeep: EWS is a valid proving ground, no?
  • + 6
 @garrettstories: not the point... These guys would ride any modern bike to the same position once used to it... It's all about the riders not the bikes imo
  • - 2
 @mollow: then what’s the point of buying a new bike ?
  • + 11
 @MX298: who said you needed a new bike?
  • + 4
 @mollow: The EWS riders did.
  • + 1
 Ya, theres no such thing as rider progression or experience. Its all about the wheel size. Ya okay.
  • + 1
 @mollow: Well, at the least, we can safely say it wasn't holding him back.
  • + 0
 @mollow: Well then we should all still be in 1988 mtb tech then right? I mean damn any and all ride/performance improvements right?
  • + 1
 @bman33: that's exactly what I meant by modern sir
  • + 17
 Wow, I'm 5 feet and 1 inch as well, I didn't know you could get a 29er as small as I need! 150mm dropper on size xs? Nice. I can only use a 100mm dropper on my current Transition Suppressor because there's a bloody pivot half way dosn the seat tube (and a bend) . This is great design from Ibis.
  • + 77
 Then you have honestly and aptly named yourself on Pinkbike.
  • + 3
 The Process 111 in small has been pretty popular with folks around that height as well (it's got pretty low standover compared to other 29ers). Making it work in a longer-travel 29er is pretty impressive, though.
  • + 13
 @stumpymidget 150mm dropper? isn't that longer than your legs?
  • + 17
 @scottzg: Not quite, but it's almost as long as the turn ups I have to put in my jeans!
  • + 6
 @raditude: are you trying to say people on Pinkbike aren't 100% truthfull about their attributes/abilities? (Sharp intake of breath.)
  • + 6
 @stumpymidget: No I am just saying, on the long list of things our president reports as "fake news", you naming yourself cannot be one of them.
  • + 12
 Sorry ibis but you guys stating the benefits of steep STAs Today as if no one ever read that before is just catch up... nice bike though.
  • + 1
 But steep STAs make it harder to pop wheelies(!)
  • + 0
 Personally I believe best would be to have a very steep seat angle with a seatpost with loads of setback. I personally rarely (if ever, might have been a decade ago) ride my mountainbike with a raised seatpost. I do prefer my saddle a bit back when I have it low though, so the steeper seattube for me wasn't really good news but the seatback seatpost solves that. So if you still want to be able to have the saddle in the high XC position, you may need a very steep seattube to compensate for that. And to compensate for that extra steep seattube, you may need a seatpost with even more setback to solve it in the low position. Still need to do the math how steep it needs to be and how much seatback you need, but it may eventually solve another issue. There will no more need to have an offset or bent seattube to accommodate for these large modern rearwheels. Which implies people can install droppers with more travel or just simply install a longer rigid post that you can still slam all the way down.

It may take another short while for the industry to pick this up, but then of course they'll be the first because no one ever said that before.
  • + 3
 Who knows, maybe they also find out that frame size specific CS length further corrects weight distribution. It should come as obvious (just by taking a glance at photo of Tom and Roxy), but they can also spend the better part of a product life cycle evaluating the outliers.
  • + 2
 @vinay: interesting take.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: It comes with practice but agree not the best....
  • + 6
 @WAKIdesigns: I thought your riding had more to it than wheeli’ing around the parking lot. The STA shouldn’t impact manuals, which is an actual riding skill used on trails.
  • + 28
 Re new geo: I agree, our intent was more to explain how we arrived at the current geo, but it ended up sounding like we thought we invented it.
For sure, Transition, Pole, and others are on it and figured out the steep seat angle effect a while back. We had been running our bikes one size up with the seat slid forward and liking the way it worked. For us, combining everything - the DW-Link with piggyback shock, water bottle, new geo, big tire clearance and excellent dropper clearance is the advancement.
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: do a manual instead
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: hahaha as Im a manual Loser, Im more interested in poppin those.. watch your CS lengths..!
  • - 2
 @ReformedRoadie: I was joking no1. Referring a bit to comments on long chainstays being bad for wheelies, pops and manuals. But then I use wheelie very often on my trails. Manuals? rarely, at least when speaking of full on manuals. They are good for clearing mud pools. The movement pattern, yes, all the time, especially since manuals and bunny hops are extremely similar in execution. The only situations where I manual (meaning I will clear a considerable distance on the backwheel) is when I am not sure I can clean something with a bunny and I see there are no risks for hitting the rear wheel hard against something. I don't like to do it often though since I am not profficient enough to be sure I won't pull to hard, and it sucks to grab the brake and hit the obstacle I planned to clear with the front wheel. And then I do it to show off on asphalt and gravel Razz
  • + 3
 @hans-heim: Hi Hans! Is there a design reason for not steepening the actual or ESTA in the bigger sizes? With these short chainstays the weight distribution gets really extreme for taller riders at full pedaling height.
  • + 14
 @alexsin: As the seat height increases with taller riders the seat keeps moving back further and you have the weight distribution/seat angle problem you describe.

What we do to get around this is measure the seat angle based on the average saddle height for each size so the weight distribution stays closer to the same throughout the size range. We use a database of all our demo rides for average saddle height and it looks like this: s 640 m 690 lg 760 XL 810 mm. We design so the seat angle is calculated to the seated position for that frame size. H
  • + 3
 @hans-heim: @hans-heim: you weren’t the first but it looks great in all aspects! You finally have a modern mountain bike.
  • + 4
 @hans-heim: just to clarify, at a saddle height of 810mm on the XL, the eSTA is 76 deg?
  • + 9
 @bogey: Correct.
  • + 4
 @hans-heim: That's really interesting. The Ibis way of measuring makes a lot of sense. This should be adopted as the standard way to measure ESTA.
  • + 4
 @hans-heim: Sweet! @alexsin and are both quite tall and have been begging for this sort of real-world measurement for a long time. Thank you!
  • + 1
 @hans-heim: Props for the R(ealistic)ESTA!
  • + 2
 @hans-heim: that’s awesome! It means I will finally be able to use a saddle position other than just slammed forward. More companies should post these heights for SA. Should be worth listing on geo charts. Can I assume that’s the height used for theoretical TT length?
Also, why no 35 mm stem option? Shortest listed is 50mm, at least on the GX build.
  • + 9
 I find the topic with the reduced fork offset quite interesting. Ibis comes to the conclusion, that because of de reduced offset they can run a steeper head tube angle. Wherease Transition claims the opposite! Maybe they arejust trying to create a different feeling or one of them is wrong!
  • + 1
 Just bought a Sentinel and i can assure you that Transition isnt wrong...
  • + 7
 From NSMB, for comparison: "Out front, the shorter offset with the 66-degree head angle creates a sense of the front wheel being really close to the rider and coupled with the stock 50mm stem, gave a feeling akin to riding a bike with a 70mm–100mm stem. Through tight turns the front wheel seems to want to tuck under earlier than experienced on similarly angled bikes on the same sections of trail. It’s a sensation experienced during both climbs and on descents and it’s a little unnerving. It has never tucked to this point, however, it’s not a feeling that inspires confidence in those scenarios."
  • + 4
 Playing with head angles and fork offset. . . . . . Wonder if a 51 offset fork fixes it?
  • + 2
 I wonder how much time they actually had in the saddle. I was glad to see a bike with a 66 degree head angle. I like a quick turning bike.
  • + 10
 @Adamrideshisbike: amazing how 66 on a 29 is now considered conservative.
  • + 4
 @rexluthor: I was thinking the same thing.
“14” E 29er’s were 67.5 and were game changers!
  • + 4
 @MX298: Riders who are focused on steep descending generally prefer to have the front wheel further out in front of them and would choose the 51 mm offset for the longer front center.
Changing between the offsets is not too big of a change, so if you like steep stuff, or you already have a fork with 51 offset, it's OK to build it that way.
  • + 3
 @hans-heim: With that theory in mind I'm curious as to your thoughts on stem length? I noticed 32-35mm length stems are not optional. With the rider being positioned more centered in the bike I would think a 35mm length stem would feel amazing with reduced offset fork yet still put plenty of weight on the front tire. Thoughts?
  • - 10
flag MX298 (Mar 26, 2018 at 21:39) (Below Threshold)
 @hans-heim: so what your sayin is the Ripmo is an XC bike.
  • + 1
 @MikeAzBS: We have 40 mm stems available in Enve and Thomson.
  • + 3
 Looks like a decent bike. As a Ripley LS owner I hope Ibis have had the chance to fix the seat tube tire rub issues that have plagued the Ripley line. I really like how my Ripley rides but as mentioned by another post - I've lost some respect for them. In this case after being told that it's my faulty shock setup that causes tire rub, instead of admitting that the frame is simply poorly designed.
  • + 2
 It's a bummer for sure... I was super surprised to see that after my first ride... In case you're looking for a fix - I just put a piece of electrical tape over where it rubs. Mine is the gray frame, so it's hardly noticeable, and I haven't had to replace it in several months of riding in varying conditions.
  • + 2
 That is pretty lame. It's like Specialized blaming shock manufacturers (the ones they selected) on the side loading that occurs causing shocks to blow up.

I'd expect something like that from a cheap brand but these are expensive bikes.
  • + 1
 What size tire are you using that rubs?
  • + 1
 @dualsuspensiondave:
I'm on a 2nd gen Ripley LS. Getting tire rub when running either Maxxis Agressors 2.3 or Nobby Nics 2.35 (the tires suggested by Ibis) on Ibis rims.

According to Ibis, the frame is to-spec if there is 3.5mm (0.138 inch!) space between tire and seat tube when the shock is fully compressed (but without any additional weight of the rider). However, any additional weight would lead to tire rub.

The suggested solutions were:
(1) to run higher pressures in the shock, which meant that I was not at the right sag and never fully used the full travel
(2) to add a token into the shock for more progressivity, which meant that the additional ramp-up prevented the use of all the travel or when I dropped pressures was not sitting at the right sag.
Both of these solutions are band-aids for the fact that a to-spec tire should simply not touch the frame, instead of "reducing the chance" of tire rub.

Sadly, this issue doesn't seem to have been addressed on the 3rd gen Ripley either, as I've seen multiple people out in Santa Cruz with tire rub marks on their 3rd gen Ripleys running Nobby Nics (the to-spec 2.6 version in this case).

Long story short, I really love the Ripley in terms of pedaling efficiency and how it rides, but hope the Ripmo does not suffer from the same issues (judging by the seat angle and different linkage design it may not). If that's the case I may actually throw my money at Ibis again in the future.
  • + 1
 @n3sta: Black frame here. Protected with invisiframe. Still annoying to see the gray marks.
  • + 1
 @rjp1: Crazy, this was a non-issue on my V2 - but yea, I hope they come up with a fix for that. Seems like it's a warranty issue waiting to happen...
  • + 3
 Almost twice the price of the new Capra 29er given similar spec... I can deal with PF BB (like the beloved Yeti's) and no bottle mount (again my Yeti mount was pretty much worthless unless I felt the need for giardia). Rad bike but price and performance drove me to the Capra... can't wait!
  • + 2
 Me too, unfortunately I have to wail until mid July.
  • + 4
 Haha! Yep. Here we go.
  • + 1
 @ashlemon: I feel you, I got on the order ASAP and I expect my CF Pro 29 to be here next week. Considering the performance and the savings, the wait is worth it IMHO.
  • + 11
 No one cares about your personal finances...! Wink
  • + 9
 Or you can bring your lunch to work, skip that last beer, and make your own coffee so you can continue to support your local shop and the awesome people at Ibis. No doubt the Capra 29 is a great bike but YT is a black box to me. I personally have had some great interactions with the Ibis crew over the years and know my shop will take care of me.
  • + 20
 @OriginalDonk: already do that, but with a mortgage and a family spending the extra 3-4k on a bike just to support a local shop isn't in the budget.
  • + 5
 seems that everyone likes to blame the local shops for the high bike prices: I also blame the bike companies themselves with their business models. The bike companies lock their business to the US dollar (which kills us canucks) and they sell distribution rights. If I look at the same spec bike from santa cruz (high tower) to the jeffsey cf 29, the jeffsey is $4800 cdn vs $7500 cdn for the SC. The shop can't even buy the SC for anywhere near the retail price as the jeffsey. Where does the cost difference come from? Almost identical spec, full carbon frame (probably made in same factory) and similar geometry.

I also looked at the Norco Sight 2 29, and if I got a reasonable discount on retail I could have gotten it close enough to the jeffsey to consider. Guess what, they are pretty much sold out of these already.

Supposedly I get my YT April 11
  • + 2
 @omclive:

You can’t compare only dollar values between these bike companies. Ibis offers 7 yr warranty on their frames, Santa Cruz offers a lifetime warranty.

YT on the other hand, offers 5 yrs on the front triangle of the frame (carbon). and only 2 yrs on the rear triangle.

Btw, I do like this new bike, even though I am not a 29” rider.
  • + 4
 @Saidrick: 5 year is the same as yeti... haven't seen anything that says the rear is only 2. You can buy another entire carbon capra with amount you save, so if you did have any issues outside of warranty you could buy a whole new bike with your extra cash lol
  • + 2
 @mtemp:

Good points OriginalDonkeyKong and madtemps.

Hybrid model? I didn't buy my bike at a local shop but still go to one shop almost exclusively for wheels builds, maintenance, whatever. For me it's not a matter of spending more, it's spending the same on either. For $4800 would you buy a nicely specced YT or mid-spec Ripmo or HTLT? (or for less a mid spec YT vs a "poorly" specced Ripmo/HTLT) Are you really shopping for the best component spec or the best all around package, including frame design, local support, brand, whatever. I guess that's for everyone to answer themselves.

Also, i don't see this bike as a contender against the Capra29. C29 looks like much more bike than this and much more gravity specific, this has broader appeal as an all rounder similar to HTLT.
  • + 1
 @mtemp:

If you read through the terms of service for Yt, the bottom of sub section 1. of section 9( warranty), Yt specifies that chain stays and seat stays , among others are only warrantied for 2 yrs.
  • + 10
 @OriginalDonk: Here's the thing -- I don't have a problem with anyone picking whatever bike they like for whatever reason they use to justify their purchase. If a guy likes YT, by all means, go ahead and get one. If you like Ibis and have some extra cash, cool.

What I don't get, though, is why on every single review on this site, someone has to get in the comment section and say they can get a YT for some fraction of the price. And it's always YT. Go back to just about any bike review, hit Ctrl+F and run a search for YT, and you'll see what I mean.

So what is it with these people? There are thousands of members on PinkBike who ride bikes from dozens (hundreds?) of different manufacturers, but you never see anyone else doing this with any other brand. Specialized, Trek, Giant -- all make solid bikes at a relatively decent price at any level. No one makes any such comments about these or any other brand. It's always YT.

So again, what is it with these people? It's like they joined a cult the moment the Capra box was delivered to their doorstep. We get it. The direct-to-consumer model allows YT to sell at a lower price point, and you've promised your firstborn for that Jeffsy. We know this. Now let us talk about this Ibis, or whatever bike we've come to see reviewed.
  • + 1
 @TheR: Haha! Update, scheduled delivery 4/2 - very nice surprise.
  • + 4
 "the development crew spent the better part of a year evaluating the outliers of "long, low, and slack" before moving forward with a new design."

They have a fleet of Geometrons?
  • + 5
 I spied a well worn production aluminum bike with a 50"+ wheelbase and a very steep seat angle tucked into a corner at Ibis HQ. Not a Geometron, if that helps narrow the options...

Every bike company I'm aware of buys their competitors bikes at retail to test different geometries. This is nothing new. It's certainly cheaper than building test mules.
  • + 7
 Welcome to the new age Ibis. Nice work; I'd shred that bike.
  • + 4
 At that angle it would have been nice if it shipped out with HA adjustment cups. We know that size specific CS are too much to ask for.
  • + 1
 So with these longer bikes, big reach and steep STA... the cockpit isnt that roomy or stretched out because the seat is so far forward. Rides have a neutral position at best. I wonder if that is good or bad for climbing. Obviously the big reach for decending is great out of the saddle. I just wonder about the in-saddle body position.
  • + 1
 Based on my personal experience with my new Transition Scout, seated climbing supplies ample grip to the rear wheel, requiring less body movement on steep and technical climbs. I would put this down to the fact that your weight is biased between the wheels rather than over the back of the rear wheel. I have cleaned sections I never have before. That being said the bike still pedals like the pig that it is on mellow sections
  • + 1
 @BadMotor: Thanks man, that what I was hoping to hear (building a RM Instinct now with similar Geo to the Transitions).
  • + 1
 Totally agree with the cramped cockpit feeling of steep STAs. For me, at 6’5” I’m gravitating towards a 74 deg angle for a nice combination of balance climbing, rolling singletrack and descending. I could live with a 75 deg STA but would push the saddle back.
  • + 2
 @bogey: Fact is, some hard compromises need to be made. Longer reach is good, so is steeper (than 73-74deg) STA, but then you get shorter effective TT. You can correct this by adding some more reach, which also lengthens the wheelbase, as does the slacker HA, and longer chainstays. A design is a compromise and a compromise is a P.I.T.A. It is all about evaluating the outliers as Ibis says.
  • + 1
 @jollyXroger: I think the idea that a steeper ESTA is better Is debatable. How strongly you feel about it likely comes from the terrain that you ride. Most of my riding is on more traversing, rough terrain than straight up fall-line terrain so I feel very well balanced on a bike with a moderate ESTA. I also prefer a bike with nothing slacker than a 66deg HTA because of the multitude of tight corners in the trails. This combination of the ESTA and HTA keep me centered, balanced and digging in with both tires (I won’t get into my preferences for front and rear center here).

For example, I test rode a whole bunch of bikes the past few summers and eventually decided on a SC HTLT because of the overall fit, balance and geometry. I found many bikes to be too slack in the ESTA and HTA or too steep in the ESTA but too slack in the HTA.

It is interesting to note that the NSMB tester felt the ESTA was too slack. He had to push his saddle forward on the rails to be comfortable which is odd given the claims of a 76 deg ESTA at saddle pedalling height.
  • + 1
 @bogey: Sure it depends on the terrain. Horses for courses after all.

I'm curious. You do not find ESTA too slack on HTLT? For me its slack ESTA and even slacker real STA are a deal breaker. In size XXL (I'm 191cm) it makes the ETT excessively long as well (692mm). At least on paper, since I have not had a chance to have a ride on one.
  • + 3
 @bogey: fortunately, it’s much easier to slacken the STA. There are companies like Selle SMP that have really long saddle rails that will let you slide back far and offset seatposts will also slacken the effective STA.
Sure you can run an offset post backwards to steepen the STA, but man does that look wonky.
Personally, I’m all about the steeper SA as my closest trail to my house goes up about 1,100 feet in the first 2.2 miles, and that’s rolling terrain. The steep sections are like walls. It’s fine on my XC bike with a lower handlebar and my seat slammed forward, but it’s brutal on a slack SA with a long travel fork. As we have taller stack heights on LT bikes, the steep STAs are a godsend for making it up the steeps. I was seriously looking at the Rallon over the Hightower LT for the steeper SA until I heard rumors of this bike.
  • + 4
 Nice ! A new offset ! I was kinda worried everybody had agreed upon 51mm for 29".
  • + 1
 Huh, looks like Ibis is following in Transition Bikes shadow with the reduction in fork offset to increase trail / stability. Lots of options in the 29er, 160 / +/-140 travel market now.
  • + 1
 Re: steep seat tube angles. Can you really "discover" something that other manufacturers have been doing for years? They should have called this bike The Indian in honor of Columbus, who worked a similar ploy.
  • - 1
 ...and it has taken since 1981 to make this discovery.
  • - 3
 After years of excavations funded by Californian Dentist Association they found the design on the walls of a tomb in Egypt.
  • + 1
 Agreed. I changed bikes last year, moving on from my beloved Mojo HD. I really wanted another Ibis, but found the geometry on other bikes much more enticing. Wound up with a Transition Patrol. This is a very nice looking bike (I really like the orange and blue colour scheme too). I wish them luck with it!
  • + 1
 Thread warden
  • + 0
 I would like to try the change in fork offset think. My enduro 29er came with a 46mm offset a few years ago. Bike never seamed to want to go where I wanted it to go. Swapped it for a 51mm and it was way more direct (nimble).

The ibis quote from head of engineering "We have a close relationship with Fox and they let us know they were experimenting with short offsets and suggested we try it. It was better."
  • + 1
 Agree bro i want a new frame to replace my slash and these orbea and transition all run shorter offsets but would it actually make that much difference its 6mm after all. I love my ohlins coils to much to change
  • + 2
 I had a first gen E29 with the 46 offset Pike. Rode it for years like that and loved it. Put a late model 51mm offset Fox 36 on it. Felt fine, turned a little easier on steep climbs, I didn’t really appreciate any major difference in cornering ability. Front tire hookup seemed the same. Sold that bike a while back and went to a L Yeti 5.5 with 51 offset. Great bike, fast as hell, no handling issues. Then went to XL 5.5 with 51 offset. It felt pretty long on the tight switchbacks I ride often. It really required swinging wide to get the bike around the very tight turns, both up and down. It is a big bike, and felt like it. Swapped to a 44 offset, which seems ideal. It turns around those tight switches better now. Again, no issues with front tire hookup or understeer with either fork. Stability at speed? Uh, no issues on either offset. Bike is crazy fast and stable. Information processing speed is the limiting factor, not the bike in my case.
  • + 3
 Umm, Isn't this almost exactly an Orbea Rallon within a couple of millimeters?
  • + 1
 Is it really a discovery if 10 brands before you did it, and countless reviews confirmed it? Yes, every brand has their own "perfect" numbers, but don't sell it as discovery if it's merely a catching up.
  • + 1
 Are you the thread warden
  • + 1
 @RichardCunningham -> on paper, this bike has a lot in common with the Whyte S-150 that you reviewed last summer. Did it feel similar? Where there things it did better/worse?
  • + 1
 I am kind of surprised to find the US manufacturing aspect only mentioned in the caption of a picture. I would think it should be. Big story on its own?
  • + 0
 I thought my Ibis HD4 rode pretty poorly. The linkage is tuned too stiff, even with the shock off it doesn't move freely. I think they look great though, and their company is run well. Good customer service too.
  • + 3
 65.9? Phew, i would not touch it if it was 66 deg.
  • - 1
 It’s to bad only small is made in USA. I’d be super stoked to buy a large made in Santa Cruz not some stupid factory in Asia.

One thing I hate about bike business is far to much of labor in manufacturing is outsourced. This business has high enough margins made in USA is non-issue, plus folks like me would pay 15-25 premium for American made bikes.
  • + 2
 Pretty cool, more intermediate geometry than I was expecting. Looks like a fun bike.
  • + 2
 Damn, with that seat tube angle, I may just swap my hightower frame for one of these in the next year....
  • - 1
 Sick rig, love the yeti style ibis is adopting on their new bikes their geometries are getting very progressive but they are still conservative on the travel numbers making their bikes very versatile no matter where you ride.
  • + 4
 Rip
  • + 16
 If I was a cheeky frame maker I’d make a bike called Ripniner... or a 29er called Chapter 11...
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: clearly you don’t know why the Canfield called one of their bikes he Yelli Screamy
  • + 1
 @raditude: I don’t know, can you tell?
  • + 3
 This is fine and all but where's my Carbon Smugg... I mean XXL Ripley?!?!
  • + 3
 Sentinel...
  • + 1
 Pretty sure the Guerrilla Gravity The Smash in XL is what you're looking for here. It's a full size larger than the Ibis XL.
  • + 1
 @GTscoob: Thanks. I already have an OG Smuggler in XL. It's almost perfect.

Some days I wish for a bit more of an XC-focused ride (in private, I have a bit of a spandex habit) and that's when I wonder about a Ripley that didn't have a 73.5 degree seat angle or the reach of a little girl's tricycle.
  • - 1
 Hopefully they fixed the paint quality and actually sand and prep the frames before they paint them. Look at the finishing of an HD4 compared to a Santa Cruz. Ibis has no business charging the money they do for these the way they halfway sand these things. It's a disgrace. Not just saying this because I'm bitter my HD4 is now obsolete and worthless. It's a fun bike that rides well, but the quality is just not there.
  • + 5
 Yeah, friend of mine has an HD4 that is chipped to f&*k.
  • + 4
 I believe they will recall those frames or rear triangles.
  • + 17
 If you're worried about your hd4 being obsolete and worthless, feel free to send it to me.
  • + 1
 @garrettstories: you have to really fight with them to take a frame back. "that's damage, not a factory defect"...

not to mention time or money to swap the parts over.
  • + 3
 Please let me take that obsolete, worthless frame off your hands. I'll even give you $500 for it.
  • + 3
 @wibblywobbly: sorry you're having a hard time. I had some chip issues on the rear triangle on a ripley and my dealer took care of it for me.
  • + 1
 Local Spesh dealer picked up the Ibis line recently and the owner was touting the HD4. Next time I saw him a new one was on the work bench because his previous one had "a paint issue" and caught the hack saw. Seems to be pretty wide spread.
  • + 2
 @wibblywobbly: Anecdotally - paint was cracked on my V2 and they took my frame back, no questions asked. Sent me a new one, all I paid was shipping. My neighbor's HD4 has a crazy amount of chips on the rear triangle, which is unfortunate - but he's still shredding faster than anyone else in the valley.
  • + 3
 Looks nice!!! Great job Ibis!! Bet that rig rips!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • - 2
 So haven't ibis been arguing against long low slack for the last couple of years? I am certain there was an interview with Scott Nicol about the mojo stating how "the average person does no want to ride so aggressively all the time," (paraphrase). Now they say "oh! well it turns out if you make the seattube steeper is works just fine!". Wierd. No thanks.
  • - 1
 Second question here:
m.pinkbike.com/news/ibis-mojo-3-review.html

And now a large has 475mm reach . Imo that's a pretty big about-face.

Thanks for the neg reps, at any rate.
  • + 1
 @KennyWatson:

You’re getting down votes because you’re comparing what Scot Nicol said about a “trail” bike (130mm travel) and comparing that to an “Enduro” bike( 145mm)... Which if you read the interview that you linked to, Scot goes on to say that “Super Reach is Good for super steeps.” ( paraphrasing).
  • + 1
 @Saidrick: if you think that really makes a difference... you've kinda proven my point.
  • + 2
 This or a hightower LT.......mmmmmmm.
  • + 9
 As a Santa Cruz fanboy I'd take the ibis. Seems like a quietly amazing bike.
  • + 5
 Whichever fits better.
  • + 2
 I'd try to demo them. The Hightower LT I rode a few weeks ago (for 2 days) was surprisingly light/nimble and didn't feel massively "burly", was super fun though. I'd expect the Ibis here to be more of a point and shoot plow, less nimble by the bigger numbers, but I'd have to ride one to be sure and suggest you try the same!
  • + 5
 I demo'd the Hightower LT last month. It was fine but everything just felt beige. It wasn't super nimble in the XL I rode (I'm 6-4). The regular Hightower is the more nimble but the LT was great in a straight line and I felt it was a pretty decent plow bike. The thing about the Hightower LT that pisses me off is that VPP is just harsh up top. Its like you have to drop 5k on a bike and then when I'm just cruising greens with my son, the smaller roots buck me. All that money and the suspension is only 3/4 functional. Climbs great on smooth climbs but the front end is tippy with that real slack STA (maybe just an issue for taller dudes). It wasn't great on the chunky climbs for the same above reason regarding VPP. It wasn't super poppy getting off the ground. However when I did get off the ground, the deeper travel was dang smooth, really impressive. I've tried VPP it on multiple bikes too. Then you go and ride a Yeti or DWLink bike like Mach 5.5 and WOW...the suspension is so dang active while climbing better. I'd be this Ibis or Rallon all day over SC HTLT. If you want a less plow bike, more fun bike, the RM Instinct is awesome and has VERY similar geo to this bike in a lighter more trail oriented package with 140mm of travel. FWIW my concern with this IBIS is the massive wheelbase and fork offset. I'd def want to spend time on it but when I rode the Hightower LT in XXL (which has nearly the same WB as this Ibis) it felt like I was driving a grandmas Lincoln. Great in a straight line but you feel the long WB big time.
  • + 1
 @Svinyard: That's a shame. I have a regular HT and love it. Nimble, poppy and super involving.
  • + 2
 Hightower LT is awesome but too slack.
  • + 3
 I never liked vpp. I could never get my intense 5.5 to ride right despite 3 different shocks. Your sentiments were what I experienced and have never considered a vpp since@Svinyard:
  • + 1
 @Svinyard: Why the heck do reviews of Santa Cruz bike never mention this? They never mention that weird stiff sensation at the top of the travel that always fights you a little bit.
  • + 4
 @Svinyard: So odd....maybe suspension setup is making this so subjective. I actually own 2 DW Pivots (429T and 5.5) and I thought the Hightower LT was more plush/softer off the top. I wasn’t use to the suspension bob as DW bikes are so stiff, but I enjoyed the ride nonetheless. It actually was a 2 day rental on Vaca and for my taste I thought it was a great bike and a great chice as long as you aren’t riding smooth, tight XC trails primarily. I was on intermediate, fast, open desert trails and I had a blast.
  • + 2
 I'm a dentist and I want to try to hit a 6 foot tabletop I got you fam.
  • + 1
 I need a bike with adjustable fork offset via handlebar remote and gives happy endings
  • + 1
 Is there not a substantial difference between journal bearings(like on turner bikes)and bushings(like on shock mounts)?
  • + 1
 Great looking bike. Sadly, I still need my kidneys where they're currently located, so I will not be getting one.
  • + 1
 I'm going to think of another name for it because I refuse to call it the Ripmo at work, even to customers.
  • + 0
 Right there with you. This was a let down in the naming department.
  • + 1
 Now is the offset ,your fork has what ?not able to sell it cause it’s not the trend ,when will it stop
  • + 2
 99% of riders out there can't tell the difference between a 44mm and 51mm offset.
  • + 0
 RC, tell me you haven’t gone for the fallacy that short stays equals climbing traction...

You of all people should be aware of hillclimb motos with crazy long swing-arms.
  • + 5
 That's totally relevant for those of us putting out 60+ HP, riding up blown out 50%+ grades. Oh wait...
  • + 12
 @ReformedRoadie: Tall riders need longer stays, and probably steeper seat tube angles. Short riders, not so much. That needs to be addressed industry wide. Your reference to hill-climb motos doesn't fly, though. They actually climb steep grades, and they have surplus power. Mountain bikes? Um, no.
  • + 1
 @RichardCunningham: this taller rider opted for a Pole rather than any more bikes without these things.
  • + 3
 @RichardCunningham: I think that what Norco does by lengthening the rear center to stay (somewhat) in proportion the the longer front center makes the most sense. But even then the race to have the absolute shortest CS you can engineer is misguided.
My current ride (which is not so current) has really long CS by today’s standards. And not the greatest rear suspension. I have ridden many other bikes with shorter stays, that are lighter, with better suspension, and they do not climb technical climbs as well. I am 5’11”, not what I would call exceptionally tall.
  • + 2
 @ReformedRoadie: I think its smart by Norco to do that BUT when I looked at the Sight geo, they also dropped the STA angle from decent to just plain bad (something like 73d) as it went to an XL. Those super slack STA totally suck for tall guys even if they do increase the CS by a few mm. Seemed odd.
  • + 3
 @Svinyard: Norco doesn't actually slacken the STA in the bigger sizes. The actual seat tube angle is the same for every size but they take the ESTA measurement from an median extension for each size, not at the collar.
  • - 1
 Less ratchet jawing and more frame designing/building, esp if you have a great beard for the lumberjack hipsters!@RichardCunningham:
  • + 1
 how come he's got a water bottle cage but no water bottle???? do they have someone to carry them ????? im so confused....
  • + 0
 Did anyone notice the Rear Shock is flipped upside down on the Small? Interesting...
  • + 1
 I didn't like the comments.
  • + 0
 Found the song for the promo video: www.youtube.com/watch?v=TnPdq3cO894
  • + 1
 lets take a photo......wait wait.....remove the pedal first....
  • + 2
 Canfield Riot
  • + 4
 Guerrilla Gravity The Smash...
  • + 0
 looks too bland and generic, meh..Ibis bikes used to be visually stunning :/
  • + 2
 Why no ISCG tabs?
  • + 2
 Wondered that too. Bike looks way rad regardless!
  • + 5
 ibis uses an adapter for all their bikes. notice the DS BB is keyed?
  • + 3
 There's an optional bolt on ISCG mount.
  • + 1
 Hope they have some demo's at Outerbike
  • + 1
 160mm rear brake? why tho
  • + 6
 Re: 160 rotor: Supposed to be 180 rear rotors on all the bikes. If there's a 160 out there it's a mistake.
  • + 1
 That's the post mount standard that it uses. One can run 160, 180, or 203mm.
  • + 1
 It looks kind of tall...not that there's anything wrong with that!!
  • + 1
 Not sure why you got down voted for that mate, I was wondering the same thing. I guess we are the only two that noticed Roxy mention it.
  • + 1
 @dazzyb: is tranny a trigger word now?
  • + 1
 @dazzyb: Very, very sad.
  • + 1
 @dazzyb: Tranny was an accurate description of the frame... car manufactures will start calling transmissions "t"s as to not anger anyone..
  • + 0
 The new sultan will slay or suck compared to this?
  • - 1
 Dentists want to be bros too.
  • - 1
 Wow an Ibis with well thought out geometry. Took em long enough
  • + 19
 Um, the HD4 has some pretty progressive geometry
  • + 0
 Coil shock options?
  • - 3
 Thank god no eccentric pivots!
  • + 1
 God loves us all
  • - 1
 Bikes are too expensive
  • + 3
 Shouldn't be a problem is you're a baller, a shot caller, and have 20" blades on your impala.
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