Niner RIP 9 RDO and JET 9 RDO - First Ride

Jul 7, 2016
by Mike Kazimer  

Hot on the heels of the announcement of their new cross-country rig, the RKT 9, Niner has unveiled two more additions, the RIP 9 RDO and the JET 9 RDO. The model names may be familiar, but the bikes themselves have been completely revamped with more travel, shorter chainstays, and slacker head angles. Those type of revisions have become a familiar refrain this season as manufacturers update their lineups to meet the requests of riders looking for more well-rounded rigs.

In a slightly humorous twist, especially given the Colorado-based company's name and their motto that “the 29er mountain bike...is our one and only love, our heart and soul out there on the trail,” Niner's new bikes are also 27.5+ compatible. Riders will be able to choose their preferred wheelsize, and then pick from one of four different build kits offered for each model.

According to Niner, "When we first started Niner Bikes (2005) there were really only two options on the table, 29 and 26. Since that time there has been a huge evolution of wheel sizes and widths for riders to choose from. We think we have to adapt and take a more neutral position on wheel size going forward as we want what is best for our riders and their particular riding needs."





The previous version of the RIP 9 had 125mm of rear travel and a 69.5° head angle, numbers that created to a quick-steering trail bike, albeit one that was closer to the cross-country side of the spectrum. That's no longer the case – the RIP 9 has left its XC roots in the dust, and now has 150mm of travel, a 67° head angle, and 439mm chainstays, 11mm shorter than before.
RIP 9 Details
• 150mm rear travel
• 27.5+ and 29” build kits
• 1x only
• ISCG 05 tabs
• 439mm chainstays
• 67° head angle with 29” wheels

That chainstay chopping was made possible by the switch to Boost spacing, as well as the decision to eliminate the front derailleur compatibility. This freed up room to scoot the rear wheel forward while still maintaining plenty of tire clearance for 29” or 27.5+ tires. The new RIP is now geared towards the all-mountain crowd, and in Niner's words, it's meant to be the "go-to for backcountry epics and big terrain.”


Niner
The redesigned carbon frame now has 12x148mm rear spacing, along with internal cable routing.
Niner
There's no option to run a front derailleur - the new RIP is strictly 1x only.


The frame itself is still a full carbon affair, but the top tube has gained a few extra curves, and the swingarm looks more substantial than before. Internal cable routing has also been added for the rear derailleur, dropper post, and brake, although the path of the housing from the down tube to the underside of the seat stays isn't quite as stealthy as some of the other designs on the market. Both the RIP and the JET feature a port under the bottom bracket that helps make routing housing or the wiring needed for Shimano's Di2 drivetrains as easy as possible, and there's even room to store the Di2 battery inside the frame.

There are a total of eight build kits, four with 29” wheels and four with 27.5+ wheels. The 29ers get a 160mm fork, either a Fox 36 or a RockShox Lyrik, and all of the 27.5+ bikes come with a 170mm RockShox Lyrik RC. Prices range from $4,700 USD for the 2-Star build, which is comprised mainly of Shimano's workhorse SLX components, all the way up to the crème-de-la-crème 5-Star build that included ENVE carbon wheels and SRAM's Eagle 12-speed drivetrain.


Geometry
Niner geo
Niner







Niner's JET was formerly an XC-race oriented machine, with a steep head angle and 100mm of travel, but after the latest revision it now sits comfortably in the trail bike category, thanks to its 120mm of rear travel and a 67.5° head angle. Like the RIP, the length of the JET's chainstays was also decreased, and now checks in at a relatively compact 434mm. Even with the shorter rear end it's still possible to run a front derailleur for riders who need the widest gear range possible.
JET 9 Details
• 120mm rear travel
• 27.5+ and 29” build kits
• 67.5° head angle with 29” wheels
• ISCG 05 tabs
• Front derailleur compatible
• 434mm chainstays

Niner's Constantly Varying Arc (CVA) suspension design remains for both bikes, a dual-link design that's intended to counteract any unwanted pedal feedback. The lower link's positioning under the bottom bracket may make it look like it'd be a rock magnet, but it does move up towards the frame as the suspension compresses, and we haven't run into any issues on the various test bikes that have rolled through our doors over the years.

The 29” version of the JET comes with a 130mm fork, while the 27.5+ version has a 140mm fork to help preserve the bike's geometry. As is the case with the RIP, there are four different build kits available for each wheelsize, with prices ranging from $4,500 for the Shimano SLX version all the way up to $9,500 for the SRAM Eagle and ENVE wheel equipped model.


Geometry
Niner geo
Niner




Sun Valley, Idaho, is surrounded by beautiful scenery, and I'm not talking about the aging movie stars that hide out in their slopeside retreats. Mountains reach skyward in every direction, and hundreds of miles of singletrack are located a short pedal from town.

I was able to sample the dusty singletrack and the new bikes over the course of two days, complete with an overnight stay in a perfectly located backcountry yurt in. While the views were absolutely stunning, there was one thing missing – anything that would be considered technical, especially compared to my normal root-filled stomping grounds in the Pacific Northwest.

Sure, there was a tiny rock garden here or there, but for the most part the trails would be just fine on a hardtail or a short travel XC rig. That's not to say that the trails weren't fun - speeding past the charred hulks of pine trees and through fields of blooming wildflowers beats sitting behind a computer any day – but the terrain simply wasn't rough enough to really suss out the limits of either bike. I came a way with a few initial impressions, but nothing conclusive - more time and more challenging terrain are required before reaching a verdict on either bike.

Niner Bikes Idaho Yurt Trip

JET 9 27.5+

I'll admit I'm not completely smitten by the whole 27.5+ movement, and although I understand the appeal, my time on a JET 9 set up with 27.5+ wheels didn't do much to sway my opinion. It was an efficient pedaler, and the additional traction provided by the wide tires certainly helped on the climbs, but on the descents its handling in the corners was a little vague. I like feeling the side knobs of a tire dig in when I push into a turn, like a serrated knife slicing into the ground, but with the 2.8” Maxxis Rekon and Ikon tire combo that edge wasn't as pronounced, which made high-speed cornering feel less precise. Tire pressure is also even more crucial with 27.5+ tires, and one ride on unfamiliar terrain simply wasn't enough to find the sweet spot. The good news is that the Jet 9 is one of a growing number of bikes that can run either wheel size, giving riders the ability to experiment for themselves and pick the dimensions they prefer.


RIP 9

I felt much more at home on the RIP 9 set up with 29” wheels. It felt surprisingly nimble for a big-wheeler with 150mm of travel, and I didn't have any trouble scooting around tight uphill switchbacks or whipping it through quick downhill turns. There are some bikes in this category that feel like monster trucks, hell-bent on going in one direction and plowing through everything in their path, but the RIP 9 had an unexpected liveliness to its handling. Of course, as I mentioned, most of the trails were devoid of any obstacles bigger than a softball - it will interesting to see how that handling translates in steeper, rowdier terrain.


Niner Bikes Idaho Yurt Trip
Must Read This Week

156 Comments

  • + 90
 "When we first started Niner Bikes (2005) there were really only two options on the table, 29 and 26. Since that time there has been a huge evolution of wheel sizes and widths for riders to choose from. We think we have to adapt and take a more neutral position on wheel size going forward as we want what is best for our riders and their particular riding needs."

HOW DOES THAT HUMBLE PIE TASTE?!

Seriously, I wouldn't care, but Chris Sugai has been rather... outspoken... about how everything but 29" is terrible. Have some more crow, buddy.

www.pinkbike.com/video/309172
  • + 16
 so true. eatcrowdamnit
  • + 5
 Just change it to TwinTNeiner.
  • + 2
 Could not up vote this enough...
  • + 5
 Seems everyone wants to give Niner a hard time about putting out new bikes capable of running 27.5+ but the bottom line is that it's a smart business decision. I'm not sold on 27.5 plus but there's a lot of wheel and tire size confusion out there among new buyers so bikes that can take both sizes are going to be considered more versatile and future-proof. (others like Santa Cruz hightower, Pivot Switchblade, etc.)
  • + 5
 @jbroehl: what the video above and you will see why everyone is giving them shit. Niner basically says that things like 275+ are just silly fads that they don't bother with. well here we are....
  • + 5
 I'm not a fan of these bikes nor companies with highly opinionated marketing edicts, but is the fact that a 27.5+ wheel/tire has the same, or very similar, diameter as a 29 wheel/tire combo worth consideration of here?
  • + 0
 Niner was actually named after the gold panhandling of the 1800s. It's just a coincidence that the wheel size they started with was the same.
  • + 3
 27.5+ rolls at least the size of a 29" wheel/tire, and my 26" Fat wheels roll bigger than a 29er.
  • + 5
 @jjamms: Almost every diameter of a 27.5+ tire that I've seen has been >10mm shorter than a 29er tire.
  • + 4
 27.5+ wheel/ tire has a very close Outer Diameter to a 'normal' 29" wheel/tire setup. Most of the original arguments for 29" wheels also apply to 27.5+ : larger OD = better rollover, larger contact patch = better grip etc. I don't see how they are being hypocritical with this OPTION for their 29" bikes...they are sticking to their guns with WHY they chose 29" wheels in the first place.
  • + 2
 @DGWW: Very close, yes. At least the size, no. That was my point. I'm not a wheelsize diehard in either direction.
  • + 1
 I think the only positive about plus sized frames is when you don't bring your whip back enough and knock the wheel really out of true, you can still ride without hearing the tire buzz on the frame!
  • + 2
 @WingnutPA: Not directed at your comment, just getting in line for @groghunter
  • + 1
 @DGWW: Because the arguments you've made for Niner are more rational than Sugai's rants, is why your logic works, but I'm still going to poke fun at Sugai for talking shit that he then has to walk back on.

You'll notice none of the stuff in the article was a direct quote from him? Considering his earlier statements, there should be, but there isn't because they're trying to quietly ignore the fact that they're contradicting him, hoping nobody remembered.
  • + 1
 @groghunter: I hear you, a lot of what goes into a successful mtb brand is marketing after all...I try not to take any of the pseudo science as truth Smile I agree that pigeonholing your company to one wheel size is shortsighted, spesh was pretty much saying the same thing for years...and I've heard that the enduro 29 outperforms the other enduro bikes...so I do think there is some truth to the 29 koolaid, the unlikely introduction of the YT jeffsy speaks to this. I used to ride a 29" long travel bike, but the wheels were just too big for my average sized frame.
  • + 2
 @DGWW: Hey, I love my 29" trail bike (& have put 27.5+ wheels on it right now, which are also lots of fun.)

But even Specialized didn't basically say anything not made by their company was technological dead-ends, or that they were for Luddites who wouldn't step up to their product. Because there's a thin line between promoting how much better your product is, & talking trash about your competitors, & more importantly their(& possibly your future) customers. A line Chris Sugai proved pretty oblivious to, at least at the time.

To be fair, some people do respond to that kind of stuff. They want to hear someone confirm that not only did they buy the best product, but that everybody else was stupid for not buying the same thing. But they're a smaller group than the ones who will remember that you talked shit about them when they bought something besides your product.
  • + 1
 @groghunter: True enough. Good points all around. I think its important to look at the success of the brand as a whole, they cashed in big time on this, maybe its just time it will stop paying dividends Smile On to the next bike project for them. There is also the possibility that they will keep the name and hope it becomes just part of their lore
  • + 3
 @DGWW: FWIW, rumor is that they've been in dire straights the last few years, as 29" sales fell through the floor when everybody started buying 27.5"s. Like every other brand's sales of 29", except other brands had 27.5" models to make up that sales gap. heck, look at Devinci, the closest they have to a 29" FS is the Hendrix, now.
  • + 0
 Only 90 people upvoted gossip? pinkbike's not as bad as I thought.
  • + 0
 @Varaxis: It's a direct quote, with a link to provide a reference, & this post is 4 months old. Get bent.
  • + 56
 Business 101: don't name your business based on a current cycling standard. I'm sure the decision process at Niner to offer 27.5+ was much quicker than the decision process of how they are going to explain this to the community...
  • + 41
 Damn it. I was going to start a company called Plus bikes. So your saying that is a bad idea?
  • + 11
 @sampolicky: roll with it brother. I'm trying to decide between Boost, 148 or Superboost for my new hub company...
  • + 7
 29+ is a thing, wonder why they didn't use that instead of 27.5+
  • + 57
 Somewhere out there there is a company called "Sixer" just trying trying to stay alive
  • + 2
 @parallaxid: Clearly not the thing that 27.5+ is as that would have been a lot easier for Niner to explain.
  • + 12
 I guess 27.5+ has a similar diameter to the standard 29, so if they think the 29 geometry is spot on then 27.5+ retains that same geometry?
  • + 24
 @Tristanssid: Get outta here with your common sense! This is the PB comment section, after all.
  • + 14
 @MTBrent: sorry, ahem, dam niner and their lies about wheel size.
  • + 2
 Damn, there goes my company name: 650Ber.
  • - 21
flag poozank (Jul 7, 2016 at 11:15) (Below Threshold)
 No one cares what the name is, stop being pedantic.
  • + 8
 @poozank: get lost on your way to the Scrabble forum?
  • + 6
 Or better yet, don't go on some ridiculous rant about how 650b is dumb and will never stick, when you clearly don't have a clue... The irony is that Chris is vertically challenged and would fit better on a 650b bike.
  • - 2
 @parallaxid: More potential market share, easier to accommodate 27.5+ and 29 given the parts available...
  • + 1
 If anything that was an issue two years ago, not so much now. 29er aren't just for XCers. Just wait for the 2017 Slash.
  • - 1
 27.5+ is very close a 29" diameter.
  • + 2
 Haha niners new bike division: 'sevenpointfiveplusser' just rolls off the tongue
  • + 3
 Anyone remember when the president of Niner said they would never produce a 27.5 bike? Oops...
  • + 5
 Chris the owner is such a liar. Over my dead body! , he said, about 27.5 I rather go broke! before I make a 27.5 bike. No wonder Steve , the co founder left company .
  • + 2
 @bridgermurray: There's Twenty6 Products. They make great pedals (though $$$).
  • + 2
 This board would will implode in a few years when Niner releases their 26er freeride bike just to keep up with the latest MTB trend of the 26 resurgence.
  • + 4
 @Tristanssid: Exactly, the only change is a slightly lower bb height depending on the tires used. We're spec'ing a 10mm longer fork on the 27.5+ bikes to accommodate that.
  • + 1
 @parallaxid: Nobody wants 18.5"+ chainstays, mainly.
  • + 8
 They should change their name to "Ninerish".
  • + 1
 @enrico650: We understand what you're saying, however consider that both new bikes are 29 inch bikes, with the introduction of Boost we were just able to accommodate 27.5 Plus (almost identical outside tire diameter to 29) wheels and tires as well.
  • + 15
 The new JET is has the same travel as the WFO... this is one of the strange things about the current trend of beefing up models one notch. Instead of keeping model names where they are, the burlier ones just get pushed off the top. That is, unless Niner has figured out how to build a 180mm 29er...
  • + 11
 RIP*
  • + 1
 @GlenPxC: Whoops. Right; thanks.
  • + 3
 The names of the bikes reflect the position in our bike line, and not necessarily the amount of travel they have. We felt that as short travel and long travel trail bikes the JET and RIP respectively fit into the current trend of 29er trail bikes having more travel. While we don't currently have a plan for a 180mm travel 29er it's not unrealistic if the market supports it.
  • + 15
 According to Niner, "When we first started Niner Bikes (2005) there were really only two options on the table, 29 and 26. Since that time there has been a bunch of money made on 27.5+. We think we have to cash in on it too and take a more neutral position on wheel size going forward as we want more money too."
  • + 4
 is that really so wrong in a market where you have to adapt or die?
yes yes, humble pie, but at least they come to the party instead of sticking to their story and seizing to exist.
  • + 0
 @ninerd: not saying it's wrong, they should just be honest about it
  • + 6
 So, $4500 for an SLX build? Am I the only one thinking that a used Enduro29 Carbon [which has basically identical geometry] with RXF-36, Ohlins TTX, and even 'old' kit otherwise would be a far better bike, not to mention cheaper?
  • + 3
 No you are not. This would be a very valid point. I would be hesitant to buy a used enduro bike given the purpose of the machine. You are basically on your own for warranty should you crack a frame.
  • + 1
 @ryan83: FWIW, people have had luck with warranty claims from Spec, even being second hand owners. perhaps less risky than it might be for other brands, though by no means a guarantee.
  • + 3
 Tehllama@ you got it figured out. My son runs an "14" aluminum E 29er with a ttx22m and a pike with an avalanche damper and hits pro times as a junior. Enduro 29er's are amazing!
  • + 1
 @groghunter: correct - i've successfully warrantied 3 frames from specialized being a second owner.
  • + 5
 I haven't ridden their mtn bikes, but I bought a Niner RLT cross bike this year and I'm very happy. They do a good job of building "opinionated" bikes, meaning they're not targeted at everyone but the intended audience is very happy with them. I agree that the aesthetics of their bikes are spot on as well, which is a big part of selling a bike in the first place.
  • + 4
 When will a 29" bike begin to stand on its own merits? "...surprisingly nimble for a big wheeler..." What crop of new 29", carbon framed bikes with sub 440mm chainstays isn't nimble? I'm going to start referring to 27.5 bikes as "surprisingly stable for a 27.5 wheel..." I mean, it's like we're using a benchmark for evaluating 29er's that's a decade old and your Sony MP3 player is stuck on repeat. It's not 2006 anymore.
  • + 12
 You forgot the part of that quote that says, "with 150mm of travel..." Not all 29ers with that much travel are nimble, as I mentioned some feel more like monster trucks. It has nothing to do with comparing the RIP to decades old bikes, and everything to do with comparing it to other bikes in the same wheel size / travel bracket.
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer: Fair enough. Point taken.
  • + 0
 @mikekazimer: Like some bikes? What bikes? Is it not allowed to say it publicly?
Test review without comparison is so annoyingly unnecessary.
  • + 2
 @pakleni: This isn't a review, and I only had one ride on the bike, so I didn't delve into any direct comparisons. The Nukeproof Mega 290 is a 150mm 29er that qualifies as a monster truck. A really fun one, but a monster truck nonetheless.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: many thanks. respect Wink
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: Any intention to do a full review in more relevant terrain? Would like to see how these bikes compare with each other (including weight) and with other similar 29er trail bikes. They look like fun rides.
  • + 4
 "we want whats best for our riders..." Pretty weird cliche-ish self-serving statement from Niner. Whom are your "riders"--people who already own Niners (and need a new one?!) or potential customers hoping to join your exclusive club?
I agree with many other commentators that the Niners are aesthetically nice, but they seem a bit over-priced and the company's attitude seems arrogant and douchey.
  • + 4
 This suspension design is begging to have that lower link turned into an integrated bash guard. I'd hate to smash that thing into a rock, but If it were designed to have a bolt on nylon component, it would really transform that 'vulnerability' into 'ingenuity'
  • + 2
 I have a RIP 9 and it seems like it would be very vulnerable, but with a few precautions its really not an issue or worry at all for me. 1) Niner did develop a small skid plate that goes on the lower link which came with the bike. 2) I have a downtube/link protector that bolts on using the lower bottle mounts like this one (fcdn.mtbr.com/attachments/niner-bikes/957939d1422036107-rip-9-rdo-bash-plate-taco-image.jpg) 3) I have an oversized taco bashguard. If you uses a taco that covers 38T+ it will extend below the lower link and protect it.

I'm sure what I have might be a little overkill but at the same time its a nice bike that I want to keep that way.
  • + 1
 I think they do have a guard- at least the RIP9 Carbon I owned last year had one. I bashed the heck out of it with no ill effects. Better than smashing a chain. It's funny that they don't play this up as a benefit, because it totally does work like a bash guard. The bearings are out of the way enough, I was only ever bashing the middle of the link where the protector was bolted on. The Rip9 had a carbon lower link with an alloy bash guard screwed to the bottom.
  • + 1
 @vaedwards: Does it guard the chainring? that is what I am wishing for
  • + 4
 I get why they'd think they have to adopt 27.5. But anyone else think this is a big mistake for Niner? It is Niner after all is it not?

Also seems like they turned the Jet into the Rip and turned the Rip into something else. Confusing much guys?
  • + 3
 RIP turned into WFO. WFO is ?
  • + 13
 Isn't it still a 29'r? It just has the ability and the option to run 27.5+.... like a lot of other bikes right now?

It's kinda like subaru making a BRZ.... but I thought all subaru's are awd. Well... not this one... and guess what... it's still a decent little car that's fun to drive.

Doesn't devalue the company.
  • + 4
 @onemanarmy: Well, they're actually selling them with the + wheels, not just offering compatibility.

Also, Chris Sugai basically made it his mission to embody the "smug 29er owner" personality, so a lot of people who buy his bikes might consider this a betrayal.

Also, the BRZ is a one off colaboration with Toyota, while this seems like a bigger paradigm shift.
  • + 0
 @groghunter: Not terrible points.

In my limited experience with them they all seem like decent folks though... go figure.
  • + 12
 @onemanarmy: but Subaru isn't named "AWDrivaru"
  • + 3
 @TugboatComplex: True that.

But Coke does make Fanta...
  • + 1
 @Endurahbrah: Yeah, probably done. If the new RIP has 150 mm of travel, where do you go from there?
  • + 3
 As a current owner of a Jet 9 RDO (2015 model) I can tell you that the Niner frame is ridiculously stout and strong. I'm 260lbs on a light day, and I beat the snawt out of this frame. So much better than the Santa Cruz Tallboy C (also carbon) frame was. Being a heavier guy I can feel the frame flex under me, and especially under heavy load pedaling. I have recommended the Jet 9 RDO to many folks, some of whom have also purchased, and not a single complain.

Net models adds all the things I would be looking for, so curious to see when it is actually available later this year. Very interested in going up 20mm. Thanks Niner and PB!
  • + 1
 I know 3 people who had to warranty the 2014.Has turned me off to niner, But I like how these look.
  • + 1
 My Jet RDO just cracked after 100km. Never again
  • + 1
 I'm 210 and rail my J9C pretty good. It's an awesome bike but it also rides really light. And the rear triangle is the stiffest f/s I've ever ridden.
  • + 5
 Niner makes extremely visually appealing frames. I don't know what it is about them, but it's like the aesthetics of a Ferrari
  • + 1
 No question. Kona, Turner, Trek..all so boring.The (older) J9 RDO designs are one of the coolest looking MTBs ever created.
  • + 7
 I find their bikes very aesthetically pleasing, even moreso in person.
  • + 0
 I have to agree , specially for there wheel size
  • + 1
 @AmericaOnline: I'm not normally at 29er fan for looks.. but god damn that RIP is bloody lush!
  • + 7
 Does 27.5+ count as a niner?
  • + 4
 "Riders will be able to choose their preferred wheelsize"... and be a dick about it. Big Grin
  • + 5
 Such great bikes, demo'd the RIP not too long ago and was really impressed.
  • + 1
 Geo looks like a 150mm travel 2012-ish Stumpjumper. Not a bad thing and I understand why the reviewer commented on "nimble vs. monster truck." Not EVERYONE is an Enduro racer. I'd really like to know how the CVA suspension climbs with this much travel. I would imagine the 75.5 degree ST angle has to do with suspension limitations if you are too far rearward in the bike. Looks fantastik. Nice job 9er, uh 275er, uh 9275er....!
  • + 4
 Will wait until next year when they are blowing out their bikes for 50% off.......
  • + 5
 A 27.5+ Niner? Checking the weather...Hell must have froze over....
  • + 1
 I have a '14 wfo and I think it's head angle is 66 with a 170mm fork and 66.6 with my 160mm. So I think there's still room for the slacker wfo in their arsenal if Niner wanted to include it. Still though, would love to try these new bikes.
  • + 1
 I rode both the 29 and 27.5″ plus versions and can tell you that they both had different characteristics…didn’t have much issues with medal bashing but definitely could tell a difference with the smaller(ish) and fatter tires. I did a quick video review… www.youtube.com/watch?v=hO3Ej5-brR8
  • + 1
 I have the previous edition RDO and it's a damn fine piece of machinery. It's not as slacked out as this new version or many others on the market now but for the type of trail riding that I do it's perfect. I'm not sure I'd want mine with a note slack HA.
  • + 2
 Can't say I like the lower pivot sitting under the chain ring like it is I can see it catching and dead stopping me first big log i go over
  • + 2
 Yeah, I cringe a little bit when my bash or rings knick a rock or log, I hope those are some burly pivots down there to take the hits!
  • + 2
 Rad to see a natural trail edit... I did park but this is refreshing. AND they are my local trails so I'm watching this over and over.
  • + 3
 It seems like the battle between the JET and THE FOLLOWING had just begun, would love to see a head to head comparisson
  • + 2
 The Following would destroy!
  • + 0
 Not even close. Following, smuggler, process 111 are light years ahead of that abortion of a bike.
  • + 3
 @ATXZJ: How so?
  • - 1
 @WingnutPA: It has the caitlyn jenner of geometry, as it has no idea wtf it is. The TTL is short as hell and the seatpost is still long, which is far from a modern bike. A 160 MM 29er with that tight of a cockpit and 67* HTA....ill pass.
  • + 0
 The should call it the Rip OTB
  • + 1
 I thought is was more strange when they started making road bikes. They had the inside line on b+ three years ago and blew it off.
  • + 1
 I just bought a niner rip 9 carbon.....wayyyyyyy better than my Santacruz TRC for everything ! I have to say that i'm very impress.
  • + 3
 So your new bike is better than your 5 year old one? Shocking.
  • - 5
flag frankmartineau (Jul 7, 2016 at 12:58) (Below Threshold)
 @tsheep: 2014, OMG didn't realise it was that old. I should be ashamed......at least he had a life time warranty....
  • - 1
 Honest question here. Why are a lot of these 140-160mm bikes coming with Float x's instead of X2's? The price difference is negligible so I'm scratching my head. The Factor Float is a good shock but with the downhill orientation of a 140mm+ bike it seems an X2 would be a better choice, especially for the very high end builds with 36's.
  • + 2
 The X2 is a DH tune shock, it's not really meant for anything smaller than 160. Big air can, only comes in longer eye-to-eye & stroke lengths. shortest one they make is a 7.8".

The float X is their AM shock, the float is their XC/trail shock.
  • + 0
 My guess is that it's for the same reason real compression settings got turned into "Climb, Trail, Descent" and now "The Settings Formally Known As CTD". More adjustments provide the opportunity to make your suspension better or MUCH worse and a lot of people won't bother to learn what they do.


I have friends that can't be bothered to work out the CTD dial on their fork or the three-position threshold lever on their Monarch RT3. Last weekend I was riding with a guy who complained that his fork felt bad and when I checked the rebound was fully closed.
  • + 2
 What a pointless review... Hey we got this long travel capable bike, let's take it on boring terrain and review it!
  • + 2
 Seems like they're missing a big opportunity by not updating the WFO to a carbon, long, low and slack slayer.
  • + 3
 They did - it's just called the RIP ...
  • + 2
 Not a fan of this hunchback type frames.. R. I. P.
  • + 0
 I built up a white rip 9 rdo this spring with a 130 pike.. Would have liked the b+ option, but now the rip would be overkill for my local trails
  • + 2
 Niner says R.I.P. Front derailleur...
  • + 1
 R.I.P. WFO
  • + 3
 @GlenPxC: IDK, it would be cool if they came out with a 160-170mm WFO that was way slack to compete against the Wreckoning, or Treks proto 29er DH bike
  • + 2
 Niner says R.I.P. to the Niner....
  • + 1
 @GlenPxC: The WFO may return, but I don't know where they could go with it. More travel? Why. Slacker angles - probably needed (67° with a 160mm Fox36 - I guess I can price an angleset into one easily enough).

Hopefully they keep the WFO on as an Aluminum-only burly version of their 150mm bike, and kit it appropriately. Basically let the RIP be the RDO variant, and the WFO be the bike park slayer.

I think the Trek Slash29 (or whatever) is going to be a 150mm travel bike, but a deep 150mm (probably with a 160mm fork). I think that is the benchmark the '17 RIP is going to be compared against, and unfortunately I think it'll come up short (the Trek will have provisions for 2x, probably be lighter, slacker, longer, and yet comparably playful).
  • + 1
 @jason745: a 29er glory
  • + 2
 The new JET 9 RDO has a removable front derailleur mount so you can choose to run 2x if you want.
  • + 1
 @NinerBikes: No hints about a more aggressive WFO?
  • - 1
 " The new RIP is now geared towards the all-mountain crowd, and in Niner's words, it's meant to be the "go-to for backcountry epics and big terrain.”

No FD mount.

These two sentences don't go together in my corner of the world (unless you just totally give up on any top end).

FD for life !
  • + 3
 @hamncheez: nope, no hints.... Wink
  • + 1
 @NinerBikes: Looking at the timestamps on my previous point, I'm doing ok at the guessing game.
I think the name and reputation of the WFO is too big to ignore. Niner wouldn't bin that lineage of awesome if there wasn't something in the development pipeline that could carry that torch.
I guess it's between my initial guess, or if they'll try some trail consuming trophy truck of a bike. To be honest, I would be disappointed with either, based on the direction of the Rip.
  • + 2
 @NinerBikes: if you're still taking suggestions, 65 HT angle and a knuckle dragging, ultra low bb...
  • + 0
 @hamncheez: don't forget the 80 degree seat angle and 1500 wheelbase
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: why you have to go and ruin a good thing
  • + 1
 Is XD drive adapter available for wheels of the RIP 9 alloy? Which hub do they use?
  • + 1
 To much negativity here. Buy a Niner rip9 and ride it as 29er and you'll be happy.
  • + 3
 Threaded BB now!
  • + 1
 Mike says it rides better in 29er guise, so its still a Niner alright.
  • + 1
 I like a lot those bikes would love to try one...
  • + 1
 What is the build weight of these bikes?
  • - 3
 blah blah blah every company jumping on the trail bike band wagon at the same price point... Personally I haven't heard of Niner bikes so I may be talking out of my ass here... but why would I buy this unknown company's base model trail bikes at $4500 and $5000, when I can get close to the top model from a well known company for the same price or even a base model for $3000( ex Transition Scout).
  • + 9
 You haven't heard of Niner, really?
  • + 1
 Hilarious
  • - 2
 These guys couldn't have missed the mark more that they did here. Congrats niner for keeping 90s MTB geo alive in 2016
  • + 2
 Once again, how so?
  • - 3
 R.I.P. niner.
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2017. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.133396
Mobile Version of Website