First Ride: Ohlins New RXF36 Trail Fork & TTX Air Shock

Sep 28, 2018
by Paul Aston  


Mid-September in Jaarvso, Sweden. Ohlins invited us to ride their all-new RXF36 Trail fork and TTX Air rear shock. Their presentation started unusually; unlike most marketeer's who say their last 'great' (read: not-that-great) product was 'perfect,' and that their new version is now much more perfect, Ohlins had the balls to admit they had a tough time coming into the mountain bike industry, made some mistakes and delivered some products they now admit were sub-par for their gold-standard.

Overdamped and unreliable products with sticky bushings and failing seals were conceded to, but these new products should set the record straight. The RXF36 Trail fork and TTX Air promise performance and damping that Ohlins feel will beat the latest and greatest from the class leaders. What are they? The RXF36 Trail fork is aimed at everybody from trail to enduro riders, and the shock from XC to downhill. There's a multitude of different options and sizes, as well as plenty for the tuners and tweakers to get involved in. The RXF36 Trail fork drops in at $1250 USD / €1035 plus tax, and the TTX Air shock for $780 USD / €702 plus tax.







RXF36 Trail Details

• TTX twin tube technology
• Air spring travel: 120 - 180mm
• Coil spring travel: 130 -170 mm
• Spring and damper systems independent from chassis
• Re-tuned air spring system
• Stanchion diameter: 36mm
• Offset 27.5": 46mm or 38mm
• Offset 29": 51mm or 44mm
• Prepared for mudguard
• Race proven 'Setting Bank' for shim stack tunes
• Overall improvements for reducing friction
• Price: $1250 USD / €1035 plus tax
ohlins.com

So what's new with the RXF36 Trail fork? Well, everything. The crown steerer upper's (CSU) stiffness has been increased by adding material to the crown and leaving more material inside the machined steerer tube, Ohlins say they did this as the 'class-leading stiffness' of the RXF36 lowers wasn't quite matched by the CSU. There is a choice of two offsets for each wheelsize: 38/46mm for 27.5", and 44/51mm for the 29".

The lower castings have been changed slightly with a different visual, and increased tire clearance for 2.8" tires in 27.5" and 29", and 27.5+ x 3.2" plus tires in the 29" lower. Travel options range from 120-180mm for either wheel size with an air spring or 130-170mm with coil.


Ohlins RXF Trail chassis
Ohlins RXF Trail chassis


So the main chassis of the fork has been improved, but so have the bushings, lubrication oil and seals. New wiper seals from SKF, a new lubricant, and bushings with more play – "Hang on, more bushing play? Do I want that?" Well, yes you do, to a point – Ohlins say that with their moto forks have much more play in the bushings means a smoother suspension action under load, but also creates a 'loose headset' type feeling, but this is harder to feel in the car park with the huge weight and inherent sag of an MX bike. They say it's harder to convince mountain bikers that this is a good thing and the older versions were too tight to give consumers the feeling they wanted. Working with their racing teams, they say that a happy medium has been reached with the new bushings. This should also help stop sticky forks; I had a RXF36 coil last year which became terribly sticky after a few weeks of riding, and there were many complaints from consumers with OEM spec forks.


Ohlins TTX18 cartridge
The TTX18 cartridge is independent from the chassis, meaning it can be removed in one piece...
Ohlins RXF Trail coil spring
... the same is true with coil or air spring options.


The new air spring is independent from the chassis, unlike most air forks that use the stanchions and lowers as the external sleeve of the air spring. This means that different air springs can simply be dropped in and out to change travel, or maybe you are a racer who wants a freshly serviced air spring for race day without having to strip and rebuild the fork completely. This also means you can change to a coil spring and back to air; if you use an aftermarket coil spring kit in a Rockshox Pike, for example, it will score the inside of the stanchions making it not possible to return to using the air spring and get a reliable seal. The air spring itself has also been updated with a larger negative spring, which should give more supple small bump performance and mid-stroke support. Coil is still an option, and there new lighter weight (in grams not stiffness) coil springs then previously.



Compression adjust on the left...
and coil or air spring on the right.

When it comes to the TTX damper, the larger 22mm piston of the old fork is gone, and the 18mm version that's found on the DH Race fork takes its place. Ohlins say they use the 18 mm piston for "improved small bump sensitivity, with increased damping pressure bandwidth the damping valve response and sensitivity has improved." To add to this, they have also worked on all the seals inside the damper to reduce friction, claiming 50% less breakaway force over the TTX22. There are 15 clicks of low-speed compression and rebound to fine tune, and four clicks of HSC. Slightly confusing is the fact that the first three clicks of HSC change the high-speed compression, but the fourth acts as 'climb mode,' turning it to the fourth position actually shuts off parts of the LSC circuit to create a firm LSC pedal platform.


Ohlins RXF Trail fork LSC adjustment
How the LSC adjuster changes the damping.
Ohlins RXF Trail fork HSC adjustment
How the HSC adjustment changes high speed and climb platform.

Ohlins RXF Trail fork Settings Bank
The 'Settings Bank' is a range of pre-set shim stacks for various rider needs. Full custom stacks are also an option for people who need something extreme.


Maybe the most important thing that Ohlins haven't shouted about enough is their 'Setting Bank'. The Setting Bank now offers eight off the shelf shim stacks for compression and for rebound, as well as further customization being possible. All consumers should get the correct tune for their needs from the start when buying aftermarket to give them a 'usable range' on the adjusters. This means turning to fully open or closed on the adjusters should leave the shocks usable. If you are a 60kg rider buying an XXL Specialized Levo eMTB from a shop you are highly likely to get the wrong tune.







TTX Air Details

• TTX-technology
• Adjustable low-speed compression
• Adjustable rebound
• High-speed compression adjuster inc. climb mode
• Air spring volume spacers included in kit
• Metric 190/210/230/250mm lengths
• Trunnion 165/185/205/225mm lengths
• 'Setting Bank' for shim stack tunes
• Optional stroke reducers
• Weight: 410g 210mm x 52.5mm Specialized fitment (claimed)
• Price: $780 USD / €702 plus tax
ohlins.com

Ohlins' previous STX Air was a single-tube style damper, where the all-new TTX Air takes the twin tube tech from their TTX22M coil shock and combines it with a lighter and easier to tune air spring. Weight is claimed to be 410g for a 210mm x 52.5mm Specialized fitment shock.

Although a twin tube design, there is only no external adjustment for high-speed rebound, LSR (12 clicks) and LSC (10 clicks) can be adjusted, along with three clicks of HSC including the pedal platform as mentioned above on the RXF36 Trail fork. The pressure in the air can equalizes with the negative chamber automatically as usual, and like most modern air shocks volume spacers can be added to tune the spring curve. Like the fork, there is a Settings Bank dedicated to the shock, giving 15x different tunes, plus custom settings.


LSC and LSR can be adjusted with a 2.5mm Allen wrench, and the HSC on the opposite side of the piggyback can be turned by hand across three settings.

TTX LSC adjustment
TTX LSC adjustment
TTX Air HSC adjustment
TTX Air HSC adjustment


Durability, friction, performance and sideload management are factors that all need to be balanced for an air shock, and you can't change one without affecting the others. Again, Ohlins admitted they had some problems with their STX Air shock after focusing too much on the performance factor which led to problems with sealing and sideloading, especially on some frames where the shock becomes a structural part of the frame. The TTX Air has improved dynamic lubrication, sealing and surfaces, bushing overlap, seal preload, and is stronger overall to cope with these problems, but they claim the improvements using the latest technology have also increased the performance.

There are between four and ten volume spacers that can be used depending upon the size of the shock. The air spring can also be fully removed and serviced without affecting the damping system. And the last feature is that the stroke of the shock can be reduced by using spacers, just in case you need less travel.


TTX Air spring volume adjust
The effect of using volume tokens on the TTX Air spring.
The TTX Air can can be serviced independently to the damper.
Handily, the TTX air spring can be serviced independently to the damper.






Riding Impressions


As always on these press camps, you rock up tired after a day in a germ-tube and head straight to a new trail, in different weather, with a bike you never rode before that's adorned with the latest suspension you have never seen until now. I chose a Specialized Stumpjumper to ride, which is somewhat different to the downhill and eMTB's I have been riding for the last few months. The bike was set up with a 150mm travel RXF Coil, and the TTX Air rear shock to handle the 140mm travel. Both had the standard 'Setting Bank' shim stacks, we set the pressure and spring weight and we were good to go.

After the first couple of runs, the rear end was too soft compared to the front, and after adding a few PSI, it was spot on. So good, in fact, I didn't want to change anything for the rest of the day. The damping front and rear seemed to be lighter than the Ohlins products I have used in the past; I left everything nearly fully open, and would like to try lighter stacks in the future to put me more in the middle of the adjusters. The fork and shock did everything that you want from suspension: they were supple at the beginning of the stroke, plenty of support in the middle and enough at the end to keep you out of trouble. Both units were also extremely quiet, and there was no sign of heat affecting the performance, although the Jaarvso tracks are fairly short. I think it's a great sign when you're not really sure what the suspension is doing, but you are having the shred of your life. That's exactly what it should do – if you are constantly thinking about what it is not doing right for you, that's a huge distraction away from the trail coming at you.

Overall, it was great to see Ohlins admitting to mistakes and explaining what they have done to right the wrongs. Many might see this as marketing BS, but I believe them, and every point they made makes sense. Of course, the proof will be in the pudding, and we will need to spend more time on the fresh produce this winter to see if the claims hold true in the real world.





134 Comments

  • + 99
 This comes at a unfavourable time for Öhlins.
  • + 23
 True that! I clicked this after seeing the picture expecting it to be an update on what's happening with the Recall status.
  • + 16
 Worst timing possible
  • + 11
 Does it come with shatter proof goggles. Does want to wear my fork internals like a 1996 Manitou.
  • + 52
 Oof! The timing.

1) recall
2) 48 hours after Kazimer calls the Fox 36 and RS Lyrik amazing (www.pinkbike.com/news/review-fox-36-grip2-vs-rockshox-lyrik-rc2-fork.html), and they're cheaper by 10-20%
3) 40 hours after Transition's video showing basically these exact slide images, but as a joke (www.pinkbike.com/news/video-get-the-full-press-camp-experience-from-transition.html)
  • + 5
 @phile99: missed that transition video, thanks for sharing,funny as f**k
  • + 5
 Needing tools to make adjustments = FAIL.
  • + 1
 Yes you are right! Quite bad timing... I have the new rxf air fork with the theoretical issue... Had the ttx air shock for years... but no issues! Further I am quite impressed with the performance of these products - it might be the non- pro in me not sensing these issues explained above... but after some different approach in terms of set up these products work just very well
  • + 1
 @phile99: that power point looked like it was terribly painful to sit through. Even worse start the Transition video!
  • + 3
 @phile99: exactly everything I was thinking... if your going to go up against fox and rockshox... maybe not price it 10-20% more than the competition? lol
  • + 2
 I think this is a way too early april fools joke.
  • + 1
 @Boardlife69: just like fox dhx2/float x2 you think thats a fail ?
  • + 2
 @phile99: also mention specialized just ordered a stop sale on all öhlins forks due to failure in top cap.
  • + 3
 At least they are being open about their issues, and not denying. Saves owners hours of googling and sanity trying to resolves issues.
  • + 2
 @projectnortheast: in Europe, Öhlins products have been consistently cheaper than Fox suspension, meaning it's a no brainer to go Öhlins.

Their products have this mystical feeling of being consistently non-descript. No big bottom outs, no major transmissibility to the bike chassis or horrid noises and a simple guide to setup. The level of dynamic control is totally unparalleled in the MTB world.

I think calling the imperfections in their prior products mistakes is a bit of a leap as they are pretty awesome. I think maybe their bracketing is a bit narrow for the general market, so unless you know your shim stack is correct for your weight, then you have to take it in for some work but this results in better performance when you're in the correct bracket.

My only actual gripe is that Öhlins won't supply their oil so I can't do a lower service without taking it in - and I like to do these regularly. Fix that please Öhlins
  • + 31
 I've got an Enduro I'm not supposed to ride right now. I bought it partially off of the positive coverage of the fork and shock in reviews on this site. I was certainly worried about treading outside the Fox/RS suspension waters on this big of purchase.

It's sort of frustrating to see PB saying that they're glad to see Ohlins admit something about the previous version of the fork being "not that great" - when they never said anything when they had the chance either. There's more than a few times where PB will begin to bash on a previous gen product only once the new version is available. I don't know how they should do it, maybe these long term opinions don't always surface before the long term review is published? Maybe they know ahead of time the issue will be fixed on the next version and they just wait for that review?

Either way, I found myself as annoyed by PB with the opening sentences of this article as with Ohlins. I suppose I'll live with my overdamped fork and shock that the local place wants $400 to reshim once I get some approved torque setting for the top cap. Like others have said here, Ohlins could mend a lot of fences by giving me some realistic pathway to owning the fork PB said was awesome just a short while ago.
  • + 5
 Yep if you want the real review... wait until the next version comes out and they’ll go through what’s wrong with that bike with a fine tooth comb of what was the best thing since sliced bread when that came out three years earlier. End of the day these bike companies are keeping these websites in business if they absolutely slaughter a company in a review they’ll stop advertising and sending them test products to write articles about.
  • + 3
 @thenotoriousmic: so basically you are saying we shouldn't believe any reviews here because they're biased?
  • + 3
 @GruntaNZ: yep. They are biased
  • + 1
 @GruntaNZ: I’m saying if you want to know the truth about your flawless dream bike wait until it gets torn apart when the next versions on the hype train.
  • + 30
 With the main complaint about the old stuff being that they were too racey & harsh this comment

"I left everything nearly fully open, and would like to try lighter stacks in the future to put me more in the middle of the adjusters"

doesnt sound like goods news. TBH

If your having to ride at one end of the adjuntment range it means you have no where to go. MTB journos padded round this issue with the Fox 36 for years resulting in in us all having to scramble to find ways to reduce the harshness, and it seems they are instent on doing the same with Ohlins stuff. Comon guys say it how it is.
  • + 3
 Yup, should have tried a different shim stack and let us know how it was.
  • + 7
 Good thing he mentioned that he was on a standard shim stack and said he would like to try a lighter stack to get in the middle of the adjustments. Nothing to see here...move on.
  • + 17
 My experince
TTX coil shock - excellent damper, however rebound tuneability practically useless.
STX air damper - average shock for a premium price. I didnt get the air leak problems which dogged this shock
Coil fork - great out of the box, but damper failed within few months.

Would I give ohlins another chance? Probably not for 4-5 years to see how they fair.
  • + 5
 How is the rear shock tuning useless? I have had one for three years now and its been flawless. The adjustment is plenty for 99.9 percent of riders. Do you really need high and low speed rebound adjustment? It has six clicks of rebound adjustment, if you're running the right spring it should be fine.

My fork has been flawless too. I did have the shim stack changed to a lighter tune because I don't do pushups or go to many races, which was an easy fix. Now, the fork feels better than my old Fox coil 36, which seems to be the fork everyone who really rides trails compares new stuff to. I did for several years after that fork retired, but now, the RFX 36 is stiffer, lighter and performs better than that fork.
  • + 1
 I ran the STX rear and Air fork up front. STX was way over damped and I could not get the compression or rebound fast enough. The RFX was also way over damped, but not as bad as the STX. For hammering through rough sections at race pace it was good, but at fun ride pace it was pretty harsh. With Ohlins reputation in other applications I am open to trying their setups again. Curious to hear some feedback in the next few months.
  • + 1
 @ShreddieMercury:
Maybe it was DOA then, because the rebound knob didn’t do hardly anything. You could barely ferl any difference between fully open or closed.
  • + 16
 Makes me feel even better having the old RXF36 that I'm not even allowed to use
  • + 10
 From this week, what I'm reading and have learnt about Ohlins is that both my £1k+ forks were sold to me knowing they are sub-par, and since found out they are a health risk, but its ok because they have admitted it?!.......

The solution? I can now buy new £1k+ forks, and struggle to sell my now openly acknowledged flawed product...... (or buy Fox)
  • + 0
 Thats the risk you take buying new to market items, the forks were not sold as sub par, just not as good as they could have been, again, new to market. At least ohlins can admit their early products were not great and move forward, more than can be said for some of other companies.
  • + 3
 @zyoungson: Ohlins are the go to name in suspension in basically every motorsport, and have prided themselves previously on being far above the best of the rest. So much so they don't even need to sponsor athletes. That to me isn't a risk but something I was willing to invest in.. New to 'a new market', not new to market. If I saw they were willing to support their customers who had invested in them on their name and reputation then fine, but it seems we have been shafted (excuse the pun) with the only follow up being, 'yeah but you can buy another one, just don't sell the old one as it's dangerous'
  • - 1
 @ajh4446: It is thier first mtb product, or at least an early one, so yes technically new to market. & they are working on a fix for the new one with the main holdup being government approval so how is that not supporting customers ? Honestly cant believe the amount bitching and crying in this thread it is borderline sad and pathetic
  • + 1
 Let's be honest, it was specialized fault. They are the only company using the rear shock as a "structural member" of the frame. They pressure OEMs and push out untested components.
  • + 13
 I am not sure why anyone would buy the RXF when the Lyrik is so good and proven.
  • + 7
 Exactly,Or a fox 36 even! We got burned On RFX 36. Customer service was worse than the fork! Never again!
  • - 3
 Because the Lyrik falls apart in high speed chunk which is where the 36 excels. In contrast the 36 does not quite have the ability to absorb the low speed chatter like the Lyrik. Also neither of those options offer a coil stock and running an aftermarket setup means you can't run air again. Lots of reasons to try it.
  • + 1
 @salespunk: they didn’t have a 27.5 spring and good luck getting this serviced!
  • + 2
 @salespunk: oh so the fork that’s won more ews races than any other fork falls apart where the 36 excels? That pure fanboy talk. I personally perfer Rockshox but I can’t pick a winner.
  • + 1
 @thenotoriousmic: Somehow.... I don't think the EWS pro's are running standard forks. Just a hunch though.
  • - 2
 @thenotoriousmic: Rockshox are dogshit the forks dive and ride in the last 1/3 of thier travel, damper opens up too much its a known thing. r/s may have won a lot of ews races but its because they crank the marketing with sponsorahips, just a consumer fork with a soft spring so average joe can feel like hes riding a magic carpet no more than that
  • + 2
 @zyoungson: buy a luftkappe, sorts that problem right out
  • + 12
 Standard rule of new brand to any industry: give them 3 years minimum to start making reliable products
  • + 8
 Except DVO, they were the best right off the bat
  • + 2
 @CullenHerring: mmmmm yeah, but I don't think they were technically particularly new. The original ones were rebranded
  • - 5
flag krumpdancer101 (Sep 28, 2018 at 6:55) (Below Threshold)
 WeAreOne wheels.... Didn’t take them 3yrs.
  • + 1
 WeAreOne brought some experience from Nobl wheels.
  • + 2
 @RollinFoSho: so you are saying Öhlins hired no one with mtb manufacturing experience when they started??
  • + 1
 @CullenHerring: Except DVO were cheating, what with being the Marzocchi USA guys and Suntour backing them them up.
  • + 3
 @Fix-the-Spade: how’s that cheating?
  • + 1
 @thenotoriousmic: I think "cheating" is the wrong word, but DVO weren't really making new products. They just had a new label.
For Ohlins it really was a whole new product that they had no previous history of making - that's why they need the 3 years bit
  • + 2
 You’d think Ohlins could of pulled it off right away, kind of surprising that they made these mistakes
  • + 1
 @RollinFoSho: they don’t really know what they’re doing yet and they’re just copying the competition.
  • + 1
 @IllestT: It's almost like Öhlins had never made suspension products before.
  • + 8
 My old RFX 36 was the best fork I've ever ridden. I guess I got lucky? Only sold it because I wanted to try a shorter offset. Internally they're so much nicer than RS and Fox. I'll definitely be in the market for the new fork and shock.
  • + 4
 You got lucky. My two sets were great for a few days.
  • + 12
 I don't recall there ever being any stigma around this brand whatsoever...
  • + 2
 It’s not around the brand but their air fork and shock.
  • + 0
 What hasn't been recalled? @TOBi1
  • + 1
 They have a stigma in the moto world, especially on the sport bike side of things. They play games with OEM vs aftermarket quality and tunability, specifically the OEM stuff is junk when used at the track.
  • + 2
 @yzedf: considering they come on every second stupid chopper riding around my town, so it’s no wonder they produce more that they can manage
  • + 1
 I see what you did there..
  • + 7
 I had the STX and after 3 fails the Specialized rep hooked me up with a Fox Float X2 which was stellar. The STX was great when it wasn’t leaking. When I got an RXF Air I immediately sold it.

It’s great they’re owning up but it would be far better if they did something for the current owners of their seriously expensive air shock and fork.
  • + 7
 "Öhlins told us they were somewhat surprised to learn that on many mountain bike frames the shocks are a structural part of the rear linkage, and that as such they absorb quite a lot of side load and bending forces." - VitalMTB

Wow, really Ohlins?? Have you ever looked at a mtn bike?
  • + 9
 It is no surprise but it is sh*t nonetheless. Weak and wonky frames/frame designs that bend the shock compromise its performance. Look at Cane Creek - their rear shocks were failing mostly on frames that are not stiff enough to not sideload the shock. And here comes Yeti and puts horizontal bearings on shock linkage, made me lol.

IMO good frame design should not rely on a shock for structural rigidity because that introduces so many variables you will not get consistent results.
  • + 1
 Its mostly specialized with their incredibly retarded proprietary rear shock mount that transmits side loading to the shock. Everyone I've known who had an enduro has blown the rear shock.
  • + 6
 "...This should also help stop sticky forks; I had a RXF36 coil last year which became terribly sticky after a few weeks of riding.."

This doesn't make much sense. Tighter bushings *became* sticky?

What is going on inside where you need looser bushes for the fork not to go sticky over time?
  • + 2
 They also changed fluids inside. They probably used something that gummed up when mixed with bushing particulates in the old fork.
  • + 6
 great timing this, currently waiting for my LBS & specialized to sort out the RXF36 on my Specialized Enduro, Might as well send this over to the rep as a suggestion on how to resolve the current issues,

in little Britain style "want that one"
  • + 6
 Having owned the air and coil versions of the current forks, plus multiple ttx shocks, I haven't had any issues, perhaps due to luck on my part or bad luck on the part of others. However, to announce new forks amidst the prolonged 'no ride' issue recall is a bit off. Come on Ohlins, if you have anew and improved fork, even if the current one just needs a few extra lb of tightening on the air cap, due to the potentially substantial delay in US government approval, why not hook people up with the new version or at least step up with a favourable discount for consumers who are impacted. I stand by the product, but missing the last week or two of uk sunshine before we enter the crappy weather season due to a recall and no ride statement sucks - yes I could ignore it and keep riding, but why should I, companies should look after the consumer better. Rant over, now send me a new one, 27.5 coil please!
  • + 5
 Didn’t realize that the current stuff was such garbage. Only people I ever saw actually riding it were destiny types who bought the s-works six fattie and said it was amazing.

And it comes on the Unno so it must be awesome
  • + 5
 I can't belive they released this info when I'm not supposed to even be riding with the RXF fork on my 2018 Specialized enduro pro. WtF? Some of us don't have the funds to just buy a new fork and a timely solution for this recall is nowhere in sight. So now I'm supposed to stop riding for undetermined lenght of time? Not sure who I should be pressing on this issue. Specialized or Ohlins?
  • + 2
 Just put a spanner on the top cap and stop moaning, noticed mine had moved in the first few weeks of riding, 2 minute job to tighten it then move on with your life, honestly a non issue.
  • + 0
 @zyoungson: what’s wrong with it?
  • + 5
 For the price of one fork you can get a piggyback rear SR Suntour Tri-Air paired with the SR Suntour Durolux that are easy to maintain and tune and fully serviceable without much effort!
  • + 4
 I am taking this 2 ways..... The good, from a human perspective, they are admitting they could have done better... The bad, from a marketing standpoint, they are admitting they could have done better.... If this were any other brand this release would have come across as already great products, with a bunch of refinements and upgrades... I think Ohlins could have marketed this release a bit better. I have had every brand of suspension and they all have had issues none are perfect!
  • + 0
 Not only was their rfx air fork junk but we got burned by the effort out of north Carolina! There is a reason why you use fox and king products !
  • + 1
 @MX298: King making mountainbike suspension?
  • + 5
 Future news : Spesh drops Ohlins and goes back (once again) to spec'ng mainstream brands on high end bikes...but how long will they wait before they experiment with suspension again?
  • + 5
 I love how the author had been riding dh and eMTB so decided to test on a stumpy.... just seems perception of the product could have been skewed by a different bike then the recent norm. (Control / test group)
  • - 1
 Imagine how bad it would have felt on a progressive bike?
  • + 3
 I kind of blame this on their deal with the big S...I think it forced them to move too quickly. Should have just gone straight to aftermarket and let the products work out their kinks for a couple years before chasing a big OEM contract. I'd still like to have a couple of pieces from them, but its going to take time to rebuild their reputation.
  • + 5
 Had two pairs of RXF36's and can confirm that they were nothing but trouble. I wish them luck with the new products but I'll be sticking to fox.
  • + 3
 Keep saying perfect , perfected for long enough it becomes true , I respect ohlins for their motor cycle stuff ( although ask KYB and Danny Pedrosa about that ) but they are trading on there name and i would give it a few years before buying there perfect suspension . Fox and rockshox have spent a long time "
perfecting" their stuff so I suspect ohlins if they ha e not cherry picked ideas will need time for really,really perfect suspension
  • + 3
 They will get it figured out, the TTX is the best rear shock ive ever ridden plain and simple better then any fox rear shock and RS Im not saying fox and RS is bad but they do got it figured out more on the other side of things. feels amazing and never had any issues. That shock has been out longer and i'm sure it took them some time to get it just right. I not be afraid at all to buy their product once they get this issue figured out. You gotta fail to know what you gotta do to be better then what it was in the past. YOU GOT THIS OHLINS!
  • + 5
 Cheers for the article Pinkbike. Hers an "Ö" and an "ö" so you can write their name in schweeedish as well Wink
  • + 2
 It's nice having other options available especially in reduced offset, since it seems a lot of bikes are going that way and some suspension manufacturers are slow to release the new offsets...

...but $1250 for a fork that has been problematic in the past? That's $200 more than the excellent GRIP2, $300 more than the Ribbon, and $350 more than the helm. That is way too much for a company with a poor track record of customer support in the US and problems with their forks in the very near past.
  • + 6
 Is there some recall for this one yet?
  • + 2
 If you buy these forks you will receive shatter proof goggles, free dentist check up, a recommendation to your local plastic surgeon, and a huge orange flag so people on the trail can see who is about to detonate cool thanks Ohlins.
  • + 2
 Bicycle suspension is quite the nutty market, that's all I can say. My SRSuntour fork came with pneumatic travel adjust with a little lever for the handle bar. Like I can't even "WTF" hard enough. When you activate it, it lowers the fork. Between that, and this, I would say if you want to have a good time, get involved with bicycle suspension!
  • + 2
 we are guinea pigs for these companies, pay top dollar to test out their product and get left hanging when it doesn't work. I had problem Sith bot my STX and RFX 36 on 17 enduro. what a kick in the balls. they should send out new forks and shocks at cost for us riders that got a sub par product that didn't work
  • + 3
 I usually enjoy Paul's reviews, but learn some damn grammar, man. A there where a their belongs, and a then instead of a than. All in one sentence no less.
  • + 0
 I dunno still soundz the same. I understood the article
  • + 1
 I’m not impressed I’ve had 3 stx rear shocks I asked for a coil they kept giving me like for like one shot lasted 6 miles!! And I’m on my second pair of rxf36 air first pair the steerier started falling out of the crown second pair is bit sticky now I can’t use them at all just have them back and give me a lyric and a coil rear to replace this shit !
  • + 2
 How am I supposed to read those TRX18 cartridge damping graphs? LSR:0 denotes zero clicks from fully closed or open? If it is from closed, the force is what remains from input force?
  • + 4
 So are they saying all their forks/shocks that came out before these are sub par.. shit.
  • + 3
 That was my take too. Some clever changes but mostly this reads like "all our current (and very expensive) products are crap...these are the goods. suck it early adopters!"
  • + 5
 I love my ohlins fork. And bonus the cap hasn't sprung off yet
  • + 1
 Ah yes..... the company that has yet to reliably manufacture its high-end components and has failed to support those who bought its components is now proposing that we should buy their new product at a premium compared to other proven products. Ohlins jumped the gun and it will be a long time until people get on the bandwagon
  • + 2
 How about trading out my fork and shock on my Stumpy before I go with Fox? I bought the bike because of my experience with Ohlins on my dirt bike. That was a mistake.
  • + 2
 I literally blew out three of the rear shocks on my enduro...I know I know linear suspension design on the bike but still was clearly not a reliable product.
  • + 1
 So happy that Ö was too expensive and my shop said that service will probably suck compared to the big 2. Damn right.
I like the „Ö“-style but gonna wait at least till Gen 3.
  • + 0
 How can you sell a fork with out testing it first for about six months to ensure it works flawlessly.
Why does the consumer have to find out a product needs changes or redesign after the poor guy shelled out a thousand bucks?
Sounds like the original forks were sticky and had creaky CSU issues.
As for Rock shock and Fox the big players.
Both still suffer from creaky CSU.
So at least this fork is getting repaired and redesigned to work.
  • + 1
 How about swapping my fork and shock out on my Stumpy before I call it a day and go with Fox? I bought the bike because of my experience with Ohlins on my dirt bike, yep I feel dumb now didn't see this coming.
  • + 2
 Im on my third stx for my Specialized Enduro, wish they would upgrade me for the troubles I've experienced for last two years
  • + 2
 Demand to talk to the Specialized rep for your store if your shop won’t. If that fails, call Spesh.
  • + 2
 My rep got me the X2 I wanted after offering me a Monarch.
  • + 4
 TTX Air shock $780=NFW..Y'all High!
  • + 1
 @paulaston any chance there will be a release/first ride or full review on those new blurred out Specialized Eliminator tires????
  • + 1
 My TTX Air was utter shite but felt good when it worked. They swapped it for a coil and it's been rock solid and performs amazing.
  • + 3
 Soooo i guess i'm stuck ridin on their mistakes
  • + 1
 "and there new lighter weight (in grams not stiffness) coil springs then previously.", This is unbelievably sloppy for a professional journalist!
  • + 1
 so - a hell of a lot of development and I need a 2.5 hex key for the adjusters

siriously?!?
  • + 1
 Ö-Fusion. LOL.
Is Öhlins actually going to start making their own mtn bike forks?
  • + 3
 Cue the recall comments.
  • + 1
 LOL bad timing......what happened to you ohlins....I used to love you on my moto.
  • + 3
 Recall in 3, 2, 1....
  • + 2
 It's an under torqued top cap, no big deal.
  • + 2
 What are they using for anti-bottom in the coil RXF?
  • + 1
 I have an RXF coil and I believe it's just the damper that ramps up. It works really well though.
  • + 1
 First things first: did got hit in the face with air cartridge?
  • + 1
 Will the STX shock be Specialized OEM only ?
  • + 1
 Specialized a moving away from the OEM, and the article states all the standard Metric eye to eye lengths. I suspect, if they release an OEM mount shock, it will be a single version for the Enduro as a short term bridge until Specialized review that linkage and go standard mounts as they have with the new Stumpy.
  • + 1
 aim at what? my face, with an air cartridge?
  • + 1
 Recalled already! Remember Marzocchi!
  • + 1
 Will this one knock my front teeth out?
  • + 1
 yeah but does it have LIVE VALVE?!?!?!?!?!
  • + 1
 In 7 days God created earth, Ohlins however destroyed their customer base
  • + 1
 What tire is that?
  • + 1
 Schwalbe Magic Mary
  • + 1
 I have a feeling it’s specialied new eliminator tire, if you look on Curtis Keenes instagram you can see these tires in some of his pictures and the tread pattern looks bang on to the ones here
  • + 1
 @norcorider-13: Could be either, the center block pattern definitely matches the MM. I just wish the tire looked like that on my MM with 30 cm rims Frown If that's indeed a spec tire, I'd be interested (and scared that it will hold up)
  • + 1
 @supercollider: If you take a look at the last picture, the name of the tire is covered by the fork but its definitely a spec tire. I got my hands on the new Blk Dmnd casing spec released and it seems a lot sturdier than the grid casing, very similar to double down and super gravity.
  • + 1
 @norcorider-13: cool! I'd give them another swing...
  • - 1
 What are thry uding for anti- bottom on the coil version RXF?

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