First Ride: Polygon's $3,299 Collosus N9

Nov 20, 2022
by Mike Kazimer  

Polygon's new Collosus N9 first emerged in all its urban camo painted glory at Sea Otter this year, complete with the IFS suspension layout first seen on the Mt. Bromo eMTB. The bike has 29” wheels front and rear (it's not mixed-wheel compatible), and 170mm of travel. After a season of enduro racing and refining it's now available, with an aluminum frame and a $3,299 price tag that stands out in stark contrast to the ultra-expensive carbon machines that have been released lately.

For the price, Polygon have put together a great parts package. Suspension is handled by a Fox 38 Performance fork with a Grip damper, and 230 x 65mm Float X2 shock. SRAM Code R brakes with 200mm rotors help keep speeds in check, and Shimano takes care of the shifting via an XT derailleur, Deore cassette, and XT cranks. Unfortunately, those cranks are 175mm long, which may not be ideal for riders in rockier terrain. 2.6” wide Schwalbe Magic Mary tires are mounted up onto Entity rims that have a 35mm internal width.
Collosus N9 Details

• Wheel size: 29"
• Travel: 170 mm
• Aluminum frame
• 63.5º head angle
• 77º seat tube angle
• 435 mm chainstays
• Sizes: S - XL
• Weight: 39.25 lb / 17.8 kg (size L)
• Price: $3,299 USD
polygonbikes.com

All of that adds up to a not-insignificant 39.25 pounds (17.8 kg) – Collosus seems like a very fitting name given those numbers.


Frame Details

The Collosus' frame is visibly stout; everything from the forward shock mount to the double-braced swingarm make it look like it was built to take a beating. All of those links and the shock position do take up some precious water bottle real estate, which means that only a 'regular' sized bottle will fit in the front triangle. Still, it's better than nothing. There's also no in-frame storage or any accessory mounts to be seen. Another feature that's missing is a universal derailleur hanger, something that's likely to become more of a 'must have' if the rumors about SRAM's next generation drivetrain are true.

There is a ribbed chainstay protector, although it's a little short – further coverage towards the front of the chainstay would help keep the paint from being chipped by the chain. The brake, derailleur, and dropper lines are routed internally, although there isn't really anything inside the frame to keep them from rattling around - thankfully, I didn't notice too much noise on my test bike.

It is nice to see that the Collosus is spec'd with a chain guide and a bash guard, since crunching a chainring is a good way to put a damper on a race run. There's also frame protection on the underside of the downtube to keep it safe from flying rocks or truck tailgates.



Geometry

Most of the Collosus' geometry numbers are right in line with what's become the norm for this category. The head angle sits at a slack, 63.5-degrees with a 170mm fork, the reach is 480mm for a size large, and the seat tube angle is 77-degrees. The chainstays are on the shorter side at 435mm across the board – they don't change with each size, a practice that more and more companies are adopting.


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Suspension Design

Polygon seem to have an affinity for suspension designs that are a little different from the norm – there was the wild-looking floating dual-link FS3 design back in 2014, and the even more out-there aesthetic of the SquareOne EX9 with its R3ACT suspension in 2017. The Collosus keeps the trend alive, although the overall look likely won't be as polarizing as those other two examples.

It uses a version of the IFS (Independent Floating Suspension) design first seen on Polygon's Mt. Bromo eMTB. The concept is that the two lower counter-rotating short links can be used to dictate the axle path, while the seatstays and rocker link are used to adjust the leverage curve, or how much progression there is. All those links may make it easier for designers to achieve the suspension characteristics they want, but it also means there are 16 cartridge bearings to keep track of, and the lowermost set of bearings are directly in front of the rear wheel, right where mud and dirt will end up on a sloppy ride.

The anti-squat percentages are fairly high, sitting around 121% at sag before gradually dropping off as the bike goes through its travel. The scaling of the chart makes the progression look fairly extreme, but in reality it's around 19%, which is fairly typical for a longer travel enduro bike.



Ride Impressions

To anyone who says that weight doesn't matter, I encourage you to take the Collosus out for a spin. I've spent plenty of time – years, really – pedaling around bikes in the 40-pound range, and I'm far from being a weight weenie, but I'll admit that it's a little harder to muster up the motivation to get out on a long pedal on a bike this heavy. Who knows, maybe I'm just getting soft.

Yes, I realize the Collosus isn't some crazy expensive, carbon fiber wonder bike, and I'm willing to cut it a little slack in the weight department considering its price tag and solid parts kit, but 39 pounds is still pretty chunky. I can't help but wonder how much weight and complication would have been saved by going with a tried-and-true Horst Link layout, rather than sticking on the links required for the IFS suspension layout?

Weight aside, the Collosus does pedal well, especially for a bike with 170mm of travel. The suspension is calm enough that I didn't feel the need to flip the Float X2's climb switch, and even on longer fire road grinds I was perfectly content keeping it in the open position. The chainstays are on the shorter side of the spectrum, but the steep seat angle and slack head angle work together to help keep the bike from feeling like it wants to loop out on steep climbs. Even though it's a fairly substantial, slack bike, I didn't find it to be overly difficult to maneuver through tighter switchbacks or more technical sections – it's really the slow rolling tires and overall heft that give it a more subdued feel when heading uphill.

When it comes time to descend, the Collosus isn't the fastest out of the gate, but it feels very solid and ready for anything once it's up to speed. The back end is quite stiff, and that trait combined with the shorter chainstays makes it easy to snap the rear wheel in and out of tight turns, although that does come with slightly reduced traction and stability – at times it felt like the Collosus' rear wheel was more likely to slide through a turn rather than carve a clean arc. It also doesn't have the plushest, most fluttery suspension feel; it'll take the edge off the rough stuff, it just doesn't erase those bigger hits in the same way that some other bikes in this travel bracket do.

Overall, the Collosus N9 delivers a great value when it comes to the parts spec, and the geometry isn't going to hold it back as long as you keep it pointed down steeper, more technical trails. The weight is the biggest downside, although that might not be much of a concern for riders who spend most of their time climbing inside a shuttle vehicle or sitting on a chairlift.






303 Comments

  • 180 12
 Looks sick but I Poly-not-gonna buy it.
  • 64 47
 Pair an overcomplicated linkage with a grenade of a shock, prime it with 39 lbs of starting weight and you literally have a grenade. Colored like one too
  • 222 9
 So the spire at ~37 pounds is the best pedaling big bike ever then you got this “pig” at 39 pounds and it’s borderline unridable?? Got it
@mininhi:
  • 51 4
 @BambaClaat: I regularly ride Meta with coil, E1900 wheels etc. and I am sure it has similar weight, still have no problem overtaking boys on Santa's uphill. Just a matter of attitude.
  • 20 5
 @BambaClaat: isn’t the Spire in the region of 33ish lbs? Smile
  • 25 0
 @lkubica: not to take anything from your abilities, but Santas are anything but light )
  • 35 1
 @mininhi: literally?
  • 13 0
 Did polygon already increase the price on this? Website says $3499 although spec is slightly different (yes I'd pay an extra $200 for the 38 performance elite listed, but the deore cassette is heavy)

Still this seems like a great deal these days for the build on it. Could probably drop a little over a pound with wheels and tires when they die/blow up.
  • 18 2
 they’re
Poly all gon
  • 3 0
 @hatton: The difference between the Deore and XT cassette is like .5% of this bike's total weight. It sucks they downgraded but like you said, save the weight on tires and wheels once they get wrecked.
  • 2 0
 @hitarpotar: if you buy it in a spec that costs over twice more perhaps. Similar tires and basic parts, it'll be close to this
  • 1 1
 Oh snap!
  • 2 1
 @mafflin: Still guessing in 15kg range? Lighter then a Meta with coil for sure, and we are not talking about S-level builds here Smile
  • 1 0
 5lbs too heavy unfortunately .
  • 1 0
 Need frame weight...?
  • 4 0
 @hitarpotar: maybe a light build on the carbon frame. My medium alloy with flow ex3 wheels, trail tires, lyrik, ohlins ttx2 air, X01 drivetrain, carbon bars, etc. was in the 38 lbs range
  • 3 0
 i cant afford it
  • 16 0
 @mafflin: bro santa weighs at least 250, before milk and cookies
  • 2 0
 @lkubica: same- Lg Meta TR mulleted with a 222mm coil. 17.6kg handled my last three day back country ride no problems.
  • 2 0
 @hitarpotar: not my xl alloy it's probably 38 with cushcores and deore drivetrain.
  • 3 0
 @mininhi: I think the shock gets a bad wrap. The stiff junction of the trunion along with yokes and flexy rear ends transmit a lot of lateral force into the shocks, causing a lot of these issues. It looks like polygon with the braced swing arm and spherical bearings should help reduce a lot of these forces put on the shock.
  • 10 1
 @BambaClaat: I think they probably committed the rookie mistake of weighing a size L with pedals on - weigh the size M with no pedals and she'll be 37lbs right in line with the Spire.
  • 1 0
 Colossus - name checks out
  • 2 0
 @lkubica: Yes, and attitude changes with fitness.
  • 1 0
 @mininhi: whats wrong with this shock? Been beating on one for 3 years without servicing it and it works a charm.
  • 1 0
 @jrocksdh: I'll bet it's 10.5lbs +/-.5lbs
  • 6 0
 @tom666, I'm no rookie - that weight is for a size large, no pedals, set up tubeless.
  • 4 0
 @mikekazimer: Ah nice. I thought we were comparing to a claimed weight which is always size M no pedals Salute
  • 1 0
 @lkubica: and maybe fitness?
  • 98 0
 I love the price, I love the components, I love the geometry, I love the way it looks.. they really nailed it
  • 20 0
 i've been rocking a 140mm Polygon Siskiu T8 for a year and a half, the thing is solid, the geo is spot on and so is the price, from this point add 1000UDS per pound you want to cut off, cheers
  • 29 1
 Bro! What are you DOING??
Your positive comments will throw off the algorithm, the site will lose sponsors cuz people can’t find the place and some Mountain Bike Billionare will have to save it from itself in a futile attempt to regain its bike-hate speech superiority ! Exclamation point!
  • 4 0
 @scary1: In my opinion, when positive comments outweigh negative ones on PB our universe will simply collapse to an infinitely dense point and then it will big bang again, so yeah, if you do not want to reset the universe, stop this positive sh*t, please!
  • 1 1
 @lkubica: yeah, infinitely dense would make the Collosus weigh even more
  • 1 0
 Yep loving everything about this bike. Always had a soft spot for Polygons.
  • 1 0
 Totally agree, it looks great, well thought out spec, and great value.
  • 68 0
 Only 4 lb heavier than that SB160 and house brand wheels and Super Gravity tyres would be making up a lot of that.
  • 16 0
 Yeah I want to know what the frame weighs
  • 13 2
 Indeed, put a proper / lighter pair of wheels on it + a pair of 2,4" tyres (trail type front / enduro casing rear), and it will sensibly improve its behavior. One can also install some carbon fancy components on it, but wheels are the key, always!
  • 27 1
 @danstonQ: agreed with everyone here! Knocking this bike on weight when it's sensibly specced with enduro ready wheels and tyres is ridiculous!

Premium bikes have gone beyond 10k, yet if you buy one you need to replace the piss weak light tyres before you can even use it for its intended purpose.
  • 5 13
flag dododuzzi (Nov 20, 2022 at 8:12) (Below Threshold)
 The weight might not include pedals, and is not verified by a photo on a scale, but I really wonder how anything in the 35-40 pounds range can "pedal well" or encourage "a long pedal". Those are downhill bike weights. Even taking these published weights at face value 40 (polygon) vs 36 (Yeti) pounds is not going to make a a big difference. Try a 26-28 bike and experience the difference!
  • 16 1
 @dododuzzi: What does a 26-28 lbs bike with 170mm of suspension cost?
  • 11 1
 @plyawn: More than anyone on Pinkbike can afford.
  • 3 1
 @plyawn: Probably less than a 35+ lbs Santa or Yeti in "top" spec.
  • 8 1
 @plyawn: there is no 160-170mm forked bike weighting under 29#
  • 3 5
 @dododuzzi: Weight was so 2010s, good geometry solves all problems. Even at this reasonable price new bikes put such a dent in your wallet that you dont even feel the few exptra pound. Now if it had headset cable routing that would be a different story.
  • 1 0
 @plyawn: "If you have to ask..." I think
  • 4 1
 @dododuzzi: I will never trust a sub 30# bike for aggressive riding. Too skittery when the trail gets loose. XC or 50 mile+ days are what light bikes excell at.
  • 2 1
 @MutleyAdams: ~31lbs is totally doable though. Source: my bike. Wink Also my previous bike was under 29lbs and even though some components might seem a little underpowered compared to the latest arguably overkill build specs it was tough enough for my svelte 90kg to ride, huck, and race on for several years.
  • 1 1
 @MutleyAdams: top end Scott Ransom carbon builds are 29-30ish with fox 38s, inserts, and pedals. Few bike-checks on vital can back that up. With deep pockets 28 wouldn't be too hard to hit.
  • 1 0
 Considering where all the metal is going, I suppose the mass is nice and low on this bike. Doesn't hurt really. I'm a bit worried about something getting stuck between chainstay and seattube though as that could damage things as the suspension compresses. A neoprene or rubber wrap could solve that.
  • 8 0
 @ponyboy24: stop trying to use logic on here. People need 2 things to complain about:
1 - The cost of expensive and (usually) light bikes with fancy components. Or
2- The weight of reasonably priced bike (with cheaper components) in comparison t the expensive bikes (that they whined about yesterday).

If someone released a reasonably priced, reliable Enduro bike for under $4k that weighed under 35lb then the people on here would explode!
  • 3 0
 @CustardCountry:
We aren't that easy to placate/destroy. It would have the wrong leverage curve, chainstay length, seat tube angle, hub width standard, rotor diameter, cable routing, destroying the planet, be out of stock and not sold in an lbs near me. That is even before said unicorn bike is even made, i will add to the list once released.
  • 1 0
 @plyawn: Gees ... this forum has not changed much! Trigger happy. All I am saying is that the Polygon is close to 40 pounds and the Yeti is 36. There is a $7,000 or so price difference and that ONLY buys you 4 pounds (no doubt because the Yeti frame is very heavy). A bit expensive at more than $1500/pound.

But the main point is that no bike in the 35-40 range will pedal uphill well. Down good, although weight is never good, but up? That weight range is where e-MTB like the just released Orbea Wild are getting close to. Something seems quite off.

@MutleyAdams: my Ibis HD3 160/150 with DVO Topaz/Diamond seats happily at 28 pounds (with pedals). And I could run the Diamond at 170. Plenty bike for my 68Kg weight.
  • 2 0
 @plyawn: They barely exist.
  • 62 5
 I can't seem to find anything to whine about, but I'm gonna do it anyway because that is the pinkbike spirit. It's a polygon.
  • 8 3
 It is a good looking bike and looks like it can just bash, but I will whine about the weight. Lol.
  • 17 1
 Soon to be featured by a youtuber that doesn't know when to say no to sponsored content
  • 12 1
 Should we complain there isn’t routing through the stem to complain about?
  • 1 0
 @vtracer: lol for real
  • 38 1
 Yo yo yo Cheap, Light, Strong, pick two.

Stop complaining it’s heavy ffs it’s cheap and sorted
  • 2 25
flag nozes (Nov 20, 2022 at 13:07) (Below Threshold)
 Stop complaining about others complaining. This is a pig that only comes alive on DH bike territory,not a fun bike to ride everywhere,as it should.
  • 19 1
 @nozes: there’s no such thing as a bike that isn’t fun to ride
  • 2 9
flag nozes (Nov 21, 2022 at 1:31) (Below Threshold)
 @evehmeyer: Did I say that?
  • 2 0
 @nozes: Not to nit pick, but I feel like 170mm bikes should be close to DH bikes in most respects. If you intend to ride more mellow terrain as well, there's a ton of awesome 150mm bikes that fit that category and can still shred a DH track.
  • 30 0
 Thanks for actually not calling it a six-bar for once.

Looks good on paper, except for the weight.

Also, did no one tell Polygon that word is actually spelled Colossus, not Collosus? They spelled it wrong.
  • 12 0
 The Polygon website has such awful grammar in English it hurts. They would do well spending a bit of money fixing that up.
  • 7 0
 @FlightlessLobster: Would you rather they do that and make the bikes cost more though? There’s a reason Yeti has the most convoluted website you’ve ever seen!
  • 4 0
 @HMBA106: To be fair, it's much easier to spell "Yeti" than "Colossus".
  • 19 0
 @FlightlessLobster: Polygon are clearly not Polyglots
  • 3 0
 It's their bike, they can call it what they want! Just be sure to pronounce it differently...
  • 2 0
 Polygon has been using that name for its all-mountain/enduro/freeride/downhill bikes for more than 10 years actually. Back in 2010 I ask a guy from Polygon about this spelling, he said it was intended. This came from a company that has a bike named Cozmic, instead of Cosmic. Their bikes, their prerogative.
  • 29 1
 I wonder if it has enough pivots.
  • 123 0
 It has more pivots than Bernard Kerrs garage
  • 1 0
 What are the benefits of this suspension layout? If anybody could explain this to me that would be great!
  • 2 0
 It could poly use about 4 more
  • 9 0
 @Garantson: the marketing benefit of a proprietary suspension layout is that it’s exclusive to your brand, thus creating a sense of artificial scarcity for potential customers.

There is no advantage to the customer of a proprietary suspension layout. You can achieve a pretty similar suspension kinematic with a bunch of different layouts.
  • 1 0
 @Garantson: The explanation given in the article is that the lower linkage (the one that connects to the chainstay) defines the axle path. Then they have the seatstay linkage that drives the shock. Knolly has a similar approach. Loads of brands dedicate a linkage to driving the shock though many of them are happy to have the rear axle move in a circular path with respect to the frame, so they're not getting the amount of attention this one is getting. But yeah, this one compares to Knolly the way VPP compares to Horst Link.
  • 26 1
 Looks like a sess... status
  • 2 0
 Hopefully with better bearings than the Status
  • 22 0
 A rolling middle finger to much of the industry attempting to make us believe we “need” a $7k+ rig.

Screw them.
  • 6 0
 The one finger wave, as my mother calls it.
  • 18 0
 @mikekazimer thank you for this squish video. These need to be put into pb law
  • 1 0
 Hopefully becomes a pinkbike standard! It's nice to see!
  • 1 0
 That was a particularly satisfying one too. Love how vertical the wheel travel is
  • 1 0
 @Beaconbike: just when it becomes standard, they’ll change it… (but yes this would be a nice thing to have)
  • 15 0
 I don't know how they did it but what a deal. Wonder what they can do with a deore drivetrain and marzocchi suspension..
  • 4 36
flag alexisfire (Nov 19, 2022 at 20:00) (Below Threshold)
 Fall apart
  • 11 0
 They did it by not taking the piss.
  • 2 0
 As an msrp it’s a good deal, compared to other things you can actually buy in the price range not as much.
  • 15 0
 Let's f*cking gooo... Where's the Deore spec sub 3k? SHOW ME
  • 12 2
 My bike is 38 pounds, but with Cush Core and DH casing Maxx Grip Assegais and heavy duty rims. It pedals as if I'm going through sand on the way up, and it takes a steep track to make it go fast on the way down. Great for where I live but there's no way I'd go any heavier. This looks like a very nicely priced whip though.
  • 11 0
 Remember back in the day when people thought 1X drivtrains would save weight?
Time for geometry on this style and weight of bike to be based around a 26-28t front ring, and 10-42t rear cassette.
  • 3 0
 Thank you.
  • 1 0
 It's not the size of your front chain ring that counts but what you can do with it. Or so I have heard.
  • 7 0
 Pinkbike Comments:

"That $10,000 bike is too expensive, why don't you review bikes that are more reasonably priced bikes????"

Also Pinkbike

"That $3600 bike is too heavy, doesn't have a Grip2 damper, and that Deore drive train is too heavy, and the linkage is too complicated"
  • 8 1
 Looks really solid for the money. Cheap, strong, never gonna be light. First upgrade I would give it is a pair of RSC levers and maybe a 220 rotor up front, followed by a faster-rolling rear tire.
  • 17 10
 Chainstays are too short (especially for large and XL) — I had a frame with 485 reach and 435 stays and sold it — balance was off. Have 446 and 452 stays in my quiver now and they ride much better.
  • 2 1
 I’ve got a 520 reach 431.5 stays
  • 8 2
 @Garradmiller: Oh man, how do you ride that pile of shit?

J/k, I love the ESD with 490 reach and a the stays slammed at 471. Yes, it would ride differently if they stays were 450mm. No, I wouldn't like it as much that way.

The BaLaNcEd ChAiNsTaYs gang is probably the most annoying contingent on this site. They remind me of the guys that were sure plus tires were the future a few years ago. Lots of overly complicated explanations for why their personal preference is that only correct way to build a bike. The world already has one Paul Aston...
  • 1 0
 @TheRamma: yes thank you. and you always have to keep in mind that different bodies have different weight and proportions and the weight distribution will be very different. My theory is that a light tall(ish) rider with long legs can fit well on short stays with large frames (that's my personal experience) and heavy dudes with short legs have more difficulty weighing the front wheel.
  • 1 0
 @jzPV: my pet theory is the opposite! I have short legs, and a long torso. Tons of weight up front! getting my weight back far enough to unweight the front is really challenging with long stays. Oh well, I'm just glad somebody is still making those inferior "unbalanced" bikes.
  • 6 1
 That Anti-squat chart has a problem, no way the blue curve is 32/10 if the one below is 32/50 and the bottom one is 32/14. AS evolve through the gear, it doesn't jump all over the chart gear by gear.

Also, providing axle path and anti rise would have been nice to be able to see how much of an actual benefit those two links provide compared to a single pivot with likage or a faux-bar.
  • 2 0
 Yeah the AS chart didn't make sense to me either. As for the linkage, if you ignore the seatstays and just focus on the chainstay yoke and it's links, it's basically a miniature VPP linkage with a really long swingarm. If you follow the intersection of the links it moves the pivot point forwards as it cycles through the travel, which should keep the axle path a bit more linear than you'd get with a single pivot. I wonder if mating it to the faux-bar style seatstay means they avoid any VPP or faux-bar patent infringements.
  • 1 0
 @gibbon-on-an-orange: faux six bar, it is.
  • 8 0
 Nicest looking Polygon I've ever laid eyes on.
  • 7 0
 Measuring the wheelbase to the nearest 10 microns must mean some pretty tight manufacturing tolerances. Impressive stuff!
  • 6 2
 Well as a 2019 n-9 owner I can tell who ever buys this bike better be ready to replace bearings. My 2019 bearings have to be replaced every 600miles (bearings at the bottom bracket) or so without those extra links. Great bike as long as you don’t mind the extra maintenance and the weight. Covid lock downs also will be issue if you need warranty anything. Indonesia. I have experienced that nightmare with Polygon. Would maybe by another bike from polygon (less complex design not this bike). Just Ride.
  • 1 0
 That was the Siskyu style N9 yes? I can tell you that this bike uses bigger bearings than that bike in most of the pivots. I've been working on one for the last year with no bearing roughness or failures.
  • 4 0
 In my book tires make more difference in terms of uphill drag (but also rolling speed when going down).
I had a DD Assegai on the rear once, never again. Going with a little less tire made such a difference! Just swap out the Magic Mary in the rear for a start.
  • 5 0
 A good quality dual suspension bike with XT drive train and Fox 38 for $3,299, post COVID? Did we go through a wormhole and enter an alternate dimension without anyone noticing?!
  • 5 1
 The reviewer complaining about weight seems to confirm the soundness of most manufacturer's strategy of speccing their bikes with relatively lightweigt tires. Some partial blame can be attributed to Polygon, though. A faster rolling tire at the rear would have made the reviewer happier, and the "line" would have been changed to "the weight didn't really bother me" instead.
  • 7 0
 But good bang for your buck at least
  • 8 1
 def down to see more 3k full squish why the fuck not
  • 6 0
 Every new long travel bike seems to be 29r only. As a short guy with short inseam, it makes me sad.
  • 1 0
 With short legs you cąn ride super short cranks too, then low bb on 29" bike with 27,5" wheels should be fine
  • 1 0
 @lightone: the tall front end and a low bb will probably make it feel like riding a scooter.
  • 1 0
 @onetrykid: why would it have tall front if swap both wheels for smaller?
  • 1 0
 The seat tube is nice and short on this. bravo polygon
  • 1 0
 @lightone: You know low BB's are also problematic when you're not pedalling, right?
  • 1 0
 @lightone: the bb will be designed for a 29r that means it will be lower than a frame designed for 275 wheels.
  • 5 0
 Good stuff Polygon, a lot of bike for the money. Good to see not all bike companies are pulling the piss out of us.
  • 2 0
 If these ever end up on sale, I'd consider buying one. I live by some nasty downhill trails that I generally pedal up service road to access. Right now I ride everything on my Ripmo, but it would be nice to put lighter tires on the Ripmo and have something slacker with more reserve for the days when I'm not riding uphill on single track. Most of my rides are shorter and more up and so I can't justify spending a ton on a big bike, but something like this is tempting as a complement.
  • 2 0
 Replace a few things on the bike and it'll be much lighter than the stated weight. Polygon have achieved a reasonably priced bike that is also a capable bike for racing or having fun.
The launch video is full of fun vibes. Epic video. Check the link below if you don't believe me.
m.pinkbike.com/news/video-polygon-launches-2023-collosus-n9.html
  • 5 0
 Seems like a good bike for heavier/stockier riders.
  • 3 0
 I feel seen.
  • 6 0
 Poly-tons
  • 7 6
 All of a sudden 175 mm cranks seem not to be 'ideal'. Not long ago they were everywhere and our friends over here said nothing about this. Do these guys have their own opinions or are they just repeating what someone else says?
If you spend all day riding bikes, trying different components, someone of average intelligence should realize that something was wrong with those colossal cranks.
I actually think 172.5mm cranks are even more ideal because, you know, they have the best of the other two.
  • 4 1
 Short cranks for the win. Went to 165s on my mega and it feels better on my knees and basically don't have pedal strikes anymore. I'd actually go shorter if I could
  • 7 0
 Bikes getting lower to the ground…..
  • 2 0
 @Solorider13: ...knees getting older
  • 2 0
 @briain: I got an Enduro bike (Jekyll) and same I need to go to shorter cranks. At 170, but would prefer shorter. 165 or 160.
  • 2 0
 @woofer2609: ...legs getting from short to shorter as I am getting older
  • 2 0
 We knew they are not ideal for a while. It was just a temporary memory loss that happened when enduro people whoght they are riding xc.
  • 5 1
 Nice to see a bike specd with XT instead of the NX or SX trash that SRAM calls a drivetrain.
  • 1 0
 Something is wrong with the anti-squat chart. It's showing an increasing anti squat from 14 to 51 (14-21-33-51), but then it increases from 51 to 10? It makes no sense. The chart lines are probably mislabeled, the bottom one should be the 51t, and then gradually moving to smaller chainrings with the 10t at top.
  • 1 0
 Polygon still has the best value for a bike you can actually get a hold of. If you swapped the wheelset and tires, you could probably get down to 36lbs just with that change. The wheels on my old polygon were about 2300g I think! But if I bought another polygon I would undo all the pivots and check the bearings as it seems that whoever assembles them overtightens all the pivots.
  • 1 0
 It's interesting to see the comments about rear wheel traction. All summer I was watching Dan Wolfe and Matt Studdard rip this thing around on insta etc. and though it looked like the wheel tracked the ground incredibly well.
  • 2 0
 Haha, @mikekazimer, after our chat at the top of SST about the bike now I'm wondering how this bike compares in a lbs-per-$$ comparison!
  • 1 0
 I love my T8 and was kinda excited to see a FR Siskiu but that suspension design is.... soft from what I heard on the Mt Bromo.... Those MM Super Softs tho are balls to pedal anything but down so, there's that.
  • 1 0
 Bikesonline.com is the worst place to buy a bike from. No support, poor customer service. I sold my polygon frame and bought a specialized. Fixed all of the problems. BIKES ONLINE.com IS A HORRIBLE RETAILER
  • 2 0
 i must say the colour reminds me of my all time fav the Gangreen Heckler colour from 09'.....nice looking bike
  • 3 0
 look at all those bearings needing maintenance......
  • 1 0
 Bearings don't need maintenance! That's their advantage over bushings!
**tongue in cheek alert
  • 3 0
 Wait, shouldn't it be spelled "Colossus", not "Collosus"?
  • 1 0
 Yes.
  • 4 2
 That’s 4 pounds heavier than my aluminium downhill bike! Wow, how did they manage that!
  • 1 0
 Heavy ass wheels.
  • 2 0
 And a 12 speed helps.
  • 2 0
 Easy - that cassette will weigh as much as your whole drivetrain. Cheap dropper. Most other parts likely no lighter...
  • 3 1
 How can a 29er not be mullet compatibele? I can't think of anything that wouldn't fit.
  • 2 1
 @panchocampbell: the 175mm cranks most likely.
  • 2 0
 I think not compatible is just the default thing to say if it’s not recommended.
  • 2 0
 I dont think its incompatible but mounting a mullet means altering the whole geometry . For starters, the rear wheel drops around 15mm and therefore, HTA gets slacker, STA gets steeper, BB drops, reach/stack changes too, and so on.
  • 2 0
 I'd rather say that seat angle gets slacker
  • 1 0
 @Benito-Camelas: I know, but it's not like it would be unrideable?
  • 3 0
 FYI if you go on their website this bike is $3499 not $3299.
  • 4 0
 Also the spec is slightly different than what’s listed in the article and on Kaz’s demo bike

Frame ALX AM/ENDURO 160mm TRAVEL
Fork FOX 38 FLOAT PERFORMANCE ELITE, 170mm TRAVEL

Rear Shock FOX FLOAT X2, E2E: 205x65mm
Shifter SHIMANO XT SL-M8100-R 12-SPEED TRIGGER

Crank Set SHIMANO XT FC-M8100-1 32T, MAX CHAIN RING: 36T, CRANK ARM: 170mm

Cassette SHIMANO DEORE CS-M6100 12-SPEED 10-51T

Rear Derailleur SHIMANO XT RD-M8100-SGS 12-SPEED

Wheel Set ENTITY XL3 TUBELESS READY

Tire SCHWALBE MAGIC MARY EVO 29"x2.60" 622x65 SUPER GRAVITY TLE ADDIX SOFT

Brake Lever SRAM CODE R
Brake Caliper SRAM CODE R HYDRAULIC DISC
Rotor SRAM CENTERLINE 200mm CL
  • 3 1
 Flow mountain bike quoted the frame w/ X2 shock at 4.5kg oooffff
  • 1 0
 @panchocampbell: their site has a disclaimer that some components may be different than the spec sheet.

I haven't looked it up on their site, but sometimes their sizes have different prices too.
  • 5 0
 @loudv8noises: that's really not so far off what a proper burly alloy enduro frame from a reputable company typically weighs. Transition has the medium Spire at 4.8kg with the same shock. Privateer has the small 161 at 3.7kg without shock (the X2 is ~650g).
RAAW has the Madonna at 3.9kg. A boutique Reeb Sqweeb in Large is 3.77kg without shock. Hopefully suggests the Poly can take a beating.
  • 1 0
 @loudv8noises: Τhat's similar to Privateer frames
  • 1 0
 @jdejace: a Radon swoop is 3.3kg and can take a beating... There's no excuse for heavy Al frames. It's not a deal breaker, but just shows what design/manufacturing couldn't achieve
  • 2 0
 Frame is 9.9lb. Spire is 10.6lb in alloy. Make some component/tire changes and weight wouldn't be crazy unreasonable.
  • 2 3
 bike looks great and price is refreshing, but 6 link suspension is dumb. 4 link bikes are already a bitch to maintain. Bikes need flex pivots and simplicity, not more parts. I regularly work with linkage dynamics and the benefits obtained in wheel path and pedaling dynamics are simply theoretical as in reality tolerance stacks, flex, and weight all eat away any possible gains. If this wasnt the case people wouldnt still regularly be winning on faux pivots.
  • 2 0
 Its cool to see new "budget" bikes but the Ripmo AF deore comes in at 34lbs without pedals and are still on sale for $2900.
  • 2 0
 in my shop we call them "polygon-wrong" due to the amount of kids abusing the cheaper models
  • 3 0
 Sounds like a lot of fun is being had!
  • 2 0
 Im not weight weener, but 39 lbs? My ripmo AF with a heavy ass coil is lbs lighter and 2.5 minions. Seems strangely obese
  • 5 0
 You really only need 2 minions. Where do you put that half a tire anyway?
  • 3 1
 Entire industry shifting towards shorter cranks... Let's go 175...?
  • 6 2
 155 please
  • 3 0
 “Hey we can give you the 175s oem for half the price of the 165s”
  • 3 2
 Yeah, Kazimer, you ARE getting softer. I mean, for a true Collosus, 39 lb.s would add up to a good bowel movement...
  • 1 3
 They did very well but could've done better. Swap the 6bar bs with a horst or linkage driven SP, better chainstay protection, longer (or even size specific but I doubt polygon would do that) chainstays, drop a little frame weight and you would have other bike companies chattering their teeth.

Also, is that seatstay brace removable? Could it be another tuning option as seen on the frameworks bikes (might fix that stiff rear end)?
  • 1 1
 That's a deore cassette. SLX has an aluminum gear. Also, collosus isn't a word. The correct spelling is colossus, a direct transliteration from the latin and greek.
  • 4 0
 It's as much a word as "Devinci" is a word, I suppose. (Unless they've been spelling it wrong all these years too.)
  • 6 0
 If you want to be pedant be correct. Latin uses the same alphabet so there is no need to transliterate. From Greek it would be transliterated as Kolossos. But it is a name. It doesn't have to be an existing word. SB160 isn't a word either. Tallboy has a space missing. What about Hugene?

It may also be a wordplay on the Italian word "Colle" which means mountain pass. The same word means 'glue' in French so it would be an awesome name for a bonded bike.
  • 1 0
 @ak-77: thank you. I get grumpy when someone corrects the "misspelling" of a marketing managers idea of a cool name. Your examples are perfect I wish I could think of more
  • 3 0
 Got one! Megadeth and Motley Crue !
  • 1 0
 16 cartridge bearings?! this is gonna be like a 2006 santa cruz V10, squeeky, creeky and every 6 month replacements
  • 1 1
 Weight is pretty reasonable. I had a 2022 Specialized Stumpjumper Carbon and that weighed around 38lb and climbed perfectly well.
  • 2 0
 30 is the new 20 for people, but apparently for bikes, 40 is the new 30.
  • 2 0
 Looks all good but the 29” ;(
  • 2 0
 No headset cable routing...I'm out.
  • 2 0
 What are those? Bearings for ants?
  • 2 0
 YES BEST BIKE WITH GREAT PRICE.
  • 1 0
 Looks like a STATUS!!! Well, the frame weight on both is quite simillar. Why should we complain on this one?
  • 1 0
 "To anyone who says that weight doesn't matter, I encourage you to take the Collosus out for a spin" it's auto referencial
  • 1 2
 What's the purpose of the 6 bar linkage exactly? All I can see is really inconsistent antisquat values across the cassette, and extra weight.
  • 3 1
 It's a dual-link four-bar. If you remove the seatstay, the wheel path remains constrained.

The anti-squat curves are a lot more compressed than the y-axis scale on the anti-squat graph makes it look. And anyway, falling anti-squat as you go down the cassette is a positive characteristic, right?
  • 1 5
flag AgrAde (Nov 20, 2022 at 0:50) (Below Threshold)
 @boozed: Tomato tomato. Just like a "faux bar" linkage gives you a single pivot axle path with a four bar linkage, this gives you a four bar axle path with a 6 bar linkage. It has 6 bars. It's a 6 bar linkage. And my point is, it gives us, what exactly?

If you believe polygon's graph, it actually has the most AS in the 10t. The line below that is the 51t. Then the others below that are in the mid cassette. I'm assuming it's a mistake, but.
  • 1 1
 It seems to be the main culprit for the lack of small bump compliance, with the wheel moving forward as it actuates. Strange choice.
  • 3 0
 @AgrAde: if this is a 6 bar, then so is Knolly's system. (It's not)
  • 1 3
 @AndrewHornor: Just because you don't want to call a 6 bar linkage a 6 bar linkage, doesn't mean that it isn't a six bar linkage.

Just because the axle path is defined by a four bar loop in a six bar linkage doesn't change the fact that there are six bars in the linkage.

You're arguing against a general engineering term that is not specific to bikes and has been defined for hundreds of years.
  • 2 0
 @AgrAde: alright, the whole industry may be technically incorrect for all I know, but there's been decades of talking about it in terms of axle path - I'm not sure that will change anytime soon.
  • 2 0
 @AgrAde: By your definition an Evil is a four bar.
  • 1 0
 @BenPea: With that much anti-squat there is no way the axle is moving forward in the first part of the travel
  • 1 2
 @boozed: I mean, yeah, technically it is. I would bet you an evil frame that Dave Weagle would agree with me that the Evil delta link is a four bar linkage system, With the axle and brake connected to a bar adjacent to the main frame, making the axle path/AS/AR dependent on only those two bars, with the other two bars being responsible for the actuation of the shock. The delta link requires all four of those bars.

Can you call it a single pivot with a linkage actuated shock? Sure. You can also call it a four bar linkage.

Not quite sure when a bunch of mountain bikers got it in their heads that "four bar" = a virtual pivot, but I think it's because everyone equates it with horst link. But pretty much everything is a four bar design. Horst. DW link. VPP. Delta. Split Pivot. Maestro. Saracen bikes, Kona bikes, and whatever else. The only things that aren't are two-bar designs like Orange, weird shit with flex pivots which you often can't define as having bar elements, and 6 bar designs, whether the axle path is controlled by all six bars (commencal supreme, felt, atherton, yeti ebike) or whether four are used to control the axle and brake with two more used to actuate the shock (this, knolly).

If I was specifically talking about the four bar part of the linkage system that relates the axle and rear brake to the main frame in isolation, and referred to just that part as a six bar, then sure, shoot me. But even if it wasn't originally clear, I was talking about the entire linkage system which has six f*cking bars in it and so I will call it a 6 bar linkage if I want.
  • 2 0
 @AgrAde: call it 6bar, but call all linkage driven single pivots 4 bar too. Be consistent. Then be amazed at how people will think you're crazy for calling a single pivot a 4 bar.

Also, if it's about the bars in the system, we're sooner or later have a 10bar system. Because marketing.

If makes sense to call the system by the number of bars the rear axle needs to not flop around in the space as that determines a lot of suspension characteristics. Additional bars for the shock only tune (and decouple) the shock characteristic.

I mean, yeah, technically you're correct. It is 6bar. I'm not arguing that in the slightest. But the majority of people don't agree that it's a 6bar (me included) for consistency's and clarity's sake. If you're willing to die on this hill, go ahead. It looks like it will be a lonely graveyard.
  • 2 1
 @Primoz: Well a single-pivot 4-bar is known as a "faux bar", so can we call this design a "sex bar"?
  • 1 1
 @chakaping: you, sir, win the internet.
  • 2 0
 ~41lbs with pedals. :/
  • 1 1
 If you're using bricks as pedals, maybe. Most flats are well under a pound.
  • 2 0
 God knows how much with pedals, inserts and a dual ply rear tire. I'm okay with heavy bikes, but here I am with a heavy AF Status with a 38, X2 and bombproof components on it and I'm almost 4lb lighter than this thing.
  • 1 0
 @woofer2609: Oh ok, 40.5 then. Big Grin
  • 1 0
 This would make an awesome doner bike!,provided the frame would sell.
  • 3 0
 Doner bike? Like a kebab? A kebab bike?
  • 1 0
 Seriously, are there two spellings?
  • 1 0
 e-bike weight but still a cool bike.
  • 1 0
 Remember when the industry made light bikes...39 pds is just to heavy
  • 2 0
 lbs or # not pds
  • 1 0
 If it's modestly (ok "modestly") priced and available then why not?
  • 1 0
 40 pounds almost
  • 1 2
 Give it some high end brakes and performance elite level suspension, and I'll buy one right now.
  • 4 3
 40 fu*king pounds!?!?!??
  • 1 1
 My Thunder chunk e bike with 2008 dual crowns weighs less.
  • 2 0
 Dual crowns weigh about the same as the new big Enduro forks but their better somehow
  • 2 5
 You can find bikes of this caliber at your local shop right now, maybe a bit better for same or less money...if you shop around, but, wanna just get a good bike at a decent price, this doesn't look bad.
  • 4 0
 Not my local shop.
  • 1 3
 I’m no weight weenie, but that’s crazy heavy. Scott ransom 930 is similarly priced, same amount of travel and weighs 5 lbs less.
  • 18 0
 That Ransom has a Domain R which must be a contender for worst suspension component available at the moment. The rest of the spec is irrelevant with that turd smeared over the front end.
  • 4 1
 @PhillipJ: Scott either has totally crapy suspension or some sh*t with lockouts which you need to replace anyway.
  • 1 1
 I’m gonna buy this for my 16 year old brother hehe, sucker
  • 1 0
 no high pivot?
  • 1 0
 needs a kogel kolossos
  • 1 0
 17.8kg wth
  • 1 0
 Catalog frame, yea?
  • 4 4
 39 lbs
  • 16 0
 Yeah but its $3k and 170mm
  • 2 0
 @samg7: if the thing was 35lbs people would be on board.
  • 7 0
 @panchocampbell: pinkbike just tested a 37lb "downcountry" bike, so this seems reasonable to me.
  • 1 0
 Swap wheels out with the money you are not spending with one of the "big" brands and it is in the same range as most of the others.
  • 1 1
 @jmhills: Negative. Even if the wheels are 5 lbs, even the lightest wheels are heavier than nothing. I doubt even a flyweight xc wheelset (which would NOT be the right wheelset for this bike) would end up cutting more than 2.5lbs.
  • 3 0
 @adamszymkowicz: I've got an Entity 29" wheelset in the basement that came off my wife's Siskiu T8, Hans Dampf 2.6 SpeedGrip with tubes and rotors, and the whole setup comes in at 5.52kg/12.1lbs.

The Hans Dampfs weigh 1150g each vs the Magic Marys on the N9 which are 1370g so that's another pound, plus the rims probably weigh a bit more as they are i35 vs i30 on the T8, so you're starting with possibly a 14lbs wheel setup.

Nukeproof Horizon V2 wheelset with 2.4WT DHR2 MaxxTerras would weigh a little over 9lbs, so a 4-5lbs weight reduction for ~$500.
  • 2 0
 @ChiefSilverback: I knocked 3 lbs off my t8 just by changing out the 2.6 veetireco snaps, going tubeless and swapping the stem and handlebar for a 31.8 clamp setup.

The stock wheels are boat anchors, I just haven't pulled the trigger on swapping them out yet.
  • 1 3
 40 pounds is a healthy horse for sure. Can it get down to 34/35 pounds and still be a weapon?
  • 4 0
 I just can't see 5lbs to shed. Unless the wheels are absolute anchors and this was weighed with DH tubes, no way you're shedding more than 2lbs without spending $2k+.
  • 1 0
 @adamszymkowicz: a lighter cassette would remove about 0.4 pounds
  • 1 0
 Shorter cranks would take about 0.1 pounds off
  • 3 0
 Berd spokes would shave another 0.5 pounds
  • 1 0
 2.4 inch tires another 0.4
  • 1 0
 Another 0.1 with xtr dérailleur
  • 3 0
 @adamszymkowicz: it's got Super Gravity tyres, drop a pound there just by changing to the Exo+ that everyone else seems to be putting on big bikes.
  • 1 0
 Another 0.5 pounds by stripping the paint off
  • 2 0
 @wburnes: I’m guessing you’re joking, but in the event you’re not, what you’ve described there is probably $2k, so my point stands.
  • 3 0
 Skip a meal.
  • 1 0
 @adamszymkowicz: the wheels are anchors indeed. The wheels on my siskiu t were 2300+g.
  • 1 0
 @adamszymkowicz: See my comment above, I've got a take-off wheelset from the Siskiu T8 sitting in my basement, unridden, 2.6 Hans Dampf, tubes, with rotors the pair weigh 12.1lbs. The Magic Marys are 1lb heavier than the Hans Dampf for that pair, and the Colossus is running i35 rims rather than i30s on the T8, so you could be up to 14lbs for the stock wheels/tires/tubes....
  • 2 5
 One bike to rule them all! With two wheelsets(one heavy,one light) a bike like this works for xc race(sure if you aim at podium its heavy) to enduro
  • 2 0
 I'm sorry, but no. This will not work in any xc race ever.
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