First Ride: 2022 Polygon Mt Bromo - A Relatively Affordable eMTB With Six-Bar Suspension

Apr 21, 2021
by Seb Stott  


Polygon's first full-suspension eMTB could hardly be accused of following the crowd. Polygon is no stranger to unusual suspension layouts, having used the equally radical R3ACT suspension system in the past, but Polygon told me they have no new models in the pipeline with this design. Instead, the Mt Bromo uses a six-bar suspension design they call Independent Floating Suspension (IFS). The basic idea, as its name implies, is to control the wheel path and anti-squat independently of the leverage curve.

There are two models: the N7 ($4,399) and N8 ($5,999) - these prices have gone up since we recorded the above video. That still seems quite good value to me though, especially when compared to Specialized's new Levo.

Polygon Mt Bromo Details

• Wheelsize: 29" only
• Travel: 160mm front and rear
• Motor: Shimano EP8, 504Wh battery
• Alloy frame
• 64.5° head angle
• 77-degree effective seat angle
• Chainstay length: 435mm
• Reach: 510mm (XL)
• Weight: 25kg / 55.1lbs (XL)
• Sizes: S - XL
• Price: $5,999 (revised up since recording the video)
.polygonbikes.com

I've also had time to grab a few rides on the Mt Bromo since recording the video so scroll down for a first impression of how it rides.

16.04.21. Pinkbike Forest of Dean Rider Seb Stott. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography

Suspension Design


Although the suspension looks wild, it’s similar to the six-bar designs seen on the Specialized Enduro or Canyon Sender CF in that there’s a four-bar linkage which just dictates the axle path, anti-squat and anti-rise, then the other two links can be deigned independently to optimize the leverage curve (the progression). With a four-bar design, one of the frame members which dictates the axle path also drives the shock, and these separate considerations can lead to compromises, at least according to six-bar proponents.

Polygon's six-bar linkage is made up of a pair of counter-rotating short links just above the motor, which form a four-bar linkage connecting the mainframe to the swingarm. This determines the axle path all on its own. Meanwhile the seatstay and rocker link are there purely to drive the shock, as well adding stiffness, and bring the number of frame members up to six.

Two short links sit above the motor, leaving plenty of space behind the motor housing.
Shimano EP8
Most ebikes, like this Merida, have a pivot behind the motor, which limits how close the rear wheel can get.

Most ebikes have a physical pivot somewhere above and behind the motor, which is where it needs to be in order to have a reasonable amount of anti-squat. Polygon's design allows them to have all the pivots further out of the way above (not behind) the motor. This, along with the elevated chainstay, allows them to shorten the chainstay length to 435mm while fitting a 29" wheel with a 2.6" tire. To the best of my knowledge, you won't find a shorter rear-center on a full-suspension ebike. (More on whether this is actually a good thing later.)

Theoretically, you might be able to get the chainstay this short by placing a pivot directly above (rather than slightly behind) the motor, but this would mean very high levels of anti-squat. The Mt Bromo's two short links create an Instant Center ("virtual pivot") which sits inside the motor, somewhere you couldn't place a physical pivot. This results in about 115% anti-squat at sag, depending on what gear you’re in. That's still on the higher side, but nothing out of the ordinary. In my opinion you don’t want any more anti-squat than this on an ebike because being able to pedal smoothly over rough terrain is half the fun. The Instant Center also moves downwards as the suspension compresses. That means the anti-squat drops off steeply later in the travel, which reduces pedal-kickback.

The other part of the "independent" suspension design is the leverage curve, which is moderately progressive with most of the progression happening at the start of the travel. The leverage ratio stays within a typical range too, so Polygon hasn't used the freedom of the six-bar design to do something particularly radical here.

The anti-squat is moderately high in the first part of the travel before dropping off steeply.
The leverage curve offers a modest 15% progression (measured from 0 to 100% travel).


Frame Details

The Mt Bromo's frame is all-alloy and there are no plans for a carbon version. There's no space for a water bottle above the down-tube, into which the battery slots in from below with its own integrated cover. Like many eMTBs, there are rubber bumpers on the downtube to stop the fork crown / bars turning too far, though the crown clears the downtube anyway so you could remove them if you wanted to. The internal cable routing is pretty neat and rattle-free. The paint has an iridescent quality giving it a rainbow reflective look in bright light.

Polygon has gone with the Shimano EP8 motor along with the 504Wh battery, so you won’t get as much range as many of the latest ebikes which often have 630Wh or more. Don’t think that smaller battery makes it lightweight, though. This XL bike weighs 25Kg exactly on my scale, or 55.1lbs. But considering the burly parts, I wouldn’t say that weight is drastically higher than many other ebikes in this category.


16.04.21. Pinkbike Forest of Dean Rider Seb Stott. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography

Build Kit

I've ridden the top spec model, the N8, which costs $5,999. For that you get a four-way-adjustable Fox Float X2 shock and a Fox 38 fork with the Grip damper. The drivetrain and brakes are Shimano XT, with a Deore cassette and chain. The hubs are Shimano XT too – you don’t see too many of those these days. The N7 ($4,399) uses a Deore-based group, Fox DPX2 shock and SR Suntour Durolux fork. You also get Shimano's E7000 motor instead of the more punchy EP8. With either bike, the wheels have a 35mm internal width and are shod with 2.6” Schwalbe Magic Mary tires in the SuperGravity casing. That’s a big thumbs up form me. Too many ebikes come with lightweight tire casings which just aren’t strong enough, and I like the extra suppleness and grip of the 2.6” over the 2.35” version, whether on an ebike or not. The short 160mm crank arms also help to reduce pedal strikes when pedaling over rocky terrain.


Geometry

The MT Bromo is up to date but nothing too radical. You get a 64.5 degree head angle and a fairly steep 77-degree effective seat angle, which helps offset that short rear center when climbing. The reach figure changes by 20mm between frame sizes, from 450mm for the small to 510mm for the XL. The wheelbase in this XL is 1280mm - not outrageously long but not short either. The short 435mm rear-center is what sets this bike apart from the competition.


16.04.21. Pinkbike Forest of Dean Rider Seb Stott. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography


Ride Impressions

The short chainstay is something Polygon have clearly worked hard to achieve and it has a noticeable effect on the ride. While I'm a fan of long chainstays on regular mountain bikes, an eMTB is a different ballgame. The extra weight in the downtube can make them a lump to manual or hop over obstacles, especially when combined with chainstay lengths which are often north of 450mm. And while front-end traction can be an issue with short chainstays, the substantial sprung mass of the battery, plus burly tires and supple fork ensured I had no such issues here. The steep seat angle means it's no drama keeping the front wheel from lifting on steep climbs either. The position feels nice and upright and the suspension stays high in its travel. At the same time, there's plenty of suppleness and traction when pedaling over bumpy ground; there's none of the choppy ride feel which can occur with very high anti-squat suspension.

And although it's undeniably heavy to lift over fences or into a car, it's surprisingly easy to loft the front wheel and hop over obstacles while riding. Okay, it's no BMX, but relative to most other full-power ebikes it's very easy to manual. At 190cm (6'3"), this is something I particularly enjoyed when riding the Mt Bromo, so I imagine the short chainstay will be even more beneficial to shorter riders.

16.04.21. Pinkbike Forest of Dean Rider Seb Stott. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography

As for the six-bar suspension, it works well enough. It's not the most progressive out of the box but it doesn't bottom-out harshly, thanks in part to the X2's large bottom-out bumper. I've far from optimized the setup of the X2 shock, but its rebound needs to be run close to fully open to get the most from it - I'm currently fully open on HSR and four clicks from open on LSR. Set up like this, it's very supple but still predictable, with no odd quirks to tune-out or get used to. Still, I don't think the six frame members and seven pivot locations provide a tangible advantage over more conventional designs in terms of suspension performance. The main benefit is that it allows for those short chainstays.

With an inseam of 93cm, I had to run the seatpost at the minimum insert line and the bars are a few centimetres lower than I'd like, so the XL isn't going to work for very tall riders without some modifications.

Nevertheless, I got to grips with the MT Bromo quickly and found that I could ride it pretty fast within the first ride. The geometry, suspension and tires work well together, providing impressive grip and stability to truck on without any nasty surprises or weak links. My biggest complaint is the 504Wh battery, which stops the fun too soon when compared to bigger-battery ebikes.




Pond Beaver 2021




Photos: Andy Lloyd


132 Comments

  • 65 4
 How come Polygon comes up with more new suspension designs than the rest of the industry combined? I mean, last one turned out to be really off, but this one looks way more promising!
  • 7 2
 They're trying to catch lightning in a bottle. Hoping for the "next big thing," in mtb design.
  • 25 0
 I was hoping it would be a 9 bar!
  • 24 1
 Have you ridden the last one, to say that it is "really off"? (REACT) I did and I'd disagree
  • 10 0
 @embi: agree, when Kyle warner road for Marin he had a 180 react and I was on a hightower. That thing pedaled better and the suspenson felt amazing.

I think its death was cause it was Friggen hideous.

I only know one guy who would ride it, and he has one of those praying mantis looking bikes now (linkage front end).

I dunno, think its just you can only step so far out of the box and still be acceptable - but the REACT seemed pretty legit to me.
  • 12 2
 R3act suspension is damn fine, I loved it. But the bike looks hideous
  • 4 0
 They ride so nice it’s not funny. I spent close to a year waiting on a react bike to come in my size, was always promised on the next container. I was bummed to finally be told they won’t be getting anymore. Bicyclesonline.com.au are lying pricks and I likely dodged a bullet, save having to deal with their service if I had a problem down the line. I bought another torque but would still rather be on a react bike.
  • 2 1
 @embi: While I'm one of the first who would try unconventional things (didn't have the chance to ride react bike yet because I think I've only seen one in the wild) we should agree that in the end its the market that determines whats "in" and whats "off" and considering this article states there will be no more polygon react bikes thats a clear sign of what market does not want... Even though pretty much every review I've ever read praised the suspension performance of react, that turned out not to be enough Frown
  • 2 0
 @sewer-rat: followed by a free bar.
  • 4 0
 You really should give the react one a chance, just for a demo. I'm on my 3rd season on mine and as a 180mm travel bike it pedals way better than my 140mm name brand carbon bike that it replaced.
  • 2 0
 I dunno...that's a LOT of bearings. I'll bet chasing creaks out of that frame would be a nightmare
  • 3 4
 from the article: it’s similar to the six-bar designs seen on the Specialized Enduro...
is it? The Enduro is a Horst link bike, and isn't this a linkage driven single pivot? It has more in common with a Kona I would have thought, although with substantially different main pivot location and the small links to control leverage curve. I should have paid more attention in Physics...
  • 3 0
 @shredddr: its definitely not a single pivot
  • 3 0
 @shredddr: you wouldn't be able to call it a single pivot because all the crazy linkages on the lower pivot create a virtual pivot point and control axle path, leverage and the location of the virtual pivot. However, it is a single beam, above the rear axle driving the shock (la-la Kona, Commencal, Marin) so in that regard you are correct. It's kind of a mashup of a lot of different designs from what I see. Specialized, Kona, old school Marins, Scott and a bit of the most recent Jamis design. I'd love to get my hands on one to see how it rides.
  • 1 2
 @shredddr: it is a 4 bar with a linkage driven shock.

It is definitely not a 6 bar.
  • 1 0
 @shredddr:
Looks closer to a DW or VPP with 2 linkages on the rear triangle. The seat stay here acts as an additional linkage and the chain stays are basically just slimmed down rear triangle.
Why isn’t there a video of the suspension in action?
  • 1 0
 @Trudeez: i didn't realize that lower pivot was moving relative to the bb. i'd like to see an animated graphic. anyway, thanks for the replies all.
  • 2 0
 @shredddr : Yeah, Enduro/Demo and Sender ARE horst-links/four-bars with respect to the axle path, but the shock is driven off 2 more links (that's 6 total) that can be changed without the axle-path changing at all. That's the key: the separation. Knolly's 4byFour is also a Horst-link re: wheel path, also with 2 more bars (in a very different location) for independent leverage curve management.

If you try to think of this as a four-bar with a reeeaally long drop-out (like longer than most chainstays), it might help to visualize how its similar. Can do the same with VPP, dw-link, or other short-link designs: the rear triangle is like a huge drop-out and the links are like mini chainstays and seatstays.
  • 1 0
 @shredddr: "i didn't realize that lower pivot was moving relative to the bb"

There are FOUR lower pivots, that's the key. They make one virtual pivot that does, as you noted, move relative to the BB. Those four pivots together define the axle path, same as the entirety of a four-bar system, and just as a single-pivot defines it's axle path completely with the main pivot.

Difference is that a single-pivot can only have a single arc for an axle path, while the others can modify the axle-path. Similarity is that single pivots also completely isolate the axle path (is always one arc) from the leverage curve (defined by the seatstay and rocker combo)

Polygon is trying for the best of both those worlds (tunable axle-path and independent leverage curve), while also getting a nice way to have super short chainstays even with a motor there.
  • 1 0
 @shredddr: theres a video on the competing MTB website. Vit*lmtb.
  • 1 1
 @shredddr: While I agree with you on the Enduro, this one is a true 6 bar linkage. The "main" pivot for the chainstays moves during the travel, placing itself forwards, thus reducing pedal kickback while maintaining very nice antissquat figures.
  • 1 1
 @Notmeatall: here’s a better way of thinking about it. If you take away the upper two bars and just use the lower dour bars, will you have a defined axle path?

In this case you will have a 100% defined axle path. The upper bars have nothing to do with the axle path so it is, by definition, a four bar design.
  • 1 1
 @bogey: Are you sure? IF you remove the seatstays, couldn't you move the chainstays like a single pivot, using only that pivot point that secures the chainstays up and down?
Other thing about the pivot point movint forwards, is that there will be way less pedal kickback relatively to a equivalent 4 bar or single pivot design.
  • 2 1
 @bogey: But it doesn't fully work without those other 2 bars, since they control the movement. Lower part defines, upper part controls, need both. So... it's 6-bar.
  • 1 1
 @Notmeatall: Removing the seatstays on this design is not the same as removing the seatstays on a horst-link. It would be more like removing the rear link from the front of this chainstay. In both cases, the seat-stays play a part in driving the shock, but on a horst-link/four-bar they also play a part in defining the axle path. And that's the difference that makes this a 6-bar: chainstays + two links + the part of the seattube/BB between the 2 links = 4 bars for defining the axle path, and seat stays + rocker link = 2 bars for driving shock. 4 + 2 = 6.
  • 1 2
 @Notmeatall: Yes I'm sure. The upper part of this does nothing but drive the shock. The lower 4 bars define the axle path 100% and this is the actual definition of a 4 bar system.

Just because you don't know or understand the true definition, which is well known in the transportation world, doesn't mean you can redefine it.
  • 55 0
 Kudos for making it to 6 bars, I'm pretty much crawling home after the 3rd or 4th.
  • 3 0
 Well done sir
  • 37 2
 Polygon is making some good looking bikes
  • 98 6
 Actually I take that back
  • 11 1
 @ki3ranb: lmfao
  • 4 0
 @ki3ranb: when you remember about the React
  • 3 0
 And this isn't one of them.
  • 7 0
 Can't believe i'm reading these GEO numbers from an ebike, Polygon really did it this time, huge advantage comparing to the rest of the ebike field. Can't wait to see it in person.
  • 8 0
 Indeed, that "high chainstay" looks better than most attempts of this kind.
  • 2 0
 Reminds me of the Lapierre DH722 - and boy that bike was fast.
  • 6 0
 People, having a 504wh battery is great. Keeps the bike lighter. Carry or drop an extra and you have 1008wh to burn for a huge day. Works for me
  • 2 4
 I just burned mine in 11 miles. 504 suck
  • 4 0
 @alexisfire: You suck for somehow burning through it that quick.
  • 1 0
 It's not even light though.
  • 1 0
 504 Wh would last me like 1000 hours, even on turbo mode, pumping out like 2000 lumens easy for 4 or 5 days!
  • 7 0
 Really don't get the smaller battery
  • 10 0
 although you will go further on a 630 or 700 watt/hr battery, really e-bikes need a 900-1000 watt hr battery so you can ride a big ride, with this I prefer my 500 as it is 6.5 pounds to have one in my pack and gives me all I need. With a 630 or 700 watt the bigger rides you will still need a second one and now you are carrying around a longer, heavier battery and coming home with unused power of 300-400 watt/hrs.
  • 2 0
 @norona: I agree 100%. But... It depends. I'm 88kg with the gear. My 640Wh battery lasts me quite a nice ride in the Alps (1200m if I want to get up there fast, and 1500m if I agree to be a bit slower). To go on really big rides I install 2nd battery (my bike is dual battery capable). Together it's more than 1100Wh. So epic rides are possible. Now there's my "but". If instead my weight was more like 65kg with gear only one battery would be enough for epic rides. And now the debate if 500, 600 or 700Wh battery is better, is very valid. Light rider with 500Wh can go on a nice ride. But with 700Wh he/she may go on a really epic ride. In all this I assumed that the biker is not an old fart using e-bike as an elevator but rather someone who is still strong like a horse and uses e-bike to get up there more quickly.
  • 32 10
 Funny - my bike has no battery at all and I'm still able to go for 'epic' rides.
  • 4 3
 @cirque4: Don't measure others with your measure. I bought it to take my daughter with me on her MacRide. But when I go alone I still prefer it sometimes from my regular enduro bike. I have couple of hours more for family.
  • 7 11
flag cirque4 (Apr 21, 2021 at 13:20) (Below Threshold)
 @goroncy: I agree with you that there is a place for the moped. I don't understand why people think a bigger battery translates to a more 'epic' ride. After all, a 5 hour ride on a bicycle takes the same amount of time as a 5 hour ride on a moped.
  • 4 0
 @alexisalwaysonfire Did you try to be your favorite punk band too?
  • 1 0
 @cirque4: not every day, 1000km a month here in squamish and whistler Smile
  • 2 0
 @cirque4: not the same distance and elevation, you just get more. Happy Riding
  • 3 0
 @goroncy: I weight 64 kg, i raced as a pro for 16 years, 48 km 6000 plus ft up and then down around whistler need two batteries, you are right in a lighter person uses less but not by much. Happy Riding! I have a lot of 24km 3000 ft climb and descend rides near home i do every day, but for the longer ones or 2 hr rides need 2 batteries.
Happy Riding
  • 1 9
flag cirque4 (Apr 21, 2021 at 19:54) (Below Threshold)
 @norona: As a retired pro you know what it means to 'soft pedal'. It's not valid to quote a 1000km/month riding regime if you are not really riding. Take the motor away and your legs are butter - you are doing yourself more harm than good.
  • 7 1
 @cirque4: if you understood training then you would get e-mtb, i never soft pedal, I hammer as hard as I can riding up steep trails and then flowing down, the only difference I do now is have a vastly better cardio workout over a strength workout, and I still ride sleds(for factory ski-doo team) so I get all the strength hauling a sled around everyday all winter. Since I do not race bikes anymore, the e-mtb allows me to push as hard without going deep into my legs, so I can do it again and again and again. Come ride squamish, I can take you on some soft pedal rides ha ha. If I was racing still the e-mtb would be the best training tool for soft pedalling on days we use to spent on the road bike spinning, but the advantage is your riding the train you are racing but able to tune your workout properly. After 16 years of following hr rate and lactate, its nice to go all out every ride and the e-mtb allows that, which is why I love it! cheers dave
  • 2 11
flag cirque4 (Apr 21, 2021 at 21:07) (Below Threshold)
 @norona: Thank you for taking the time to reply. Just for personal back ground - I raced road bikes for 17 years in Ontario, I live in Deep Cove and ride the North Shore, and Squam regularly. I rarely ride Whistler as I hate the dusty gravel they call trails - I find the moped has accelerated trail damage there more than anywhere locally, perhaps why they are banned in some areas. I am in my 60's.

I understand training well enough that if you 'hammer' you are not saving your legs. Also cross-training on a moped is simply not what riders do. But training is a personal thing and if what you say works for you all the more power (batteries) to you.

BTW you have earned some personal notoriety for sledding out of bounds of Brohm Ridge in Garibaldi Park.
  • 8 0
 @cirque4: calm down big man. If you don’t like eebs, don’t get one!
  • 2 2
 @goroncy: Not sure how having an ebike gets you more hours. Unless you only measure your rides by miles...

If I suddenly had some way to go more miles in the few hours I carve out each week for riding, I wouldn't just stop when I hit some mile number and leave some hours on the table, I'd just ride more miles in the given hours.

To me, that's a super backwards way of thinking. If you want to, and get to, spend 3 hours riding, you should spend 3 hours riding, regardless of how many miles it is. An e-bike isn't going to make those hours longer or shorter...

Although in some situations I can see how it can help people get slightly more enjoyment out of those few hours, but that's pretty much only self-shuttling up long [fire] roads, IMO.

Smiles not miles.
  • 2 0
 @justinfoil: Although you are in the opposition to what I said I upvoted you because you have some valid doubts.

No. I don't care about miles. I care about going down when I'm alone. Only. So 2 big downhills in the Alps is what I'm there for. In E-Bike I'm doing it much faster. Because going up takes me a fraction of the normal time.
  • 1 0
 @norona: I'm in Vancouver, and Squamish is ebike Mecca! Love riding my Decoy up there.
  • 1 0
 @goroncy: "In E-Bike I'm doing it much faster."

But you do care about the distance over the time. You want 2 "big" downhills, and you're ok with doing it taking less time. That's literally exactly what I was saying. If you had X hours and could do 2 big downhills without e-power, then why wouldn't you do 3 big downhills in the same X hours with e-power, since it makes it faster?
  • 6 1
 If only it had a 630wh battery, I'd actually seriously be considering this. As it is, the marin alpine e2 is still top of my list.
  • 8 1
 Isn’t Marin and Polygon owned by the same company? Might be why very similar geometry....
  • 1 9
flag SLBIKES (Apr 21, 2021 at 11:27) (Below Threshold)
 @Richt2000: NO
  • 3 0
 @SLBIKES: polygon owns marin. Hence they both used the React system.
  • 4 0
 XT hubs are garbage unfortunately. Great while they last but a plastic internal spacer will shred itself and gradually make the hub self-destruct. Seen it multiple times.
  • 2 1
 Must be the latest hubs or something. I've never seen one where it has a plastic washer. I've overhauled quite a few Shimano hubs over the years and they're all machined steel cones, cups, and washers.
  • 1 0
 @CSharp: yes, the latest ones, inside the freehub. It'll be great for awhile, then start creaking, then self-destruct. There are pages of this documented in the MTBR forums.
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: yep, it is really unfortunate as it's an amazing budget hub, long gone are the days of indestructible XT hubs.
  • 1 0
 It makes sense. You can buy a pair for a hundred quid.
  • 5 0
 will probably take close to a decade to figure out where that creaking is coming from
  • 5 1
 I think technically it’s actually 4 bar suspension, (the pivot in the seatstay has no influence on the swingarm/rear axle) with a linkage driven shock.
  • 2 2
 Yep. Just like the Knolly's.
  • 2 1
 I'm not sure if there is an agreed-upon strict definition, but if you're right then I think only Atherton/Robot is doing a "true" six-bar?
  • 2 0
 @seb-stott: I respect your work and I’m happy to see your name on any article but there has been a strict definition for suspension design a long time. The number of bars always refers to the suspension members that influence the axle path only.

For example, a Kona has always been a single pivot with a linkage driving the shock (linkage driven single pivot).
  • 2 1
 @bogey: You're right. But Specialized's Enduro/Demo, Knolly Four by four system, Canyon's Sender CF and the MT Bromo have been described as six-bars, in some cases by their manufacturers, to distinguish them from conventional four-bars where one of the four members drives the shock. I agree that in the strict sense it's not a six bar but I think the term is now most often used to describe this sort of design because true six-bars are so rare. Maybe we should invent a new term for it - "Faux-six bar", "extra-linkage-driven-four-bar", "four-bar-boost-plus"? Wink
  • 2 0
 @seb-stott: I am a self confessed geek (AKA engineer) And I think we should stick to calling it what it is, 4 bar with a linkage driven shock. The only 6 bar I’ve seen is the Atherton/Robot.
  • 2 0
 @Cord1: Crazy that you're suggesting sticking with long-standing engineering terms that properly describe the design?! How dare you!

This Polygon being a 6 bar design is clearly fake news. IMO Pinkbike has a duty to call out the BS that marketing is spewing but they often perpetuate the fake news.
  • 2 0
 @bogey: my nukeproof is 7 bar. 4 bar in the rear and am gonna count seat, top and downtube to bump the numbers up. Sound like a plan?
  • 1 0
 @Cord1: and let's not forget that yeti patent m.pinkbike.com/news/yetis-new-suspension-design.html

@seb-stott: back to polygon, if the rear pivot is on the chainstay instead of seatstay, only then can their new design be called as "true-six-bar"?
  • 3 0
 Charging Time ...... this should be listed below the weight and above the cost in the mini description of ALL e-bikes. People want to know if you can ride in the morning then have lunch and ride home without a struggle.
  • 2 0
 Good suggestion, although I think it might depend on what sort of outlet you plug it into, temperature etc. I'll look into that.
  • 1 0
 @seb-stott: ya mon.... when rating a light we talk about Lumens why just discuss watts and not burn time??
  • 4 1
 Geo looks pretty sweet, aside from the short chainstays, especially to super short seat tube!!! If I had 6 grand lying around I might consider this or the Marin Ebike!
  • 4 2
 Yeah, Im looking at upgrading to the marin, if this had the same 630wh battery I'd be struggling to decide. With the 504wh its no competition.
  • 2 0
 @seb-stott

I’m a fan of short chainstays on the ebikes I’ve tried also.
The rocky mountain altitude mk1, canyon sprectral on mk1 and the focus jam2 (with flip chip in short position) all have slightly shorter stays.
  • 3 0
 It's a short-link 4bar that drives additional linkage to compress the shock. The only 6bar currently is Atherton's bike, AFAIK.
  • 1 0
 You're right. Polygon describes it as a Six-bar though, and while it is just a four bar with an extra link, that seems to be what the term six-bar is most often used for these days.
  • 3 0
 Weird they didnt opt to gor for the 630wh battery. They would have made this essentially the default e-bike for people on a budget. As it stands it has genuine competitors.
  • 5 1
 I'm 5'3 and no way I could ride a stubby 510 reach bike. Must be at least 690.
  • 6 1
 55 lbs and only 500 WH. GTFO
  • 4 0
 SKF, INA, FAG, KOYO, ... LIKES VERY MUCH THIS PARTICULAR SUSPENSION DESIGN! Keep it up, boys!
  • 1 0
 Curious why the X2 is positioned with that orientation. Usually it's flipped around. I know they can do either way, but this orientation looks like it puts the reservoir and compression/rebound adjustments in a really tight space, close to the frame...
  • 1 0
 "and these separate considerations (of a four-bar's axle path vs leverage curve) can lead to compromises"

Those _intertwined_ considerations of a four-bar's axle path vs leverage curve DO lead to compromises. However, those compromises CAN be acceptable for a the performance target of a given design.

Can same the same thing about single-pivot vs four-bar. Single pivot means the center of rotation is fixed, and that IS a compromise vs the complexity but axle path potential of a four-bar, but that also CAN be perfectly acceptable for a specific design target.
  • 1 0
 This bike looks amazing value for the specs! Bet it's a blast to ride. Well done Polygon.

For those complaining about the 504W battery, I have a 540W battery and typically my legs will go before the battery does. I can even get out after work for a 2 hour blast on boost for the climbs (eco for the DH), and still have 40% battery left.
  • 4 3
 500Whr ebikes should be shamed out of production, they're last years tech, and when buying an ebike battery life/range should be one of your CHIEF concerns, unless you live somewhere EXCEPTIONALLY flat.
  • 4 0
 How many pivot bearings do you want?
Polygon: All of them.
  • 1 0
 yeah, I look at all those bearings and just think how much of a pain that'll be to maintain.
  • 1 1
 I'm not sure how I feel about that rear triangle. I guess its nice that you don't have to protect it from the chain slapping around but it is down right ugly. Also that dropper post length is wayyyyyy to short. I hate it when bikes that are worth multiple thousand dollars put a tiny dropper on it. It is nice that its not gonna destroy your wallet to buy but making that dropper that short is just annoying and yet another thing to upgrade that you should not have to do.
  • 2 1
 Looks Really Good, well done Polygon!! My only wish would have been for a carbon model and a slide out battery much like the Levo utilizes for a much cleaner look.
  • 1 0
 I'm not usually one to give a guy a hard time about his seat angle, but that seat angle makes my rump hurt just looking at it!
  • 2 0
 Interesting design, but going to cost some bank when it's time to replace the bearings:/
  • 2 0
 It looks good, and price point not that bad - so definetly on WANT list after turbolevo
  • 1 0
 Nice bike, but I hate the fact that there are so many welds near the linkages in the rear triangle. They can't mold and/or forge those pieces?
  • 3 1
 That is actually a nice looking e-bike. Kudos.
  • 4 2
 Looks so appealing. Just a bit more battery would be nice.
  • 2 0
 Hopefully this suspension design also goes across to the next sisku
  • 1 1
 Hopefully not. Two main reasons. One, the driving factor for new design is restricted pivot placement due to the motor. On siskiu there is no motor. Main pivot can be placed low enough. Two, siskiu is traditionally an affordable option. Using a complicated design with no clear benefit will drive the price up and make it more difficult to do maintenance.
  • 3 3
 Great bike and great review. Interesting analysis of the suspension and short chainstays. But surprised they couldn't fit a water bottle in there.
  • 1 0
 Best presenter on pink bike. Thoughtful observations. Get him doing more, please.
  • 1 0
 Nothing special, a linkage-driven single-pivot also isolates axle path from leverage.
  • 3 1
 Bro motor
  • 1 0
 Polygon looks good with IFS..
  • 3 1
 504, I’ll pass.
  • 2 0
 This one goes to 6!!!
  • 1 0
 Mudd motor collector...much?
  • 1 0
 @seb-Stott what length dropper post was specced on the bike?
  • 1 0
 Would have been good to see it going down mt bromo
  • 1 0
 Looks like a dirt surfin machine to me. Cheeeeeehooooo
  • 2 2
 Looks like the Polygon transformed into a Merida at the 4th picture
  • 2 0
 Whoopsy, misread
  • 1 0
 Interesting !
  • 2 4
 Relatively affordable, Relatively unattractive
  • 2 5
 I just puked in my mouth a little
  • 1 4
 Er yucky
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