First Ride: Privateer 161 Gen 2 - The Beast Is Back

Feb 16, 2024
by Seb Stott  
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Privateer hit the ground running when they launched the first 161 Enduro bike four years ago. It was innovative with its super steep seat angle and size-specific chainstays, but at $1,535 for a frame & shock, the price really put Privateer on the map.

Privateer felt they could improve on their first attempt with the Gen 2, which they've been testing and teasing for what feels like the last four years. It's now compatible with full 29" or mixed wheel sizes thanks to a flip chip, and the chainstay length is adjustable in addition to varying by size. The suspension kinematics have been redesigned based on rider feedback. It's also possible to fit the 161 with a longer stroke shock to deliver 175 mm of travel and it's compatible with dual crown forks up to 200 mm.
Privateer 161 Details
• 6061 alloy frame
• ~161 mm rear travel, 170 mm front
• can be run with 175 mm rear travel and up to 200 mm fork
• Size-specific & adjustable chainstays
• 29" or mixed wheels
• Weight: 18.2 kg / 40.1 lb (actual, XL )
• 80° seat angle, 64° head angle
• Sizes: P1-4; 450-515 mm reach
• Price: £4,379 / €4,879 / $5,479 as shown, £1,979 / €2,179 / $2,479 frame & shock
privateerbikes.com

The seat tube has stayed the same at 80 degrees, although the price has got a bit steeper.

Along with updating the 161, Privateer also updated the 141 - you can read about that here.



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Frame details

All four frame sizes can be run as a full 29er or a mixed-wheel bike, thanks to a flip chip between the seatstay and rocker link. This adjusts the bottom bracket drop by 18 mm, keeping the bottom bracket height and frame angles the same with either wheel. Another flip chip has been added to the chainstay to allow the rear-centre to grow by 10 mm. A reversible brake mount means there's no need for a separate brake mount for each chainstay setting, so no spare parts to carry (or lose). A 5 mm Allen key is all that's required to swap the flip chips and turn the brake mount around. This design is not compatible with SRAM's UDH, so Priateer use their own hanger, which means it's not compatible with SRAM Transmission drivetrains.

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This adjustment is in addition to size-specific chainstay lengths, which vary by 13 mm across the size range (440 to 453 mm in the short/standard setting). The seatstay and chainstay are specific to each frame size, although they're made from the same basic tubes in the factory - just cut to different lengths.

A stout one-piece forged rocker link means there's no need for a chainstay bridge, resulting in bags of tire clearance. The main bearings are huge (42 mm) and full-compliment (more balls thanks to no carrier) to boost longevity. Additional seals between the pivot bolts and frame are designed to stop mud and water from getting to the bearings in the first place. My test bike had some squeaking from the seals on the rocker link, which needed to be taken out and greased.

The bolts thread into the frame, so you only need one tool to loosen or tighten them, making it easier to do a bolt check trailside. The BB is threaded and the ISCG tabs are replaceable in case of damage. There's also plenty of custom frame protection on the chainstay, seatstay and downtube to keep everything quiet. Privateer say they designed the chainstay to run close to the chain, so the rubber protector stops it from flailing up and down as much over rough terrain.

Cables run along the top of the downtube, with bolted cable clamps to stop them from ratting. The gear cable runs inside the chainstay, but the brake hose is fully external. You need to loosen the bolts to slide the cables through (when adjusting the saddle height, for example) but swapping a brake should be a two-minute job with an Allen key.

A full-size bottle fits and there's an accessory mount under the top tube. Another party trick is that it's compatible with dual crown forks up to 200 mm travel, and rear travel can be extended to 175 mm with a longer-stroke shock.

There's no word on the frame weight, but my guess is it's not light.



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Geometry

Like many bikes that have been refreshed recently, the geometry isn't dramatically different to the previous model. The super steep seat angle and moderate head angle remain unchanged; front center lengths are similar too, as are the chainstay lengths in the standard setting, though now there is the option to make them 10 mm longer in each size. One difference is the longer head tubes (taller stack height) in the larger sizes, which in practice means running fewer spacers below the stem for lanky folk.

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According to my own measurements, the bottom bracket height has increased (from 336 mm to 348 mm), which could play nicely with the updated suspension layout which works best with more sag.



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Photo: Ali McKee

Suspension design

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Privateer wanted to increase the progression compared to the original 161, for a softer start to the stroke and more support later in the travel. Privateer's designer, Dan Hicks, tested multiple frames, aftermarket links and air cans to try and find the limits. His philosophy is to keep some travel in reserve for those "oh sh!t" moments (not an official Privateer marketing term).

As a result, the Gen 2 is super progressive. The leverage ratio between the rear wheel and the shock starts super high (at 3.6:1), making it very easy to compress the initial part of the shock's travel. This leverage then drops continuously and dramatically to 2.2:1 at bottom-out, making the suspension much firmer towards the end of the stroke. That gives an overall change in leverage ratio (the most common way to put a number on progressiveness) of 39%, which is one of the most progressive out there.

The custom-tuned shock ships with no volume spacers; most riders will leave it that way.

Privateer also use an unusually high average leverage ratio, extracting about 161 mm of travel from a relatively short 60 mm stroke shock. Removing the stroke limiter or fitting a 205x65 mm stroke shock can boost the rear travel to around 175 mm. Travel will depend slightly on the chainstay length (frame size or flip chip setting). Adding 10 mm to the chainstay will increase travel by around 3-4 mm. I measured the useable travel on my XL test bike at 165 mm in the standard chainstay length and 168 mm in the longer setting. The smaller sizes should therefore match up with the quoted 161 mm figure.

Privateer sought to keep the anti-squat and anti-rise numbers more consistent throughout the travel - for more predictable pedalling and braking behaviour, respectively. Anti-squat is high in all gears and throughout the travel, meaning lots of support when pedalling. It's highest in the harder gears, so it should stay firm and high in its travel sprinting for the finish line. Because anti-squat doesn't drop off throughout the travel, the 161 should pedal well with a wide sag window.

Anti-rise quantifies how much the brake caliper acts to compress the rear suspension and resist its tendency to extend due to the load shifting onto the front wheel while braking. Privateer have significantly increased anti-rise levels for gen 2, meaning the bike should pitch less and stay deeper in its travel when braking.



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According to my aesthetic-conscious colleagues, the lines of the XL size aren't the prettiest, but you're supposed to be looking ahead when you ride anyways. Right? Photo: Ali McKee

Builds

There's only one build kit for now, but it's pretty close to what I'd spec with my own money. A Fox 38 Performance Elite fork is matched to the Float X2 shock. Hayes Dominion brakes with 203/220 mm rotors offer exceptional stopping power and consistency, while Shimano SLX gearing (with an XT shifter) does the job admirably. The OneUp dropper is great too, though I'd like a longer-travel version in the bigger sizes (Privateer spec 180 mm in all sizes, perhaps to simplify stock keeping).
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The wheels are from Privateer's sister brand, Hunt. They use front-rear specific rims, with a massive 33 mm internal width at the front, 31 mm at the rear; and 28 front spokes with 32-rear. A DH-casing rear tire and Double Down front complete the burly build. P1 size bikes ship as a mixed wheel; P2-P4 ship in full 29". If you preorder before 30th April you can get a free rear wheel and tire in the alternate size.

A frameset including X2 shock, headset, axle, ISCG, and seat clamp is also available for £1,979 / €2,179 / $2,479.



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Photo: Ali McKee


Ride Impressions

I'm planning to keep the 161 for a long while to act as a testing platform for kit and components, so I'll report back in six months or so on how the bike performs. I've already had the chance to ride it a few times to get an initial impression.

How does an 18.2 kg bike climb? Not nearly as bad as you might think.

I'm sure many will baulk at enduro bike that weighs more than 40 lb, but it's worth pointing out that some of this heft is down to the burly tires, wheels and brakes - all of which are welcome and appropriate in my view. Swapping to a set of lighter alloy wheels with EXO+ tires from another enduro bike dropped the weight to 17.4 kg (38.3 lb), which isn't too far off the mark considering the cost-conscious build and the fact that enduro bikes are getting heavier across the board. A similarly-priced Scott Ransom 930 isn't much lighter size-for-size, while Darrio's personal Frameworks Trail bike is considerably heavier than the stock 161.

Besides, as I discussed in this article, weight doesn't make as big a difference as you might think. And if a bike is designed to be (relatively) cheap and strong, you can't expect it to be light too. I'll report back on how durable it turns out to be.

More importantly, the 80-degree seat angle feels right to me. With slacker seat tubes, I always want to get the saddle as far forward as I can, but here I have it set to the middle of the rails and it suits me nicely. It's a position that makes it possible to attack steep climbs in relative comfort. It might not be ideal for cruising along the flat, but I don't think that's an issue for an enduro bike. The suspension is supportive and stays on top of its travel under power, making it feel remarkably efficient for the weight. The draggy tires make a much bigger difference to climbing speed, but these should be switched if climbing is a priority.

On the descent, the increase in suspension progression over the old bike is very noticeable. It sinks into the early stroke at the lightest touch but ramps up strongly as you get towards the end of the travel. I haven't got close to full travel, although I haven't ridden any huge landings yet. It doesn't feel restricted though, and nor does it ramp up abruptly so it feels like you've bottomed out even when you haven't - the end-stroke feels smooth and damped and like it always has more to give. And when you have ~165 mm of travel available, keeping some in reserve is not necessarily a bad thing. I might try out some different shocks to see if I can make it less progressive, though.

The geometry is stable, but without the front axle feeling too far away. Much of the riding I have done has been fast and rocky, where it's reassuringly composed. The suspension is very sensitive over small bumps and tracks the ground nicely when lightly loaded, which adds to the sense of confidence. That's about all I can say for now, so look out for a long-term report later in the year.




Author Info:
seb-stott avatar

Member since Dec 29, 2014
298 articles

295 Comments
  • 306 14
 That kinked top tube is something I could never buy
  • 132 1
 The original looked sooo clean too!
  • 145 2
 It has a whiff of shitting dog.
  • 27 0
 Downtube doesn't help either.
  • 17 0
 I believe it's more subtle in the smaller sizes. It looks very ugly on the XL though.
  • 36 0
 Looks a bit like it hit a wall at speed and bent..
  • 12 5
 My Niner RIP9 RDO looks the same, kink in the toptube, I really dig it Smile
  • 39 2
 no kink-shaming here, but it looks terrible!
  • 22 2
 Yeah, they destroyed it. That kinked tt is against every aesthetic sense you can have
  • 14 1
 agreed. disgustang
  • 7 2
 Yeah, I bet their industrial designer was a privateer...and a high school intern.
  • 6 2
 I like it, it's reminiscent of the old Satnacruz Jackal / V10 which I was quite fond of.
  • 19 0
 Looks like someone drove into their garage with their bike still on the roof
  • 4 6
 If it means I the frame accommodates a larger bottle, frankly I don't care if it's kinked.
  • 51 0
 40lbs, $1200 increase, AND a kinked top tube? This isn’t it…
  • 14 0
 ... Looks like... A Niner???
  • 12 1
 That rocker link is as bad! How hard would it to make something at least somewhat aesthetically pleasing?
  • 2 3
 It's either that or a frame like my 153, where I can't even fit a 450ml fidlock water bottle on a Medium frame (w/ piggyback shock). I'd take the kinky all day.
  • 6 1
 Literally the biggest turn off a bike can have.
  • 5 0
 @scruff0372: nobody likes a dogshit whiff
  • 3 4
 [Chuck Ibis has entered the chat]
  • 4 0
 Looks like a Mondraker ... I mean a Session Wink
  • 1 5
flag rrolly (Feb 16, 2024 at 7:05) (Below Threshold)
 I used to have the same opinion until I saw frames with this in real life. I now ride a Niner WFO. That bike looks terrible on the website, but really nice in person.
  • 12 2
 Why does everyone have a straight top tube Fetish? If the Design isn't affecting performance not a big deal. I would like to know if you guys see a problem with not having UDH compatibility and having trunnion mount suspension
  • 5 0
 @Bike-JAM-AMA: An actual useful poll would be ranking frame features in order of importance...those two, TT shape, cable tourism, in frame storage, etc.
  • 2 1
 She's a 10 but her arch game is -8
  • 1 0
 @kovaldesign: hahahaha
  • 4 0
 Yea shame about that as the geo and adjustability looks pretty sweeeet. Super-fug
  • 6 0
 I fixed it. No saving that rocker though...
  • 3 2
 Yeah, this bike can go hump itself.
  • 1 0
 @Lylat: They need a mod
  • 2 0
 It's a real curveball
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13: A Tenner
  • 2 1
 @scruff0372: Return of the SC Nomad Mk1
  • 1 1
 @watchmen: I thought the same, and I loved that bike, though its downtube, (and that of the Jackal) was straight; only the top tube had curve.

I like that Privateer is willing to try something different. I think it looks pretty good. I'd like to see a size medium. Great bundle of features in this one, that I appreciate.
  • 2 0
 @jray152: Agreed.. Absolutely terrible
  • 3 0
 I went straight to the comments to see the hate on that bend. Was not disappointed.
  • 2 0
 Thought the same. Looks like some Haibike inspiration
  • 1 0
 The smaller sizes look fine to me, but in XL that is one strange looking bike. Also high leverage shock and no raw option is a miss.
  • 2 0
 Oooo…Kinky AF
  • 1 0
 @Lylat: holy! That looks so much better hahahahaha.
  • 3 1
 @privateer-wheels: Having a wildly progressive leverage rate that will make finding a damper setting a nightmare whilst simultaneously having very high anti-squat both deep into the travel and higher gears (super important that your 40lb 170mm travel bikes pedals well at high speed) -and I assume with the attendant pedal kick back. No optipn for fitting the most currently most popular groupset and a seat angle that makes my wrists ache just looking at it, are certainly a different bundle of features.
  • 1 0
 @jray152: my thoughts exactly. I understand about things being more expensive but my brother’s Gen 1 is a fair chunk lighter and rapid AF!
  • 3 0
 I believe the original looked better. But I certainly have nothing against anything kinky.
  • 7 2
 Hi @thingswelike, thanks for the feedback. Our purpose was to create the fastest Enduro race bike for the Privateer. As part of this, Increasing space for a larger water bottle and tool storage was high on our athletes and riders wish list for Gen 2. During our design process, we take time to complete elevated levels of safety testing which surpass standard requirements. From this, we found the new design to be more durable and long lasting, which let's the privateer focus on going fast and not the reliability of their bike. Thanks for taking the time to check out Gen 2, Andrew - Privateer Bikes
  • 2 1
 LMAO yall kids judging a bike by itsestethics. As if any highly subjective matter affect the ride in any way. Yall must be unhappy with everything in life if the looks are priority in your list of ''needs''. Sounds like its still the same monster downhill as the gen1
  • 2 0
 @rustyglaze5: If there's an ugly 40 lb bike sitting next to a pretty 35 lb bike.... I know which one I'm taking.
  • 3 2
 @JonDud: the faster one.
  • 127 3
 So it got more expensive and uglier while still remaining heavy as heck. Add to that the extra progressive suspension design with shorter stroke shock which will require (if air) bizarelly high pressures. I just don't see how it is an improvement over previous edition, Oh and no udh, not that I care coz I am too poor to even think about fancy robot derailleurs.
  • 44 14
 If I can help you: just don’t buy it
  • 12 0
 @pasteque51: KInda dissapointed because I was looking for a promising frame to replace my stumpy, and sadly this just isn't it, while the previous one was on the shortilist. Like for simmilar price you can get sexier and made in europe MDE, which will probably also be lighter and have better cinematics (at least for me). But well it do be like it is, and all I can do is complain on the interwebz
  • 14 0
 I don’t like this I’ll save a bit of extra travel for emergencies nonsense. I’d rather my suspension worked properly all the time and I just took the occasional bottom out instead of riding everything with compromised suspension performance just so I’ve got spare emergency trace for those oh shit moments. Absolutely makes no sense. I’m out.
  • 2 0
 @malca: you can probably get a sick deal on gen 1
  • 6 0
 I'd rather have a Madonna. Or a Titan.
  • 2 0
 @malca: buy an MDE. I tried to buy a Stray, but they don't currently sell to North America. Only thing out there that checks all my boxes
  • 3 0
 NO UDH will be a bigger deal in the future as the tech trickles down...
  • 2 1
 a starting leverage rate of 3.6 is insane....
  • 1 0
 @jaydawg69: Well it'll certainly be sensitive off the top. I think the kinematics look great overall. Maybe a little too much squat for me but otherwise I bet it works really well. Some other aspects seem a little odd though.
  • 1 0
 @malca: Have a look at Bird Aeris or Am.
  • 1 0
 @malca:

Incan Onkyo recommend MDE.

Had the 2018 and 2021 Version. Soldntheblast one Just because I happened top buy IT too big. Both are great Bikes.
But I like The older one more for ITS looks and machining. Thebrear end IS the closest innfunction you can gel to a HPP. Even the 650b 2018 Dämpfer climbed Vetter then my 29ers, Alutech and Bird Aeris.
You can use 216*63,230*60*230*65 shock s. WEIGHT in L IS around 3,4kg
  • 3 1
 Hi @malca, thanks for the feedback. The linear progression that we have added to Gen 2 was something that Athletes racing Gen1 for multiple years desired. Through the last season of testing the Gen 2 prototype, we haven't felt the need to exceed any manufacturers working pressure ranges (300PSI for the X2) and have had great feedback from our riders. UDH and SRAM T-Type was something we considered during our design process, but rear centre adjustability is something we truly value and combining the 2 wouldn't work in our Gen 2 design. Much like yourself, we choose to run GX and SLX on our own bikes, which perform well but don't break the bank. We appreciate all the feedback we get in these comments and take them on board, Andrew - Privateer Bikes
  • 5 1
 Wow, so many comments about bent tubes. Sure I love me some straight piping too but I understand that it doesn't make sense (from a structures point of view) to have the top- and downtube meet that short headtube too much parallel to each other. So if the options are to either have a bend like this or have a straight top tube meet the seat tube much higher up, I'd go with the current option any day. Low top tubes are important for riding pleasure, I don't see how the bend in the tube would matter. There are loads of bikes with poor standover out there already so it is good to see options like these as well.
  • 102 15
 If I was a bike designer, one of the first things I would do is read the PB comments sections of newly launched bikes. The feedback is free, invaluable and comes unfiltered from the very people who are looking to buy newly released bikes. So if consensus from 90% of readers says no bend in the top tube, then you just gained access to a measly 10% of the market. It really is that simple.
  • 68 10
 Because every one of the 10s of millions of mtbers comments on pinkbike articles. 40 comments right now, and maybe 15 of them are about the top tube/aesthetics. It would be absolutely disastrous for any company to listen to us raving loonies in the comments section. If anything, going off vocal minority Vs silent majority, doing the opposite is the better option.
  • 28 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: Appealing to the silent majority is an interesting move, Nixon.
  • 19 0
 I used to be a category manager for one of the world's biggest bike retailers. I did exactly this. Remember the polls that used to run at the side of the homepage. Golden.

It was free market survey data. Something Google / Facebook would've charged mega money for.
  • 7 0
 There's aesthetics and then there's more practical things to target for, like pivot points, front triangle room, geometry for good handling etc. At some point you need to prioritise certain features, which usually leads to some kind of compromise. Designing a bike that works within a certain brief and translating all this to 4 or 5 frame sizes while keeping the visual aspect appealing is not easy. That said, I agree that first gen looked better and more consistens across sizes, but they claim to take a different approach this time.
  • 8 0
 @justwan-naride: this is a problem of tooling cost Vs consistent looks across sizes. Tooling up for a different TT for the larger sizes would be a lot of money, so they reuse the smaller one and sacrifice aesthetics. Cost engineering, plain and simple. I'm not saying they got it wrong, but there's no other justification for it in this case.
  • 1 0
 @Tambo: Didn't think of that but it makes sense
  • 10 5
 If anyone would listen to Pinkbike comments and design a bike to be liked in the comments it would be a really bad bike. also the loud people screaming theyre opinions into the internet are not the majority
  • 7 0
 That's why I'm here... always interesting to read comments for a rough gauge of what the people want.
  • 15 2
 There's rarely any consistency to the feedback though, and you should outright forget about consensus.

Take the whole ongoing "bike weight" discussion for example. Roughly one half of the community swears that weight doesn't matter while the other half throws a temper tantrum when any bike weighs over 15kg. Same for for the alloy vs. carbon frame material debate. Lots of people here have been brainwashed by years of marketing into believing that "carbon" somehow automatically equates to superior performance (, which in reality it doesn't). Or the wheel size debate. Or e-bikes. And electronics in general. I could go on an on. There's no consensus on anything. Heck, there's even some poor idiots that unironically defend headset cable routing.

The takeaway: What ever you do as a brand, according to the PB comment section, you're doing it wrong anyways. Damned if you do, damned if you don't.
  • 3 1
 @Muscovir: yeah its like a MTB is a complex system and most things have trade ofs(there is no just turn all dials up to good solution). Also the many factors are weighted different each bikes o its not easy.

also marketing material from manufacturers creates like a pseudo expert group who are proud of theyre ""knowladge" and will not deviate from what they think they no about something


And also the bike media is not free from promoting bullshit(just remeber the Nicolai Nucleon 16(it was framed as the complex bike(which it is not(count the bearings and the idlers...))
  • 24 4
 Using PB comments to try and design a bike is like getting Homer Simpson to design a car
  • 5 0
 @Muscovir: not everything is binary. People have a weird need to separate everyone into 1 of 2 categories and completely disregard nuance.

Literally every example you gave, zero of my opinions fall into any of those columns. Most IRL people I talk to are similar too, yet the PB comments section is just full of extremists.
  • 2 0
 @Taylor084: comment made my day, thanks!
  • 2 2
 You value your opinion much more than others, vanity is not becoming.

If you don’t like something, there are many others who see things differently.

So yeah, if I was a bike designer I’d make it the way I like it and the way the engineer thinks it needs to be.

No one looks at their bike while their flying down the mountain, just saying…
  • 2 1
 It looks like they did it to accommodate the water bottle, so maybe they were listening to the comments. Messed it up though.
  • 11 0
 I am friends with the designer/engineer for a bike company and I asked him how much weight he gives pb comments. In summary he admitted that while they (the bike company) will sometimes make certain design choices to avoid being roasted on pb, ultimately they won’t compromise on their ideal kinematic or ride quality, just to satisfy a vocal minority. Design decisions are made through testing, rider feedback, and sales numbers, pb comments are a small part of that, but not the driving factor.
  • 4 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: imagine the absolute state of it if it was left to the pinkbikers to design via the comments section?
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: PB's next project right there. Maybe it will top the Grim D.
  • 1 0
 @BansheeRiders: That's why I own a Titan, which IMO is very similar and just Banshee just dropped prices on their frames.
  • 1 0
 @iian: yeah it seems like a great opportunity to get loads of insightful data. Are you able to disclose what brand you worked for?... because now Im really curious
  • 1 0
 @JasperTS: It's been done. I can't remember then name (I thought it was Kavenz).
  • 1 0
 @BansheeRiders: Shorter seat tubes please :0)
  • 65 0
 People at RAAW HQ silently doing fist pumps. Madonna and 161 are certainly cross-shopped,
  • 25 0
 Yeah I'd buy the new Madonna over this
  • 3 0
 @melonhead1145: I’d agree. Especially now that BB is adjustable (Or really everything) on the Madonna.
  • 60 11
 Please stop trying to pretend that a bike weighing more than an ebike is acceptable. I don’t care how much it costs it simply shouldn’t be acceptable and should be called out as an issue, not hidden away with excuses
  • 33 8
 Also, the whole "bruv bikeweight doesnt matter as much as you think" is definitly written by people who only do their average 20km hometrail lap with 300m of ascending. try that fat f*ck on a big weekend with 2000m of climbing and you will absolutely curse those 17,4kg, not to mention henrys 18kg spire Big Grin
  • 10 11
 @Tiefkuehlpizza: or maybe they're just really fit and strong...? 18kg bike for a 100kg rider is likely to be less of an issue (and more necessary) than it is for a 70kg rider, assuming both are equally fit.
  • 7 10
 @Tiefkuehlpizza: 2000m each day, right? Otherwise, 1000m a day shouldn't be a big deal even on a 18kg bike.
  • 4 0
 Exactly. This thing is a tank.
  • 7 5
 @Tiefkuehlpizza: I'm one of those guys who write that. Did a 85 km 3500m ride on my 38 lb bike last year, along with many other 50+ km 2000+ m rides. I also have a bike that weighs 9 lbs less and actually don't find it that much easier doing similarly big days on it. I think I notice the weight more when I am descending or trying to carry speed on flats, but probably a lot of that is more influenced by the stickier tires and suspension.
  • 5 2
 @gnarnaimo: Same here I weigh 200 pounds so an extra 5 pounds of bike is a very small % of the total. I would much rather ride a big heavy bike that is going to make it home without breaking rather than saving a few pounds.
  • 2 1
 @Tambo: It's all adds up right. At the end of the day/Enduro that weight will catch up with you.
  • 4 5
 @Tiefkuehlpizza: you will for the first few rides out and then you’ll adjust get fitter and stronger and won’t notice until you jump on a lighter bike. It’s designed to be abused by fast riders / semi pros 3 or 4 times a week for a full season.
  • 2 1
 @thenotoriousmic: If you had a lighter version for race days I'd be fully behind your point.
  • 1 1
 @BuntyHoven1: that’s their argument not mine, I’m not peddling that around.
  • 2 0
 @Tiefkuehlpizza: 2000m jfc. I question if I've ever done 2000m outside of a bike park lol.

Now I have a new goal this year I guess Smile
  • 3 1
 @BuntyHoven1: I also did the Trans BC (30-40 km per day, 1000-2000 m per day for 6 days in a row) on the same 38 lb bike. When the event ended I was wishing it went longer! At the end of the day an additional 5 lbs to the total mass climbing is an addition of roughly 2%. Unless you are competing for fractions of a second on climbs I'm not worried about a few extra lbs. You will likely notice the weight when trying to be playful/jumping and while descending. Whether or not that is a negative is preferential.
  • 1 1
 @BuntyHoven1: I'm only 150 lbs fwiw
  • 4 0
 @Tiefkuehlpizza: Did a 35km, 1700m climb/ride with my 16.8 kg (37 lbs) enduro bike. The full Lord of the Squirrels loop from Function. Was totally fine.

That day was preceded by a 620m day riding Blackcomb trails (Dark Crystal (sooo good)) and followed by a full Whistler bike park day which was followed by another 600m day in Squamish. Never thought about my bike's weight once.

What I did think about was great it was having an one bike that can handle anything and everything thrown at it. From all day epics to full on bike park days.
  • 5 0
 It's not that weight keeps bikes from being able to climb. Current geometry trends offset the extra weight and allow enduro bikes to climb better than ever. Notice I wrote better, not faster. With big wheels, big tyres, and the rider placed centrally in the wheelbase (thanks to the long rear center and steep STA) we now have silly amounts of traction. At the same time rider stance is more relaxed compared to a thoroughbred XC bike, so there's actually less stress on the upper body. This is very welcome on all day missions.

What these bikes don't do well is climb fast. They just don't reward the effort. Sit and spin and watch yourself climb stupid stuff all day long.
  • 2 0
 @justwan-naride: You can still have the better geo without it weighing more than a tank
  • 1 0
 @chrismac70: that's what she said, I guess?
  • 3 0
 @Tiefkuehlpizza: 2000m+ day on a 17kg G1 and I'm just an average 50+ rider. Bike built for reliability on the downs. Lightweight ebikes are spec'd with flimsy tyres etc to meet the weight target. Real world usability weight is significantly higher.
  • 2 0
 @mark90: you're exactly right about the lightweight tyres. The spec on the flagship lightweight ebikes are not practical, even if they are fancy and shiny.
  • 5 0
 No ebike with this amount of bomb proofing will be anywhere near this. My Kenevo sl with a coil and dh tires is 21.2kg. Ebike weights are a myth. Add 4kg to your current bike and that's what any SL ebike will. Weigh. Add 6.5kg for a full fat
  • 2 0
 Many of our best rides here top out above12,000’ elevation. The air is thin, and the trails that high tend to be steep. But the descents are… moderately OK. I have one friend who rides a 40ish lb Nicolai Geometron. Everyone else drops as many lbs as financially possible. This will not be a common bike here.

BTW I could give an eff about the TT. Doesn’t matter at all.
  • 1 1
 @Jordmackay: yeah holy confirmation bias. OP is comparing a $10,000 carbon ebike with a tiny battery to a $5,000 alloy over built enduro bike. Apples to apples. Which one would you rather put lap after lap at the bike park on?
  • 4 0
 Hi @chrismac70 , thanks for your feedback. Our purpose for Gen 2 was to create the fastest Enduro race bike for the privateer. We designed our frames prioritising kinematics, geometry and durability, and spec our bikes with components that are fit for purpose. This may not suit all tastes and types of riding but we feel it necessary for our bikes to perform as intended and aren't too dissimilar in weight to race winning World Cup Enduro bikes. We think it's great that other brands have brought super light e-bikes to the masses. At Privateer we prioritise the durability and longevity of our frames and bike builds, which doesn't enable us to play in that category. Thanks for taking the time to comment. We try to take all feedback on board, Andrew - Privateer Bikes
  • 2 0
 @PrivateerBikes: kudos for speccing proper tyres
  • 1 0
 @Jordmackay: My Giant Reign E+1 weighs about 26kg in XL - tubeless / rear insert and double down tyres. Thing rips and at 100kg myself i can fling it around pretty easily. Nothing like descending on a heavier bike - so stable
  • 1 0
 @michaelbevege: Until you have to stop haha. My first run on a full fat i went clean into a tree thinking i could brake the same haha
  • 1 0
 @michaelbevege: That has not been my experience on ebikes. I've demo'd 3 and borrowed 2 friends ebikes. The climbs is great, feels like cheating. But everywhere else I hated wrestling with the bike. All it takes is a ride on a 50lb ebike to realize how much a jump, flick, move, lift and push my bike around through varying terrain. All of that was much harder. Shedding speed was also harder... for all the energy you save going up, you need it going down, haha... maybe I'm just weak, but I really really noticed that extra 13 lbs or so on the downs.
  • 40 0
 Christ Privateer, all you had to do was keep the prices the same and the top tube straight and you could've had it all.
  • 1 0
 Hi @EducatedHillbilly , thanks for your feedback. We've worked extremely hard on our pricing and have had considerable cost increases from our supply base. We have added many new features into the Privateer Gen 2 platform which we feel are worth the investment. Amongst other benefits such as improved durability and increased space in the front triangle, moving away from the straight tubes meant we were able to improve kinematics that were previously limited by tube positioning. We appreciate all the feedback we get in these comments and take them on board, Andrew - Privateer Bikes
  • 1 0
 The fugly hunched tt makes room for.. a water bottle. Great.
  • 40 2
 I am happy to ride a heavy and ugly bike as long as geometry and kinematics are spot on - but not at this price. Crazy. Good luck selling these, Privateer.
  • 5 0
 Yep. i brought my original 161 in May 2022 for ~£2800. This new version is £4300. Spec differences are Hayes brakes instead of Magura, Maxxis instead of Schwalbe, and Fox suspension inside of RockShox.

This bike shouldn't have been more than £4000
  • 9 1
 @melonhead1145: CPIH inflation has been about 13.9% since May 22 so this should cost about £3188
  • 2 1
 @browner: price is around £1000 more than the Gen1 was last for sale for
  • 2 4
 @melonhead1145: you’d quibble over 300 on something that cost over 4000, so silly.
  • 3 0
 @melonhead1145: All of those spec changes sound like wins to me
  • 1 0
 Hi @mtb-daniel, thanks for your feedback. We've worked extremely hard on our pricing and have had considerable cost increases from our supply base since our Gen 1 bikes. We have added many new features into the Privateer Gen 2 platform which we feel are worth the investment. We are experiencing very turbulent times in the industry where brands are having to discount heavily to clear large stocks, which has created a very competitive market. Thanks for the comment, we appreciate all the feedback, Andrew - Privateer Bikes
  • 30 0
 Weight: 18.2 kg , damn that's a beefy boy
  • 19 1
 she thicc
  • 21 0
 @NuriB: I think it’s hilarious and awesome how people far outside the US know some US slang and presumably English as well meanwhile all too many Americans won’t even try to learn a second language. Cheers, mate.
  • 7 0
 @NuriB: That's not thicc anymore, that's full-on chonk.
  • 9 1
 @generictrailrider: I don't think it's too surprising tbh. The 90s brought us globalization and the internet and ever since, our contemporary popular culture has been strongly influnenced by what ever was cool in the US at the time. For the past two decades everything exciting on the internet has predominantely been happening in English. We're listening to the same music as you, watch the same movies and shows, visit the same websites and generally consume lots of the same media. Metaphorically, you guys are like that one cool kid in the neighbourhood who was always first to have the new, cool stuff and with whom you always wanted to hang out after school. In a way, I guess you could say we (Europeans) were somewhat linguistically and culturally colonized by you guys. Besides popular culture, our workplaces have adopted lots of English business terminology and fluency in English is pretty much a necessity in all high-paying professions. On top of that, English is the lingua franca of the academic world. Conveniently, most scientific text are published in English and most degrees require you to take at least a couple of courses in a foreign language - which mostly is going to be English.

Plus, the widespread adoption of the English language has simplified communication even amongst our European neighbours. Personally, I'm fluent in German, French, Italian and English. But if English wasn't so widely adopted in Europe, it would be almost impossible for me to communicate with people from Norway, Poland, Spain, etc. But because everyone is mostly fluent in English anyways, that's really not a problem. Just don't talk to French people in English, they hate it for some reason. When in France, just stick to French Wink

Long story short: For us non-natively English-speaking Europeans, becoming fluent in English these days is pretty much a necessity.
  • 2 0
 @generictrailrider: The most awesome and hilarious thing is that I learn more of your language thanks to Pinkbike, than I do at school
  • 8 1
 @Muscovir: In Morzine there's people from the UK, Australia, NZ, France, Italy, Spain, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Eastern Europe and everybody is hanging out and having a good time, speaking in English, in France. Everybody is happy about that except the French locals who are fuming that nobody is speaking French lol
  • 1 0
 @NuriB: had a buddy with an odd accent. Not from his past, he just talked funny. Any time he said “fit” sounded like “thicc”. Made for some funny conversation.
  • 25 0
 Can't help but think someone just rode this clean into a tree. Kinked top tubes are not the one.
  • 9 0
 Sometimes kinky is good - not on bikes though.
  • 22 1
 > A stout one-piece forged rocker link means there's no need for a chainstay bridge

No. It's missing because it's complex to make one.

> 161 mm of travel from a relatively short 60 mm stroke shock

poor shock. will require lot of damping. goodbye your seals

> This design is not compatible with SRAM's UDH

oh cmon...
  • 9 0
 Also, not a fan of bolts that thread directly into an alloy frame. If you strip the threads, you essentially need to toss the frame (or kludge something with a helicoil). Why not just thread into the opposite side hardware, like every other design out there?
  • 2 1
 If you're sub 75kg it'll work fine. Agreed on the UDH though.
  • 3 1
 I mean Transitionbhas been getting 160mm travel out 60mm shocks for a while now pretty effectively (see new patrol or spire with 205x60)
  • 2 1
 @KNBikes: the spire and patrol are half as progressive. 23% progressive for the spire starting at a 3.1 leverage ratio compared to 39% starting at 3.6 for this. Even with a cascade link at 180 travel the spire isn’t as progressive. I’d assume this bike is pushing 50% progressive in the longer travel setting.
  • 1 0
 @TheSlayer99: he never mentioned the progressivity in his comment just long-ish travel (161 mm is long-ish)?) via short (60mm is short now) shock? plus, Air shocks gain progressiveness with more stroke, as air volume is increased? So, as a counterpoint, wouldn't a longer stroke shock, further amplify the issues with this frame?
  • 1 0
 @KNBikes: the high leverage ratio is a byproduct to a degree of the short shock. And yes, as I mentioned lengthening the shock would theoretically worsen this effect.
  • 1 0
 Specialized enduro is 170mm on a 60mm stroke. I’ve got a Cascade link pumping it up to 180mm travel. The Float X2 is at 90% max PSI for my 175lb self. HSR is max slow and it’s still fast.

Rides great.
  • 18 0
 WHAT DID THEY DO? The previous version was so sexy, but this is the ugliest thing I've seen in a long time
  • 16 1
 18.2 kg for enduro bike. this is a wrong side of evolution. Stupid downgrade, only marketing.
  • 8 3
 It's an enduro bike for a specific type of person.

If you want something super durable for repeated bike park laps and/or for enduro racing a heavy aluminium bike like this or a RAAW is a good option.

If you use your enduro bike mostly Trail/AM and only occasional DH/bike park use there will be better options out there (3kg lighter).
  • 6 0
 @tom666: Alternatively if you remember any of the last decade and didn't break your frame/ split your tyres there are enduro bikes out there for you 4/5kg lighter
  • 2 1
 @tom666: most people should be riding trail bikes these days anyway. Enduro bikes have followed DH bikes in becoming highly specialized machines which require appropriate trails to get the most out off. Modern trail bikes absolutely rip and they’re a lot more fun and easier to get on with than big heavy enduro bikes.
  • 3 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Agree with you, I am a big supporter of the 140-160mm Trail/AM bike and they're getting better and better all the time (some are as capable as most Enduro bikes from 10 years ago).

Hopefully brands build different bikes for different types of people and they don't all go down the same route of super-burly aluminium enduro race bikes. I think there will still be people making lightweight 160-170mm travel bikes because there is demand for that.

There is however a bit of a shift towards these burlier aluminium bikes atm and a lot of people welcome it.
  • 16 2
 Over 40 pounds and 5500 USD for an average spec. I love the geometry, but I'll pass.
  • 3 4
 That is for an XL frame though to be fair. The frame price is fair
  • 4 0
 I do like the fact that you can over stroke it for more travel and potentially turn it into a downduro bike. 39% progression is ALOT
  • 4 0
 Agreed there is no excuse for it being that heavy beyond poor design choices
  • 3 0
 @chrismac70: apparently the 161 frame in a size P2 is 10.6 pounds (no shock). That's very heavy. For reference a size medium spire (With the shock) is also 10.6 lbs.
  • 8 0
 @chrismac70: just to follow up, an X2 shock is ≈660 grams. So the Privateer frame is around 1.5 pounds heavier than an alloy Spire frame, which is already considered to be a heavy frame on its own.
  • 3 0
 @ChristianToole: And not necessarily a good thing, unless you’re regularly hitting monstrous compressions or missing big jumps. And even then, adding volume spacers is easy. Lowering progression is almost impossible.
  • 4 0
 @Ttimer: Exactly, I like progressive frames personally. But progession really shouldn't ever exceed 30%. If that still isn't enough, like you mentioned, you can add volume spacers, some shocks now have HBO. Coil shocks have progressive spring options and large rubber bottom out bumpers, all to aid with progression.
  • 2 1
 @ChristianToole: to be fair there isn’t much difference in frame weights from S - XL. Either way this thing is a tank.
  • 2 0
 @Ttimer: at least cascade components won’t try to sell everyone a link for these bikes
  • 1 1
 @ChristianToole: 2005 Santa Cruz VP Free was 215mm travel with an 11lb frame. It was indestructible. Enough metal to have a cash value for scrap.

10lb frame 20 years later for a 161 travel bike is either gonna last well past the Ai Event Horizon or is being used to counter balance some underground evil lair (counter balance to keep the Earth rotation smooth and all).
  • 1 0
 @ChristianToole: Yes, it is. Merida One-Sixty alloy Long (Large) frame with 500g Float X shock & rear axle is 10 pounds. And that frame passed Category 5 (FR + Downhill) test, so it shall be theoretically as strong as 161 frame, but it's still 2 pounds lighter!
  • 16 1
 I am not a fan of the bend in the top tube.
  • 14 0
 Hello heavy and ugly little thing
  • 11 2
 I own a 30 lb Ripmo V1, a 42 lb Heckler SL, and a 53 lb full sized Heckler. In my experience, If you ride chunky and technical terrain weight matters....a lot. If you do a lot of "up", weight matters. The rides I enjoy the most have all three. My fastest Strava times are on the heaviest bike. The bike that is the most fun to ride is the lightest. This 74 year old is having trouble maintaining pace with the analog bike these days so the SL is becoming my "go to" ride. Guess I just don't understand the "weight doesn't matter" side of the debate If a crap rider like me can feel the difference.
  • 10 0
 "People seem to really despise the way the Ibis top tube kinks, so maybe we can really cash in if we kink the opposite direction?"
  • 8 0
 Unless you're only looking for a full 29" bike, hard to imagine how this one could be a rival to an updated Airdrop Edit. It's also made of aluminium with riders in mind, has external routing, Horst link, full insertion depth... but it looks good.
  • 4 0
 If you do want full 29” then Bird have you covered with the Aeris 9 for all the same reasons (although not as pretty as the Airdrop)
  • 3 0
 I was looking at the airdrop but shipping to EU you gotta add all the duties, fees, VAT, money here and money there. Its also less progressive 2.8 than this at 3.6! Less travel(167 to 175). It would end up the same in terms of price I think. I'd take the spindrift if the seatpost weren't so damn high
  • 1 0
 @mrmm8900: propain and their damn insertion depth, the Spindrift would be so perfect if it could take longer droppers
  • 1 0
 @mrmm8900: if only more progressiveness and more travel meant a better bike Smile
  • 1 0
 @mrmm8900: btw, you’re confusing leverage ratio and progressiveness. From one perspective, more leverage ratio is actually worse, because requires higher air pressure or heavier springs, and overall puts more stress on suspension.
  • 9 0
 Does anyone know why its so heavy? At this weight I'd rather have a steel bike.
  • 2 0
 Mid-higher end parts on a thick aluminum frame with basic frame engineering techniques and heavy tires out of the box.
  • 5 1
 @The-Wheel: It's heavy for sure. People must have some amazing DH trails they ride all the time that every new bike with more than 150mm of travel seems to be like 35+lbs. Everything must just be slog up a 45 min climb and smash down, repeat. That is not my after-work ride and also not my style....but I guess most people buying MTBs live around epic trails. Also this bike is an XL and most bikes are actually heavier than we think when you actually put them on the scale. Not every XC race bike is 22lbs and not every trail bike is 30lbs. You start weighing these things in the real world and you have lots of 25lb race bikes 35lb trail bikes. The Carbon Gen1 Ripmo is supposedly a pretty light bike but in the real world when people start putting DD tires and inserts and strapping tools and tubes, frame protection, chain guards to the bike I've seen some that are around 35lbs for a high-end build even taking to tube and tool off before weighing. With tools and tube probably 37. Another one I see is the "lightweight" Pivot Firebird. Mid-level build, burly tires added and its 35lbs.
  • 11 1
 40 pounds. Let that sink in…
  • 7 0
 It's sinking alright!
  • 2 1
 They tell us weight doesn't matter. Who are "we" to argue with "they"?
  • 7 0
 Maybe an unpopular opinion, but, after getting spoiled by Sram Transmission drivetrains, I will never consider a non UDH frame ever again
  • 5 0
 Hard to overstate how unfortunate looking that bike is. I like to think that I am generally forgiving of aesthetics, but this bike strikes me as one of the uglier current designs. Not only for the kinked top tube, but the rear triangle and the linkage are hideous. Also, coming in at 40.1 lbs is unforgivable for a 160-170mm bike. That is about has heavy as my mid-tier DH bike from 2010.
  • 6 1
 It’s funny how, according to Pinkbike, it’s not OK for a small manufacturer like Privateer to make 161mm out of a 60mm stroke, but it’s perfectly fine for a big one like Spesh or Santa Cruz to make 170mm out of the same stroke…
  • 10 2
 Looks great, but 40lb? Good lord.
  • 7 0
 Wow, what did they think about? This bike went from gorgeous to ugly in one generation. Frown
  • 4 0
 I love my Gen1 161 but I don't think I will be buying this. Privateer support have been fantastic with any issues. However the price increase is too high compared to the Gen1, with similar parts, plus it seems they've made it heavier. The only benefit this has over the Gen1 is that it can be run with mixed wheels out of the box.

I think for value for money I'd be looking at Vitus/Nukeproof for my next bike (as long as they are still around)
  • 1 0
 I've recently replaced my Gen 1 161 (£2800ish when new) with a top spec Giga 290 RS from CRC in the sale.. The same spec Mega is currently in the sale too, with an extra 10% off the already discounted price.. No brainer in my opinion.
  • 4 0
 There's a lot about the design of this bike that is smart – the pivots look massive and durable, you can fit a really long dropper post in, external cabling, easily adjustable chain stays. And I know the science says that weight isn't as big a deal as I think... But holy hell, 40lbs. I'm sure they'll sell out (as Gen 1 did), but if I'm riding a bike that weighs that much, I'll take one with a motor.
  • 9 0
 Yikes wtf did they do.
  • 6 0
 18.2 kilos. My trail bike has 20mm less travel, but is 5 kilos lighter and cost 1000 euros less. Not sure who this is for. Fans of lead pipe plumbing?
  • 4 0
 Oh no... I have the gen1 161 and it's a great bike, especially for the price, so I wanted to like this. And it might ride amazing, but that kinked top tube just looks weird and bad. I mean, I get that it's for a good functional reason, but I just cannot love a bike that looks like that.
  • 6 0
 As someone who currently runs >50mm of stem spacers, I'm a fan of the stack height on the XL frame.
  • 6 0
 Unfortunately nowhere near as aesthetic as the gen 1. In size M it is kind of okay (more or less), but XL is horrible.
  • 3 0
 Very curious to read more ride impressions specifically regarding the progression in the rear suspension. The rest of the kinematics look great, albeit I prefer less anti-rise. That much anti-rise can make the rear skip and shatter in the rough stuff, rather than track and hook up under braking... it's going to behave a lot like a single pivot, which defeats one of the reasons of using a horst 4-bar.
Been eyeing this frame, the Madonna, and Geometron for years now hoping for my ideal frame to come in aluminum. None of them are there yet although maybe a Saturn 16 with custom geo (I want much more BB drop than stock) would get me there. In the meantime, still running a Spec Enduro with the saddle slammed forward bc nothing out there seems like an improvement yet.
  • 8 2
 450mm reach for the smallest version.. These bikes are oversized
  • 6 0
 No offense, but aren't you sponsored by Canyon? The Strive is probably the worst offender when it comes to nonsensical reach figures.
  • 3 0
 @TristanBotteramMedia the STAs are wildly steep so looking at the ETT numbers they will be fine when seated and really long when descending.
  • 4 2
 No UDH. I'd take that over adjustable stays. Transmission is that good, having owned and ridden everything from both SRAM and Shimano. And to their ethos of "if you are working on your bike, you're not riding your bike," no B tension, high/low stops, nor barrel adjuster means more riding...set it and forget it.

Outside of that, I LOVE everything about the bike(s)...
  • 6 1
 It's funny how simple the formula is for MTB aesthetics: straight tubes. That's the formula..... Literally that's it.
  • 2 0
 But you can say what you want, private bikes attract interest. After all, almost 300 comments have already been sent. I think that's a good sign. If no one was interested in the new privateer gen2 design, there would hardly be any comments. I'm starting to like the kink.
  • 5 0
 Photo is private. ‍♂️
  • 2 1
 Personally if you can fit a longer length stroke and get more travel for the same weight, why not just have the longer travel? Run it as firm as the 161mm travel if you like how it rides but have an extra 10-15mm travel because why not.
  • 4 0
 Yuck, they ruined that bike. Looks like its been in a head on collision from the factory.
  • 5 0
 Looks like a niner....that is, not good.
  • 5 0
 WOW they destroyed it. The V1 was sick. This thing is FUGLY AF.
  • 4 0
 Tell me you don’t read the comments section before designing a frame everyone will complain about without telling me, lol.
  • 1 0
 You can try and say 40lbs is a reasonable bike weight and it doesn't matter as much as some might think, but that's a heavy ass bike. Maybe not noticeable in the UK hills, but if you're pedaling up steep trails in the Rockies, it's going to feel a lot different.
  • 1 0
 It states it should stay high and firm in its travel under sprinting in its harder gears etc. Around 130-140% in the 10tooth ( and even quite high in every gear ) which seems a lot to me, and ultimately compressing the bike. Totally opposite of staying high and firm.
Or am I missing something?
  • 1 0
 Sorry my mistake was thinking about anti-rise. “Self-delete comment”
  • 1 0
 Everyone says this is just aesthetics, function is more important - what type of phone are you using? If I'm going to be charged a small fortune for a bicycle frame I don't think it's unreasonable to say it has to work well AND look good.
  • 1 0
 Toptube is F***ING hideous, and can we please stop making down tubes with horizontal sections at the bb that are about the same length as the crank arms, they're just asking to be smashed by a rock. A cool looking frame has turned into an absolute munter.
  • 1 0
 No seatstay bridge, over-levered kinematics, no raw color option, hideous top tube, 40 LBS, and $5,500. No longer a value frame option for the privateer, which was the niche that earned this company success. Honestly what were they thinking? I don't think the leadership understands how bad this is. Rough times ahead, sad to see.
  • 2 0
 LOL..the P1 has an ETT of 462 and a 450 reach. Thats some 33mm shorter than my current bike with a 450 reach and 76.5 deg STA. How does one pedal a bike around with a 80 degree STA? 20% grades or bust.
  • 1 0
 I had an early gen1 that I nought in may 2020 for around £2800. It was a great bike, I loved it and rode it a lot. I wanted to like this one too, but the pricing seems odd. The frames are around £100 more than the gen 1 was, but the complete builds at 1600 more seem a bit off. I just did a quick internet search and tot-up and the same build with parts from 3 or 4 different u.k webstores came up at 200 less than the complete build. I know a lot of this is down to current overstock in shops, but still. I'd buy the frame and do my own build this time it think. Id save even more by fitting anything other than wobbly Maxxis tyres and though the A4's are great nrakes I'd probably save another 200 and go with shimanos. That brings it down to a whisker over £4k.
  • 3 0
 For US pricing, the gen 2 frame only is 50% more expensive than the gen 1.
  • 2 0
 Hi together,

maybe this link has already been posted:

www.pinkbike.com/photo/26239039

Not sure who did that how (photoshop or the like), but this version looks really great !!!!!
  • 2 0
 Well done
  • 2 0
 and the price for a frame is really acceptable; compared to last, kona, raaw and many other 29" manufacturers (even if there are different frame designs with different suspension concepts)
  • 2 1
 So is this a four bar suspension platform or a linkage driven single pivot? Technically the pivot is located on the seatstay (linkage driven single pivot). But its also apart of the chainstay (four bar)...
  • 6 0
 It's a horst/pure 4-bar. Because the rear axle is mounted on the seat stay, not the chain stay (and not both).
  • 4 0
 Sorry but that is ugly AF.
  • 1 0
 A lot to like about this bike, and I can get over the kinked toptube! I also like seeing Hayes brakes on more bikes out-of-the-box, less faff and bits to change out after buying. Bravo!
  • 2 0
 Wow. The gen 1 in raw was such a pretty bike. This is like the weird twin that was locked in the basement and finally escaped.
  • 2 0
 Why would anyone choose this latest Privateer over the latest Raaw Mondonna V3?
www.pinkbike.com/news/first-ride-raaw-madonna-v3-better-than-ever.html
  • 4 0
 Seat post insertion is too short and the seat angle is too slack on the Raaw
  • 1 0
 @mcfadden999: An effective seat angle of 78 degrees is not flat, is it?
  • 1 1
 @johnlord82: still not 80 degrees, plus the seat insertion sucks
  • 2 0
 Adjustable geo is super nice. The one thing I would change about my Gen 1 is a longer chainstay. Too bad this new one looks like a catalogue frame.
  • 2 0
 So it weighs 40lb and has that really ugly bent top tube that makes it look like it hit a wall? I’ll pick up a used Gen 1 instead and ride that instead.
  • 3 0
 That Madonna I just bought is looking better and better..
  • 3 2
 That frame colour choice, a 64° head tube angle, and a 80° seat tube angle make the bike perfect for a backcountry ride. Can't wait to get my hands on one soon in the US!
  • 2 1
 I really like Privateer’s approach & ethos; simple & durable designs, at a great price point. Kudo’s for these latest offerings, they look superb
  • 1 0
 Let’s finally give them real size-specific chainstays but also make the frame look like someone front wheel cased a 100’ gap at Hardline.
  • 1 0
 well this is step backwards. IMO, this looks horrible. Also, stop specing L and Xl frames w a fucking 170-180mm dropper posts.
  • 1 0
 Surely there are many of us who regret that gen 2 is nothing more than gen 1, visually speaking! In sensations there must be an abyss of differences, maybe
  • 1 0
 Looks like a killer bike - Aesthetics yes, not the greatest but at least my 2018 Mega would look a "new" bike again beside this
  • 2 0
 They also downgraded frame material from aluminium 6066 to 6061...
  • 3 0
 Looks like a Niner
  • 2 0
 A frame only a mother could love! Who approved this!??
  • 2 0
 So it got uglier and more expensive. Way to kill a good thing
  • 1 0
 The Specialized Enduro exists. A cash strapped privateer needs to look no further.
  • 2 0
 The prototype gen 2 looked so much better. What happened??
  • 1 0
 Might have to design a new "human seat" to work with these new seat tube angles.
  • 1 0
 Well my bingo card is empty…an entire article from Seb without him mentioning once that he rides in Innerleithen.
  • 2 0
 Why custom tune when the whole point of the brand is easy maintenance
  • 1 0
 Why does it look like they ran it into a wall at top speed before taking these photos????
  • 2 1
 Guess I'll be selling my Gen1 soon

Anyone interested? Big Grin
  • 13 2
 why? Gen2 looks like a downgrade .... Can't unsee that awful top tube now too
  • 5 0
 @alexisalwaysonfire: I'm guessing they put a kinked top tube in to make way for a full sized bottle and maintain the standover. Aesthetics aside, that's a definite upgrade. I can just about squeeze the smallest fidlock bottle inside my gen 1 p3, not sure the smaller sizes managed to fit a bottle at all.
  • 5 0
 @alexisalwaysonfire: The geometry is better for tall humans and you can't ignore the fact you can put in a Boxxer or 40
  • 1 0
 Make sure you're committed to the new version, because no one is going to buy it off you in the buy/sell section.
  • 1 0
 @mr-moose: Actually first gen P1 fits a larger bottle than the rest of the sizes. I have a 600ml on mine with a regular assymetric bottlecage.
  • 3 0
 @justwan-naride: P2 gen1 fits a 600ml bottle easy
  • 1 0
 @mr-moose: check out the yt thirstmas 5000 bottle. Fidlock just launched a wide short bottle that should fit as well.
  • 1 0
 @haen: good tip, thanks
  • 1 0
 And no emoji support. *sigh*
  • 1 0
 Needs P0 and P-1 size options
  • 1 0
 Still not a proper XL size.
  • 1 0
 Buhahaha!
No point going into details (price, weight ...)
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Fuel Ex 2 gens back
  • 2 3
 The steep seat angle is ridiculous.. making u size up so your knees don't hit the damn bars..then the reach is to long..and ugly as ..
  • 5 1
 The steep seat tube is the best thing about these bikes (gen 1). I haven't hit my knees on the bars since the mid 2000s. Don't knock it til you try it.
  • 1 0
 Someone needs to take a look at that "top tube tumor" before it spreads.
  • 1 0
 Jfc that seat tube angle is ridiculous
  • 2 0
 40lb WTAF
  • 1 1
 Add pedals, a coil shock,full DH casing tires,your tools and and a bottle cage for your 44lb nimbly enduro machine.
  • 3 3
 @nozes: take a fat poo and a piss and you’re basically at the same weight as a specialized enduro
  • 1 0
 @mcfadden999: my coil shocked transition patrol is 33lb.
  • 3 1
 @poah: I have just weighted my Privateer 161 P3 (Gen1) also with a Coil, Conti DH Casing, Tubes and it weights 17.51kg a(~38.5lbs). But its the first Bike that I had hold up for more tha one season.
  • 1 0
 @RockCrawler: mine is 7 years old
  • 1 0
 @poah: I’ve pooed five lbs and pissed ten, clearly you’ve never been to college
  • 2 1
 @mcfadden999: Got a doctorate. You get them at University.
  • 3 4
 @poah: sounds gay
  • 3 0
 @mcfadden999: Your dad has several
  • 1 2
 @poah: how could he, he was too busy boning your mom
  • 2 0
 @mcfadden999: she's dead - he must like wanking off into dust.
  • 1 0
 @mcfadden999: FFS why??
  • 2 0
 @mcfadden999: She was cremated not buried.
  • 1 0
 Looks like a....first generation Canyon Spectral
  • 1 0
 Playfull 18 kilo bike with 170mm travel and with 455mm chain stay?
  • 3 0
 Hippos can be playfull to.
  • 1 0
 Looks Dis-able sure it rides decent hahahah
  • 1 0
 Good god that is ugly as sin.
  • 1 0
 Sucks you can’t unsee things
  • 1 0
 I'll be getting a Raaw Madonna V2.2 to replace my Privateer Gen. 1
  • 1 0
 canyon called...they want their 2015 spectral back
  • 1 0
 The hunchtoptube of Notre Dame
  • 5 4
 Looks like a Mondraker
  • 11 0
 I tought more like a Hibike NDuro from some years back.
  • 2 0
 I had the same feeling. 2015 mondraker vantage in full suspension.
  • 5 0
 Looks more like a Niner.
  • 1 0
 That's ugly







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