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First Ride: RockShox Flight Attendant Trail Suspension System

Jun 20, 2024
by Dario DiGiulio  
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RockShox unveiled the newest generation of Flight Attendant this past March, with the initial offering focusing exclusively on efficiency-minded cross country platforms. They're now expanding that lineup to include all of their fork and shock platforms, encompassing everything from do it all trail bikes to descent-focused enduro rigs.

All of this piggybacks on the newest Charger 3.1 damper update, as well as the new air springs found in the Pike platform. The XC version hit hard with purported gains of 1.8% on the clock, but is that enough to warrant the complication and cost for trail bikes?
Flight Attendant Trail Details

• Forks: Pike, Lyrik, & Zeb Ultimate
• Shocks: SuperDeluxe, Vivid, Vivid Coil
• Vivid & Vivid Coil not available aftermarket

• Zeb: 2450g, $1,599 USD
• Lyrik: 2100g, $1,549 USD
• Pike: 1960g, $1,499 USD
• Super Deluxe: 560g, $949 USD
rockshox.com

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Models

If it's a RockShox product that says Ultimate after the name, you'd be safe betting that it's now part of the updated Flight Attendant family. The range now includes everything from XC to Enduro, only omitting the DH bike products, though plenty of World Cup coverage seems to indicate that they're working on something in that space.

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Pike Ultimate is the 35mm chassis fork, offered in 120mm to 140mm travel. Geared towards lighter and sportier trail bikes, the Pike will be well suited to bikes like the Santa Cruz Tallboy or Specialized Epic EVO.
1960g, $1,499 USD

Super Deluxe Ultimate is the smaller volume and lighter of the two air shocks available, but don't let that make you think it's sequestered to short-travel bikes. Before Vivid came around, the Super Deluxe was spec on anything from trail bikes to DH race bikes, and with the new air can options that range is still just as wide.
560g, $949 USD

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Lyrik Ultimate also uses 35mm stanchions, but is meant to encapsulate the all-mountain realm of bikes. With 140mm to 160mm of travel, it will pair nicely with things like the Trek Fuel EX or Yeti SB140.
1624g, $1,449 USD

Vivid Ultimate is the more gravity-oriented air shock, with adjustable hydraulic bottom out, massive air volume, and the new Touchdown damper that bypasses compression damping in the first 10% of the stroke.
780g, Not available aftermarket.

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Zeb Ultimate is the beefy 38mm chassis fork, handling bikes in the 160-190mm range of front travel. Meant for bikes like the Specialized Enduro or YT Capra.
2450g, $1,599 USD

Vivid Coil Ultimate is built around the all-new Vivid Coil chassis, using the same damping technologies found in the Vivid, but with a coil spring instead of air. All the typical benefits of coil apply, and the tradeoffs might just be reduced with the help of the suspension robot. Read on to get some thoughts on that front.
1130g, Not available aftermarket.

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Clearance is going to be an issue for some bikes - make sure to check with your frame manufacturer before jumping in.
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For typical clearance reference.

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The shock is chunkier than stock, but clears even this unusual orientation well. Still, check clearance, especially on frames with a shock tunnel.
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Strong presence.

Updates

There are a bevy of software updates that have gone into the Flight Attendant (FA) overhaul, and much like using the system itself, you don't really have to think about them. The FA algorithm considers more points of data, has a longer memory, and uses all of that to change its performance to better match your rider profile. The name given to that latter system is Adaptive Ride Dynamics, and principally it's the mind behind the system. You choose your Bias Adjustment - basically how firm/soft you want the system to bias towards - and it collects data points that influence how it's performing, giving better fidelity to the changes it makes.

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Key to this data aggregation is having a power meter paired in the system, which differs from the first version of FA that only implemented a pedal cadence sensor. That power data collected by the meter gives the algorithm a better sense of where your given thresholds are, so it can differentiate between Low, Medium, High, and Sprint outputs. You can also set those thresholds yourself in the app, but I chose to let the robot do the thinking for me.

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The more of these you have, the better off you are - this goes for existing FA customers as well.

That's the final key detail here: beyond pairing the system, you don't actually have to do anything else. You can edit mode settings and fine tune the effort thresholds, or you can just ride and let the system do its thing. I've barely opened the app since putting the fork and shock on my bike, and the settings have noticeably changed with time.

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Green lights tell you what state you're in. In this case I have a split state, because I've set the fork to never fully lock out.
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One click gets you to Bias Adjustment mode.

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Two clicks and you can adjust the fork's low speed compression.
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Three, and you're adjusting the shock's low speed compression.

A note to people who already have first-gen Flight Attendant on their bikes: updating your firmware will get your system more in line with the most modern version, but not entirely. To increase the fidelity of data collection and get the best algorithmic learning out of the system, you'll want to have as many of the connected components as possible. Namely, the power meter and Transmission drivetrain are going to help a lot.

Some FAQs

SRAM put together a very thorough FAQ packet for the Flight Attendant update, and I figured some of them were worth plugging directly in here, as I'm sure the questions will come up.

Comparing the same bike with or without Flight Attendant, how much weight does the system add?
Including the fork, rear shock, pedal sensor/power meter, both SRAM AXS batteries and the difference in weight between a 1- and 2- button left controller, the system adds around 220g for XC components and 308g for Trail/All Mtn/Enduro components.

How do Flight Attendant’s Bias Adjust and Adaptive Ride Dynamics work together?
Think of Bias as the first step to personalization: you can set the Bias to trend toward Open, Lock, or a balance of the two positions. From there, Adaptive Ride Dynamics gathers rider effort data, and uses that to meet the rider where they are on that ride. For example, if you’re riding in the Low Effort Zone, you’re probably soft pedaling along and the system will trend toward the Open position. If you’re putting out more effort and you’re in either the High or Sprint Effort Zones, you’re going to likely prefer that it is firmer, and it’ll trend more toward the Lock position. All of it is based on the initial Bias setting, which will determine whether the system will trend in one way or the other.

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Ride Impressions

With racing in mind, I have been nothing short of impressed with the XC Flight Attendant (FA) system I've been running on my Epic for the past few months. I still have some skepticism about whether your average non-racer is going to benefit from the system enough to warrant the cost, but that's ultimately a decision for the consumer.

Perhaps a noncommittal answer, but when it comes to Flight Attendant's trail guise, my feelings are cloudier still. The Zeb / Vivid Coil combo I have on my Frameworks feels like a lot of extra complication, cost, and weight for minimal gains at best. The bike already climbs well, especially from a preservation of geometry perspective, so the dynamic firmness isn't patching a hole in the initial design. This is a bike I never lock out - partially because the switch is inconvenient to reach - but I have been happy to feel the rear end firm up on consistent fire road climbs and paved commutes to the trailhead.

Technical climbs are where things start to feel a bit counterintuitive, as those situations tend to be made easier by a bike's ability to maintain traction, conform to bumpy terrain, and isolate the rider from any erratic movements. That said, FA prefers to stiffen up in those circumstances, as you're putting down power and that's read as an effort where efficiency would be beneficial. There were a few moments where I wished the suspension would just open up completely, but it was fixed in Pedal mode or in a Split State. The shock still has some give in Pedal position, but the traction simply doesn't compare to Open.

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My feelings are rosier to the system when applied to bikes with a more 50/50 split between climbing and descending. Pike and Lyrik bikes especially, as they can really reap the benefits of efficiency while still pushing on descents. If you're someone who likes to turn yourself inside out on climbs, lives in a place where those climbs reward efficiency over compliance, and still want the best possible descending performance on the descents, FA Trail could be the ticket.

All these thoughts aside, at the end of the day the system still rests upon the very capable Charger 3.1 damper, so at least you can rest assured that things are working very well when the system is open. Mechatronics aside, I'm just pleased with how well the Zeb and Vivid Coil work on my bike, and have felt great pushing it on gnarly trails.

Speculative Ideals

Part of me still thinks the potential of a system like Flight Attendant can't be fully realized with bikes as well rounded as they currently are. The benefits of an active system that biases towards pedaling efficiency could really be taken advantage of on a bike with compromised efficiency in pursuit of better descending. I wonder what could be achieved when playing with FA and a bike with very low anti-squat, for example. This kind of concept is best tested in the real world, so if any companies are keen to play with the idea, hit me up.

In a more tangible sense, I think Flight Attendant can be a great pairing with bikes like the Specialized Enduro, which still holds its own despite being a little long in the tooth. Most of that bike is perfectly current, but the slacker seat tube angle and very active suspension might fall a little short of current climbing expectations. An active lockout could easily alleviate this, and keep the bike held up on the climbs without getting in the way on the descents.



For more info on the Flight Attendant lineup, head over to rockshox.com.

Author Info:
dariodigiulio avatar

Member since Dec 25, 2016
212 articles

153 Comments
  • 291 4
 I, and most readers here I would assume, just want to know more about that Frameworks bike.
  • 13 0
 Truth
  • 38 0
 When the packaging is more interesting than the gizmo
  • 6 2
 @Explodo there’s an article written about it in Pinkbike.
  • 21 0
 @IllestT: Are you a cat?
  • 8 0
 @bocomtb: I can neither confirm nor deny
  • 160 0
 I absolutely love that this high tech electronic expensive af suspension is on a bike that uses a ski strap for cable routing
  • 2 1
 Soon this shit will come with WiFi so one can work remotely from their sprinter van, while exploiting a small mountain towns secrets on social media!
  • 98 10
 Does anyone really want more computers and tech on their bike? I've always felt that a huge part of what makes biking fun is the escape from technology and computers. I guess the tech bro's are here to stay in the sport and this caters to them.
  • 28 0
 if it genuinely adds to and improves my ride, Im not against it. If its adding marginal gains (like Flight attendant trail appears to) then Im not interested.
  • 7 0
 It reminds me of Simon memory game from the... 80's?
  • 19 0
 I agreed! But then I tried the AXS thingy and changed my mind.
  • 7 4
 How many people use strava daily ? how many use cycling computers ? I agree with you and would like to even leave my phone at home if it were safe to do so, but I feel that the majority of folks will have some interest in electronics.
  • 8 24
flag wolftwenty1 FL (Jun 20, 2024 at 8:08) (Below Threshold)
 Tell me you've never used AXS without telling me you've never used AXS....
  • 16 0
 @mtmc99: Yup. I really didn't like the idea of AXS until I tried it. Never having to fiddle with a derailleur again is a huge step up for me, so I bought it. This seems like an overkill replacement for either flipping a switch or tinkering with dials, things that I don't mind so much.
  • 7 0
 I do. I have a GX Axs derailleur on one bike and a Gx transmission on another and if I can afford it, I'm never going back. Would love to have this system on my enduro bike
  • 10 5
 Bought a bike with a GX AXS derailleur and Reverb AXS seatpost. They're the future, but the current stuff is not worth the price.

The best things about AXS are: lever action and no cables to run. That's about it.
AXS 170mm post was too short, and the collar too tall, or I would have kept the post. Ditched the seatpost for a 210 Oneup. Spent the difference on grips, tires and beer. Nice to not have to charge the battery.

GX AXS shifting I could take or leave, Shimano's XT 11 speed and 12 speed were just fine IMO.
Shifting under power is infinitesimally improved.
But a cheap, super-functional derailleur precariously dangling from a hanger is better than an expensive electronic unit whose parts individually cost as much as the outgoing tech. If I blast the GX AXS derailleur on a rock, it's possible that replacing a couple pieces won't restore the thing to as-new shifting performance. Oh and did you like using the barrel adjuster to tune shifting while pedaling? Too bad, you have to fiddle with an app. Not often, but when you do you'll miss physical adjustments.
  • 29 3
 @wpplayer18: I'm willing to bet that the amount of time you spend charging the batteries on your bike far outweighs the amount of time I spend adjusting my X01 derailleur.
  • 6 0
 @Jer3myF and the great thing is that you can still buy non tech components.
  • 9 7
 @stevemokan: they charge at night while I am sleeping. it's not even close. bad bet
  • 4 0
 @CaSentLeTabarnakMonHomme: For much cheaper too!

- GX AXS Upgrade kit: $633 (competitivecyclist.com)
- GX Eagle 12spd Derailleur + Shifter: $180 (worldwidecyclery.com)
  • 1 0
 @chrod: no one is paying $633 retail price for that.
  • 16 1
 @ksilvey10: I think he's talking about the time spent to remember to charge batteries, remove, plug them in the charger, swap them back out, etc over the lifespan of the system.
And the penalty for forgetting to charge the battery?
Cabled systems never have that problem.

How much would you pay for a magic AXS battery that "never needs charging"? A cabled system gives you that, at the expense of up-front installation time and a couple fiddles of the barrel adjuster every year or two.
  • 11 0
 @chrod: "Oh and did you like using the barrel adjuster to tune shifting while pedaling? Too bad, you have to fiddle with an app. Not often, but when you do you'll miss physical adjustments."

That's incorrect, you can do adjustments on the fly by holding down the pair button + pressing the shifter buttons to micro adjust the alignment. Its pretty easy to do, even you could do it.
  • 4 1
 @ksilvey10
correct - folks are adopting AXS because it came discounted on their new bike.

But replacement parts.... wait to pay more
  • 5 1
 @chrod: not even close man. i have had wayyyyy less trouble with the axs stuff than xo1 or gx or xt cabled stuff. sorry, it's just better. and those batteries last a long time without a charge. plenty of warning before they go dead. everything you are saying is basically a non-issue
  • 2 0
 @Wabit: No way!
Guess I'll have to read the manual that got lost under the coffee mug... Wink
thanks!
  • 1 1
 @chrod: I put it on two frame builds. it's so not-a-problem. keeping cable derailleurs tuned, especially when you ride really rough trails was way more of a pain
  • 5 0
 @ksilvey10: Sorry to hear that cabled systems failed you. They're tricky until you get the process down.
  • 1 1
 Double post
  • 9 1
 I might be an outlier, but I tried AXS and Di2 and I don't like either. I tried, I really did. I still have XX1 on my XC bike because I haven't bother going back to XTR (I saved the parts) because it does work, but after the GX AXS quit on my enduro bike I bought an X01 mechanical to go back on.

I bought a new road bike last year and went Di2 Dura Ace as Shimano and Sram no longer offer their top spec in mechanical and am totally underwhelmed by it. But my options now are limited.

The older I get (now 44) the more I LIKED electronics, and the less I like them.

If anyone wants a fully functioning XX1 derailleur and shifted and wants to make a good offer, I'll rush to swap it out. But I'm lazy when it comes to working on my bikes.

Also, I haven't had to make a single adjustment on ANY of my mechanical bikes in months, not sure how remembering to charge my batteries is more convenient. I have to carry an AXS battery and charger in both of my vehicles so I don't forget to bring one, and I have killed an AXS battery in one ride before. Luckily I was able to get back near the trail head before it quit working.

The Di2 battery does last a long time at least. I only charge it every couple of weeks (I ride about 250 miles a week).

Which reminds me, I should go plug my AXS battery back in during my lunch break.
  • 10 0
 small sample size, but there seems to be a pattern emerging w.r.t. AXS

under 40's: finding it easier to use electronics and swap batteries to avoid fiddling with cables
vs.
over 40's: finding it easier to fiddle with cables to avoid batteries
  • 3 0
 Totally agree. Gonna get to the point where we cant use our bikes in the wet, the mildly damp, thunder storms and or excessive sun spot activity due to the amount of spurious electric tech for techs sake. Possibly.
  • 2 0
 @chrod:

Exactly this. If ASX can automatically adjust the B tension over the life of my chain, it _might_ be as good. That's about all the 'maintenance' derailleur adjusting I've had to do in the past decade...about once every 20-30 rides.
  • 1 0
 @stevemokan: I went about two months before the battery went dead, but I also don't feel like it's some huge improvement over mechanical. My X01 system once dialed in was great, and the shifting is just a touch more immediate. I have X01 Transmission on my new bike, and it's just fine. I'd have been just as happy with X01 Mech... Maybe being able to shift under full power is nice, probably going to mess me up when I switch to my other bike that's still X01 mech.
  • 1 1
 @chrod: What are your thoughts on the mechanical AXS coming soon (maybe this year ?)
  • 9 0
 I love tech, live and breathe it. Don't really like this shit, just wanna grab my mountain cycle and go 9/10 times and this gets in the way of that.
  • 4 0
 @wolftwenty1: In my experience everything on the drive train is a consumable. My last derailleur lasted a year and a half before the pivots went slack enough that there wasn't anyway to compensate with wire tension. And yeah, I do keep up on maintenance and cleaning (of my MTB anyway). If I dropped $400 on a derailleur and it wore out after a year and a half I would be pretty pissed. People can choose what they want on their own bikes and that is great. But I wish that bike companies would invest a little more of their finite resources in finding materials/designs that increased reliability, longevity and maintainability and a little less on light-up doodad battery powered bling.

But then I am also in the camp that thinks certain cars were better left without traction control...
  • 1 0
 @DGWW: very few folks i know use strava. i only use it when i'm training, not casual rides.
  • 1 0
 @thomasjkenney1024: transmission does.
  • 1 0
 @DGWW: do you live in a hammer factory? What will happen to your phone if you don’t bring it with you?
  • 2 1
 @JSTootell: If you killed an AXS battery in one ride, you either didn't have it even remotely close to fully charged or you road across three stares non stop.......The AXS batteries last forever on a full charge. I did a a 4 day gravel stage race totaling over 200 miles of riding and the AXS battery on the derailer was still over 50% and the dropper battery was at 90%.
  • 14 0
 I hear you, but...
can the escape from technology really ever compare to the joy you get from complaining about the existence of a product you don't want?
  • 1 0
 @numbnuts1977: I never start a ride without a full charge. Never have, ever. I pull the battery off the charger from inside my van or Jeep, ride, then put the battery back on the charger when I'm done. I have literally never, not once, started a ride without a full charge.

But my rides can be quite large on occasion.

Sram also says the remote battery should last for 2 years, mine lasted 6 months on that same bike.
  • 1 0
 @JSTootell: Here's another thing: EVERYONE has to check tire pressure, bolt checks, lube chain etc. regardless of drivetrain. No bike is maintenance free, and the additional (in my experience, less) maintenance and electronic drivetrain requires is negligible in the grand scheme of things
  • 1 0
 @Weens: quote of the day!
  • 4 3
 @Jer3myF “tech” has literally gotten the sport to point where it is today. I heard geezers moaning similar sentiments 24 years ago when disc brakes started arriving on a mass scale. Go enjoy a nice ride on you fully rigid canti bike or penny farthing or whatever it is you have.
  • 3 0
 @slowandcontrolled: Sick, you still ride a San Andreas? Fair dinkum.
  • 1 0
 @chrod: you know you can hold the bind button and click the shifter to adjust any gears that aren't perfect. No need to get the phone out.

Also my gear charger lives in the car and I take the battery off and shove it in, takes less time than my seatbelt. I only need to do it 1 in 6 or 7 rides, hardly an issue. Not for the masses yet, but it will be the future.
  • 1 0
 @stevemokan: I only ride twice a week at most, so no. When I had cables, I was always adjusting and fiddling with them. Charging a battery once every couple of months >>> messing with cables once a week.
  • 4 1
 I look forward to the day when I can just send the bike to ride on its own, do all the tricks/jumps/drops and then post the AI-edited 360 degree recordings to all social media, without ever having to get off the couch.

I can then relive the whole experience on my fruity logo'ed VR googles.

Dog forbid I ever have to tinker with the bike - it'd better clean itself, grease itself, charge itself.

I won't even have to own it - it will be included in my $$$$ monthly subscription.

The future's bright, can't wait. /s
  • 3 0
 @wpplayer18: This has got to be an exaggeration, or you need somebody to help you with your adjustment technique.
  • 1 0
 @st-lupo: if he had something liks Sram SX he probably had to work on it 3-4 times/ride
  • 2 0
 @tkrug: I use my phone in order to stay safe when riding alone. Being able to call for help and / or notify a friend of where you are going and when you'll be back / modify return time is critical for safety.
  • 1 1
 @JSTootell: This seems terrible, having to remove 3 batteries and charge them after every ride is a total dealbreaker for me
  • 4 0
 @DGWW: I recognize your sarcasm.

Look, if you all like electronics, then go ahead and enjoy them. I never once said anyone else was wrong. I said I tried and I didn't like them.

People have to get butt hurt because not everyone likes the same thing. I don't enjoy electronic shifting, some people juggle geese.
  • 3 0
 @st-lupo: Little bit of both. The once a week estimate is probably an overestimation and I'm totally ham-fisted when it comes to shifter cables and adjustments.
  • 2 0
 @wpplayer18: If you have Shimano read their online dealer guide for your derailleur, it is wicked good. Make sure your chain/derailleur/cassette are very clean and in good condition when you start. Make sure your wheel, der hanger and detailleur are bolted tightly. Make sure your cable moves smoothly. If you gotta do a shift and a half om the way up the cassette _and_ down, your der or shifter is worn out. If your chain rides up on the cassette teeth and/or chainring teeth either the chain or the cassette/chainring are toast (probably both).
  • 53 0
 I’m so excited for people to refuse to service their FA suspension for three years just like they do with every other $10,000 clap wagon they have in the garage.
  • 35 0
 From this point forward, I will only be referring to my friends bikes as "clap wagons"
  • 4 0
 clap wagons 4 lyfe
  • 3 1
 @misteraustin:

I thought it was called a 'bang bus.'
  • 19 4
 To your speculation, could this create an opportunity to make less well rounded bikes that excel at even higher levels on the DH and let the electronics compensate on the rest creating a greater window of performance?
  • 18 0
 this is exactly what the author is suggesting
  • 1 2
 @DGWW: I agree but wondering the possibility of designing a bike from scratch to maximize the technology, Grimm Donut V4? Maybe that was what he was looking for in his call to manufacturers looking to participate.
  • 4 0
 yep, heading back to 2005 when the climb switch was part of the design
  • 3 0
 I own a YT capra 2016 and I love it and don't think I need to buy any new enduro bike yet, but this bike would clearly benefit of better performance pedalling. For the uphill it is not really a problem with a climb switch, the problem is when pedalling standing while downhill or at a racing stage, when it is not worth stopping to close the switch, but the bike moves way too much
  • 14 0
 Shifter battery Dropper remote battery Dropper battery Fork battery Shock battery Derail battery GPS battery I hearts coin battery!!
  • 7 0
 Don’t forget power meter battery.
  • 5 0
 @shorttravelmag: Mini air compressor battery,too.
  • 4 0
 Camera battery too
  • 2 0
 God, give me a Flight Attendant klunker Smile
  • 5 0
 @shorttravelmag: heart rate monitor battery and, the only really necessary one: pacemaker battery.
  • 2 0
 Don't forget the battery for the battery monitor that monitors everything
  • 1 0
 Don't forget the 750w battery in your downtube?
  • 3 0
 @pbuser2299: and the spare one in the backpack! What a time to be alive for batteryphiles!
  • 9 0
 This is for me at least, is just another addition to the growing list of unnecessary tech clutter that try's to take me a little bit further away from the simple(ish) joy of riding a mountain bike. Personally do not need this level of complexity.
  • 1 0
 Amen!
  • 13 1
 I, for one, welcome our new Robot overlords...
  • 6 0
 I would love to try Flight Attendant on a monster high pivot bike like the Norco Range. I had one a couple of years ago and it was breathtakingly good on rough descents, but incredibly hard to climb and very lethargic on pumpy, smooth trails. I imagine a system like this would make that bike more well-rounded and turn it into an absolute weapon.
  • 8 0
 I ride to escape the pettiness of smart devices.
  • 4 1
 "hold on, need to charge my shock"
  • 6 0
 If you have FU money and like to push buttons, why not?
  • 4 0
 The technical climbing issue could be solved with a speed sensor or imu: high effort + slow speed = need traction
Yay, another battery.
  • 7 0
 - Dropper above 85%: firm suspension
- Dropper 40-85%: trail mode
- Default: DH mode

allow users to set custom thresholds
that is all
  • 7 0
 @chrod: I've been calling for dropper-height to determine suspension firmness for years. Seems like the best indicator of what I want my suspension to do (without having a dedicated climb switch).
  • 1 0
 Magura had the simplest solution of all,a electronic valve connected to a inclinometer like a smartphone has built in.
Go up,it closes. Go down,it opens.
Why did Magura stop producing suspension forks anyway? I had 3 forks and they were amazing.
  • 2 1
 @chrod: They probably thought of that, but then (rightly) concluded people would rather be forced to buy a power meter than run a reverb. ;0
  • 3 1
 @dancingwithmyself: lol!
The one AXS Reverb wasn't that bad in my experience. Only ran mine for a month, no personal experience with reliability issues. Came on the bike, so swapping and selling for a 210 Oneup saved $400. Lever and post action was really smooth, but not worth the price.

Though if it'd talked with the rear shock I'd never have to think about the climb switch, and I may have kept it.
  • 2 0
 Not interested in FA but what you bring up is interesting. Both DH bikes and Enduro have been chasing the works well in all situations for a long time. It seems like Canyon this year went the route you are talking about and the results are showing. Both Luca and Troy have had great results so far. So in that spirit I do like where this is going. If I can truly have a DH bike that climbs like a goat our however that well worn methaphor works, im all for it.
  • 2 0
 The benefit of any new bike technology may be seen when put against the clock, but wether the average rider benefits or not is beside the point. If it makes the riding experience more enjoyable, riders are going to gobble it up. The question of what makes something enjoyable is entirely subjective.
  • 2 0
 What does flight attendant actually do? Is it dynamically adjusting high/low speed compression and rebound? The description/chart from SRAM isn't super clear to me. It would be cool to have essentially a built-in shockwiz that was dynamically optimizing my suspension for the conditions. I suspect that's not actually what it's doing though.
  • 1 0
 built-in shockwiz is what I'm looking for but open/close I can do myself.
  • 4 0
 super high end suspension on homemade looking frame with no paintjob. love it.
  • 4 0
 308g is an awful lot of weight just to make the suspension firm up a bit when I'm pedaling.
  • 7 2
 Came here for the bike. FA can FO.
  • 1 0
 I rode the Lapiere EI Shock 10 years ago and had exactly the same feedback on it then - pretty good but firmed up when doing technical climbing where you want it open - thus became annoying. Seem's nuts to spend all that time on R&D and still not be much better than 2014 tech.
  • 1 0
 If/when they get the DH line up and running I would be very tempted to jump from Fox to RockShox as suspension has always been a very difficult thing for me to get right consistently. I can live without wireless shifting and dropper posts but this has very real practical use for a lot of people in my opinion.
  • 1 0
 Jarno Trulli once commented that he did not like traction control, that F1 driving was much more exciting and skill-focused without. Nico Rossberg, IIRC, decried the 'airline pilot' aspect of the many (prolific!) button presses just needed to complete a lap without damaging or disabling the car.
  • 2 1
 FA doesn't seem of much use, yet I still find it to have more value than Transmission and especially Reverb AXS. I think if the rear shocks were offered aftermarket and you could ditch the power pedal requirement, they would be on to something. Actually, just give us a way to have auto lock out engage based on bike speed and the angle of climbing. Set that stuff in a phone app and you are good to go.
  • 4 0
 Transmission is just soooooo darn good. I never wan to go back. AXS before Transmission was not appealing to me, but look what came after it?

Who knows what FA could turn into in 5 years?
  • 1 0
 As someone who always left the lockout on, got to the bottom and thought "gee, that was a rough trail - you idiot!"; Flight Attendant has been a game changer. It can switch to open before you hit the bottom of the drop that you were fully locked out when you left the lip. I use the override for lockout in races so I can sprint on a stable bike, but to open for technical climbing to prevent it from interfering with the traction.
I don't have a power meter on mine and that might well override my need for override!
If SRAM is listening, the one thing I want to be user-adjustable is the delay to switch modes. I find it swaps mode in tight hairpins just as I start to pedal again and I'd like to delay it by another 0.5 sec or so - make that user-adjustable please.
  • 1 0
 It seems all tests of flight attendant focuses on how it helps climbing. But that is beside the point, all enduro-bikes climb well.
What I want to know is how it affects standing sprints, as an enduro-stage is full of standing sprints in not-too-steep down-slopes? Even the downhillers use it now, so we know they find it useful.

And preferably do the test with some timing. A couple of testers do the stage 5 times each with and without electronically controlled suspension. Then it wont just be about opinions anymore, and people can make an educated decision if they think it is worth it or not?
  • 1 0
 Quick question from a newbie. The piggy back suspension rear shock. I've seen them set up like with the chamber sticking out at the side. Apologies for sounding like a Rube , but doesn't that get in the way of peddling or does it not stick out that much. I'm on about In pics 8 and 9, just before UPDATES section. Or am I just seeing an optical illusion
  • 1 0
 Unlikely if you use specific trousers and shoes. Sometimes I sit on my bike to rest, feet at an angle, and stretching a bit, so it could get in the way then, but I'd consider that a minor thing. But if it disturbs you visually, I'd recommend not buying it, optics are often way more important than actual function.
  • 1 0
 Mercedes sells an active suspension that pulls and pushes the wheels according to the camera-measured road surface for 25 years now. And the chinese BYD started to sell one, too. Maybe it is time for mountainbikes, commit to the next step after steering, pedaling, shifting, seating and damping assistants.
  • 3 0
 i love the fact that for all its electrogizmotrickery its all cheaper than a pair of wheels
  • 3 0
 @Compositepro: Yeah but composites are hard, what would you know.
  • 1 0
 @L0rdTom: its since i became a tantalum snob
  • 5 2
 Can it get me a pack of peanuts and a beer and tell me where the emergency exits are?
  • 3 0
 Spot on, something like the Enduro or a Norco Range would extract most value from FA. Something like a Ripmo? Not worth it.
  • 2 0
 I would like to try it before I say no, but, I feel like I already have a negative bias against electronics so it won't matter.
  • 1 0
 As a person who would rather not have electronics on their bike, I absolutely love Flight Attendant. It works so bloody well and does everything that I would want to do, more quickly and more efficiently.
  • 5 2
 I have no interest in any electrical jiggery pokery on a bike. Apart from the necessary motor and battery obviously.
  • 1 0
 Ahh… lost for words…
  • 1 0
 I love SRAM & Rockshox, but would like to see more money be spent on their NX & SX mechanical drive trains (Shimano Deore/SLX smokes them on this front), figuring out how to make mechanical Transmission.
  • 4 0
 How do you have a Specialized Zee tool attached to a King bottle cage?
  • 3 0
 I embrace both convenience and tradition.
  • 1 0
 @dariodigiulio: The burning question is: do you pack a full size behemoth, like a Blackburn Tradesman, in addition because you worry the EMT tool won’t cover all the bases?
  • 1 0
 I thought this was only available for certain bikes that were designed to work with it. Since this is just bolted onto a frameworks is it safe to assume you can just get the correct size and bolt it onto anything?
  • 1 0
 Forks are available aftermarket, SuperDeluxe is in some sizes but it's recommended that you check with the frame manufacturer to check clearances.
  • 2 0
 "...combo I have on my Frameworks feels like a lot of extra complication, cost, and weight for minimal gains AND MORE BATTERIES TO CHARGE at best."

FIFY
  • 2 0
 Hit me up? Hit me uuuup? Get it on a DH bike and start pedalling uphill man.
  • 2 0
 I'm sorry, no sir, we will not be serving the nuts today due to overly restrictive allergy guidance.
  • 1 0
 Love my S-Works Enduro Ltd with FA - my only mod was to bump the fork to 180mm. I would be curious to try a Vivid or Vivid Coil but there is no aftermarket availability yet.
  • 3 0
 Now the SRAM 4-dock AXS battery charger makes sense...
  • 2 0
 Have fun with your electronics... The average rider could not tell the difference if it slapped them in the face.
  • 2 0
 Is that a Session in the diagram?
  • 3 0
 Nope
  • 1 0
 so you're saying the Grim Donut would be perfect for this. That bike was so far ahead of it's time and this is the proof.
  • 2 0
 Vivid Air and Coil. I like it. Wish it was available aftermarket though.
  • 1 0
 Bike tech become more complicated than transformers. And yet I like it
  • 1 0
 Looks like Tramp dolled up for a dog show
  • 1 1
 Actually it’ll make you slower on the climbs because it weighs more (insert roadie/XC nerd voice)
  • 1 0
 Darío, how much does this bike weigh?
  • 4 0
 it's a DH bike with a transmission on it. 38+ pounds at least.
  • 4 0
 He said about 40pounds in the DarioVsKazVsHenry bike test...
  • 2 0
 43lbs as you see it
  • 1 0
 Now skynet can ruin my bike ride when the machines decide to take over
  • 2 0
 No thank you
  • 2 0
 Crap
  • 1 0
 They should have named it “pilot” cause only pilots can afford it.
  • 1 0
 Great to break that Strava ceiling you've hit, once. Sign me up!
  • 3 3
 Reinventing the Specialized Brain?
  • 3 0
 this is a much better system as it's not trying to react to bumps faster than you can feel them
  • 1 0
 nice system
  • 1 1
 Flight Attendant - expensive solution to problem you never had.







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