First Ride: RockShox's Updated 2020 Reverb - Bike Connection Summer 2019

Jul 12, 2019
by Brian Park  


RockShox has ground to make up with the Reverb, in both performance and consumer confidence. Over the years the post has gotten some rightful criticism here for reliability issues, slower rebound speeds in cold weather, and the more daunting service regimen of a hydraulic line. And on top of that, they're not cheap. The emergence of excellent cartridge-based posts at much lower prices have made the Reverb a harder sell in recent years.

To be fair, some of the reliability issues the Reverb is known for can be attributed to its own success. RockShox sells a ton of them—there are probably more Reverbs in existence than any other post. If a small company sells 100 dropper posts and 3% fail, that's 3 pissed off people on the internet. If another company sells 100,000 dropper posts and only 1% fail, that's still 1,000 angry people on the internet even though their post is more reliable. Is that the case here? I'm not sure. Pinkbike's tech team is a small sample size, and we've had our fair share of issues with Reverbs over the years, but not out of line with what we've experienced from other designs.

So with the announcement of a major Reverb update, it's a make-or-break moment for RockShox's dropper post. While I was at Bike Connection Summer in Andalo, Italy, I spent some time on the new Reverb. Not enough for a full verdict, but some quick first impressions.






It's got lighter action. As advertised, it drops with dramatically less force than any other post I've tried. This will be especially helpful for lighter riders and people whose bikes have slack seat-tube angles. It doesn't feel much quicker than the previous generation, but it does apparently have faster return speed. It's still not an ejector seat, and you can still dial back the return speed, if you like. It felt about right wide open.

There's more drop from a shorter post. Every year I think "I wouldn't want any more drop" until I try a dropper with more drop. It turns out more drop is really nice to have. Seat-tube and leg length determine how long a dropper you can run, but the new Reverb's shorter overall length means most riders can fit a longer travel post than before.
Reverb Details

Diameter: 30.9mm, 31.6mm, 34.9mm
Travel: 100mm, 125mm, 150mm, 175mm, 200mm
Length: 301mm, 351mm, 414mm, 467mm, 519.5mm
Remote: 1X or Standard (L-Below, R-Above)
MSRP (standard remote): $349 USD / €390* / £345*
MSRP (1x remote): $399 USD / €445* / £395*
*Includes VAT
More info

The new 175mm Reverb is 467mm long and will fit most of the current crop of shorter seat-tube bikes. It's still a few mm off the total length of the super-compact OneUp 180mm post, but it's shorter than most. [Edit: there's some discussion to how these are measured, but the OneUp is definitely a bit more drop for total length] As for the 200mm Reverb, it measures at 519.5mm, which is much shorter than the Vecnum 200mm MoveLOC post's 543mm total length, the 9point8's 560mm total length. There are several other 200mm+ posts coming down the line, so it'll be interesting to see how they measure up.

It was close, but at 5'7" I was still able to run a 175mm post on this size Large Megatower.

The updated internals are said to be more reliable. We'll have to wait and see if this bears out in long-term testing, but with new Maxima oil, a new IFP design, the addition of vent valve, etc., the service interval has been increased to 600 hours. That's a good sign.

RockShox says the vent valve shouldn't need to be used often, as the new IFP design is supposed to prevent most sagging.
But if you do need to use it, you push the vent valve with a fancy poke-stick (included).

I'm still not sold on hydraulic actuation. For all the praise here, and it really is a damn good post out of the box, I'm still not convinced that actuating a dropper via hydraulic hose is the way forward. Fully hydraulic systems are still harder to fix trailside and more daunting to service at home.

If I had to guess, I'd say in 5 years the best high-end posts will be wireless only, while the best value-conscious options will be cable actuated.

The hydraulically actuated 1x lever does feel great.

Final thoughts
bigquotesSo is this the beginning of a new era for the Reverb? Does it justify the premium price versus its simpler, cheaper competitors? Well, it's certainly more refined than the last generation, works very well out of the box, and will give riders more drop on more frames. The value judgment is one people need to make for themselves, but when this post arrives on many higher spec test bikes in 2020 we'll be happy to see it. As for reliability, we'll let you know once we've put a lot more miles on it.Brian Park


Regions in Article
Andalo


204 Comments

  • + 100
 I've had 5.... yep.. 5 Rock Shox Reverb posts. They ALL failed. Not trying to bash Rock Shox here, it's just a matter of fact. None of them were abused and I even went as far as to ask what special care is needed for them. Sold them all and bought OneUp posts. So when my new Norco Range C1 came in with a Reverb I immediately ordered a OneUp V2. No more Reverbs for this guy. No special care needed anymore! No more suspension seat post! No more side to side play! Sorry Rock Shox.... I'm out.
  • + 21
 I had 4 fail in one summer. One. Summer.
since went to a bikeyoke revive and a raceface affect (two ends of the price spectrum) and had zero issues since.
  • + 8
 @ratedgg13: I've installed 4 Aefects, 2 were bad out of the box and had to be warrantied.
  • + 7
 @RobKong: Specialized Command Post was the best I've ever used - bulletproof and easy to service. They just need to make them longer than 125mm. I have the RF Aeffect right now and also have zero issues.
  • + 4
 But, you know, since they sell so many, some are bound to fail...
  • + 10
 Have 4 Rock Shox Reverbs. They too all failed and continue to do so regularly. I also have a Command Post, Fox Transfer, and a X-fusion Hilo on other bikes that have never failed. One of the Reverbs is used actually as a spare to replace the other ones when they’re in for repair. Never again.....
  • + 2
 i'm on my third, all the same failure, air on the wrong side of the piston. to be fair they have given me warranty replacements, but I think i'll have to buy something else
  • + 25
 If they keep failing, why do you all keep buying them?
  • + 8
 How is this not categorized as a product requiring a recall?
  • + 2
 @Loamhuck: It, like the first gen guide brakes, had a "soft" recall. If you brought in either (I did for both my reverb and two sets of guides) they still will warranty them no receipt no questions asked.
  • + 12
 Also they don't sell ton of them they sell a ton oem. When people go to buy a dropper it's because their bike didn't come with one or because their bike came with a Reverb.
  • + 17
 I've had 5..yep...5 Rock Shox Reverb Posts. NONE have failed (seriously).
  • + 2
 @Thustlewhumber: RIP your reproductive parts.
  • + 4
 I've had 3, all failed. Tried out RF Turbine- lasted three months - tried Magura Vyron elect- works but not my favorite. KS or Fox is the way to go. Fox is obviously the more expensive version, but can't go wrong with the reliability and affordability of KS.
  • + 11
 I find wiping my stanchion daily really helps extend the life of the post... ok, I will see myself out.
  • + 7
 Maybe you should Transfer?
  • + 1
 Even when they don't fail - the service for them which needs to done yearly is $130 on a post that costs 300. I can't justify doing this for more than once. I'm on a PNW Bachelor now and its as good of post (smooth performance) has a better actuator and is cheaper to repair.
  • + 3
 @MikeyMT: I've only had one Reverb -- one -- and it was as reliable as any other part. If it had one weakness, it was the stupid remote button. I knocked it out of commission I think three times by breaking that thing. That was on me. It was not a product flaw. Although I guess you could argue that the design of that button IS a flaw. But otherwise, I only messed up the seal once where it stopped functioning, and I had the thing for 10 seasons. A quick day in the shop and it was fine. I even hung my bike from the seat post on my bike rack and drove it 2200 miles round trip. Worked fine.


@Highlander406: Some people are into that kind of thing.
  • + 2
 I have had 3 Reverbs (0 failures over about 4 years total), 2 Fox transfers (0 failures), 1 Gravity dropper (no failure) and 2 X fusion Hi-Lo (worthless piece of shits that almost never worked correctly).

I do know others who have had issues with Reverbs and the hydraulic line is a pain.

I do think the failure rate (# failures/total number sold) of Reverbs has been higher than some other posts. I am skeptical that the rate ratio or relative rate of failure (failure rate of reverb/failure rate of other posts) is dramatically higher than some of the the other posts on the market. As Brian park eludes the prevalence of reverbs (number of units on bikes) is dramatically higher than any other posts on the market.
  • + 4
 @orastreet1: Where did you get this from? I only had to service mine once in 10 years. It was expensive, but not quite $100. I did bleeds maybe once a season, which were quick, easy and inexpensive to do myself.
  • + 3
 I've had upwards of ten and ZERO real failures, and i never service them either. *excepting for the original hose barb design that ripped off easily though that was near a decade ago.
  • + 2
 @TheR: They are the most common on bike brand builds due to the volume pricing deals... Fox Transfer would be a superior choice if you are listening, brand product managers!
  • + 4
 Man, I'm glad I bought a Gravity dropper in 2011, I have only had it serviced 4 times and cleaned it once my self and it still works great, not the lightest and only 3 positions but keeps on ticking!
  • + 1
 @TheR: Yup. The new lever made it even better / more reliable.

I gotta laugh at all the penny pinchers here and comments about it being expensive. You want a top of the line product at a Wal-Mart price. Life doesn't work that way...there are plenty of cheaper options; some perform just fine, others do not.

I'd try the FOX but I've heard mix reviews on it that the 'feel' is not that great...it does look good though.
  • + 5
 @ppp9911: I was going to say -- every single post out there has a group of people who will tell you how much it sucks. We got some people on here raving about the Command Post, KS Lev, Fox Transfer, OneUp, and so on, but I've read in other threads on this site how each one of those has failed someone, and how that they, too suck. If you were to believe every single thread on dropper posts, not a single manufacturer makes a reliable one. Just not buying it.

And I'm not a Reverb homer -- just relating my experience. My new bike has a KS Lev on it. So far, it's been great. And I think I like it better than my old Reverb just because it has a better actuation lever. (OneUp -- aftermarket) If it is anywhere near as reliable as my old Reverb, I will be happy.
  • + 2
 @MikeyMT: There are mixed reviews on every single post out there. Hell, for every single part and every single bike. I take it all with a grain of salt. Maybe some guys are extra hard on their bikes. Or maybe they don't know how to maintain the thing. Or maybe just bad luck. I don't know. But if you never bought a product based on what you've read in the comment section here, you'd never buy a single product.
  • + 2
 @MikeyMT: I really like the feel of the transfer posts and prever their action over the reverb or even the one-up that I have tried. The biggest limitations of the fox for me (actual dealbreakers) are the fact that they have the longest collar to rail height and the longest insertion of just about any post on the market. On my medium Devinci's I cannot even run a 150mm fox transfer but I could actually fit 170mm one-up and 175mm reverb
  • + 3
 @TheR: Agree 100% and like your comment above. I find a lot of people dont do a good job caring for their bike. As my buddy says...'if it worked better covered in mud and dirt it would come from the factory that way'.

I like the Reverb, and unpopular opinion...SRAM customer service is great.
  • + 1
 @ppp9911: interesting. My 170 reverb just barely fits on my Stumpy without it being too tall for me fully extended.
  • + 4
 @MikeyMT: Another unpopular opinion related to SRAM -- I actually liked my Avid brakes.
  • + 3
 @TheR: lol...speaking of; I ran Guides on my DH bike for years (on CODES now) with no issues!
  • + 3
 @TheR: There are mixed reviews on all of them...tho the BikeYoke rarely has any. Its in a very different price point from the OneUp v2, which I wish I had....but its in the same league as this Reverb/Transfer and is definitely the post to have. Maybe the Reverb lives up to the BikeYoke standard but no way I'd bet my money on it. A guy would be silly to buy this over the Revive, its just WAY to proven at this point.
  • + 1
 @Svinyard: Yeah man, fair enough. Buy what you like, for sure. I have no particular allegiance to any given post. I've only had two in my life -- a Reverb for 10 years and now a KS Lev, because that's what came with the bike. The Reverb was good. So far, I like the KS better (hell, it's 10 years newer). I'd be open to the Bike Yoke, too.
  • + 1
 Two Reverbs here. One good. One bad.
¯\_(ツ)_/¯
Went 9.8 over Faux. Wasn’t avent grade enough to know about Bike Yoke
  • + 2
 All of those saying they've had 5 posts and zero failures: why? Do you only keep the post for one season and sell it? That tells you nothing about reliability except it can last ones season. Sounds to me like you have zero to contribute.
And even if you have 5 bikes for 5 years all with reverbs and no failures that means you are dividing wear and tear up over 5 posts.
I'd rather hear from a reviewer with a daily driver than about how your bike museum has had no part failures due to dust collection.
  • + 3
 @taletotell: Please re-read my posts. One Reverb, 10 years. I used the thing -- it did not sit gathering dust. Even hung it on my bike rack from the post for those 10 years. What can I say? The thing worked.
  • + 4
 @MikeyMT: with your luck I’d think about playing roulette professionally.
  • + 1
 @ppp9911: I had the hi-Lo, and it did suck. The new xfusion manic is banger though. Super cheap, super reliable, and the total length to actual drop is really good too; at least two centimeters better than the old reverb it replaced in my frame. Its not the smoothest out there, but its middle of the pack in weight.
  • + 2
 @taletotell: True... And I'll add... I've had 9 Reverbs, each with 300+ hours, used a lot, put away wet and dirty... 2 were external hose, the rest stealth. 2 failed (1 of each style). I've also used the Bike Yoke, One up, and PNW. All work great still... The only issue I had with my Bike yoke, it got sticky really quick, so got a lower tube service early on... Otherwise, it's been flawless... Hope that helps.
  • + 2
 @MikeyMT: I've had friends tell me that their reverbs are great yet years later I find out that they've all had problems with sag so what is your definition of "never fail"? Because I for one cannot live with any f*ckin sag.
  • + 1
 @Senduro: Odd. I've been told Bike Yoke is the standard all posts should aspire to.
  • + 4
 @MikeyMT: Just replaced my reverb with a V1 OneUp, $200 total with the sweet paddle, there will be no line bleeds necessary, and if I do end up with a failure, I can easily replace a cartridge myself for way less than a reverb rebuild, $60. I like my chances here, no more dratted RevReb for me! Wink
  • + 1
 @ichabodchain: I've to got ditch more than my reverb to live with no sag... ????
  • + 2
 Same here, actually 1 out 4 Reverbs only made it beyond 2 years. Yes they require maintenance, but rebuild kits not cheap and expensive rebuild for shop to do. All about the same cost as OneUp. Almost 1.5 years on OneUp with no issues other occasional regreasing of lower bushing with no tools that takes about 5 minutes to do. Have OneUp V2 for when last Reverb bites the dust.
  • + 0
 Give them to me. I'm pretty sure I can make them work. Wink
  • + 1
 When the second one failed I'd have swapped brands. I too have a knackered reverb that has been serviced twice this year (it came with my bike and couldn't afford a replacement). My biggest gripe with them is not being able to lift the bike from the saddle when carrying it and having a lever that gets in the way when turning the bike upside down to do repairs or remove the back wheel. My Reverb lasted less than a month after servicing before the up-down play started again.
  • + 1
 @TheR: I think that is the definition of insanity, doing the same thing over and over expecting a different reverb.
  • + 1
 @lake-st: I have owned several and whenever they didn't work, I found out I just did a poor bleed. Once I did a good bleed they work great. Granted it not the easiest to bleed but there are some tricks.
  • + 1
 @TheR: They’re about 3- 4 years old and at the time I felt there wasn’t anything else out there. My last post was a Fox Transfer which has been dead reliable.
  • + 2
 A late reply but nevertheless.
I had the same Reverb for almost 4 years and had two services on it. One was needed (sagging), the other one was just to be sure kinda deal.

I've been told that to prolong the reverb life you should not lift the bike by the seat with the post in a dropped position. It's not a problem in the raised position (it's sitting on the end stops), it's a problem in going but a milimeter lower.

As for the hydraulic actuation, I actually, and bought a Reverb (had the first option of a Revive for a nice price) for my new bike because I like the actuator. Hydraulics are preferable to cables if you ask me. Yeah, harder to repair trailside, but knock on wood, I haven't had issues.

Cold performance can be an issue, but i know why that is and I don't take it as a negative. The Reverb uses a closed system, unlike the brakes, where cooling down the oil will reduce the volume and prevent the actuator from being actuated. Bleed the post in a colder environment and you should be fine. But I never actually had any issues in cold weather (it was slower, but always worked) with the actuator bled in summer.
  • + 1
 My raceface just stopping going all the way up. Needs service, but even that seems a shame since I've only had it since this season started. Time to look up the service video
  • + 51
 5'7" on a large Megatower with a 175mm post? WTF? Do you have a 34" inseam?
  • + 6
 yeah I'm 5'11" with a 34" inseam and use a 175mm post on large Hightower with the post almost as far into the frame as it will go, I can't imagine using a 175mm post if I were any shorter.
  • + 2
 I think the rear tyre is increasing his inseam by hitting it... I have 125 dropper on large Carbon Jack 27,5 with 160mm of travel and whenever I ride DH on rough steep tracks, I get rear tyre rub. I could run 150 dropper by 175 would be ridiculous on a long travel fully. At the same time I wouldn’t mind 200mm dropper on a 4x ht bike...
  • + 2
 i have mondraker dune 2016 and 175mm reverb and its still short, need 200mm version!!! also, hydro actuation is better then cable, i riding second reverb, both 5 years in sum, and no problem about it, never rip it, so many throw outs, maybe i just have that working specimen whitch others dont, idk...
  • + 5
 That’s the first thing I noticed too, wtf. Must be a typo.
  • + 3
 @t4ngent: gaw damn people! im 6'1" with a 32 inseam and a 150mm dropper hardly fits in my large slash. yall got some really long legs
  • + 3
 I'm a little taller than 5'7", and I do I have long-ish legs (maybe ~32" with shoes? I'll measure for science). It was one of the test bikes at Bike Connection Summer, and it belongs to SRAM honch Al Rafferty. Pretty sure it has 165mm cranks. The 175mm post was slammed but exactly where I'd want it, extended but without my hips rotating too much.

@t4ngent the old Hightower or the new? The old Large has a 450mm seat-tube, vs 430mm on the new Megatower and Hightower.

@WAKIdesigns the Andalo tracks weren't too steep but I definitely get some butt-snuggling from long travel 29ers in steep terrain. I wouldn't normally ride that bike in size Large, it was just what was easiest to try the post on.
  • + 2
 @TylerG96: Are you on a Large? The Large Slash has a 468mm seat-tube, while the Large Megatower has a 430mm seat-tube. I don't think you'd have an issue with a 175mm post if your seat-tube was 38mm shorter.
  • + 2
 Steeper ST angles start to make longer droppers critical. Better overall climbing with the steeper ST angles but without being able to drop the saddle a bit further it feels in the way.
  • + 1
 maybe bikes are still too small
  • + 0
 @RoboDuck: erm no. It’s the other way around. But what remains unchanged is the fact that rear wheel ends up where it ends up during compression so why would you want to drop your seat below the level of where your rear tyre can come up?
  • - 1
 @kleinblake: or people need to learn to ride...
  • + 1
 @brianpark: I was on a large 5010 with a 17.75" seat tube, running a 175mm KS Lev Carbon, and I could have easily run a 185mm post, but I'm 5'11" tall. My co-worker is 5'7" with a 32" inseam on a medium Bronson with a 150mm dropper.
  • + 1
 a lot of it depends where you ride. If you ride steep, more post the better. I'm around 5'8 and could probably use 200mm of drop. My 150mm of drop isn't enough. My friends are in similar situations. I also think a lot of people don't have their seat high enough for climbing. and it's definitely not a persons riding ability.
  • + 1
 @brianpark: That's still crazy to me. I'm 5'8 or so; my bike a medium 5010 with a 420mm seat tube and my 150mm dropper post is down basically all the way. You must have super long legs haha
  • - 1
 @jaydawg69: no more post is not better unless you run Large / XL frame, and are 6ft. At some point you have to lean forward to handle steepness on a 120+ 29er, It is either uneducated or insane to think otherwise. I get into Champery steep shit so I don’t need to be schooled on what is steep. If you don’t stay forward you just don’t ride down real steep stuff, you just don’t. And if you keep your weight too far back, then as soon as you ride onto a drop off the rear tyre will kick your butt and you will fly over the bars and stop 50-100ft lower. That is off course if you manage to not wash out as your front wheel will lack support and on steeps understeer can be savage. I have no idea how people cannot understand what rear tyre does to you on steeps and that on most Large full suspension frames using a dropper longer than 150 makes no sense what so ever... holy sht...
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: everyone has different styles. I ride with a guy who is a expert level rider, 6'1 and uses around 240mm of seatpost between climbing and going dh. Shaums March showed me that the seat in the dh position should fit into where your kneecap bends. That's how I have it setup and and it's around 200mm difference when climbing. Just don't tell me what I'm supposed to run as you've on numerous occasions don't know what your talking about.
  • + 1
 @jaydawg69: DH pros run their saddles at a height around dropper post dropped 100-120mm. I know Schaums say him fro me next time you see him. We did an online jumping course together.

Sorry:
ep1.pinkbike.org/p5pb16210339/p5pb16210339.jpg
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: DH bikes have different geometry than Enduro bikes bro.... go back to the swamp.
  • + 1
 @jaydawg69: Yeah, but pedals, saddle and bars are pretty much in the same place these days, which you can see from my graph. So no geometry doesn’t matter here as long as contact points are the same. was just giving you advice. Next time you see Schaums ask him about your position on steeps
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: no one wants their seat up their ass... lower is better. No down side bro.
  • + 24
 Long legged people rejoice now that 200mm dropper posts are a thing.
  • + 1
 even going from 185 to 200 the difference is very noticeable. no more seat hitting my gut....waiting for bikeyoke 215....
  • + 7
 @LuvAZ: 210mm from OneUp is out now. 6'4" and loving it.
  • + 4
 300m, can someone make a 300 mm post?
  • + 1
 Cool now bring out 200mm AXS droppers tup
  • + 14
 Fully agree on the concern on hydraulic actuation: owning two Reverbs (hydraulic), a Fox Transfer (steel wire) and a OneUp Dropper V1 (steel wire) -- the latter two are simply a breeze to install/repair.

And they work as good as the hydraulic Reverb.
  • + 4
 I'd rather have hydraulic activation any day..no cables to replace and the RS stuff is easy to bleed. I love the feel of the RS remotes.
  • + 11
 I'm far from a fair sample group, but in our small group of riders almost everyone I know who's had a Reverb has struggled with it. If it were a first production run issue it would be forgivable, but over a decade of production from the worlds largest bicycle parts manufacturer ... give me a break. That's inexcusable.
  • + 10
 Don't understand why hydraulic actuation is such a no no - it's not that hard to bleed a reverb and the lever action is way more consistent/easier to push with the new 1x levers.
  • + 28
 Because it is more of a hassle compared to wire operated remotes without bringing any real benefits. And it's not more consistent than wire either, just ask people who ride in cold weather.
  • + 4
 @Crossmaxx: I found cable actuated ones harder to get bang in the sweet spot without having to worry about cable stretch and clogging.

The reverb system is so so easy with the new bleed tool.
  • + 3
 Because it is sram/rockshox wank saying it is the best thing since sliced bread but in reality is no better/slightly worse than other alternatives.
  • + 5
 @nwmlarge: Depends on the cable and casing as well. The cheap ones can get gritty easily and usually have quite a bit of friction out of the box. The better stuff with sealed ferules and polished and coated cables such as the Shimano optislick or some of the better jagwire stuff are usually way better and hassle free for a long time.
  • + 4
 Here on the east coast those hydraulic levers only work 8 months out of the year. As soon as it gets near freezing they are useless. And you cannot repair trail side as you can a cable.
  • + 2
 Fine for fair weather riders, but reverbs start to stop working below 5°. Which is a lot of the riding season for me... Which makes it a fairly useless product.
  • + 4
 went to a Wolf Tooth easy push cable lever for my Fox Transfer. I don't think there is such a thing as easier push. LOL Definitely a lot easier than the Reverb that came on my bike.
  • + 1
 @Crossmaxx: or people who regularly go from low to high elevation, and back.
  • + 2
 Try to ride in below 0, it just doesn’t work
  • + 5
 @bigbluebike it's not that it isn't good, there was definitely a long time where cable actuated posts were pretty rough and the Reverb had the best action out there.

It's just that cable posts are damn good now, and simpler, easier to fix on a road trip, cheaper, etc... This post is amazing (out of the box anyway), I just don't see hydraulic actuation as the way forward on droppers.
  • + 1
 @gmoss: I run the same set-up and it's pretty much what dreams are made of. Wolftooth Lever + Fox transfer. That ultra satisfying clunk sound is soooo good.
  • + 10
 RockShox has sold a lot of droppers ONLY because they had a strangle hold on OEM bundles for new bikes while Eagle was the only 12 speed option. Not because it was a great product.
  • + 1
 Ya I heard of ONE dude who bought one non-OEM and he regretted it.
  • + 11
 I wonder why they did the release and test in the summer and not in the winter? :p
  • + 2
 Snark about cold-weather performance aside, it's because model year 2020 bikes are starting to ship now. Smile
  • + 7
 @brianpark since you called us out let me clarify.

Yes our V1 170mm is 450mm without actuator (this is the standard measurement) but the 467mm you referenced for Reverb is also without their 30mm strain relief.

If we are including the actuator our V2 180mm post is 17mm shorter than the Reverb 175mm.

More drop, less cost, less length
  • + 3
 Great @OneUpComponents now I have to edit my edit.

There's no question your post is the most compact we're aware of.
  • + 7
 Dont know what are people on about for the Reverbs, yes it can fail as any other product out there under different circumstances but SRAM are like here is a new one dude, no questions asked. Producing so many doppers will eventually show QC issues which lead to faults some times unfortunately. My last reverb came on a new bike in 2016, bike is ridden a lot since, can't say exact numbers but probably over the 600h they recommend the service for the new one. The thing still going with no signs showing a need of a bleed or service.
  • + 16
 I had 4 reverbs fail in one summer. While it was nice for sram to replace them, the fact that I had weeks where I couldn't ride my bike as my post was getting shipped either to or from sram was ridiculous. Then I tried posts from literally any other brand, and haven't had issues. No lost riding time.
  • + 14
 I've had 4 reverbs, had 4 failures. Never again.
  • + 7
 @ratedgg13: I read this a lot, I have the same reverb since it first came out, service less than once a year. Ride 4 days a week, I use it a lot. No problem, go figure
  • + 6
 I've had 2 Reverb's. Revision 2b or whatever that were supposed to be better. Got them only because they supported 34.9. First failed in the middle of a race and I had to slam the saddle as low as I could get it and unable to raise saddle during pedal sections. Replacement failed with the squish.

Why even risk trying the new one when you can get a Revive for the same price and everyone who has one raves about it? I've had 2 of those as well, and they've been absolutely flawless with faster/smoother/consistent compress/return even after 2 years of no service than a brand new Reverb.
  • + 6
 Every post I have had has failed. Reverb, mechanical, high end cable actuated cartridge based, all of them. Reverb has actually been one of the more reliable. I can count how many times I see people lifting their bike or even worse hanging their bike off the seat while the post is dropped. This accounts for the high percentage of failures.
  • + 7
 I recently rode a Reverb for 3 weeks on a loaner bike, my bike has a black Transfer that I’ve had for 2 years. The Reverb is inferior in every way. It costs more, the hydraulic actuation sucks, the drop feels like the post is actuating through mud, and the return speed is slow. RockShox has overly complicated a component that should be made as simple as possible. And the need for a vent valve? That’s called bad design. The only reason they “sell” more is because so many bikes come with them OEM. You’d have to be nuts to spend more on this aftermarket, when just about every other option is better and cheaper.
  • + 0
 9point8 u can lift bike
  • + 2
 1 reverb, 1 failure here. Then I sold it.
  • + 2
 Honestly my experience has been that it isn't something unique about SRAM dropper breaking. It's SRAM stuff. It seems to have gotten better over the years and their warranty department has always been great.

General rule of thumb: if people are always giving a warranty department praise the stuff doesn't last.
  • + 0
 @ratedgg13: just to split hairs, but chose not to ride is more accurate - can't ride is when a frame is being replaced and you don't have a back up! Install a fixed post while you wait - it's just not as fun.
  • + 6
 I have a 150mm travel Brand X from CRC. it works really well and cost $132 CAD on sale new. The lever is fantastic and included in the purchase. Why would anyone opt to spend more for more possible hassles? I mean, I'd go for a OneUp long before one of these, as it has some nice options and more travel, but a Reverb? It's up there with other things I don't understand have a following. Boler trailers, Ed Sheeran, and aircooled VW's come to mind.
  • + 5
 I have had numerous Reverbs over the years on various bikes and only one of the first gen posts failed on me. Not sure why everyone on here is having issues with the newer posts. Saying this I will probably have a failure on today’s ride....
  • + 0
 I don't think they are bleeding it correctly.
  • + 2
 I've got a 150mm reverb gen2 (B1). That thing has failed numerous times, and has gone back for service as well as doing it myself. Whoever works on it, me or their service people, it always fails within 6 months again, and usually starts to sag a bit within a month. There's usually one particular seal that's damaged at the bottom of the post which results in hydraulic fluid getting into the frame and making a giant mess.

Also, why the hell should we need to bleed a post constantly?!

I replaced it with a 9point8 which has also had it's share of maintenance issues, but the worst that happens is that it leaks it's air a bit, and you need to top it up to get a decent return speed. Also, even if it airs down completely, you can still pull it into position and it holds it's lock.

My wife's oneup works like the day we bought it still, and I'll buy one of those next time around instead.
  • + 1
 @enki: I have had all the different versions and I would have to bleed them maybe once a year. Some much longer. Most of my Reverbs came on bikes so I wasn't going to kick down another few hundred to replace, and I just figured them out. Yeah, mechanical posts are good because they are less maintenance, but the bleeding only takes a few minutes. Now since there is so many options, I would definitely try some mechanical posts if I had to buy one, but I think Reverbs get an undeserving bad rap.
  • + 5
 Hopefully they figured out the longevity problems and sag issues. I personally have had no issues with my old reverb but would love for them to be consistent for people across the board
  • + 4
 I've had 2 Reverbs (including the current on I'm on). Both sagged. I successfully rebuilt the first one but it was tedious and expensive. With the quality and price of the OneUp and others, the Reverbs just aren't worth rebuilding any more. Put it on PB classifieds and let someone else Eff with it while you're out enjoying your new post.
  • + 4
 So can you lift the bike by the seatpost without screwing up the dropper now? I hated worrying about that with my (now retired) reverb.
I still keep a quick release on my seatpost after the days of my reverb failing and sticking down in the cold.
  • + 1
 Oh man, the bike shop I used to go to hung my bike from the reverb stanchion. One of the many reasons I don’t use them anymore; the bike shop nor the Reverb!
  • + 1
 @skelldify: it's not really bad for bikes to be held in stands by the dropper post, I do it all the time with my dropper (although mine is a Giant Contact and not a RS Reverb)
  • + 7
 Hot tip: buy a OneUp post not a Reverb.
  • + 0
 OneUp is a gambit as well. A complete design flaw for the V1 and all of us that have it are stuck with it. Its a very heavy actuation (I'm fine with) but the damn collar/bushing design means everyone is very close to having the last inch stuck, and their v1 remote was a disaster too (breaks super easy). Great team/company/service there but it sucks for those of us that bought the V1 and are stuck warranting it out for...another v1 while they are now out with v2 which they say fixes the reliability problems with v1...tho it's still a stiff actuation because its using the housing apparently instead of the cable pull.
  • + 1
 @Svinyard: dully noted. Thanks!
  • + 3
 @Golden-G: Fwiw I'd happily buy a OneUp V2 post and might end up getting a 210mm if my v1 replacement gives me grief (I can't afford a BikeYoke). Apparently there is a new v1 bushing that helps with the original issue, I'm hopeful. OneUp, despite the v1 issues, is a pretty amazing company and their support is great. Good place to put your dollars.
  • + 7
 After inspection almost every post that we have warrantied has simply needed its air topped up. For the small percentage where the bushing has wore out we provide service parts and now a longer lasting IGUS bushing. Any broken V1 remotes are warrantied with new aluminum versions. We aren't perfect but we do stand behind everything we sell.
  • + 2
 "The new 175mm Reverb is 467mm long and will fit most of the current crop of shorter seat-tube bikes. It's still a few mm off the 450mm total length of the super-compact OneUp 170mm post" - EXCEPT the OneUp 170mm post you link to (v1) isn't 450mm total, you still need another 26mm of extra room to clear the actuator at the bottom of the post. Look at OneUps own diagram on their website -, they purposely left out the actuator length when the V1 was announced so they could make the false claim of being "the shortest".

This coming from an owner of two OneUp droppers. Don't get me wrong - The OneUp's are really good seat posts, they're just bad at measuring real world specs.
  • + 2
 Ehhh that's on me, not OneUp. They even specify on their website, I just forgot to clarify. And in defence of that design, most seat-tubes still allow for the actuator to pass through even once the seat-tube curves.
  • + 1
 OneUp has shorter stack height though, that's the real competitive advantage (and drop rails for the saddle mount). No mention of how new Reverb measures in terms of stack compared to OneUp.
  • + 2
 Worth noting the one up v2 has a shorter actuator and they do include it in measurements. All the whole thing is shorter generally.
  • + 1
 @jordanaustino: when the v2 is shimmed down to 170mm it's still 470mm in total length. Not bad and probably a better buy assuming they fixed the v1 flaws (I have a v1).
  • + 4
 @ raine2jz

Yes our V1 170mm is 450mm without actuator (this is the standard measurement) but the 467mm referenced for Reverb is also without their 30mm strain relief... so apples to apples

If we are including the actuator our V2 180mm post is 17mm shorter than the Reverb 175mm.

More drop, less cost, less length
  • + 2
 Of course this will be spec'd heavily on builds because of SRAM's OEM package pricing, and glad to see it's an improvement, but who the hell is buying this retail/aftermarket? Zero need for hydraulic actuation, cable posts work fine in 2019 (even in the wet here in PNW/BC) and are easier to service. Other brands are cheaper, offer more drop for same total length (OneUp as an example). I just don't get why anyone would buy this other than as part of a SRAM build kit package on a new bike.
  • + 2
 I remember how I've bought the updated and "fixed" B1 version. Sagged out of the original box. Needed service due to unbearable big sag after few months... SRAM = overpriced CRAP, the extra you pay goes into marketing bullshit.
  • + 2
 I think it's pretty obvious that hydraulic actuation for a seat post dropper is overkill. Glad to see that in the review. Great for brakes doesn't mean great for a post. Running hydraulic lines and bleeding is my least favorite mechanical activity on my bikes, and DOT fluid just makes it worse (I know, the Reverb doesn't use DOT, but their brakes do). Never owned a Reverb, had a Joplin that had its own issues and decided to wait for the engineers to figure it out. Lots of good options out there that are simpler, cheaper, and work now.
  • + 2
 "If I had to guess, I'd say in 5 years the best high-end posts will be wireless only, while the best value-conscious options will be cable actuated."

I call bullshit on this...unless your "high-end" and "value-conscious" really relate only to price and not quality.

Will bike parts continue to be electrified? Yes, they will. Will everyone want them? I really don't think so.

Will bike makers try to force us all to use them by starting to make frames without cable holes? Possibly, but some company won't be stupid and will get my business.
  • + 2
 Just this last weekend, I totally mangled my dropper lever. Luckily it was a cable-actuated one, and I was able to still use it by just yanking on the cable. Meant I could finish the ride even though the way out was a mean climb
  • + 3
 @crankbrothers - Highline all day, every day. I've had 4 now on various bikes and have never had one issue or complaint. Install it, ride it, never have to think about it again.
  • + 2
 I've got three, and my oldest one (nearing 3 years old) started sagging. @crankbrothers sent me a new cartridge overnight under warranty and 10 min later i was back in business. The highline rocks.
  • + 2
 I got the 160mm Highline when they first released it two years ago and it’s been flawless.
  • + 3
 One more happy Highline user. Two years of rugged use (ride it hard, put away wet, hang the bike by the saddle) and it's been 100% flawless. The cool kids like to diss Crank Bros like it's still 2010 but that post is a winner.
  • + 1
 I have owned my Gravity Dopper Seatpost for 7 years. The guy who had it before me had it for 3. It had arrived on a used bike when he got it. So 10+ years. Minimal service. Super reliable. And when a part breaks (main internal post broke last year) I go to the website, find the small part number, and it's an easy fix in the garage.

Here's to another decade of a reliable dropper post that I love!
  • + 1
 Oneup replaced my failed Reverb. About 400 km of use on the bike this year. No problems except for some side to side play. Wasn't much more money to replace the reverb than to repair it..... Brand X on the fat bike. It has been surprisingly flawless operating in sub zero conditions. Same side to side play as the Oneup. Bought another Brand X for my son's bike. Crappy remotes. Ya get what you pay for here. The Reverb seems to be needlessly complicated for the job at hand and needlessly expensive. YMMV.
  • + 1
 I dont think i'm going to jump on the electronic bandwagon anytime soon, but I'm interested in how it feels compared to the bike yoke. I have a revive as well as a gen 2 reverb that came on my Hightower LT, I prefer the bike yoke hands down in terms of speed, force, and feel, but I'm curious if this new reverb's feel translates to the non electric version as well?
  • + 1
 SRAM if you are reading this, ditch the hydraulic lever, the fragile barb in the older style lever snaps to look at it. One spin of the bars or a snag on the hose can snap the barb off. The newer design is more robust as it supports the barb. Just make it cable operated like the wolftooth to reduce the risk of failure in the event of an accident.

Given how unreliable the post is, reduce the stupidly expensive RRP of the service kits, (approx £80). It just adds insult to injury. The cost of the 400hr reverb seal kit is almost double that of a full service kit for a fork which includes far more items - They never make 400hrs before sagging!

While looking at the RRP of the kit, how about including just the parts needed. Case in point, you need the circa £80 service kit to get all the parts that typically cause the seat to sag i.e. the pressure retaining parts. They are only 5 small rubber components, nothing more than 3 tiny O-rings, an IFP seal and the internal seal head seal. Those 5 tiny rubber parts should not cost more than a couple of pounds - certainly not £80!

We don't need the expensive alloy parts like the seal head, and the top cap.

Make the bush in the top cap assembly a replaceable item rather than having to buy the whole alloy top cap assembly for an RRP of circa £40!

There is a global movement trying to get all companies to look at how they manufacture or provide their services with regard to wasteful practices and their environmental footprint. Case in point, you don't need to supply alloy parts in a service kit that do not wear out. Or any other part for that matter. For example, the top out bumper in the seal head or the top out o-ring or the O-ring in the seal head that expands the seal head bush - they don't deteriorate. So why include them in every already expensive kit? By all means make it an option to buy them IF you really need to.

The upshot is, trying to service these already unreliable and expensive posts is stupidly expensive. You charge a bloody fortune for a couple of Lok luer syringes and oil. The whole experience is an unreliable fragile rip off!

Sorry rant over!
  • + 1
 Improving on the 30% recurring warranty rate of these will save sram a load of money, so I’m not sure charging the customer more for a product that only really meets the standard the original should have had is entirely fair.
  • + 1
 I uave had a one cascade for about 6 months use it a lot 1 cable adjust that's it. Love that post 170mm and reliable. I have internal routing on my frame but got the external because its easier to fix. I jave never had a reverb. But all my buddies dont have them anymore.
  • + 1
 PS Give the UK Rockshox importer - Fishers a MASSIVE boot up the arse! They are forever out-of-stock of common service parts for all Rockshox items. They are a bloody joke and have been for years!
  • + 1
 Can someone fire whoever engineer that decided to keep that hydraulic activation? It has been proven time and time again to be the weak link on this product yet they keep on the same path
  • + 2
 doesnt matter if they made 1000 or 1000000, a bad design will always be a bad design. soo many way better options out there. stop sugarcoating this, its a POS
  • + 4
 They also said Guide brakes would be more reliable.
  • + 2
 SRAM...." you don't have to break it, it will just break or fail on it's own". But do not worry, we will make more, and we are really nice on the phone".
  • + 4
 May we please have insertion lengths for each post?
  • + 2
 I second that. It's baffling to me how so many dropper post manufacturers will not provide the length of the inserted part. (i.e. from below the collar, to the end of the actuator.) It's literally the most crucial piece of info to figure out whether a post with more drop will fit your frame.
  • + 1
 My main issue with reverbs is the hydraulic actuation. It just doesn't work well in the winter, and I tend to ride through most of the winter down to the low 30s and it was specially crap at that temperature.
  • + 0
 "Pinkbike's tech team is a small sample size, and we've had our fair share of issues with Reverbs over the years, but not out of line with what we've experienced from other designs"

I think you need to quantify that statement for many people to believe it Wink
  • + 1
 Too many variables, you'll just have to take our word for it. And as I said, we're too small a sample size to really hang our hat on a long-term reliability conclusion. I think you'll find we've never shied away from criticizing previous iterations of the Reverb in long term testing.
  • + 2
 Had 2 rockshox reverbs both failed then went fox transfer and never looked back. Fox is going on 2 years and flawless
  • + 1
 Reverb with wolftooth sustain. That’s the only way to get a good, working dropper out of the reverb. Not a big fan of hydraulic either.
  • + 1
 End the discussion, if you're dropping any money on a dropper, just buy a bikeyoke revive in your desired length and diameter and call it a day.
  • + 3
 I'll stick to my flawless and potentially taint destroying Command Post
  • + 2
 At this point I think they're just continuing with hydraulic actuation to avoid admitting what a terrible idea it is
  • + 2
 Exactly. My 7yr has a KS Lev Integra and you can actuate it nearly by breathing on it. No clue what the advantage is to the hydraulic nonsense here.
  • + 1
 PSA: dont buy this. Just get a BikeYoke and call it good. It's a known quantity purchase that is the best post ever made and is close enough to this price.
  • + 2
 Change that stack height plz
  • + 4
 OneUp.
  • + 1
 Main question for anyone with a Reverb, are the internals backwards compatible?!
  • + 1
 Nope
  • + 1
 I've had 50 reverbs and zero failures, wait, does sag equal failures? Hehehe
  • - 2
 How do you justify an $800 dropper post? How? A $200 x-fusion works better, is more reliable, and has the same low profile insertion length. A OneUp is probably better performing for just a little bit more (although I'm hearing rumors that they are having some reliability issues of their own)
  • + 3
 The wireless AXS post is 800, the standard one is around 400.
  • + 1
 @Pavel-Repak: Thats the one I was referring to, since in the article the author speculates that wireless is the future. That being said, how do you justify $400 on a dropper post unless you're into ultra premium stuff, and the post is ACTUALLY ultra premium instead of just "competitive" (assuming all these improvement claims are true)?
  • + 2
 @hamncheez: I find judging value super hard. Does this post work better out of the box than a lot of cheaper droppers? 100%. Assuming it's reliable, is that worth it? Not for me to say.

Your wallet isn't my wallet or anyone else's wallet. For 99% of people in the world all of this stuff is unjustifiably expensive. "$200 for your seat to go up and down when a $20 quick release works just fine? You crazy."

Oh, and my note about wireless being the future assumes the $800 technology will be available cheaper. If not from RockShox then from someone else.
  • + 1
 @brianpark: Ya, it will most likely get cheaper. However, for double the price of a very good oneUp or xFusion, it needs to be class-leading like the bikeYoke, or ultra light like the KS lev, etc.
  • + 1
 I personally love the reverb. Every one we sell is the cost if the post, plus labour and parts to rebuild it when it fails!
  • + 1
 Yup had 2 fail I’ll stink to the crankbrothers no issues there
  • + 1
 Had my first reverb for 1.5 years and no issues.
  • + 1
 Just happy I converted mine to cable actuated with the Wolftooth kit.
  • - 3
 So sram includes a "fancy poke stick" to fix the sagging issues, but still offer a shitty remote that I am pretty certain nobody has said they prefer?

Slow clap for ya sram.


That could be a good pinkbike poll - who prefers the sram push button remote vs the paddle remote.....
  • + 1
 I wonder if this one works when it's below 60°f
  • + 1
 they do have top notch CS though.
  • + 1
 Is there an option for external routing?
  • + 1
 Ya, buy the wireless one if you're ok with spending $800 on a freaking dropper post.
  • - 3
 I think the main reason for so many complaints is due to it being on every other bike as stock. If you have to brands of droppers, both with a 1% failure rate and one sells 1 000 000 units while the other sells 1 000 units, brand A will have 10 000 faulty units, while brand B will have 10. Still the same failure rate, but a lot more angry people for brande A.
  • + 1
 Posted before reading the article, feel free to bring the downvotes.
  • + 2
 @Pavel-Repak: it's okay, their actual fail rate for first gen was probably around 20% from what I hear.
  • + 0
 @ratedgg13: Never had a reverb, but such a high failure rate for gen 1 is believable. It most likely dropped do about 5% with the B1 post, which would still leave 50 000 angry people. Hopefully this C1 should be at 1% and even if it gets squishy, you at least have the vent valve.
  • + 2
 @Pavel-Repak uh, are you in our office?
  • + 0
 The real question here is: if my wife gets sagging issues, is rs willing to update to new internals for free?
  • + 20
 Use your fancy poke stick (included) to reset her.
  • + 4
 @ArturoBandini: All she needs is a few more inches of travel.
  • + 3
 @Samuel-L-Jackson: With less overall length this may be an issue
  • + 1
 You do know the pounds down to the dollar...
  • + 1
 Still a hard no for me.
  • + 1
 Simply never again
  • - 1
 5 feet 7 and on a large? Bikes are still too small or bike riders have serious small man syndrome?
  • + 1
 It was the most readily available test bike. At nearly 470mm reach it was pretty roomy, not what I'd choose for myself, but just fine for getting first impressions of a dropper post. Smile
  • + 0
 Pnw* cascade
  • + 0
 Just stop making them.
  • - 2
 Still overkill
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