First Ride: 2021 Rocky Mountain Altitude - More Travel, More Options

Sep 9, 2020
by Mike Kazimer  


Rocky Mountain's Altitude underwent a re-design for 2021, emerging from the misty forests of Vancouver's North Shore with 160mm of travel, 29” wheels for the larger sizes, and an even more enduro-oriented focus than before. The changes already seem to be paying off – Jesse Melamed took the win at the first EWS race of the season in Zermatt on the new bike.

The creation of the new Altitude allowed Rocky Mountain to consolidate two models into one – the Instinct BC, which had 155mm of travel and 29” wheels, and the previous Altitude, which had 150mm of travel and 27.5” wheels. That morphing was accomplished via a wheel size split - the size small Altitude is now only available with 27.5” wheels, the size medium can be purchased with either 27.5” or 29” wheels, and the large and XL sizes are 29” only.
Rocky Mountain Altitude Details

• Wheelsize: 29" (M, L, XL) or 27.5" (S, M)
• Carbon or aluminum frame options
• Travel: 160mm (r) / 170mm (f)
• 64.4° - 65.5° head angle
• 437 or 447mm chainstays
• Weight: 32 lb / 14.5 kg (size L C90 Rally)
• Price range: $3,500 - $9,999 USD
• Price as shown: $9,099 USD
bikes.com


There are aluminum and carbon framed options, with prices starting at $3,500 for the base model alloy version, and going all the way up to $9,999 for the top-of-the-line Carbon 99. The carbon frame only can be purchased for $3,699. You can view the full range comparison here.

I've been spending time on the $9,099 Carbon 90 Rally Edition, which is built with the same parts spec that Rocky's enduro team riders are using. Parts highlights include a 170mm Fox Factory 38 fork, Float X2 shock, Shimano XTR drivetrain and brakes, Race Face Turbine R wheels, and Maxxis Minion DHF / DHR II tires, both with Double Down casings.

2021 Rocky Mountain Altitude

2021 Rocky Mountain Altitude
2021 Rocky Mountain Altitude

Frame Details

The Altitude's frame shape has been altered slightly, with a thinner top tube profile, a less chunky head tube, and an overall clean and modern look. It's an effective frame design, one that can accommodate longer travel dropper posts and leaves plenty of room for running a full size water bottle.

Rocky did an excellent job taking care of the little details – there's a very effective chainslap protector on the chainstay, a plastic guard between the chainstsays, and downtube protection to ward off damage from flying rocks or shuttling. The internal cable routing is fully guided to make installation hassle-free, and the ports in the head tube make it possible to run brakes moto-style without sending the hose on a strange path.

2021 Rocky Mountain Altitude
A flip chip in each seatstay allows for 10mm of rear center adjustment.

Dual bearings are now in place at the chainstay and seatstay pivots, which is said to improve the frame's stiffness and durability. All of the bearings are shielded, which is good news for riders in wet climates.

One interesting feature is the modular shock mount – the portion that hangs down from the top tube is replaceable, which leaves the door partially open for Rocky to make kinematic changes in the future without needing to open a mold for a whole new front triangle.

2021 Rocky Mountain Altitude
Rocky's Ride 9 geometry adjustment system creates a wide range of possible set up options.
2021 Rocky Mountain Altitude
The foward shock mount is modular, which allows for different options to be offered in the future.


2021 Rocky Mountain Altitude
2021 Rocky Mountain Altitude
The little details on the Altitude's frame are all taken care of, from the plastic shield between the chainstays to the ribbed chainslap protector.


2021 Rocky Mountain Altitude

Geometry

Not surprisingly, the Altitude has grown longer and slacker – the reach on a size large now measures 480mm, with a 65-degree head angle in the neutral setting, compared to 458mm and 65.6-degrees on the previous version.

It's also possible to change the rear center length by 10mm by flipping the chips in the seatstays and switching the orientation of the brake adaptor. It's a welcome feature, and one that will allow taller riders to achieve a more balanced ride, or for others to choose their preferred handling characteristics. Go with the short setting for a quicker, snappier rider, or the longer position for more stability at speed.

Rocky's Ride 9 geometry adjustment system is still in place, which allows riders to quickly tweak the bike's geometry by removing two bolts and changing the orientation of the two interlocking chips at the rear shock mount. On the Altitude the head angle can be changed from 64.4-degrees all the way up to 65.5 degrees in a matter of minutes.

I'm going to step up on my soapbox here for a paragraph or two, so skip ahead if you'd rather not hear my thoughts on adjustable frame geometry...

Rocky has long been a proponent of adjustable geometry, and I don't think it's just because 'Ride 9' is a catchy term. However, I'm not sure why they didn't make it so the Altitude's slackest position was extra slack. Remember, this is a 160 /170mm bike – I'd hope that most riders considering a bike like this are planning on taking it into steep, technical terrain, areas where a slack head tube angle has very few downsides.

Personally, if I'm on a bike with adjustable geometry I'd rather have the ability to make it too slack versus too steep. I have a hard time imagining many riders will ever run this bike in the steep position, which gives it a 65.5-degree head angle – why not shift everything over so that there's the option of giving the Altitude a DH-bike worthy head angle?


2021 Rocky Mountain Altitude


Suspension

The Altitude's kinematics changed with the new frame, and the result are numbers that blend the best traits of the old Altitude and the Instinct BC. Anti-squat sits a little below 100% at sag, but it doesn't drop off quite as quickly as before.

The suspension rate is progressive, with a flatter curve earlier in the travel that ramps up more quickly towards the end of the stroke to provide additional bottom-out resistance. Each frame size has a specific shock tune in order to ensure that lighter riders on smaller bikes are able make the most of the bike's travel, and to keep bigger riders from blowing through all 160mm too quickly.


2021 Rocky Mountain Altitude
Jesse Melamed approaches warp speed on the Altitude. Photo: Margus Riga


Ride Impressions

My first handful of rides have all been with the Altitude set up in the slackest geometry setting with the chainstays in the long position. I'll try some different positions as testing progresses, but at the moment I don't really have any reason to want to deviate from that configuration.

The bike has a really fun blend of quickness and plowability. Even in the longer chainstay position I haven't had any issues navigating tighter trails, and on rougher straightaways the Fox 38 / Float X2 combo creates a satisfyingly smooth ride. It's nearly silent, too, free of any annoying cable rattle or chainslap. Yes, the XTR pads did make a racket at first, but some strategically placed mastic tape took care of that.

I've been flipping the little lever on the X2 for longer climbs, but the shock stays fairly calm even in the open position, as long as you're pedaling circles and not squares. The effective seat angle isn't radically steep, but the steeper actual seat tube angle helps keep things in check when the saddle is at full extension, and I'm sure the longer chainstays are helping with the fore / aft balance.

It's easy to imagine using this as a race bike, but it's also easy to envision building it up as a long-legged aggressive trail bike – it seems to be a very well-rounded machine, rather than one that only wakes up in the gnarliest terrain.

Look for an in-depth review and comparison to other bikes in this category later this year.







257 Comments

  • 112 21
 Sorry but I don’t get the point of this tbh. The slayer 29 is 170/170 and this is 160/170 and the geo is quite similar. So what’s the deal here? Slayer is more free ride inspired and this is more ews inspired I guess but that doesn’t change that these bikes are almost the same
  • 25 11
 Yeah, would have been cool if Rocky had a mullet option...Maybe next time
  • 11 4
 same, like the only thing that are really different to the slayer is the carbon rear end and the fact that there is a dualcrown version of the slayer available.
  • 8 0
 @jonesy-1: YES, or a flip chip like the Kona Process X has.
  • 33 0
 10mm is the difference
  • 7 38
flag chucknorris99 (Sep 9, 2020 at 0:59) (Below Threshold)
 MA DOVETE ANDARE A FARE LA PIZZA PORCOGGIUDAOH. CIOSEEEEEMITIIIII
  • 30 22
 Those two serve different purposes and are probably different in more ways than what meets the eye at first glance. The Slayer is a park/freeride bike with entirely different kinematics and a frame that was probably optimised to be able to take more abuse. Whereas the Altitude is their enduro race bike with all the characteristics that implies. Jesse Melamed seemed to like it.
  • 46 5
 Only the cheapest 29er slayer is 170/170, anything above the base model is 170/180, and the 27.5 versions are 180/180. Plus slacker geometry. And a heavier (stronger) frame. And a coil shock. Race vs freeride.
  • 28 42
flag landscapeben (Sep 9, 2020 at 2:55) (Below Threshold)
 Also ugly as sin, the old Slayer was a thing of beauty.
  • 10 26
flag ricardosafreire (Sep 9, 2020 at 3:29) (Below Threshold)
 I agree. I wish brands would take a more environment concussions approach when developing their range instead of trying to fill market segments. This is an issue across the board in the sport's industry.
  • 26 5
 @BenTheSwabian:
Yeah, because enduro bikes don't have to sustain any abuse during races. They are made for gently cruises near beaches.
  • 2 0
 @jonesy-1: don't be surprised they come out with one by updating the shock mounts. Those in conjunction with the Ride 9 chips should keep the geo proper.
  • 5 8
 @inked-up-metalhead:
There is a coil version on this as well. And, do please compare similar wheelsizes(I mean, 29er with 29er); when the slayer showed up last year, the 29er was an 170-170 bike. As I am not interested in this particulary bike, I dif not follow it to see if there are any up-dates/up-grades for 2020. Then again, why would you want to increase an already high BB, with 38mm forks that have a higher ATC for the same travel amount. Basically, from a 170mm fox 36 to a 180mm Zeb, the difference ia almost 2 cm in ATC. That's got to affect the geo, don't you think?
  • 214 2
 Having ridden and raced both I can say that the Altitude is exactly what it is meant to be. The Slayer is a big, brawler of a bike that likes going downhill more than up. The Altitude has a little more agile suspension platform and it comes in at a lighter weight making it more of an all-day bike. Same same, but a welcome difference.
  • 26 157
flag ReeferSouthrland (Sep 9, 2020 at 6:10) (Below Threshold)
 @JesseMelamed: Did corporate write that for you.
  • 16 1
 Jessie never seemed to ride the Slayer for ews racing, so presumably there is something not quite right with it, but at the same time Instinct doesn't seem suited to the gnarlier ews courses and Jessie was frequently over forking it. My guess is their ews team had a lot of input in this bike's design and it's been propose built for enduro racing with their recommendations.
  • 4 2
 @eugenux: You're not technically wrong, but still incorrect. The impact forces a enduro bike has to withstand are nothing compared to what a freeride/dh bike has to endure. Industry leading companies like EFBE test those categories to different standards. Another indication is that the Slayer has an additional strut in the front triangle, which ties the top- and downtube together. And like I said, the kinematic characteristics of the linkage are most likely very different. Bikes like the Slayer don't need to be efficient.
  • 2 10
flag eugenux (Sep 9, 2020 at 6:32) (Below Threshold)
 @ReeferSouthrland:
Come on man, you know he has to put it that way "more agile suspension platform at a lighter package"(and etc-etc)

From what everybody says the slayer is plush and not the best bike to go up-hill and so it seem to be the case for this one..the diff being 10mm less susp travel in the back(and now 10mm in the front, making a little space for the Altitude)

What surprises me is the fact that racers started to use bigger travel bikes, when in the previous years the norm was around 150mm(as they can compensate with skill); the course are that much harder or they simply use the best bike avialable for them/their teams.
  • 28 2
 @JesseMelamed: thanks for the experience-based insight Jesse!
  • 1 0
 Now that bigger travel doesn't necessarily come with a big downside, don't be surprised to see bikes with similar travels. If Rocky can get the characteristics they want with kinematics, geometry and frame design, why limit the travel?
  • 1 6
flag eugenux (Sep 9, 2020 at 6:41) (Below Threshold)
 @BenTheSwabian:
Your assumption might be correct but I can bet two small Coke bottles that 99.99% of the riders will not find either bike to be not enough stiff or less able to cope with hard-hits.

If Jesse is alowed to (really)answer such a question, I would really be curious if one feels less stiff then the other or if both give the rider the same stiffness sensation.

Looking over the geos..neither bike looks too agressive, as per the current trend(reach, fc, sta, low bb, etc)
  • 2 1
 I think difference is that Slayer better not be peddled up, while Altitude should handle that just fine?
  • 135 1
 @ReeferSouthrland: I'm flattered that you think my comment is so well written.
  • 5 0
 This one won't break!
  • 3 0
 @dthomp325: just like spesh riders run the stumpy more than enduro.
  • 1 0
 @JesseMelamed: where would you put the instinct bc edition?
  • 11 0
 @kinlodesigns: Below both in terms of aggressive riding. The Instinct BC is less travel and smaller so it's a much more playful bike once you've ridden these new ones.
  • 1 0
 @BenTheSwabian:

Will bike in all categories getting the longer, lower, slacker treatment, bikes in neighbouring categories are going to be really close. Especially when a new version comes out. If there is “enough” difference to set a gap between two models, weight, a bit of geo (Slayer’s shorter RC) and suspension kinematics, that’s what’s going to set categories apart. Or, you could make a Trek Remedy and be incredibly boring.
  • 1 0
 @JesseMelamed: was the “same same” comment a reference to Southeast Asia? Lol...I just remember a lot of places in Thailand saying same same but different.
  • 1 0
 @Noeserd: that's what she SAYS
  • 2 0
 I completely agree here. It seems like many companies are making their All mountain and enduro bikes so similar that most would probably just opt for the all mountain bike and throw a 38 or Zeb on if needed. The other side of this is you see the 120/130mm bike becoming aggressive trail bikes to fill in the gap such as the Optic, Delano, Fuel, Stumpy etc.

I'm no product planner or marketing expert but it seems like making two bikes so similar is probably stealing profits from one and giving it to the other vs having clear product differentiation.
  • 1 0
 @Tflores2828: This is something the ski/snowboard industry has dealt with for years. I think of this like the AT version of a big mountain ski.
  • 1 0
 To me, it is quite close to both the Instinct BC edition. 29 with 155/160 travel and the Slayer is 170/180mm with same wheel configuration as this Altitude. It could be that Rocky Mountain is reworking their entire lineup.
  • 1 0
 @JesseMelamed: I figured you had time to work on your writing skills while you self quarantine for two weeks after being in Europe!
  • 2 32
flag ReeferSouthrland (Sep 9, 2020 at 12:38) (Below Threshold)
 @JesseMelamed: Always a pleasure making Canadians feel good about themselves.
  • 3 5
 @JesseMelamed: where did you get a chance to demo both, not sure I trust your input though
  • 1 2
 @cjeder:

The difference is a good pair of AT skis is 3 times cheaper than the bottom range Altitude. I can have 2 pair of skis and 3 snowboards but I cannot have(again!) 5 bikes.
  • 6 3
 @ReeferSouthrland: haha coming from an American? Look around you before trying to help Canadians.
  • 2 17
flag ReeferSouthrland (Sep 9, 2020 at 14:13) (Below Threshold)
 @ybsurf: We are doing great here, trails never closed 1 day, thanks for the support.
  • 6 2
 @JesseMelamed: Since you're here already, I gotta fanboy for a bit. Congrats on the win in Zermatt! Superb riding, well deserved victory. That gap down off the huge rock on stage two was insane!
  • 3 12
flag nvranka (Sep 9, 2020 at 14:32) (Below Threshold)
 @ReeferSouthrland: yup, been riding 5days a week since covid, good times.

Unfortunately weekends have become unbearable due to crowds, so I’ll stick to my mon-fri.

@ybsurf: feel good to have your singular moment of “superiority”? Lmao.
  • 6 2
 @nvranka: you see you made another Canadian feel good, what a day you're having today...
  • 3 1
 I’ve test ridden the Instinct BC Edition and the Slayer over the last couple of weeks and while travel might not be extremely different, they felt completely different to me. I actually had more fun on the Instinct BC. I felt more at home on it.

I think the new Altitude makes the Instinct BC Edition better while the Slayer remains in a class of its own where it shines on steep gnarly descents, with even more travel for 2021.
  • 2 4
 Love it or love it ladies.
  • 2 1
 @nvranka: haha not sure. I've just heard it used enough times.
  • 4 1
 @onemind123: I worked on my writing skills enough during my University days.
  • 4 2
 @JesseMelamed:

The phrase is very used in Asia, especially in trade; you look for a specific product, the supplier in front of you does not have it but he assures you that his brother-in-law, nephew, sister cousins, etc has it. Then you go with him at the brother-in-law's factory and it is not the damn product. When you ask him, he tells you with confidence that is the same; when you show him that it isn't, instantly the line "same-same but different" arrives. It is already/almost a cliche.
  • 4 1
 @eugenux: very interesting! Thanks for the knowledge!
  • 3 1
 @eugenux: yeah classic indo lingo... haha
  • 2 1
 @eugenux: not sure why you’re being downvoted lol, what you wrote is exactly my experience traveling throughout SEA.
  • 3 2
 @nvranka:
no worries, I have a bunch of groupies that always downvote me, no matter what write.
  • 3 1
 @BenTheSwabian: Thanks! Definitely a bit bigger than I expected!
  • 1 0
 @nvranka: I live in SEA, almost never heard those phrase as it is.

I've heard a lot of "beda tipis" though if you know what I mean.
  • 80 2
 New Altitude = vegan Slayer
  • 4 1
 Altitude makes things shrink. Take it from me.
  • 2 1
 @BenPea: What goes up must come down. At some point this model will go Underground. It may no longer be the hot new shit, but will be pretty cool instead. And, judging from your comment, it will be big. Real big.
  • 20 0
 I like it like that! Altitude feels like a more precise, slightly smaller Slayer. I'd take Slayer for more downhil bias and Altitude more for Enduro.
  • 3 0
 Exactly, its a lighter, fitter, healthier, and most versions have a gassy rear end.
  • 5 0
 @cjeder: gas-y rear end
  • 1 0
 @BenPea: not if it's a bag of chips.
  • 1 0
 @filsdanvers: crisps?
  • 2 0
 @JesseMelamed: So evidently the new Altitude is jiving with you nicely (congrats on the win and thanks for the Fantasy points!), do you think you’ll be on a Slayer for races again, or does it just depend on the track? I know you usually like to ride the same bike and setup for everything.

You tell @RockyMountainBicycles to hook you up with a Maiden yet before they’re all gone? Long Live the Maiden!
  • 3 0
 @sledMXer: It would depend on the race but I feel like I can morph the Altitude enough to be able to handle any race course as good as the Slayer.
  • 53 11
 "I have a hard time imagining many riders will ever run this bike in the steep position" Maybe if you want a Mullet setup, or want to run a 180 rather than 170 fork?

Nice looking bike......but.... Seems every brands top of the line bike is now $10k! Price inflation at the top end is out of control. The top tier Altitude is $3000 more than the top tier in 2017. 40% price increase in 3 years.. wow. I know it's not just the bike companies.. I'm sure they are in part passing on Fox / Shimano /SRAM top end costs... but it just doesn't add up these days.

I think bike companies + the whole supply chain of high end kit, are pricing top level stuff at nonsense levels to make their mid tier offerings which have also gone up a lot, seem palatable. Old marketing trick, but where does it stop!
  • 7 0
 It stops when it stops working Smile I agree that the prices are a bit nuts on many top end models but I think there are enough brands with very solid offerings at more reasonable price points that we shouldn't really be complaining too much about the state of the market. e.g. www.radon-bikes.de/en/mountainbike/fullsuspension/swoop-al/swoop-al-80-2021 I'd prefer Shimano over SRAM for the drivetrain but still I think most people would be quite happy with that bike for 2.5k. It might have been 250-300 less for something similar a few years ago but honestly I think we were in kind of a "golden age" of bike pricing for a while back then.

In 2016 a radon swoop 170 with xt 11s and a Fox 36rc2 / float x cost 3k... Which I still think is one of the best deals on a bike in history (I bought one)... So yes definitely prices have gone a up since then, but on the whole, there are still good deals available IMO.
  • 2 0
 upside is we are seeing more alu models, unlike a few years ago when it was carbon everything with a token alu base model hardly worth looking at
  • 4 3
 There will be the inevitable comparison with "I could buy a moto for £5k", but the £10k mountain bikes are pretty much ready for world level racing (bar a shock tune). You're talking £100k+ for off road moto and £250k for wsb AFAIK. So, the £2-3k stuff is far more comparable to Moto etc
  • 4 0
 @mountainsofsussex: if i remember correctly, it was about €3,000,000 to buy a previous-year spec MotoGP bike if you were to run a race team (i think that was Honda). And it didn't have room for a water bottle.
  • 1 0
 @DidNotSendIt: I'll have three of those, please! I figured that a world super bike was at least loosely based on a publicly available model, so sort of comparable to what an EWS or DH team would have.
I reckon we should celebrate how amazing the bikes we have right now are. My 2 year old bike cost me under £3k, which is still a lot of money. But I've ridden the crap out of it, down stuff that is pretty dumb, and nothing has broken or needed replacing before time apart from one tyre that got cut in the Alps. 5 years ago, tyres, gears, suspension, pivots would all be screwed, and it wouldn't have ridden so well.
  • 5 0
 This. Prices are now officially insane
  • 3 0
 @mountainsofsussex: A very valid point.

My bike is spec'd more than i will ever need (it was a mid to upper-spec picked up on sale but to be honest the equivalent-price lower spec bike i was going to buy would still be more than i need) and it didn't cost the earth. In fact, it's so good i'm actaually planning to build a hardtail for the easier trails i sometimes frequent where the bike is too capable.

A few years ago Nukeproof brought out a worx edition Mega for sale (the green and gold one, think they did a run of 50 bikes) that was spec'd as closely as they could to Sam Hills race bike and RRP was £5k. A near factory team spec bike at that price illustrates your point pretty well. I actually saw that bike on sale (last one in shop) for £3500 the next season. Wish i picked that up.
  • 6 0
 Only problem is the “mid tier” builds have trash components at still very high prices.

If anything, they encourage you to buy the more expensive proper build. Not the mid.
  • 1 0
 @nvranka: depends on where you look i suppose.

Santa Cruz you got to go £4k+ to even get a dropper with it.

Spend £1k less with the likes of Nukeproof, YT, Propain, Canyon etc and you've got a pretty sweet deal.
  • 1 0
 I would ride it in the steep position! I would only benefit from a super slack HA on like 5% of my trails and I climb a lot and the SA is not really steep so... I nearly always do ride my bike in the steeper position for those reasons!
  • 1 0
 @nvranka: Right?! What is the deal with the Canadian bikes? They're so expensive and the USD is stronger than the CD. $6999 for the "nice" build? Holy shit.
  • 1 0
 Nukeproof for the win!
  • 2 0
 @mybaben: I love Nukeproof.

So does everyone else judging by the fact that the 2021 Scout frames have sold out on pre-order alone (on CRC at least).
  • 3 1
 As soon as people stop buying them the prices will stop going up.
  • 2 0
 @DidNotSendIt: clearly we are only talking about “name” brands...the DTC brands like YT etc definitely have tremendous value.
  • 3 1
 Why do people compare the top of the line from 5 years ago vs. top of the line in 2020?

Bikes have gotten cheaper on a $ vs. performance every generation (a roughly $4k AUD base model 2021 Altitude Alloy 30 is specced with components/geo better than or at least equal to a top tier $8k AUD 2016 Altitude 999 MSL).

The appetite for the super high end has just gotten bigger (wireless shifting, carbon wheels,. SRAMs X-Dome cassettes etc). Ironically, the very thing you're complaining about has meant tech from those 'overpriced bikes' has tricked their way down more affordable models.
  • 33 0
 No BC edition because any bike these days is BC inspired. I'm still waiting for the BC level trails to pop up everywhere like the bikes,but it doesn't seem to be working.
  • 3 4
 You need the right terrain
  • 20 1
 Yea, its fascinating how many long, low and slack enduro sleds, decked out for racing on the steepest, most chunky tracks the world has to offer, i see poodling around the mellow trails in this country. The same trails that we used to ride on 26" hardtails with 100mm of front suspension (sometimes we still do, and its just as much fun).
  • 1 1
 @Ttimer: Right, well said. Way too many people here on their 5k€ enduro sleds, gingerly rolling down mellow trails which my mates and I ride on our XC race bikes.
  • 4 0
 @BenTheSwabian: I'll never forget getting gassed by a dude in lyrca on a fs xc bike in winterberg on the flow trail while I was on my 29er supreme xl... that bike is amazing on steep fast nasty terrain but an outright pig for that flow trail. To be fair though he was no ordinary xc rider either... clearly knew what he was doing.
  • 1 0
 Smart of them to consolidate and to offer the 29 in larger sizes for taller guys/girls. To your point re BC trails I still think the Evil Offering is still a great do almost everything bike though and can be found on sale with a new one coming out. Throw on 140, 150 or 160 fork, go push coil on the rear if you want to, 30lbs and can pedal. Works for most trails that aren’t bike park in BC.
  • 1 0
 @kooahara: evil with fox 36 160mm and push coil is nowhere 30lbs.
  • 25 0
 Excluding the top spec, with Rocky it seems you always have to factor in the cost of a wheel upgrade. 370’s on a $8500 + bike?
  • 1 2
 I know the point you're trying to make but they usually put 350s on bikes over $6k. Yes its annoying but you can upgrade the 370 to 54T ratchet for ~$300 which is easier then trying to sell off the stock wheels. I'd rather have a 370 hub with double butted spokes and a decent rim then a DT1900 or a house brand at $4500.

That being said, when did SLX with fox performance and wheels with 370s become $5400?? That is $700 more then a similar specced instinct!
  • 4 0
 I know right? $6999 (US) for the "good" bike and still crappy hubs and rotors. Also no Factory spec, but Performance Elite. I don't need Kashima, but for 7K...you would think...
  • 3 4
 For $100 and 5 minutes work, one can easily upgrade the 370 hubs to 54T engagement. Super easy and cheap process.
  • 2 1
 @KJP1230: Hey are you sure about this? When my friend's DT370 blew I was told the star ratchet mechs don't fit on the 370 hub, would be awesome if they did!
  • 5 0
 @OnTheShore: maybe wholesale but not for common folk. The star ratchet alone is $100 plus you need a new $100 freehub body and a few other small parts. Also you can’t do it at home unless you wanna buy proprietary tools.
  • 2 0
 @mybaben: I just bought my dad the YT decoy elite (it’s an ebike)....shit is top tier across the board with a few minor exceptions and it was $7k.

RM and other bike brands’ pricing is ludicrous.
  • 2 0
 @KJP1230: Still a crap hub. Engagement point numbers look good on paper.
But these hubs tear themselves apart inside pretty regularly. And it doesn’t matter which freehub body is in there.
  • 1 0
 Yep, better to wait for it to fail and get upgraded to a 350 under warranty!
  • 28 8
 We have the Slayer for enduro, and so I do feel like this should have stayed a 27.5 more playful bike. Not everyone who is a size large wants a 29er to race, especially as RM have ditched 27.5 for size L and above on the slayer.

Looks great, but now its just another 29er slayer (for those over 5’10)
  • 10 1
 Isn't this their enduro bike? I thought slayer was a park bike.
  • 18 2
 exactly, I want a large in 27.5......
  • 6 1
 Amen to that. Don't get me wrong, I love RM and have had the two previous Altitude versions, and also own a Maiden and a 2018 Slayer. This one with 27.5 wheels in size L and I would've seriously considered it. But for my style of riding and me liking playful bikes I just can't bring myself to buy a 29er (yet... never say never).
Here's to hoping that the new Instinct will be 150mm rear and 150/160mm front and come with 27.5 wheels.
  • 1 0
 Deleted. duplicate post
  • 6 1
 @Nicksen: totally agree. My 2017 Slayer (large) is in no danger of being replaced. I want to pop out of berms like I'm on my old Yeti 4x... Either on the back wheel or it being thrown to where ever the fun is (ie probably sideways). Jesse Melamed will probably comb the comments to say "oh this bike is rad to the max" or something but he is both insanely talented and paid to say that!
  • 5 0
 Agreed, I was excited when I saw the article but became immediately disappointed with the treatment it got. I get the move, but what drew me to the old Altitude as a potential new bike was that it fit that more playful side. Now it is just another enduro sled.
  • 1 0
 With the modular shock mount design, you could probably buy the forward shock mount and linkage for 27.5. Still sucks you can't get it this way stock though.
  • 3 0
 @Nicksen: it would be interesting to see actual sales numbers on comparable 27.5 vs 29 from the same brand. When I ordered my Santa Cruz frame mid shut down all of the 29 frames were back ordered but my bronson shipped next day. 27.5 might be dead and I blame the customers.
  • 1 0
 @friendlyfoe: power of marketing is real
  • 1 0
 @friendlyfoe:
Luckily, there is an answer, if all 27.5 bikes dry up, just buy a 29er with a high BB like the firebird 29 and stick 27.5 wheels in it, voila, sick 27.5 wheels bike.

Fb29 rides better with 27.5 wheels than 29 lol
  • 2 0
 @friendlyfoe: Yeah that would be interesting. I'd say in here NZ I see more Nomads and Bronsons than Megatowers and Hightowers. Altitudes vs Instincts maybe 50:50. Would be good to see sale numbers for the new Norco Sight, for example, since that comes in both 27.5 and 29.
  • 1 0
 yup Im thinking norco
  • 24 4
 +9000 usd for a 14,5 kg all mountain bike with alu rims... Madness
  • 15 1
 The exact same model with the alloy frame is 5500 USD. I honestly don't understand why one would buy a carbon model at this point. The carbon frame is 3.2kg... I cannot justify 3500 USD for the sole "carbon feeling" when riding
  • 6 1
 @trackingadventures: Incorrect; The alloy 70 = carbon 70 build + factory suspension. The $9,000 carbon 90 is a totally difference spec w/ full XTR & carbon bars.
  • 1 0
 Totally agree, for 9k you could build a top spec bike with carbon everything
  • 20 3
 Gorgeous bike! Nice to see a company coming up with an enduro bike geometry not to win the numbers game, but with angles, sizes and kinematics that actually make sense. Can't go wrong with a Rocky, can you.
  • 3 0
 I may be a bit biased here since I've been a loyal Rocky customer since 1996, but I would agree that they're very easy to ride allround bikes. This is certainly true for my 2018 Altitude.
  • 15 1
 As always, great review guys!!! I found it interesting that Mike and I BOTH removed volume reducers on this bike, but we're also on the lighter side of the spectrum. Crazy that Mike wanted the bike even slacker! I was a lot happier with the Ride 9 in the neutral position than the slackest setting, but Mike and I have such different styles. He's much more "wheels on the ground", where as I'm all about jumping over as many of the bumps as possible. I'm excited to get some more miles on this bike, big thanks to the guys at Rocky!
  • 1 0
 Assuming you've moved from Ibis to Rocky now, Jeff? I always enjoy what you bring with your Youtube content, and am looking forward to more. Cheers.
  • 6 0
 @mammal: Thanks for the note! My main bike sponsor isn't really just one bike brand, it's an online retailer than carries many brands, including Rocky and Ibis. I've been riding bikes from Rocky, Ibis, Orbea, Intense, and Chromag thus far, and have a few more coming in soon!
  • 1 0
 @JeffWeed: Very interesting, thanks for clarifying! I'd say you're a lucky man then, I don't know of many riders that have access to so many quality brand to try out. That's a good place to be.
  • 19 3
 OMG 75.4 STA OMG OMG this is not ridable!!! DRAMA!
  • 15 2
 It's kind of funny how the entire comments section wrote off the Trek Slash because of that, but barely anyone is complaining about it here.
  • 4 0
 @Paluzas: beat me to it. effective STA is slacker than the slash. HTA is steeper... WHERE IS THE HATE?!
  • 2 1
 @Paluzas: Because there's also an option to run it steeper. Which personally, is how I'd run it. 65.5 HTA and 76.5 STA is perfect for me.
  • 5 0
 @hi-dr-nick: Trek's got a flipchip to get the STA to be the same. The HTA would still be slacker though.
  • 1 0
 "Rocky has long been a proponent of adjustable geometry, and I don't think it's just because 'Ride 9' is a catchy term. However, I'm not sure why they didn't make it so the Altitude's slackest position was extra slack. Remember, this is a 160 /170mm bike – I'd hope that most riders considering a bike like this are planning on taking it into steep, technical terrain, areas where a slack head tube angle has very few downsides.

Personally, if I'm on a bike with adjustable geometry I'd rather have the ability to make it too slack versus too steep. I have a hard time imagining many riders will ever run this bike in the steep position, which gives it a 65.5-degree head angle – why not shift everything over so that there's the option of giving the Altitude a DH-bike worthy head angle?"

Hmm, what bike that was recently reviewed does this sound like?
  • 11 3
 @Paluzas: But the Slash's Actual STA is like 50 degrees, which is a huge issue if your seat is any higher than the "measured" height. This is a much better design regardless of what the reported angles are.
  • 6 1
 @ksilvey10: because this bike actually has a steep STA, where the slash is clearly way slacker, the effective STA may be the same, but in actuality the slash is way slacker
  • 2 1
 @Paluzas: Still, personally for me I have zero interest in anything slacker than 65 degrees so have no interest in the Trek. Along with what someone else mentioned too, the actual STA on the trek is super slack and also kinked far up limiting your dropper options
  • 2 1
 @tempest3070: I would most certainly run it in the steep position. Not everyone wants a head angle under 65 degrees. To me it just feels like shit on the climbs with it that slack, even on a bike with a 68-69 degree seat angle. That's also the main that discerns it from the Slayer.
  • 4 2
 @arrowheadrush: ok, if you've got a super long inseam, sure that matters. And there was SOME hate from tall inseam people. BUT- no, many of the comments were not about that, they were just flat out "Trek wussed out and didn't keep with times- should have been 78, I'm out" type crap which I haven't seen any of here.

For MOST people, these are essentially the same STA.
  • 4 0
 @tgent: Trek did specify that they measured the effective at an above average saddle height for each size. The actual may be very slack, but it sounds like the effective will work well for like 90% of riders, so I don't really see how it's a huge problem.
  • 1 0
 @ICKYBOD: You think most people climb with their seat just below the stem height!?!?! I think if you're over 5'2'', you're probably higher than your handlebar and at 6'+, you're way higher! Well maybe not so much with those new 29er with super high stack number but....
  • 1 0
 @ksilvey10: not to mention how the Evil Wreckoning’s geo got slammed -and it makes this look positively prehistoric
  • 1 0
 @rookie100: Hmmm I really don't follow on this one, near as makes no difference on reach, pretty similar adjustable HA, only cedes a degree on STA.
I had the original Wreckoning and it was a blast, this new on would be a step up for sure. That said I do think the new Altitude would be a better all round bike especially with ability to adjust the chainstay length.
More like 2 different rides for different applications, but playing in similar ball parks TBF.
  • 1 0
 @Paluzas: amazing, great point
  • 2 0
 @OnTheShore: true. i went a bit overboard with the choice of adjective.
I would say the Wreckoning has similar geo despite being marketed more as a charger/crusher/slayer/freeride/dual-crown compatible bike and the hate for its STA was hilarious...all occurring about a week before the same keyboard warriors moaned that the Privateer’s STA was too steep.
There is no question these numbers are conservative however. RM has basically matched Santa Cruz’s geos from two years ago.
....totally agree re. the chainstay adjustability. That is about the sole thing keeping me from buying a Meta and a Wreckoning at the mo. Need to demo both.
Cheers
  • 4 0
 @Timo82: I'm 6'2. On an XL my seat and grips are about in a line, and Trek's stack isn't particularly short. The way Trek describes it, and backed up by the VitalMTB pics, this would be WORST case would still be safely over 75, based on those pics probably closer to 76 than 75.

And really I don't have a dog in this fight, it's just fascinating too me. Whatever- some people hate trek and will really pick apart to make their point. Sometimes it's whoever comments first sets the tone.

There are some comments here about price- but quite a few ripping on the Trek's price but the 9.9 xt is 500 cheaper than this. And the 8000 tested would leave you enough to buy 2 X01 gear sets.

That's not knocking this, I really like Rocky Mountain bikes. Just interesting to me how different the comments are on STA and price
  • 3 1
 @ Brdjanin Came here to make this comment. Seemed like every PB user that day had to complain. Now no one cares. Everyone is going to run it in the slackest setting and they'll be fine with their 75.4 degree STA.

For any continuing haters, Trek specified on PB's Instagram story that the 75.9 STA was in the slack position on a medium frame at a seat height of 760mm. That's a ridiculously high seat height for a medium. You'd have to be about 6'2" for that seat height. So for every person shorter than 6'2" the Slash seat tube angle is actually steeper than 76, in the slack flip chip setting.
  • 2 3
 @tgent: trek measured their effective seat tube angle at a height where the rider would need a 36” inseam to meet it. Anyone shorter than that gets an even steeper effective seat tube angle because of the slack actual angle youre Talking about
  • 1 0
 @Zimbaboi: For all sizes? Because I'm certain that's not true.
  • 7 0
 @sledshed, that's not accurate. I have a size large Slash, and with the seat rails at 730mm above the BB the seat angle is 75.6 degrees in the low position (I measured it using the super scientific broom stick and digital angle finder method).

That's pretty much the same seat angle that I get on the Altitude in the slack position, but don't forget that the Altitude has a 474mm reach vs 486 for the Slash. That means the seated position on the Slash feels more stretched out.

In addition, the Slash's actual seat angle is around 67-degrees, while the Altitude's is around 70-degrees - that'll make a difference for taller riders.
  • 2 0
 @rookie100: It just goes to show that these companies need better infrastructure for demoing bikes so people can see how they ride before purchase. With the move to online sales companies need some type of infrastructure for bike demos so people can try for themselves.
  • 10 0
 Man, is it just me or are frame prices crazy this year? It could be related to Covid and/or international trade disputes or no real reason at all, but frame-only prices have spiked up to the $3500-4k range. Definitely a tough trend to watch.
  • 5 0
 Yes, they are crazy expensive and unaffordable for most. It's a pity
  • 1 0
 I know. I don't get why the Canadian bikes are so expensive. The USD is stronger than the CD, why is the good bike $6999?!! And it still has shitty hubs and brake rotors.
  • 1 0
 @mybaben: I wonder if our terrible dollar is causing their component cost to increase. Regardless of the reason it's not like the consumers are going to be willing to take on that extra cost.
  • 1 0
 and they only offer the frame in the hideous color; presumably trying to push you back towards the bad value builds.
  • 1 0
 @friendlyfoe: I don't know...That could be the case. I def won't pay that much for wheels like that.
  • 7 0
 Bike looks sick. Glad they didn't go geo chasing and just built a solid, badass bike. The results speak for themselves. Hopefully the Thunderbolt gets updated to fill the void of the prior gen Altitude and keep the 27.5 flame burning. Really like what RM is doing across the board, just solid NO bs bikes that work.
  • 8 0
 What’s the recall colour going to look like? Might as well plan for the inevitable now and buy matching kit that won’t look like total shit with the new “get riders back riding faster” cover all cut corners colour.
  • 3 0
 I hear ya Jack and good on you for bringing up how poorly the whole debacle was handled. I didn't think I was the only one who was crushed to drop $5000 on a new bike last summer to be told less than 12 months later that it wasn't safe to ride and I'd be getting a replacement of different colour. Next to my vehicle the bike is the most expensive thing I own and there has been nothing offered as a consolation for the bare-minimum solution they came up with. No t-shirt, no matching sticker kit. Nothing but 'sorry about your luck.' So much for trying to support a Canadian company who is happy to take my money and run. I'm gutted.
  • 1 0
 @beerdo: I couldn't have said it better. I would never buy their shit bikes again and I have no issue spreading the word about what a shit job they did to deal with it.
  • 8 1
 Was excited for this bike but Rocky Mountain made some very poor choices regarding pricing. They release a video which was a ripoff of Capita Defenders of Awesome, a non corporate snowboard company, and then price their bike for Dentists to buy. What is the goal here??? I was going to buy this frame only the day it came out, but 3700 for a frame only is a lot for a company who doesn't have an amazing history of quality control recently. Kona has kept me interested and im going with the Process X and im going to Mullet it.
  • 10 0
 nice looking bike but those prices are nuts.
  • 6 0
 Here's a reason why Rocky bikes are great that you won't get from the reviews. Start with the bike in this review. Awesome Enduro bike. Do a little shopping on Buy/Sell site, pick up a set of light trail tires and a trail shock. Set the ride 9 setting in the 8-9 position, set the chainstays in the short setting and for probably less than a few hundred bucks you now have a killer pedal efficient trail bike. Pick up a 27.5 wheel and tire and maybe a longer air spring for the fork and you can build a long travel slack mullet. The versatility of the Rocky frames is awesome and with a little smart shopping on Buy/Sell you can end up with a fleet of very different bikes for not a lot of money.
  • 5 0
 I reckon this thing is great, for the reasons in the initial impressions. A versatile long travel 29er. It's clear to me it's not supposed to be a park bike. Could care less if it overlaps some other bike in their range, which brand doesn't have model confusion these days? The pricing on the other hand, completely agree its stupid.
  • 5 0
 Hey RM,
So that little shield above the seat tube chainstay pivot. Is there any possible way for you to make those to fit your other frames and sell the first one to me? There is this certain little horrible crunch sound that makes me wince. Sometimes It’s an acorn on a lucky day. (carbon Instinct). Please?
  • 2 0
 Look up MadGuard
  • 2 0
 I made one myself out of a thin sheet of plastic. Very easy.
  • 8 0
 so it's a slayer that can climb, sweet
  • 4 0
 Good to hear somebody gets it. There are lots of places that have more technical climbs than fire roads to get them to the top of the gnarliest descents (think Sedona, Moab, Fruita, Phoenix, Tucson, etc).

65.5 head angle is plenty slack for all but the steepest terrain, and the long travel let’s you plow through the chunk at speed.
  • 1 0
 Apparently the new Slayer pedals really well for what it is. I wonder if the RM team will alternate depending on the venue, or if they're just gonna stick with the Altitude. I know they were really talking up the Slayer for enduro racing at the beginning of the year, but they could be marketing. But a guy at the local enduro was swearing up and down that he uses the Slayer as his trail bike and loves it.
  • 1 1
 @roma258: I'm curious about the slayer as a 30+ miler bike too. Ardent race rear, a float DPS, some carbon rims might make it go. I demoed a stock C70 and it felt like a tank. Not sure if there is getting around that aluminum rear end though, it's DH diameter tubing.
  • 2 0
 @gticket: probably not a 30 mile bike. That's still a lot of weight and suspension to lug around. Maybe 15-20 mile bike is more realistic, which is more my speed anyway.
  • 5 0
 @mikekazimer what "trick" did you use to quiet down the XTR pads? My XT pads are so noisy, I've tried sticking foam under the fins and that doesn't really work. Help me Obi-wan kenobi you're my only hope
  • 2 0
 I too would like some details on the type of noise and the fix.
  • 2 0
 If you look at the photo of the rear axle flip chip and brake assembly you’ll see a layer of mastic tape under the brake pads.
  • 1 0
 I've had luck with my Saints by cutting a small length of zip-tie (10mm long), and glueing it down to the point at which the lower edge of the brake pad fins touch the top of the caliper, at the rear. So one piece of zip-tie to space out both pads at the rear, and it basically spaces the brake pads out perfectly so that they've got very little space to move (and rattle). They've only got about 1mm of movement for sliding purposes, but it's not enough to make noise.

Or, you can buy the pads without fins. I've heard that makes them quiet too.
  • 1 0
 @mammal: the non-finned pads are cheaper too. And the fins don't actually do anything. Unless your descents are 45 minute white knuckle affairs, heat dissipation isn't actually something you need to worry about.
  • 1 1
 @adamszymkowicz: While I agree about the fins not usually being required, I definitely run into situations (maybe once per month) where I'm super glad I've got the finned pads. Even a 10 minute segment gets those puppies cookin if it's a consistently really steep trail.
  • 1 0
 @mammal: I mean, the boiling point of Shimano's mineral oil is something like 280 F, which is higher even than DOT 5, and regardless of how hot your rotors are getting, the fluid isn't hitting those temps. What protects the fluid is the insulating properties of the ceramic pistons in the calipers, not the fins.
  • 1 0
 @adamszymkowicz: But the fins are affecting the temp of the pad materials, which are transferring heat from the rotors, yeah? And the temp of the rotors is affecting the frictional properties between the two materials, no?
  • 1 0
 @mammal: Yep, to a marginal degree. I will say that the ice-tech rotors do make a noticeable difference over the standard version, but the finned pads vs. non-finned don't dissipate enough heat to ever be noticed.
  • 1 0
 guys I fixed it today. You just put pieces of velcro tape on the caliper where the angled ends of the fins rest on the caliper. 4 pieces per caliper. Went for a ride on some DH trails and all I could hear was the serene sounds of my screaming
  • 1 0
 @adamszymkowicz: I'm assuming you've thoroughly tested finned VS non-finned with controlled back to back testing then? Not saying it makes a world of difference, but it certainly helps sink heat from the pads. Heat most certainly has a large effect on the frictional properties of both braking surfaces. That's why you see ceramic materials used in both brake pads and rotors in high performance brake systems.
  • 4 0
 Most people, like me, would be better served on the Instinct as we don't race enduro but still ride the shore (or shore-esque areas). The instinct seems (or at least seemed) to line up with the Norco Sight.
... So when are we going to hear about the new Instinct?
  • 5 2
 "Personally, if I'm on a bike with adjustable geometry I'd rather have the ability to make it too slack versus too steep. I have a hard time imagining many riders will ever run this bike in the steep position, which gives it a 65.5-degree head angle – why not shift everything over so that there's the option of giving the Altitude a DH-bike worthy head angle?"

While i kinda agree with this assertion, there's the slayer for DH like builds.
Maybe rocky didn't want to make the bikes too similar?
  • 11 0
 Nah I'm the devil-may-care maverick who'd prefer the steeper option personally, both for the livelier HA and the higher BB.
  • 3 0
 I agree, I think 64.4 to 65.5 is a sweet spot for the Enduro category. Sub 64.4 HTAs are downhill bike territory or as many other have stated Rock also makes the Slayer. Also over 1 deg of adjustment, with a ton of options inbetween thanks to Ride 9, is a huge range compared to other companies flip chips. I'm impressed and that is the range I would choose given the bikes intentions.
  • 2 0
 I would think that if this is someone's single bike, they could steepen it up to make it less dull on flatter, rolling terrain which may account for many weekday rides or something. When Pb reviewers say a bike is great on steep tech but sucks on flat ground, with adjustable geo, Rocky could potentially address that complaint. And like you said, seems like Slayer takes the DH cake Kazimer wants out of this bike.
  • 1 0
 @pbuser2299: AND the steeper STA, no!? Razz
  • 5 1
 As a long time Rocky owner, was hoping for a large frame 27.5 option. Looks like that won't be happening. Sadly, i'm going to have to look at other brands.

Unless Rocky has another 27.5 bike up their sleeve?
  • 4 0
 Try a Sight 27.5, you wont be disappointed
  • 1 0
 @epoit: Had no idea the Sight was even an option. Thanks, i'll check it out for sure!
  • 2 1
 Also check out the Revel Rail. The Canfield suspension system is the truth.
  • 2 1
 @diegosk: I just ran into the first Revel Rail in the wild. With coil no less. Beautiful bike in the flesh, the owner couldn't stop raving about it.
  • 5 0
 Not much change in the design but the numbers have changed in a good way. That's what it took to make this bike sexy!
  • 2 0
 Regarding the geometry adjust range not going slacker, isn't that what the Slayer is for? I'm assuming the race team had some input on this bike, and it sure seems like they know what they're doing. Plus, head angle is not everything! Ride 9 has a minimal effect on wheelbase, and that's where a lot of speed stability comes from.
  • 1 0
 Pretty sure Jesse and Remi are both running anglesets in their Altitudes.
  • 1 0
 @slumgullion: Pretty sure? Got a link?
  • 2 0
 @slumgullion: holy shit, something in PB comments actually backed up with evidence! Good work.
  • 2 0
 If the playfulness hasn't been reduced too much then I'm sure it's a very nice bike - but no thanks to the big wheels from this guy. I bought my '18 Altitude in part for the fun-size wheels. And at 6'1" tall, I've still managed to buzz my butt a couple times (on a 26+ rear wheel actually). Lots to like here but I'm still feeling pretty good about my old bike.
  • 3 0
 Sick bike, but what's the point of making it so similar to the slayer? the altitude was kind of the nimble and fun, agressive trail bike. It's more of a big enduro rig now.
  • 2 0
 Does the air port on the shock ever snag on your shorts or knee pads? I have Rallon with a very similarly positioned X2 shock and this happens regularly which is really annoying.
  • 3 0
 Same bike, same shock, same problem.
  • 4 0
 Now that this one's out, can we have a bike check on Jesse Melamed's ride from Zermatt please? Smile
  • 4 0
 Mastic tape on the disc brakes to quieten them?

Never heard of this before - can anyone elaborate?
  • 6 0
 That price.....
  • 2 0
 Only a 76 degree seat angle and no option to buy the aluminum frame only. Bike manufacturers like Rocky are still not understanding other companies are letting riders buy what they want A La Carte.
  • 5 0
 A $7,000 bike with DT Swiss 370 hubs?...go
home RM...you’re drunk
  • 1 0
 I guess Jesse proved the bike is fast, but to me the big question is whether it is as much fun / playful as the 2020 Altitude and the Instinct BC? (I tried both and settled for the Altitude but know many think the Instinct BC is more fun)
Somehow I have my doubts. If someone has ridden both, comments are appreciated. Thanks
  • 1 0
 I’m a bit surprised and disappointed that they only have a Fox 38 on the expensive model. Similarly to how smaller frames have 27.5 wheels, L/XL frames should probably have the Fox 38. Bigger riders would probably benefit from the extra support.
  • 11 11
 I know that Rocky has a lot of BC cred from back in the day, but I really don't understand why people are still so pumped up about them after the Procycle rebranding. All you have to do is look at the bikes to realize they're not actively making better bikes or pushing the envelope of design any longer. All Procycle is doing is tweaking existing molds that they still own patents to and hoping that people won't notice. My guess is the "new Altitude" is really just a Slayer front triangle from 2 years ago with a different link and chainstay, which is why the geo adjust only makes it steeper rather than slacker. Yes, Melamed can win an EWS on it. He can win an EWS on anything. Going down the parts list you can see the extreme measures that Procycles is taking to cut cost on every bike, some commenters have already pointed out the budget hubs, but I'd bet dollars to donuts that the bearings are super low-end as well, and all the breakages from their models over the last few years point to major quality-control issues in the manufacturing process. Rocky is dead. All their new bikes are zombies.
  • 8 2
 You're flying high on top of the Dunning-Kruger curve here, sharing your useful insights!
  • 5 0
 Just wondering why you'd think the "new Altitude" front triangle is from a 2019 Slayer? Have you seen the Slayer lineage over the last 10 years. None of those bikes bare any resemblance to any of the Altitudes. Also, they've changed the shape of their tubing so dramatically between Altitude/Instinct redesigns, they're no way they're reusing molds.

I'm not a Rocky fanboi, and say what you want about their development goals, but they're not just rebranding old bike parts as new ones.
  • 4 0
 Think you're way off base on the Slayer recycle comment here. All of the angles and measurements have changed, it's a new bike with (mostly) modern geo.
Also while I agree that Jesse could beat you and I riding a tricycle, at the top level the skill and time gaps are so small they all need every advantage they can get, so I don't think it can be said the performance of the new bike is irrelevant to Jesse's performance. Well, that and he is an amazing rider TBS.
I do fully agree on some of the dodgy part spec, I've seen a couple of those DT370 hubs blow already, bummer DT couldn't make a better mass market hub given their uber mensch engineering prowess. YMMV.
  • 2 0
 @trygvesande: Appreciate it, and yeah, you might be right about me not being able to see my own inadequacy because I have inherent biases against Rocky. They treated some friends of mine who worked for them really poorly in the time just before the rebranding. You're right, I'm writing them off. Lets see what happens in six months.
  • 1 1
 @mammal: You're right about my Slayer comment, I didn't look at the geometries closely enough. However, when you compare the 2018 Altitude numbers with the new 2021, there are a lot of similarities, especially if you change the sizing (2018 XL compared to 2021 L and extrapolate that to a new XL size). The numbers don't exactly line up (mostly due to the inclusion of 29" wheels, and a longer fork), and yes, there are some cosmetic differences between the two frames, but it seriously looks like Rocky is trying to get everyone hot and bothered over an image refresh, and not an entirely redesigned bike.
  • 2 0
 @adamszymkowicz: Cabon molds can't be modified very easily, unless it's an extremely minor revision (usually a very slight increase in the outer envelope of the part, or enlarging a fastener hole). Be sure that these are brand new molds that they've dedicated to the new models.
Again, you can say what you like about whether they should have revised their designs more, but they are definitely completely new bikes.
  • 7 0
 While we're just making things up, I've heard they're just gluing together broken hockey sticks and they're using poutine gravy as damping fluid. Really though, would it have been that hard just to google a picture of a 2017 Slayer and realize that it is a completely different bike. This comment isn't just ridiculous, it's ridiculously lazy.
  • 6 1
 @adamszymkowicz: I am sorry about your friends, but your analysis of their business and bike design was just stupid.
  • 2 4
 @trygvesande: Maybe so. But their bikes are cheaply produced garbage now too.
  • 2 0
 @adamszymkowicz: I don't think think you fully understand how credibility works. You normally lead with the reasonable sounding opinion first.
  • 2 0
 That brake adapter looks like its made to be used with Flat mount brake calipers. Is flat mount the future of mtb brake mounting?
  • 2 0
 I loved the old playful altitude. Who cares about winning races? A recent poll on this site said nobody.
But they still have the thunderbolt so that's cool I guess.
  • 2 0
 Does the regular (non-BC) Instinct stay in the range in the trail-AM segment ?
  • 3 0
 @Mike Steep setup (higher BB) would be useful for a mullet setup, tho.
  • 1 0
 @shredjekyll: lol 'large' (small by today's standards) framed 26" bike weighs less than massive length 29" monster of a bike. LOL!
  • 2 1
 thought this was the XC year, what's up with all the enduros coming out these days? get with the program!!
  • 2 0
 C90 rally’s looks sweet, Shame UK don’t get that option
  • 2 2
 No mountains enough tall there.
  • 2 0
 @frix182: very true
  • 2 0
 Does the alloy version also have adjustable chainstays?
  • 1 0
 I don't think that Mike Kazimer is a fan of ASMR, judging from this review and the Gnarvana review
  • 4 3
 why are these bikes so expensive!? only thing these crooks seem to update is their increased price tag every year.
  • 2 0
 Exactly! WTF?
  • 2 0
 Nice big scratch on that XTR caliper already.
  • 7 0
 Rocks are sharp.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: damn straight. Keep pushing it!
  • 2 0
 Looks like an old Nomad? (geo and all)
  • 2 0
 Anyone else feel like the builds and pricing absolutely suck on this bike?
  • 1 0
 Looks like they maybe did away with the worlds creakiest shock bolt situation.
  • 1 0
 So what is the trick to silence the Shimano brake pads??? Wife bought a new bike and it is driving her crazy.
  • 3 2
 Only just got my slayer ffs
  • 26 0
 It hasn’t got shit overnight btw
  • 11 3
 Id still chose the slayer over this. This is a bit of a fail if you ask me.
  • 4 0
 Just bought a Slayer 2 months ago, still loving it! Pretty sure you can race on a Slayer too
  • 5 0
 Melamed won the kicking horse DH on a slayer... I'd say you'll be fine
  • 1 0
 @wellbastardfast sell it to me for 500 pounds, I think that's fair price for a worthless bike
  • 2 0
 Looking good!
  • 1 0
 Send me the bike mike and I’ll do the long term test!
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Norco Sight. Doesn't look like a Trek.
  • 1 0
 Still can't buy it because I live in Appalacia...
  • 1 0
 Nice BIKE ,how about the bb height with the sag ?thanks
  • 1 0
 My 2018 Altitude is set-up 180/170....so rocky is behind the times here Smile
  • 2 0
 10k is a laugh
  • 1 0
 Do the aluminum models have the removable frame shock mount?
  • 1 0
 I love it! I definitely want one
  • 1 0
 looks awesome
  • 1 0
 SOOO LIGHT!
  • 3 1
 No joke. Just picked up a C70 today and it's spot on 30 pounds stock.
  • 1 0
 lol my 2012 large slayer is under 30lbs
  • 1 0
 Looks like a v2 Bronson
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2020. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.037136
Mobile Version of Website