First Ride: Rocky Mountain Maiden

Aug 6, 2015
by Mike Kazimer  



The last few seasons saw Rocky Mountain's downhill bike, the Flatline, take a backseat to their all-mountain and trail offerings, but sightings of various prototypes everywhere from the Red Bull Rampage to the World Cup circuit made it clear that a new bike was on the way, although it was anybody's guess as to when it would make it to market. After nearly four years of development, the speculation can finally be put to rest, and the Maiden will officially be rolling into shops by early October.

The new bike is a full carbon fiber affair, with 200mm of rear travel delivered by a mega-sized version of Rocky's Smoothlink suspension. 27.5” wheels are spec'd on the complete build kits, but 26” wheels haven't been put out to pasture just yet. There are two rear wheel positions, and with the addition of a custom lower head tube spacer the geometry can be corrected so that no matter what size wheels are used the ride feel is nearly identical. A four position chip also allows for further geometry adjustment for both wheel sizes. Depending on the chip's orientation, with 27.5” wheels the head angle can be set from 63º to 63.8º.

Details
• Intended use: downhill
• Travel: 200mm
• Full carbon frame
• 425mm chainstays
• 27.5" or 26" wheels
• 12 x 157mm rear spacing
• PressFit BB107 bottom bracket
• Sizes S, M, L, XL
• Weight: N/A
• Price: $4499 - $10499 USD


There will be four complete bikes offered: the Maiden Unlimited, World Cup, Pro, and Park as well as a frame only option, all in sizes S, M, L and XL. Pricing ranges from $10,499 USD for the no-expenses-spared Maiden Unlimited to $4499 for the Maiden Park. The frame with a BOS Stoy RaRe shock goes for $3999.

Rocky Mountain Maiden 2016
Massive bearings and an equally stout looking link arm show that the carbon Maiden means business.

Frame Design

The Maiden's frame is completely made from carbon fiber, including the chain stay and linkage, areas that often see aluminum used due to additional cost and complexity that can arise from this design choice. Rocky calls their carbon construction “Smoothwall,” which refers to the company's use of a rigid mold rather than a bladder during the layup process to ensure that the frame's shape is consistent both inside and out.

During the bike's development process a number of prototypes were built up that relied on bushings, but due to the larger size of the pivots there was too much stiction to make them a feasible option. Rocky decided to go with bearings, but not just any bearings – the Maiden uses Enduro MAX bearings that are the same dimensions as what are used for a BB30 bottom bracket, which means they should be readily available when the time comes to replace them. A supersized version of Rocky's Pipelock expanding collet system is used to hold everything securely in place.

Rocky Mountain Maiden launch 2016
A finned guard keeps mud from getting flung off the rear wheel and onto the shock.
Rocky Mountain Maiden 2016
There's even room for a Di2 battery to be hidden away inside the Maiden's downtube.

The return of internal cable routing doesn't show any signs of abating, and the Maiden is no exception, with the brake and derailleur housing entering at the head tube and exiting through a port in the top of the downtube. That port can also accept a Shimano Di2 battery, which acts as a bit of future proofing should electronic shifting start to spread to the downhill world.

A plastic downtube protector helps to keep the frame safe from rock strikes, and a molded chainstay protector keeps the chain slap noise to a minimum. There's also a guard that fits into the v-shaped cutout where the seat tube splits around the rear shock to keep the shock from getting coated in mud and grit.

Rocky Mountain Maiden 2016
The Maiden uses a version of Rocky Mountain's Smoothlink suspension design.

Suspension

Rocky Mountain stuck with their Smoothlink suspension design for the Maiden, a layout that sees the rear pivot positioned in front of and ever-so-slightly above the rear axle. The design has been configured specifically for the demands of downhill riding, with a progressive stroke that's intended to split the difference between a more linear layout and one that ramps up very quickly. The rear wheel has a nearly vertical axle path, with only 26 millimeters of chainstay growth as the bike goes through its travel.

Except for the base model Maiden Park, all of the bikes use BOS suspension products, a spec choice that stands out in the sea of RockShox and FOX equipped downhill bikes that are currently on the market. According to Rocky, the decision to go with the French brand rather than one of the bigger players was partially due to the feedback from Vancouver area racers and shops who had been impressed with construction quality and on-trail feel of the company's products.


Geometry

In certain circles, particularly on the internet, the topic of downhill bike chainstay length is as rife with controversy as religion or politics. Of course, armchair engineering doesn't compare to real world experimentation, and Rocky tested out a number of chainstay lengths during the Maiden's four year development period before settling on a relatively short 425mm length. There are several geometry adjustments that are possible on the Maiden, but that number remains consistent no matter what wheelsize is used.

On the topic of wheel size, the Maiden was designed with 27.5” wheels in mind, but measures have been taken to ensure that the bike can accept 26” wheels as well while maintaining the same BB height and trail measurements. There are two rear wheel positions, and a spacer that mounts on the underside of the head tube to correct the geometry for smaller wheels. These two adjustments allow the bike's angles to remain nearly identical, preserving the handling characteristics that Rocky worked hard to achieve.

Along with being able to set the bike up for different wheel sizes, the lower shock bolt runs through a square chip that can be rotated into four different positions, which allows the head angle to be changed in 1/4 degree increments from 63° – 63.8° degrees. Unlike Rocky's Ride 9 chip system that's found on a number of their enduro and XC bikes, changing the chip's orientation doesn't have an affect on the feel of the shock – it only alters the geometry, not the spring rate.


Rocky Mountain 2016
A spacer mounted to the bottom of the head tube corrects the Maiden's geometry to accommodate 26" wheels.


Rocky Mountain 2016
The two brake caliper and rear wheel axle positions depend on the wheel size that a rider chooses.
Rocky Mountain 2016





Rocky Mountain chose Retallack Lodge as the setting for the launch of the Maiden, a mountain bike paradise that's tucked away deep in British Columbia's Selkirk Mountains. Thanks to multiple van shuttles and a helicopter ride we were able to rack up over 20,000 vertical feet of descending over the course of a few days on a selection of incredible trails peppered with berms, jumps, roots and rocks, which provided plenty of chances to get accustomed to the Maiden's handling characteristics.

It took a few laps to find the sweet spot in regards to suspension setup, but that's to be expected considering the BOS suspension's level of adjustability. The Maiden World Cup I was riding comes with the BOS Stoy Rare shock and Idylle Rare fork, both of which have independently adjustable low speed and high speed compression along with rebound damping. Making those adjustments requires the use of tools, and even accessing the fork's rebound requires a flathead screwdriver. The good news is that the adjustments are effective – those knobs aren't just there for looks, and a few clicks in either direction makes a noticeable difference on the trail. I did notice a rattling from the front fork during repeated quick hits – I'd venture to guess it was related to the negative spring, but more time with the fork would be required to fully figure it out.

After a few tweaks to the suspension, the Maiden's true colors began to show through, and I felt more and more comfortable staying off the brakes and letting it run. The bike's handling when diving into berms was what impressed me the most – the short chain stays made it easy to quickly snap in and out of corners, but there was still loads of stability on tap to keep the bike locked securely into the turn. The Maiden feels extremely solid, which helps keep it on course even when stumps and holes are trying to direct it off line.


Rocky Mountain 2016
The carbon Maiden in its natural habitat.

As easy as it was to corner and perform quick direction changes, the Maiden has a ground hugging feel, and I found myself more likely to carve or manual from one side of the trail to another rather than jumping. When I did take flight the bike felt well balanced and predictable, but a little more 'oomph' was required to get airborne than I'd expected.

It'd be easy to take a cursory glance at the Maiden's geometry numbers and categorize it as a park bike rather than a race machine, but those numbers don't tell the whole story – there's a good amount of raw speed begging to be unleashed under that blue paint job, and the bike felt best when ridden aggressively, heels down and fingers off the brakes. Even with 200mm of travel between myself and the ground I never felt like I was disconnected from the terrain that I was rolling over. It's not an overly plush ride, but it's also not harsh either, striking a balance that makes for a very enjoyable experience, transmitting just enough feedback to really feel in tune with the trail.

So who is the Maiden for? A downhill rider who spends a good chunk of time in the bike park but still occasionally finds themselves racing the clock would be a prime candidate. It's a bike that's just as fun on machine built trails as it is on the more raw, chopped up terrain, and it doesn't balk when pushed hard into corners or through rock gardens. It's much too soon to announce a verdict on durability, but if the bearings end up being as reliable as Rocky claims, this could be one formidable workhorse of a bike.





Visit the high-res gallery for more images.




www.bikes.com


335 Comments

  • + 509
 Is it Maiden Taiwan?
  • + 9
 haha
  • + 177
 They should make an iron version
  • - 10
flag sebas241freerider (Aug 6, 2015 at 7:32) (Below Threshold)
 Quick ! give me a list of mountain bikes made in Taiwan no giant please , I am moving over there in 3 Weeks
  • - 42
flag vhdh666 (Aug 6, 2015 at 7:32) (Below Threshold)
 you mean "iron Taiwan"? LOL
  • + 33
 Maiden Japan is one of my favorite albums.
  • + 10
 This should provide an enjoyable Maiden Voyage down Highland!
  • - 12
flag PedalShopLLC (Aug 6, 2015 at 9:24) (Below Threshold)
 Maiden Taiwan ---- ha ha ha ha good one.
  • + 10
 @Acorn22 You're a trooper.
  • - 15
flag caste1200 (Aug 6, 2015 at 14:19) (Below Threshold)
 why my "looks like a session" comment got deleted?
  • + 11
 hmmmmm, Did you mention Hillary Clinton in your comment?
  • + 35
 Clever move from Rocky Mountain to release a brand new DH bike that still can be used with 26'' wheels instead of going full 27,5'' ,big props for this company not forgetting the people that ride 26'' wheels.
  • + 8
 All the full bikes come with 27.5", & the frame only option is $4k. I'm curious how big the market of people who want to stick with 26", but have $4k for a new frame actually is. Not saying there aren't any, I know one(except he only buys Specialized) but I'm not sure that's a huge group of people.
  • - 14
flag jmbrit (Aug 6, 2015 at 15:42) (Below Threshold)
 So a manufacturer wants me to pay the best part of £7k for a bike that's done NOTHING to deserve it?

I'm getting that right, right? At least spesh, trek, sc etc have some damn dh pedigree. FFS these companies all take the piss now, since one got away with it they all think they can, unacceptable.

Good luck with the sales figures
  • + 14
 Brett tippie rides this bike, so if that doesn't make you want to own idk what will.
  • + 5
 My first thought after opening the page, "damn that bike looks sexy!" Super rugged looking. Difference in opinion ain't a bad thing though
  • + 1
 Pressfit = durability FAIL !!!
  • + 2
 The bike is rampage proven dumbass thats good enough proof for me!!!
  • + 3
 @jmbrit Are you saying you don't like it because a WCDH winning rear end has never graced its saddle? Are you one of those people who buys what ever bike was ridden to the most podiums every year? Let me guess, you ride without a chain now.
How's that kool aid taste?
  • - 1
 @taletotell no that's not what I'm saying at all and the last time I ran chain less was in seeding runs in dragon DH in the last decade, look it up, that's what the format was a-hole before you say some dumbass shit. What I'm saying is pretty obvious, when was the last bike they put out that was a dh race sled that was any good or proven? Exactly. Hey let's charge what trek and Spesh charge just because we can. Don't forget to swallow when they let go in ya mouth boy. And wtf is Kool aid bro? (God I hope you get I'm joking with the American bro reference, I'd hi 5 you if I could to make you feel stoked) Sounds very USA to me, and very very gay. I bet you don't buy this bike. How's that taste?
  • - 1
 @NWuntilirest actually that's enough of a reason to keep me off it ! But seriously you'd buy a bike because somebody rode it? Hahahaa. Ok you moronic down voters, seriously grow a pair. I'll be looking for this rad bike on your profiles will I? Thought not. And I won't be seeing it on a podium at regional, national or WC either.
  • + 3
 the kool aid is reference to this: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonestown The abbreviated version is this: mindless followers drank poisoned kool aid (juice) in an act of over enthusiastic fanaticism because they so believed the words of their leader.
Also I am well aware of chainless races. I refer to copying gwin's recent big dh win with no chain. If you want a bike based on whether it takes podiums then maybe you would be better off without a chain like him... Do you get it now? If not I am likely wasting my time trying to explain it to you.

As for my response to your initial response, If you don't understand what I was saying you may just be less than clever, but let me try again.

You are saying a bike has to win something to prove it is worth the big bucks. You may need to research how economics works. The entire racing format is built around marketing, so when you let the podiums influence your opinions you are doing a good job of supporting the sport. kudos. That being said, there is more to a bike than whether it can win races. I ride a remedy. A remedy just won some serious enduro wc races, but that doesn't mean my money was suddenly better spent. Instead it is important that my bike works for my style and is reliable. I am not about to take podiums (or even really try) so I can't see that influencing my choice of bike, but even if it did it would just prove i'm an idiot since i am a different rider than the guy who won that race in ireland, and I ride in different conditions.
Consider that when you buy a bike and you will be happier with the purchase. You may find that after all the hype induced fog has cleared you like a santa cruz bullit with a marz 66 fork and a manitou metel shock on some 2.5 minnions, even though it weighs 40lbs and has never even tried for a podium.
  • + 2
 Good ol' Jim Jones.... I was young when that happened but I still remember how I didn't understand why anyone would do that, let alone around 900 people. network TV did a mini special about that event -- people are so dumb, still can't believe would put themselves through that, just like the who Waco TX thing which wasn't a suicide but similar in relation to the members being brainwashed : en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waco_siege
  • + 1
 Well, dumping threes is easier than ever on my r-dog ticket, and tippie is a LEGEND
  • + 2
 @PedalShopLLC Everybody seems to be taken in by something or the other, it's a natural human trait based on several ways in which our brain works. Look up the Gambler's fallacy for one example, but there are others, for instance we're predisposed to stay with a bad situation once we're in it, because we want to prove ourselves right for choosing that situation. I'm sure I could find you somebody who's a skeptic in most ways, but believes that $300 oxygen free network cable make their MP3s sound better.
  • + 3
 In the case of Jonestown it looks like many may have been forced to drink at gun point, which is a would you rather game in itself.
  • + 338
 4 years and it still looks like a session?
  • + 135
 and there it is!!!!!lol
  • + 176
 As soon as I saw the bike I came looking for this.
  • + 45
 Kind of resembles an Ellsworth to me....
  • + 84
 @Yippee-Ki-YayMF Them are fightin' words where I come from...For example, yo momma so ugly they call her Ellsworth.
  • - 38
flag stefanfresh (Aug 6, 2015 at 6:47) (Below Threshold)
 more like 4 years and it looks like crap, and as always lately, prices are just crazy
  • + 11
 @stefanfresh, not lately. There have always been $10,000 bikes. It's nothing new.
  • + 3
 @jwillsaylor same here hahahaha
  • - 12
flag yoshiro (Aug 6, 2015 at 6:57) (Below Threshold)
 Looks like Session is going to have a Maiden Voyage after being rolled 4 years . . . Pardon the pun, I'm bad at doing it.
  • + 13
 4 years in and they said f*ck it let's just copy the session Big Grin
  • + 20
 In all seriousness, it looks like a Norco to me
  • + 2
 It looks like every other dh bike out there. The nsmb article is pretty hilarious because they mention how it is rocky mountain's unique take on a dh bike a few times... at least some people don't sound like they've been pocketed.
  • + 9
 @ka-brap $4k for a frame, tho.... just doing a few google searches, that mo' money than a demo, wilson, or a v-10...
  • + 0
 Or maybe looks like Radon Slide?
  • + 1
 With BOS suspension though
  • + 9
 @groghunter, definitely not a cheap frame you're right. Could be better off buying the $4,499 base model and selling the parts you don't need.
  • + 3
 @ka-brap definitely, since it doesn't come with a garb rear shock in "Park" trim: vector RC ain't bad at all. www.bikes.com/en/bikes/maiden/2016#/models/maiden-park
  • + 2
 I did lie slightly though: carbon Demo 8 frame only is $4.5freakingK. specialized.com/us/en/bikes/mountain/demo/sworks-demo-8-frame.

That said, they only sell the S-works, which uses a different grade of carbon than the base carbon full bike. Not sure it directly compares. & they offer an aluminum model with the TTX for $2900.
  • + 1
 Oh, & they have a far cheaper park bike as well, for that matter(no frame only option) www.specialized.com/us/en/bikes/mountain/status/status-ii
  • + 14
 With all due respect, I wonder how many times a statistical designer has to hear "looks like a session" until he decides to kick his boss in the face and draws something more original...
  • + 5
 why do you think it has the paint job of a pair of bermuda shorts from the 70s? XD
  • + 2
 Here is a thought for you , maybe lot's bikes look like a session because 4 bar is a great design , and one day , if manufactures are honest all bikes will look the same because there is one one optimum design and not many like we see today
  • + 2
 Personal preference, riding style and different terrain, there's no design that can possibly fit every part of those 3 factors.
  • + 1
 No I'm no Protour, but the chainstays do seem too short for a race bike. I'm slow enough as it is, and I can use all the help I can get when it comes to high speed stability and feeling "in" the bike.
  • + 1
 @bigburd I agree that things look alike becuase they're good, a la 'session', but I'm not sure we are that close to optimum, like finnrambo said there are so many factors, not least of which that every different 'engine' you put on a bike has different weight distribution, different torque, different rpm, different timings and to top it off, is constantly moving about. It's a pretty full on equation they are looking for especially, like waki sorta said, if you've got marketing and other folk in your ear.
  • + 1
 I'm glad someone said it!
  • + 9
 My first thought was that it looked like an aurum.
  • + 1
 That's what I was thinking also
  • + 117
 looks fantastic ! I ´m so glad they gave us an option between 26 and 27,5 wheels!
  • + 15
 "Price: $4499 - $10499 USD - A downhill rider who spends a good chunk of time in the bike park but still occasionally finds themselves racing the clock would be a prime candidate ". That selected group of riders are very lucky to have this machine for that price.
  • + 4
 That's probably the majority of bike park riders- "I mainly ride for fun, but I occasionally race". Also, at $4,499 every bike brand has a downhill bike for that price so how is that a problem unique to Rocky Mountain?
  • + 36
 Bike this days should be more like this ....FULL OF OPTIONS...and not setting new standards.. in short...option should be the NEW standard.
  • + 6
 @metong you are absolutely right !
  • - 15
flag MTBCAM (Aug 6, 2015 at 6:46) (Below Threshold)
 I love that Rocky knows 26" isnt dead...but this thing is...ugly as shit.
  • + 15
 Yes totally agree with company's releasing DH/Park bikes that you can run both 26 and 27.5! Really leaves options for those people who may have a boatload of 26 parts(mostly wheels) but who may eventually want to change up to the 27.5 game with out buying a whole new frame
  • + 0
 De Bogotá? Huy que frío. :s
  • + 10
 Bugs the fuck out of me that I have to look at this bike in usd from within my own country. Canadians should get a special price just like the maricons get on their cars
  • - 20
flag MTBCAM (Aug 6, 2015 at 8:30) (Below Threshold)
 And what does that have to do with this bike? Pretty stupid and pointless comment @wolf-amongst-lambs
  • + 17
 @MTBCAM, because it's a Canadian bike that we pay for in Canadian dollars, but if prices are in US dollars, we get bent over by the exchange rate. $4,499USD is equivalent to $5,920CAD at today's exchange rate. Lowest exchange since about 2004, further pushes this bike into unaffordable territory for most...
  • + 5
 I was going to hold out for Rocky's Slayer replacement, but I just got a deal on an Enduro and this thing reinforces that decision because it's ugly and expensive. I would rather see an aluminum frame and better spec for the lower end models, pretty poor value for $6k CAD.
  • + 4
 @scotteh I get it man, I do...So go buy a YT like everyone else is (like me in a couple seasons). Because you can have a tues and a capra completely spec'd out and have money left over for the price of one of these maiden unlimited. I used to be a rocky fanboy, I had a Flatline for a couple years, but 10k+ for a downhill bike is ridiculous. I'll sit back and continue to watch YT's fly out of the warehouse like hotcakes.
  • + 7
 @MTBCAM You'd be surprised how expensive YT gets in Canada...because the distribution is in US. With the exchange rate and import fees, they're not really much less expensive than anything else up here.
  • - 1
 Maybe the new Glory is a better option then? Arent they distributed cheaper in canada?
  • + 3
 My point is this bike is ugly AF and way too damn expensive. Hell I can get a brand new 2015 devinci wilson carbon with a fox 40 and saint everything from my local dealer for $6000-$7000...
  • + 1
 Yep I think the Giant comes cheaper than YT here, or pretty close at least. It's been a while since I looked, but the exchange rates only got worse since, so I guess it's cheaper indeed. But then, price is one thing, #1 should always be how the bike feels, for me at least, testing the bike and enjoying it is the first consideration, then comes price..
  • - 2
 Even better....http://www.go-ride.com/product/devinci-wilson-carbon-w-saint-fox-40-k-air-3449.htm
  • + 1
 @MrDuck Youre right man, but I dont care how amazing the bike feels...no one should have to fork over 10k for one IMO.
  • + 9
 Well yeah, it's a ****ton of money for a bike. But in my opinion, if that's your one hobby, got no family or even a girlfriend, and a $400 car that just barely gets you around, and want the best of the best that's around, why not just get it. It doesn't mean the price isn't stupid, it's ridiculous, but if it makes you happy, why not? I don't have the smallest regret about buying my Demo. I probably won't spend that much on a bike ever again, but it's a dream come true, and even though I'm broke for at least the rest of the year 'cos I spent all my savings, I have got one to love now Smile
  • + 24
 Please invade the US. And bring your health care system with you. And syrup. And beer.
  • + 0
 @MrDuck Youre lucky man, I have two kids to pay for and I'm lucky to have my 2011 Glory 0 and my yeti SB66. Maybe someday I'll be able to drop 6k+ on a DH bike.
  • + 2
 I'm not sure why or how, but Giant in Canada for Canadian customers is quite a bit less than Giant USA prices for Americans
  • + 2
 @codypup I just barely made it to Canada man, no intentions to move on anytime soon! Could've brought some lager from Czech though..

@MTBCAM Define lucky! I may have a dream bike, but I'm forever alone..apparently an S-Works doesn't work for picking up girls too well. Or it's just me, I suppose. Also, I'm jealous of your Yeti, my enduro bike is 8 years old and way too small for me :-/
  • + 2
 @MrDuck Try being alone AND having two kids to support hahaha! Unfortunately for me my bikes dont pick up too many chicks either...And the first one left because of the bikes haha
  • + 2
 @MTBCAM You win this one! At least you got company though, I hope a good one in your kids! Otherwise just come up here and let's get wasted 'cos world sucks Big Grin
  • + 0
 @MrDuck I am planning a whistler trip next season actually haha, and if it werent for the kids I'd probably move to Canada anyways!
  • + 4
 I love reading comments about different prices in different countries. Even just writing that down makes me smile. Buy a coffee/banana/beer in London and do the same in Bangladesh. Then tell me your story about the price in your country, while I play my violin Smile
  • - 1
 With what the price turns out to be in Canada with the exchange rate that you worked out for the low spec maiden , you can buy a trek session 8 park for cheaper.. And it probably rides way better
  • + 1
 You can't compare a trek session park to the maiden due to one being carbon and one not. The only equivalent frame from trek is the session 9.9. I see it as the park model is something you can upgrade over time as the frame is the same as the top model.
  • + 76
 i like mountain bikes
  • + 1
 What's the point? If your buying a new bike it's going to come with wheels so who's actually going to be retrofitting 26's when they already have 650b? Looks sick non the less always been a fan of Rocky Mountain they've just always been to expensive in the UK.
  • + 2
 i see is as giving options, for example on a wide open rough track 650b would be the choice but maybe on a slower technical track a 26" would be better due to the slightly faster turning, also people who like to jump and trick DH bikes may prefer the smaller wheels.
  • + 48
 should build one in Iron for publicity
  • - 28
flag SmashedFungi (Aug 6, 2015 at 4:57) (Below Threshold)
 Hell yeah Iron bikes, welcome back 1820 Big Grin
  • + 43
 Maan you missed the joke he was refering to a popular brithish metal band called judas priest that are famous for riding an iron harley davidson into stage at their concerts.
  • + 11
 The band reference is to IRON MAIDEN. Not sure how two people missed that one.

www.snappypixels.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/stupid-yet-funny-fail-pictures-1.jpg
  • + 10
 Oh my god. Im sorry haha I knew the name came from Iron Maiden, but i thought he meant because of the price of carbon bikes
  • + 14
 @aoneal oh my god stop embarrassing yourself he was making a reference to the orchestral ensemble Maidens of the Celtic harp, made famous because of the use of an iron harp.
  • + 38
 OK, correct me if I'm wrong...
4 years of development and the end game is very nice looking bike that can come to a insane 10,500$ price tag, which turned out to be neither the race machine nor the bike park shredder?
Costs more than carbon S-Works Demo 8, but it seems to be not so "speed encouraging", fast and stable and on the other hand rider it's not as fun a nimble as Session Park, Kona Operator etc.?
Don\t get me wrong, it looks dope, but am I the only one who gets the impression that it's just a "good downhill rig" and nothing more?
  • - 3
 There are several version and the cheap one comes at $4499
  • + 1
 Pretty sure RM can price it this way because they don't except big sales in this market, compared to Kona, Trek or Specialized where gravity plays still big part on sales. I know i know RM has superstars on team, and they were n1 FR company, but they know, this is not going to happen again (no hate here, but there is just too many choices now and market changed a lot too).

Just my 2 cents Wink
  • + 16
 I'd say I see you point, however it's a bit early to tell. These are only first ride impressions and as pointed out in the article, numbers are not everything. Besides, Rocky doesn't race the WC this bike seems made for their guys, who ride big mountain and I'm willing to bet it's very good at that and an overall fantastic downhill bike.
  • - 9
flag olaffons (Aug 6, 2015 at 5:21) (Below Threshold)
 Darkstar- I think that it's NOT TOO EARLY TO TELL. I'm not judging the bike from the numbers, geo etc.

Exact quote from the article: "As easy as it was to corner and perform quick direction changes, the Maiden has a ground hugging feel, and I found myself more likely to carve or manual from one side of the trail to another rather than jumping. When I did take flight the bike felt well balanced and predictable, but a little more 'oomph' was required to get airborne than I'd expected. " I think it tells U everything about the bike which turned out to be less fun than Mike expected. And I'm pretty sure that Mike didn't presume that Maiden is a straight racing machine.
  • + 14
 This is one rider's impression.... and he never said it wasn't fun man. I'm just saying, never be quick to dismiss over a review, let alone over a first ride type review where the rider barely gets acclimated.
  • + 1
 True, on that we agree. Smile
  • + 3
 But can someone explain why the most expensive bike costs that huge amount of money? sure carbon and bos is expensive but what the hell does it come with drugs in the top tube or your sister? (its a joke if you didn't got it)
  • + 4
 The geometry reads off pretty good for going fast and that's what I don't get about the rest of the article. Head angle and reach is within reason, bb height is about 350mm (13.7" or there abouts) which I would say is about right.
Chainstay length is not bad, it works out feeling longer than that of the latest demo(430mm) because of the axle path. They also went for big bearings, so they will last a long time compared to other bikes.
I think Rocky mountain have got a lot of things right on this bike, much more than they're being given credit for.
  • + 3
 I like that they used bb bearings which makes them a cinch to get. I agree @EuanBisset145 they killed it.
  • + 4
 @AMGoran - Bikes are simply that expensive when running top of the line parts. Pretty much all of the major brands have high end models priced pretty similarly. Drop the expensive carbon rims and a level or two off the fork / shock spec and the price drops quickly. I would suggest that RM has a pretty reasonable cost spread here, especially considering all models have the carbon frame. I'm confused why everyone is so surprised by the cost of super high-end products. It's not dissimilar to high end cars, houses, leisure equipment etc... - why should bikes be any different? If the consumer doesn't like it, then they will buy a lower end model, pure and simple.
  • + 0
 @ldhbaker congratulations you've just waisted your time writing that because you actually don't have the answer to my question just the answer for your own which i don't really care about Smile
  • + 2
 @AMGoran - I'll be the judge of when I waste my time, thank you very much.
  • + 3
 So i was down-voted, because I stated there is a cheaper version WITH NICE SPEC and CARBON frame?! WTF guys.

Those who do not care only about racing, because downhill is not only about racing against the clock you can check this review of the bike - dirtmountainbike.com/longform/2016-rocky-mountain-maiden-downhill-bike#JqIWxde8cFbVyq15.97

@ldhbaker good answer, I don't get what is wrong with it. Smile
  • + 34
 I... just cant resist anymore......2008 called, they want their rocker arm back
  • + 21
 That would be Kona on the phone...
  • + 6
 Or Ellsworth...
  • + 6
 Kona and Ellsworth are single pivot. The End.
  • + 24
 "After nearly four years of development, we’re proud to launch the Maiden. With the freedom to design on an extended schedule, it represents the cutting edge of our technology."

= marketing speak for "We almost had it finished when the 650B wave crashed over us and forced a redesign."
  • + 2
 If you look at the development cycle you will see that it wasn't started until 650b came out. Rocky was one of the earliest adopters 650b with their current altitude. Which came out in 2013.
  • + 1
 I bet if they'd started the design two years later there would be no 26 compatibility. Would have been a shame, though.
  • + 2
 We'll never know, but two wheel size options is a winner. It's a vote for sanity in my book. And since this is a dh bike, it's also a hint that the best wheel size for dh is still undecided. I suspect (read: hope) it will stay that way. Who would argue with that? You can have this bike in both wheel sizes, brilliant. Really I think more of this should be going on with trail and enduro bikes but hey, what do I know. To me that'd be superb, a 27.5 bike that can be made into a 26 in minutes by swapping wheels and a couple of other bits. Yeah maybe the forks need different rake/trail thingy, but in that case the fork companies need to sort out rake chips for the forks. Coz who wants a set of wheels and some forks hanging about? Might as well get another bike at that point.
  • - 2
 I think is actually silly to me to have both wheel sizes. Bike comes with 27.5 are you telling me people are going to go out of their way to put a smaller wheel size on it? All of the new tires/wheels coming out are 27.5. So you're going to buy a brand new flashy dh bike and put non current wheels on it? 35mm bar stem, cinch crankset, all kinds of other stuff that is bleeding edge. But we give someone the option to do something stupid with it. All it does is appease those who won't be buying it anyways.
  • + 4
 Not sure what you mean but are you telling me there aren't going to be people who would want a 26park bike that can become a 650b race bike in ten minutes? (Or have you swallowed the idea that 27.5 is magically 'faster' but doesn't feel any different?) Maybe I'm weird but that sounds good to me. Likewise something like a 160mm 27.5 bike that I can turn into a 140mm 26er in minutes. I've not had chance to get on 650b yet, maybe it's the wheel size to end all others, but logic tells me if it has an inherent advantage it carries the same disadvantage equally.
  • + 2
 You honestly think people are going to buy two wheelsets?
  • + 2
 Yeah. Not sure why an extra set of wheels is such a strange idea. I know people with two sets of the same size wheels. People buy 2,3,4,5+ bikes, two sets of wheels is nothing.
  • + 0
 Because it has no advantage other than 'to try it out'.

People buy multiple sets of wheels because they have a race day wheelset and a training wheel set or and adventure wheelset etc. Same size of tire to swap tubes/tires between. No one is going to spend 5.5k+ just to buy a set of old stock wheels.

The only likely circumstance I could see is that if you taco'd a wheel and you still own a 26" wheelset in the garage, that happens to be current enough to have a 157mm hub.
  • + 2
 Okay bud, whatever you say, sounds like you don't get what I'm on about. And you've got a bit of 650b koolaid round your mouth.
  • + 0
 Honesty couldn't care what wheel size you're on. Ride 20's for all I care, I'm still on 26. I'm just saying no one is going to utilize that feature. It just there to appease you people who aren't going to buy the bike anyways. Because change is scary. No chance am I going to spend $6k and then buy shittier wheels and tires just so I can be that cool guy who rocks small wheels. Should go and buy a 2006 big hit and run 24/26.
  • + 18
 So the difference between a 26" and 27.5 is a headset spacer? and a wee chip that could not make more than 5mm difference.
Are all the other companies telling us shit regarding frames only been 275.
  • + 6
 Pretty much. It apparently only takes a few tweaks to accommodate a slightly bigger wheel-size. Even big Spec uses the same front triangles as their 29er's on many of their rigs with small changes to the rear.
  • + 2
 I'm sure some entrepreneurial person will be onto it!
  • + 18
 i'd put an Eddie sticker somewhere on it, and it would be called: the CARBON MAIDEN!

(yeah. sorry 'bout dat)
  • + 2
 definitely Smile
  • + 12
 Anyone go on the website and take a look at the specs on some of the lower end models? They specced XT Brakes and Deore Brakes on the two lowest end models... why not Zee? The bikes are $5400 and $6700, there's no reason they can't be using downhill specific (four piston) brakes.
  • + 13
 Di2 on a dh bike, bit fancy
  • + 12
 Mmmmmmmmmmmmm.. Always wanted to ride a rocky mountain maiden,,, Oh look?... A bike! Big Grin
  • + 9
 PB, can you create two comment sections? You know for those who probably won't finish high school and for those that have? 'Cause for every good question or comment we've gotta wade through dozens like "Looks like a session", "will prob snap", "Is that an operator?", "That color makes it look likes is made out of cheap pool furniture.". At least they've self-selected themselves as life-long employees for McDonald's
  • + 5
 Do you realize which camp your comment squarely places you in?
  • - 1
 Captain snap.There are brilliant scientist that are great at thiere jobs but can't spell worth a dam. You are profiling and being judgmental.so you can feel good about your self.
  • + 7
 Funny how the race rig is 2x the price of the Park model… most racers I know can barely afford KD for dinner while majority of park rats I've met ride all summer on daddy's platinum card.
  • + 10
 I feel ya. I was on the lift with a guy, conversation goes
him: so what do you do
me: software stuff, work for a consulting company
him: you ride a lot
me: try to at least twice a month, you?
him: I am up here every weekend, all weekend. I have a condo up here (Winter Park)
me: what are you riding
him: ah, I just picked up one of the demo bikes from the park, I got a good deal on it
me: do you live up here
him: no, I have a house in Boulder (ridiculously overpriced city in Colorado IMO)

At this point, I was thinking he is one of the very young entrepreneurs at a tech startup in Boulder

me: what do you do, you have a tech startup?
him: oh no, I am in 10th grade, still in high school
me: I see, so when you say "I", you really mean "my parents", because you don't own crap

The rest of the lift ride was pretty quiet after that.
  • + 10
 So you are saying you wouldn't have liked that situation when you were in 10th grade? But you sure learned him good.
  • + 6
 Sure I would have. I was raised to be appreciative, not feeling entitled to my parents credit card and know the value of the dollar. Ya know, not incessantly sucking mom's tit.
  • + 13
 And all this has to do with what exactly?
  • + 2
 I had a similar texting conversation with a kid (didn't know till later). He was selling his dh bike and I was looking to trade my bike for his.I ask a bunch of questions about the bike and he gives answers that show he doest know much about bike tech. Not a huge deal. I ask what he did for work. He says construction. Me too that's cool. We decide to meet and he said he had a another house near where I live so we could meet and check each others bikes out. Sounds good, he must be pretty well off to have more than one house. I ask whens a good time for him to meet. He says his Dad doesn't want to drive him to swap bikes. LOL If you're a kid reading this, don't try to act older than you are. Its better off you tell the truth and people will respect it. After I learned he was 16 I lost all interest and respect. I think it great for kids to be involved in mtbing but cant stand when they try to act like they have adult lives. Just be a kid...
  • + 3
 Visit Aberdeen in Scotland Its full of OIL Mom$Dads with spoiled kids-teens attempting to ride 7K + bikes. But they look cool.
  • + 2
 @thegringo - the context must be a bit confusing in the fact that we are replying to the comment made just a few lines above this. That is how this site functions, FYI.
  • + 1
 AHHH cheers for pointing out how it works. Nothing like been put straight by a yank.
  • + 2
 meesterover:
I see that same shit every friggin weekend at Trestle. .....the "not mine, it's Daddy's dime" crew.
  • + 0
 @KK11, I was at Trestle ;-). I will be there again this weekend.
  • + 1
 Nice. I'm there every weekend. Sunday this weekend.
  • + 0
 No @meesterover no confusion, your talking shat, over something that you know bugger all about, this is a post about a bike, not slush funds. FACT
  • - 1
 move on @thegringo and find some English comprehension classes while you are at it. The fact is you do not understand how comments to a comment work and speak like a teenager.
  • + 1
 Don't
  • + 2
 @meesterover I'll bet you have a Facebook page, don't ya.
  • + 2
 No, I do not use Facebook, You do realize the irony in these comments right? We were on topic discussing the point made about the cost of the bike and only those privileged or well enough employed will be able to afford it. Now even that, you have completely derailed.
  • + 3
 My apologies for being a dick @meesterover, sincerely, it's just that we were talking about the Maiden, then slush funds. I felt you were attacking the well to do youths, over things that weren't in their control, which is'nt altogether fair. Sure, they have all the gear, and no idea, but so what. Just ride for the love of it, and to hell with the fortunate minority.
Anyway what are your initial thoughts on the carbon Maiden, if you don't mind me asking. I don't think you voiced an opinion on the actual thread at hand yet, just curious is all.
  • + 1
 @thegringo. Good for you for being a real man on this thread. Seriously. Forums need more people like you.
  • + 2
 No prob man, We are both being seriously stupid arguing on a web forum. About the bike, I just finished building a Jedi Canfield that I enjoy immensely. The bike looks pretty decent, but for me, I do not want a carbon DH bike. Only in the fact that these bikes cost too much money and I want something that is hopefully more durable. I have to ride a bike before I have an opinion on it. I have read several reviews that made the bike sound great, but in the real world, I just could not stand riding it. One that comes to mind are the Banshee bikes. I do not like how they handle under braking for whatever reason. Long story short, I want to demo or rent the bike before I commit to the purchase.
  • + 2
 I hear ya, I'd never pay that much for a bike even if I won the lotto, purely on principle. I've been fortunate enough to own 2 RM's over the years, one a Switch from years back, the other even older, a cross country rig, the names escapes at the minute, but it had stays like this, in fact the back end was similar in more ways than 1, albeit 100 ml travel if that. And I enjoyed them both immensely. Your right we can only speculate on second hand info, at best, the proof is in the pudding.
No hard feelings @meesterover .
  • + 1
 Nice Jedi by the way, I'm a fan of the parallel linkage design, makes for good pedalling, my nephews M3 peddles really well for a DH bike, and the parallel linkage and V.P.P aren't a million miles away from each other, pedalling wise.
  • + 8
 4000$ just for the frame and shock? Best you rethink your marketing strategy.
  • + 2
 Definitely steep, but that's with BOS shock, which are not exactly cheap. You can buy a complete Maiden for $4500, so a good part of that 4K is the shock
  • + 5
 I have to give Rocky Mountain credit. They could have easily pumped out a version of this bike much earlier but instead after reading this whole breakdown of the bike... It look as though they did their homework and got an A on the project. I like all the built in adjustability the bike has to offer, lots of room for really getting this bike dialed. I am glad that someone over their stopped wearing their ass as a hat and decided to go with easy to replace and service bearings as the the choice for the pivots. If anyone has had to swap all the bushings out on any of their newer bikes will know, its a pain in the ass... The only thing I am not a huge fan of is the BOS suspension choice.... the suspension systems to be getting some really high praise but I am more of a fan of service easability and parts being readily available. Luckily in Vancouver Suspension Werx is a Bos service center.
  • + 4
 I'm a huge Rocky fan since selling the line in the shop I worked at over 15 years ago, but I'm a bit disappointed in this release. I don't care that it looks similar to some other brands or models, but from the review it sounds like Rocky took the middle ground and tried to make a bike to work for everybody, instead of a bike that targets specifically racers or free riders. I guess that's safe for marketing and sales, so it makes sense, but I just wanted one of my favorite brands to have a kick-ass ride that everybody wants and respects.

The last few years of the Flatline, if you saw somebody with one, you instantly didn't give them credit and thought "rental", and didn't pay much attention. Not like you would with somebody you see in the lift line on a V10, Demo, or an Intense or something more "boutique".

I'd love to see Rocky return to the glory days when their bikes were the envy of everybody in the lifeline, or at least more respected. They have some killer talent riding for them, so I was just hoping for more. If I'm going to spend anywhere near $8000+ on a new sled, it would most likely be a smaller custom brand.

I suppose I need to ride one before making final judgement, but I think most everybody is going to like whatever they throw a leg over. It's not like you get off of anything and say "this sucks, I can't ride it."

With full carbon everything, I would expect it to be light, but there was no mention of weight or it feeling light. None of the previous Rockys were light, they've always been strong and overbuilt.
  • + 1
 I use to own a flatline pro and i would say you're right saying it was way from light but the new generation of all mountain / enduro bike like the altitude is pretty light. You can get one of these for around 3000$ and it weight under 30#. I can't say much for the maiden, i did not try it, but i am expecting it to be pretty light.

Most people are bashing it as it islooking like something else... what about the session after Dave Weagle end is contract with iron horse. I agree it is really similar but frame engineering go further than look and some angle tweeking and suspention adjustments like the ride9 system may change everything.

I am expecting it to BE A KICKASS DOWNHILL RACE BIKE, but as RM roots are in freestyle i guessed they wanted it to be suitable for this purpose also. Again you have to possibility to change to geometry depending on your riding style.

I won't pronounce myself on it though, there is many good bike and RM will have to proove themselves with this one.

Let's give it a try ... when are the test rides?
  • + 5
 Specialized puts a spacer on the bottom of the head tube to accommodate a different wheelsize and the PB community erupts, saying they are cheapening out and calls for their heads. Rocky Mountain does it and....
  • + 8
 Specialized did it as a time and cost savings, using an existing front triangle bring a 650b bike - one they say they didn't want to make, but were catering to consumer demand - to market.

RM did it to cater to Park/DHers that still use to 26" wheels.
  • + 8
 Looks like a Kona.
  • - 4
flag thegringo (Aug 6, 2015 at 8:26) (Below Threshold)
 Kona's are single pivot. The End.
  • - 1
 aaah.... This is a single pivot bike as well....
  • + 1
 It's not a single pivot frame at all, it's closer to FSR that it is Sessions, Stinky's and Afterburners. Look at the pics, THEN type.
  • + 5
 If I have a DH bike. I want it to be strong. This bike looks beefy. Plenty of options too. Well thought out Rocky Mountain. What took you so long!
  • + 3
 The died creativity!!! All brands use the same design, begin with a Iron Horse of Sam Hill, and Kona copied, Giant, Trek, Norco, Ellsworth, Ghost, NS bikes, Commencal, Identiti, Pivot and others... And now, Rock Mountain... Bored
  • + 3
 A decent answer from the Rocky Mountain Slayer SS and Maiden to the Trek models - Ticket S and Session.
As the owner of the Slayer SS'14 I can say that the Smooth suspension Link (C) with a stroke of 100 mm is works great, no buildup when pedaling, there is no tension on the chain while depreciation. Designed in the same way for years, so all time-tested and hard trials.
The geometry of the Maiden similar, so i suppose this is exactly great! Pipes, pens, links look strong. Wiring hidden in the frame, is very good and modern. Well RM, we look forward to its appearance in Russia!
  • + 3
 Dear Rocky Mountain,

I have owned two of your bikes, including my current Slayer which I love. However it is clear with your releases in the past few years that you have lost touch with me. I have no idea what you are doing design wise, and especially wonder who your crack dealer is when it comes to selling a park bike frame for $5000. That is what we in the business call friggin' insane monkeyballs.

It is no wonder that Rocky dealers in the US cannot gain traction.They try for a year because of your rep, but can't keep it together. They have to deal with odd design decisions, pricing that compares favourably with... nobody, and horrible sales reps. I have not rode much else than Rocky and Norco. So I know there is a difference. However if you can't put out A+ class bikes you are so done.

I know personally that I probably will never be able to afford another Rocky bike, so hopefully my slayer loves me long time. Hopefully, you guys right the ship over there, otherwise rest in peace.
  • + 4
 I'm stoked about this bike, I trust the intelligence behind everything that Rocky Mountain makes. Don't give a shit about reviews or comments just want to demo one! Well played with the wheel size options.
  • + 3
 All these naysayers...it has a similar suspension design to multiple other bikes, but the pivot locations and rocker angles change EVERYTHING. Thank you Rocky Mountain for continuing to make a true, 26" wheel mountain bike. I LOVE my Slayer 70 and cannot wait to feel the coil sprung longer travel version of this linkage. THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU.
  • + 7
 $10,500?! Woof.
  • + 6
 and you didn't made any conversion to CAD yet .... poor canadian customer we are Frown 13 800$ CAD lel.
  • + 1
 Believe me, you two are lucky men. If I buy the Maiden in America...........

currency conversion: 10500$ = 9653€
shipping costs + cargo insurance: about 500€
currency conversion fee (paypal charges 3%) = 304.59€
duty (3%) = 289.59€
VAT (21%) = 2027.13€
other costs (storage) = 10€

....... I would have to pay 12784.31€ = 13.906,5$, thats to say, an extra cost of around 3400 dollars.
And this shit happens all the time.
Oh wait, don't we live in a globalized world? isn't there the free movement of goods and services and all that crap?
I'm confused now.
  • + 4
 Oh man you live in Spain? Do me a favor and buy a damn Canyon! i wan't one so bad but we just can't here Frown
  • + 6
 Big shout out to expired patents!!
  • + 3
 And which ones are those??
  • - 6
flag jackalope (Aug 6, 2015 at 6:13) (Below Threshold)
 Being in Canadia, I don't think the Spesh FSR patent was ever applicable, so companies like Devinci, Knolly and RM could use a horst link design without having to pay for the "privilege". My assumption is they just couldn't directly sell bikes in the US if a given bike utilized a horst link design (e.g. Knolly's "4X4"system) - which is obviously no longer an issue now that the patent has expired.

In fact, I want to say Devinci had an old school Wilson which used a horst link in Canadia, but had a rate modified SP in the States...could be wrong on that tho.
  • + 10
 Smooth Link is not a Horst Link design. It is not and never was in violation of the old FSR patent. To have violated the old FSR patent the pivot would have to be on the chain stay (like it is), but also be located below the rear axle.
  • + 2
 @Iccomz - ha, right you are! I didn't look at closely and just assumed it was like the new carbon Demo. So yep, they could've pooped on Spesh even when their patent was in effect.
  • + 1
 Still essentially a Horst link copy though. Rocky had basically this suspension design as early as at least 2008 with the Altitude (ep1.pinkbike.org/p4pb2512604/p4pb2512604.jpg). My question would be, does it suffer from brake jack/pedaling forces? If it does, why not just use the Horst link?
  • + 8
 Big shot out to people who don't know what they're discussing... The horst-link patent was never valid anywhere except the USA BUT Rocky's Smoothlink design is not a horst-link, its an improvement on their previous ETS link patented design. They did away with the elevated links and ended up with nearly the same wheel path and drivetrain behaviour in a stronger and more conventional looking layout. Smoothlink debuted on the Altitude which replaced the ETS-X, then was carried over to the rest of the models as they came due for redesigns.
  • + 1
 Oh my mistake i guess, I thought having the rear axle on the end of the seat stay was a FSR patented idea.
  • + 1
 It was actually nicolai's idea but he was working for amp research at the time so horst leitner's name went on the patent application as the owner of the company, and they became known as horst links as a result. Horst also designed the original stumpjumper fsr for specialized under contract and used horst links on it and the rockhopper A1 mac-strut softtail design also. FSR btw stood for Front Suspension Rear, because the stumpjumper hardtail with a suspension fork was the stumpjumper FS. Tony Ellsworth independent of Horst arrived at a similar pivot albeit nearly level to the axle and two long parallel links as part of his ICT patented desigh for his first model called the Truth. But all of them came after Mert Lawhill used upper and lower pivots off the dropout as part of his patented rear suspension design, which was later licensed by gary fisher, yeti and schwinn.
  • + 1
 Is the axle attached to the seat stay not part of the horst patent?
  • + 2
 The pivot had to be ahead of and significantly below the axle to be considered a horst link. Etsx and smoothlink bikes the pivot is ahead and above the axle.
  • + 1
 @deeeight FSR stands and stood for Future Shock Rear
  • + 5
 I was used to better style from RM, slayer and old flatline were more unique. But I'm sure it rides good
  • + 4
 Nice DH bike, though I wish it had a standard threaded BB. Gone are the times DH bikes or MTBs in general had the user friendly threaded BBs...
  • + 5
 Enter Santa Cruz, stage right.
  • + 1
 My 2015 Devinci Wilson has a threaded BB
  • + 2
 You guys are right, my fault...luckily there still exist brands that spec bikes with threaded BBs and Santa Cruz is keeping this standard on all bikes except the CX one. But the vast majority uses PF BBs and this just sucks in my opinion as PF BBs can be a pain in the ass.
  • + 1
 I had the RM6, RM7, RMX, Flatline 1 and still ride the Flatline 2, imo they All looked at least different........this Will probably be the best, but it loods "of the Shelf" .....Session, KONA, Ghost, Elsworth....This has no 666 factor.
  • + 4
 am I the only one who thinks it is very aesthetically unpleasing? I'm very disappointed in the looks department
  • + 2
 fugly
  • + 1
 It's the colours. Awful.
  • + 1
 So the name reference Iron Maiden but the bike is made out of carbon.
And the promo edit doesn't have Iron Maiden in the soundtrack.
Huh.
That being said I love that they made it an all purpose big bike. That's way more in tune with how most people use their big bike anyway: a whole lot of park and shuttling.
  • + 1
 Why do I get the nagging feeling RM are playing catch up.

4flippin years of R&D fps, oh please, I'm still yet to see a decent new version Slayer r have they forgotten their best seller category of bike.

Still, it looks ok I guess, liking the colour and decals, looks like a 70's Star Wars toy.
  • + 1
 Rocky's best selling category has, and always will be, cross country bikes. Something neither the Slayer nor the flatline, nor this new Maiden are intended for.
  • + 1
 Lol no shit. Slayer and best selling. Now my phone is covered in coffee. That was good stuff.
  • + 1
 All I need to know about Rocky Mountain bikes I learned at Whistler and Silver Star. I remember seeing bikes blowing up all over the park and piled up in the repair shops waiting for part. I would guess they are Maiden China?
  • + 1
 At $10,500 why don't they add a little truth in the bike name and call it the Rocky Mountain Extortion. Seriously, who pays for this shit? If you NEED a bike north of 10 grand, you better have a sponsor paying for it, a sponsor who gets their money for idiots who pay 10 grand for a bicycle with a 3 year shelf life.
  • + 3
 Since my 16 i've always ride a RM since the rmx to the flatline but on that one i give up...i think its time to try something else...what you think about gambler
  • + 4
 Welcome back RM.... Do you get a discount if your a member of the Iron Maiden fan club?
  • + 1
 just looking a Geoff Gulevich and he is running 26" wheels on his bike, its all down to personal preference and what you ride. i see advantages and dis advantages to having 26" and 27.5" this frame gives you a win win situation depending on what your riding and dont mind having 2 sets of wheels.
  • + 5
 Rocky mountain are so costy now! Too bad i can't afford one.
  • + 1
 yes, but you can put a di2 battery in the frame here !! (lol they re f*ckin kiddin us)
  • + 1
 lol! i'll stick to Devinci and Xprezo for made in canada bike.
  • + 1
 You havent priced out xprezos lately have you?
  • + 1
 RM=asia made. Xprezo=canada made!
  • + 1
 What is it with RM. They make a full range of amazing bikes, but when it comes to DH bikes ahhh!
Adjustable geometry.......just more to go wrong. Just make it right.
I have yet to ride a RM DH bike that I would drop my loot on over many other equally priced comparison.
$10,500!!!!!
Not a chance!!!
  • + 4
 That color makes it look likes is made out of cheap pool furniture.
  • + 2
 Ha, all these muppets talking about it looking like a Session. You mean everything looks like a Kona:

ep1.pinkbike.org/p4pb7265839/p4pb7265839.jpg
  • + 4
 11k? It better include lifetime podium finishes.
  • + 4
 WTF, 4 years of development and it looks like a Specialized Rockhopper?
  • + 1
 why would I buy a 10 thousand dollar Dh bike when I can buy a 2015 kx250f with a motor and more development put into it, I love riding Dh and do more than I dirt bike but why would people buy this
  • + 5
 I'm budgeting out my build on a rally car, Subaru, NA, suspension mods, lightening, engine build... and that number hasn't hit 10 grand. Honestly, could the industry give riders a louder f*ck you, than they already have with the current state of pricing?
  • + 4
 The big problem is that people buy these preposterously priced bicycles. Unbelievable really.
  • + 4
 A Session looks better then this bike
  • + 3
 hopefully it will not snap as much as the flatline... but god the world cup and park modele are ugly as shit.
  • + 4
 Who's gonna buy a frame for 4000 when there is a full build for 4500?????
  • + 3
 I barely have my wife sold on the idea of me dropping 5k on a top-of the-line Tues. 10 large is right out
  • + 1
 God damn I wish bikes were cheaper. I know some of us can afford a $4500 dh rig, but Lots CANNOT. wish there was a price cap at $3000. Oh well, Ill have fun on my next YT Atleast!!!!!!
  • + 1
 id buy a clearance pro model or a used one...i just looked at the demo info they have listed on the website and they will be in whistler for crankworx obviously...but they won't be having demo's for us to try out....wtf
  • + 2
 The difference between this bike and the Session is these chainstays will probably last 10 years.
  • + 1
 While up in whistler last month a guy out on front of me on Clown Shoes had his rear triangle on his session blow up on him..... holy sweet jesus that was an epic sight to see...
  • + 2
 Not nice looking at all. Not the best bike for 10K$ ? what else ? That bike just got a demotion reading the article !
  • + 1
 Pop quiz, hot shots: Is the RM Maiden more like a Trek Session, Giant Glory, Norco Aurum or Kona Operator? (This might also be a trick question.)
  • + 2
 Rocky Mountain for LIFE! Always have. Always will. Thanks for creating such sweet machines!
  • + 2
 "...which allows the head angle to be changed in 1/4 degree increments from 63° – 63.8° degrees."

Doesn't add up to me!
  • + 3
 Pressfit? What!? Why!!!!????
  • + 2
 Whats more satisfying than replacing one using a hammer rather than being civilized and unscrewing it lol.
  • + 1
 btw, they also released a sweet video edit today. not sure why it's not linked in the article (unless I missed it). here it is:
vimeo.com/135163991
  • + 1
 haha - whoops - it's elsewhere as a separate PB article...
  • + 2
 Press Fit Bottom Bracket. Please stop for the love of all things merciful. I am sick to death of this SHIT.
  • - 1
 It looks like a Rocky Mountain, from long before Ghost were even a rumour. Back to basics, just like Specialized have come full circle with the Demo, which in anyone over 30's eyes is just a Bighit mk 6, Rocky Mountain where using a rear end similar to this decades ago, albeit short travel, it's the identical principle. I like the way we're going back to how it was in the first place. Coooooool.
  • + 3
 I second that observation.
  • + 1
 I second that reply. The End.
  • + 3
 simply put anything over 9 grand for a bike is insane......just saying
  • + 4
 You're my boy blue!!!
  • + 1
 I think she looks sharp, but just like a woman... expensive and not really sure about what she wants? 26 or 27.5? Park or track? Disco or heavy metal? hehe.
  • - 1
 There are 3 ways to win at design.... Be first, be the Smartest or Cheat.
It's waaay too simmialr to a Session/After Burner/Stinky, so not first.
Some clever stuff, wheel options are neat, but for how long? 26 vs 27.5 was the debate, we have now decided no?!
Or Cheat..... Apparently this works for some...
  • + 1
 Sessions are ABP, stinky's and Afterburners are single pivot. I fail to see where you see cheating here. RM were using a backend like this decades ago.
  • + 2
 sweet geo correcting headset spacer, that looks.....ummm.....well thought out, after the fact.
  • + 3
 What do you get when a Kona Stinky and a Trek Session have butt sex?
  • - 1
 I need this in my life, I have to have one! Oh my, it is so wonderfully beautiful and sexy, so robust and raw! I love it! I saved up for 4 years to get a 2009 Glory, now I have to save up for this.... life is hard, but I will be damned if I one day not own one. Rocky Mountain, can at least smell one and then you take it back?
  • + 1
 Great to see RM back in the DH game, especially with a n all-carbon frame and great graphics.
  • + 2
 I dont care who you are, 4200 for a carbon frame is RETARDED
  • + 2
 Oy ya' but how does it climb?! Razz
  • + 3
 YT at half price!
  • + 1
 PB, please post the weight of the test rig, unless I missed it somewhere in the article?
  • + 4
 MTBR has it listed at 37 lbs for the pro model.
  • + 1
 I had to skip reading the whole article initially to make sure that there was a Session comment or two...
  • + 1
 Norco,Trek,Kona,Giant, now your really just paying for the name cus the frame is all the same..lol
  • + 2
 why have rocky mountain made a session ?
  • + 2
 Nice looking Norco, sorry I mean Trek , hang on I mean Giant .
  • + 1
 id laugh if they got in trouble for using maiden as a name like K2 did with some names/bands a few years back
  • + 1
 I really like the frame's looks a such, but the shown color option is about as ugly as it gets...
  • + 1
 did you know that the iron maiden was never used for torture but was created a lot later in the 19th century ??
  • + 5
 I think I'm actually married to her. The whole torture thing is debatable based on perspective.
  • + 1
 I guess RMB's spies went too close to their neighbour, mr.Norco. Nice real triangle design though, looks dynamic Smile
  • + 1
 So its a really expensive park bike?
how much difference does .8 degrees really make?
  • + 0
 I really liked the design and she looks tough! I have a Slayer so I can tell RM knows how to built a strong an efficient frame.
  • + 1
 I miss my Flatline everyday and cannot WAIT to check this bike out! Looks rad!!
  • + 1
 i think antoni gaudi designed the rear end. RM should be able to sell the shit out of 'em in barcelona...
  • + 1
 4g's for frame and shock? No thanks, looks nice and all but c'mon. Sure Gully will love it!
  • + 3
 Is that an operator?
  • + 2
 looks like a carbon operator
  • + 2
 niiiice.....digging this bike.
  • + 2
 Its future proofed w/di2 but will it take 26+ sizing?
  • + 1
 We all know it looks like something else.. I'd say this looks better. It looks more playful rather than race oriented.
  • + 1
 The headtube spacer and bearing/pivot fasteners look like proper crud catchers. Odd design decision by RM...
  • + 0
 It's actually a tried and tested and proven design by Rocky Mountain. The End.
  • + 2
 a beautiful bike but....the press fit?
  • + 2
 Love that bike and the changing wheel stuff
  • + 1
 I'd consider many different brands before I'd lay down money for a new Rocky.
  • + 2
 I like it, but that's the best color they could come up with?
  • + 2
 Maiden Cambodia
  • + 1
 The brain child of Steven Leslie! What a Designer
  • + 1
 its a trek session park bike
  • + 2
 Rocky Mountain Session
  • + 2
 26 or 27.5...sick.
  • + 1
 What if you want + size tyres for more grip in corners?
  • + 1
 26" compatibility I like, but kinda looks like a kona....
  • + 1
 Looks like a Session Maiden Taiwan
  • + 1
 You lost me at press-fit BB!
  • + 0
 Unfortunately, never liked RM bikes, I guess this one will not change my opinion... 2016 with 4 year late geometry.
  • + 1
 Just go and ride your Maiden!
  • + 2
 looks like a session
  • - 5
flag thegringo (Aug 6, 2015 at 8:27) (Below Threshold)
 Sessions are abp. The End.
  • + 2
 Looks like a Stinky
  • + 2
 Looks like a Stab
  • + 2
 Wheres the new slayer?
  • + 1
 Reminds me of iron horse Sunday
  • + 1
 Sweet Norco Aurum.
  • + 1
 dope
  • - 2
 Looks awesome. But that name... I'm riding a maiden. Come on, that is bad. Imagined up by a horny kid? Or is it designed for women?
  • + 4
 Or badass like Iron Maiden?
  • + 1
 Good point, still a weak name for a men's bike.
  • + 1
 Since when do DH bikes have sexes? Pretty sure Rachel rides the same Fury her brother does...
  • + 2
 Named after the band Iron Maiden. Making it the most manly and bad ass name for a bike ever.
  • + 1
 Weight as tested?
  • + 1
 2016 dare
  • + 1
 will prob snap
  • + 1
 Session
  • + 0
 Rocky Mountain needs a DH team!!!
  • + 1
 26 ain't dead...
  • + 1
 looks like a session
  • + 1
 Dig the paint
  • + 0
 cool bike
  • - 1
 HOTTTTTTTTTT Big Grin
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