First Ride: The 2020 Kona Process 134 CR Has a Full Carbon Frame & 29" Wheels

Aug 7, 2019
by Mike Kazimer  


Kona's new Process 134 CR was inspired by the Process 111, the short-travel, big-wheeled ripper that developed a legion of loyal fans. A carbon version of that bike never materialized, but the new carbon Process 134 was designed to deliver a similarly fun ride, with the benefit of 23 additional millimeters of travel.

The Process' model name gives away the rear travel amount, and up front there's a 140mm fork with 51mm of offset. There has been all sorts of debate over offset this year, and most new bikes seem to be launching with reduced offset forks, but Kona's test riders preferred the handling of the 51mm offset fork, so that's what they went with.
Process 134 CR DL Details

• Wheel size: 29"
• Travel: 134mm / 140mm fork
• Carbon frame
• 66° head angle
• 427mm chainstays
• Alloy 29" and 27.5" models available
• Price: $5,999 USD as shown
www.konaworld.com

There are a total of six new Process 134 models – two with 29” wheels and carbon frames, two with 29” wheels and aluminum frames, and finally, two with 27.5” wheels and aluminum frames. Prices range from $5,999 USD for the CR DL 29 model pictured here, down to $2,399 USD for the base model alloy version.


Kona Process 134
The carbon rocker link drives a trunnion mounted RockShox Super Deluxe Ultimate shock.

Frame Details & Suspension Design

This is the first full carbon Process frame in Kona's lineup – the front triangle, swingarm and rocker link are all made from the fantastic plastic. The 134's lines are similar to the Process 153, but the overall look is much sleeker, with a thinner top tube and more compact rocker link.

There's clearance for up to 2.5” tires on the 29” models, and 2.6” tires on the 27.5” models. Nobody likes the sound of chainslap, so Kona positioned the chainstay yoke as far down as they could in order to maximize the distance between the chain and the frame. The new rubber chainstay protector also has raised and ribbed portions on it, an increasingly common design feature that works well to silence the slap.


Kona Process 134
Internal routing ports are in place on both sides of the frame.
Kona Process 134
A custom chainslap protector keeps things quiet and the carbon chainstays scuff-free.

Along with room for bigger tires, the frame design allows for greater seat post insertion depth, which makes it possible to run a longer travel dropper post without running into obstructions. There's also plenty of room for a water bottle, a design feature that's made a welcome comeback over the last few years.

Riders who run their brakes moto-style will be happy to see that their cable routing needs weren't overlooked – there's a port for the rear brake line on both sides of the frame. The internal routing follows tubes molded into the frame, which meet at a Y junction before continuing towards the back of the bike.

Kona Process 134

The Process 134's suspension curve is slightly more progressive than the Process 153 in order to keep it from going through its travel too quickly. For comparison, there's an 11% leverage rate change in the last two-thirds of the 134's travel, versus an 8% change on Process 153. The bikes come with one volume spacer in the shock, which means there's room for riders to add or subtract spacers in order to tailor the ride feel. It's frustrating to open up a shock in the hopes of adding more volume reducers only to find out that it's already maxed out, so it's nice to see that Kona's designers were thinking ahead.

Along with giving the 134 a more progressive suspension curve, the main pivot location was moved forward in order to keep the amount of anti-squat more consistent throughout the travel.



Kona Process 134


Geometry

Kona was one of the early arrivals to the longer front center party, and the Process 134's reach numbers fall right in line with what's quickly becoming the norm. The 29” wheeled bikes are available in sizes small to XL, with reach numbers ranging from 425mm to 510mm. There's also an XS 27.5” model, which has a reach of 400mm.

Other numbers of note include the 66-degree head angle, 76-degree seat tube angle, and short, 427mm chainstays. The geometry numbers for the 27.5" model are nearly identical, with the exception of the amount of bottom bracket drop and the chainstay length, which is two millimeters shorter than the 29" version.


Kona Process 134
Process 134 CR DL 29

Models

My ride time was spent on the Process 134 CR DL 29, which is equipped with a 140mm RockShox Pike Ultimate, Super Deluxe Ultimate shock, SRAM G2 RSC brakes, X01 12-speed drivetrain, and a 2.5 / 2.3” Maxxis Minion DHF tire combo.

Kona Process 134
Process 134 CR 29

• Process 134 CR 29: Carbon frame, SRAM GX, Fox 34 Performance & DPX2 Performance Elite, Guide R - $4999


Kona Process 134
Process 134 DL 29
Kona Process 134
Process 134 DL 27.5

• Process 134 DL 29 or 27.5: Alloy frame, SRAM GX / NX, RockShox Pike Select, Deluxe Ultimate, Guide R - $3,699.


Kona Process 134
Process 134 29
Kona Process 134
Process 134 27.5

• Process 134 29 or 27.5: Alloy frame, SRAM SX, RockShox Recon RL, Deluxe Select, Shimano Deore - $2,399


Views: 7,846    Faves: 18    Comments: 3





Kona launched the Process 134 in Bellingham, Washington, which meant that instead of struggling to ride through a jet lag induced haze I was able to get in two days of riding on trails I know like the back of my hand. Those trails also happen to be where much of the 134's development took place, full of fast and flowy sections with just enough techy, rooty awkwardness thrown into the mix to keep things interesting.

Day one started off with a few miles of climbing up a logging road, which the 134 handily dispatched. It's a calm and efficient climber, especially during seated pedaling. Sure, if you get your weight forward and out of the saddle the shock will cycle through its travel a bit, but during normal, non-goonlike pedaling it's very well mannered. Tighter, more technical singletrack was easily handled as well.


Kona Process 134

With a few clicks of compression dialed in on the Super Deluxe Ultimate shock I was able to easily find a setting that worked for both climbing and descending, with no need to reach for the blue lockout lever. That piggyback-equipped shock may not be what you'd expect to find on a shorter travel trail bike, but it's a good indication of how Kona expect this machine to be ridden. The same goes for the wide tires and big rotors – it may not have a ton of travel, but the 134 is well equipped to meet the needs of riders whose preferred trails are on the rowdier side of the spectrum.

Short chainstays aren't always the answer, especially on longer travel bikes where high-speed stability is a necessity, but the Process' stubby, 427mm back end seems well suited to its playful nature. Put a few tight corners in front of it and the 134 will snap through them with ease – it's nimble when it needs to be, but without any twitchiness.

Kona Process 134

This isn't a super slack and squishy enduro monster (and it's not meant to be), but the 134 can hold its own in rougher terrain. I'd probably put one more spacer in the rear shock for a little extra bottom-out resistance, and maybe a higher rise bar to get the front end up a bit, but otherwise the bike felt very well balanced and poised. The 140mm Pike never felt undergunned, and delivered a very good blend of comfort and support. I'll often start daydreaming about putting a longer travel fork on a bike like this in order to increase its downhill capabilities, but at the end of the two days of riding I realized that thought hadn't even crossed my mind, a testament to the bike's ready-for-anything demeanor.

We'll see how it handles on a wider variety of terrain and trail conditions when we get one in for a long term review, but so far the Process 134 is shaping up to be a very promising addition to Kona's lineup. But I'm still not going to give up my dreams of a carbon Process 111...







152 Comments

  • + 76
 I love Kona bikes, but the pricing is terrible for what you get on specs.
  • + 28
 Completely agree, DT370 have no place on 6k bike.
  • - 17
flag mokydot (Aug 7, 2019 at 0:51) (Below Threshold)
 i feel "konak" right now, a.k.a "ngaceng".
  • - 16
flag marushin (Aug 7, 2019 at 1:34) (Below Threshold)
 @mokydot: coli lah, jangan ditahan
  • + 15
 Here in the uk they are up there with the most discounted bikes come sale time - usually 50% off for last years model.

Not much opportunity to demo them though.

As the Geo is BANG ON (I like shorter chainstays) I must try them soon
  • + 13
 6K$ for a carbon frame, XO1 eagle, Ultimate Rockshox and G2 unfortunately does not seem over the top these days when compared to non-DTC brands. The only part that appears out of place is the DT370.
  • + 14
 370s are better than most hubs
  • + 10
 Buy a frame Cherry Pick Your Parts.
  • - 16
flag pinnityafairy (Aug 7, 2019 at 7:37) (Below Threshold)
 Do you even have the skill to build a bike bro?
  • + 9
 I think their bikes are pretty reasonably priced for the builds. My wife just got a 153. X01. code rsc. Wheels were the only kinda meh. Also they can be found on sale constantly. Just look through pinkbike classifieds and there are dealers selling at discounted price. We did not pay anywhere near the $6k price tag, for a full x01 build.
  • + 7
 @Richt2000: yeah, I'm a bottom feeder, too. Never will I pay full price, but if a nice build XL comes up at 50% off in US I'll be all over it. Until then I'll just have to make due with my 111 and Spec Enduro!
  • - 4
flag jorgeposada (Aug 7, 2019 at 10:18) (Below Threshold)
 Eyyywwww chainstay pivots give me gas.
  • + 4
 @Longroadtonowhere: so you think their bikes are reasonably priced, but you are only willing to buy one when it's on sale?

I like my coffee black with a lot of creamer.
  • + 4
 @BobbyHillbomb: Not sure why you are hassling him. He thinks the pricing for the new bike is appropriate, but prefers to wait until the bike goes on sale the following year to buy. Not everyone on PB has new-year-bike money to throw around. We aren't all dentists.
  • + 3
 @skerby: only good thing about dt370 is you can remove the shitty pawls and install the proper dt star ratchets
  • + 7
 @onemind123: another good thing about the 370 is that it's actually a very robust, reliable 3-pawl system.
  • + 2
 I’m likely wrong, but weren’t we just warned that Trump’s tariffs going to increase bike prices?
  • + 1
 @BooyahSaki: First, I'm not hassling him. Questioning flawed reasoning? Maybe. What caught my attention was that he said that is a fine and reasonable price for everyone to pay, but he refuses to pay the full price. See where I'm going here? I don't think he actually believes they are a good value at full MSRP, and if that's the case, I agree with him fully.

Also, the dentist thing is worn, tired, and wasn't even funny the first time around.
  • + 3
 @BobbyHillbomb: that’s not what i said at all. It’s a very similar build to my patrol at the same price and i bought that and thought it was a fair deal. If you look at some bigger companies you aren’t getting x01 and codes at anywhere near that price point. That said i was looking for used bikes for my wife and came across a brand new 2019 process on sale so we jumped on it.

Also paying full price for any bike is kinda silly. It’s very easy to find discounts in this industry, especially if you aren’t buying a bike the week it comes out. The pinkbike classifieds is full of brand new 2019’s at discounted price.
  • + 1
 @mnorris122: it is nowhere near as robust as the star ratchet system. I know of three of my riding buddies that eventually had problems with the dt370 hub. Two did the upgrade to stars and the third built a whole new wheel on king. All three have had no further issues with more miles put on.
  • + 1
 @guylovesbike: yes exactly plus those the most expensive bikes you always buy with 10-15 % discount. And with a DTC brand you don't.
  • + 2
 @skerby: yea I dunno the hate for 370s. They are a pawl drive vs the ratchet, but they are good hubs.
  • + 40
 "Riders who run their brakes moto-style will be happy to see that their cable routing needs weren't overlooked – there's a port for the rear brake line on both sides of the frame."

This is legitimately fantastic news for all UK riders. Tidy cables!
  • + 12
 First thing I noticed! And NZ rider too!
  • - 1
 It was a nightmare for left-rear brake users before Kona's 2018 product line. My 2017 Process 153 was not considerate enough for that.
  • + 23
 Ok Kona. This looks awesome.
  • + 1
 Agree, but isn't it just a 153 with less rear sus and a pike? The geo is the same.
  • + 20
 I can’t believe Y2K was 20 years ago.
  • + 14
 WTF?! Y2K was 140 years ago man. And my dad still has not come back from going to the corner store for smokes.
  • + 19
 Seeing Miranda Miller on Kona just makes me happy
  • + 3
 Agreed. Such a stellar rider and human being, and a great fit for Kona. The fact that she is the face for the launch of the new 134 says that Kona feels the same way!
  • + 19
 Frame onlys? Usual crap parts high prices from Kona
  • + 2
 That was what I was hoping for. Looks like the 134cr DL 29 frame only is $3299 USD. Aluminum not available as a frame only yet
  • + 2
 @bkchef2000: I hope you're right, I like to build the way I want on an AL frame.
  • + 1
 Looks like 27.5 is available frame only but not 29
  • + 0
 @SethO: @markg1150 Take a look at the website: CR DL frame only as well as AL DL 27.5 frame only available.
  • + 16
 I guess my 111 will stay where it is.
  • + 6
 Still love mine. I have kept it as a back up and loaner bike. Still such an unbelievable ride!
  • + 1
 Those geo number are almost identical to the 111, please someone buy a 134 and sell me their XL 111!
  • + 12
 Nice, but no Carbon frames with 27.5" wheels is a pity!
I hope those still come in the future Smile
  • + 5
 ...they have at least one, the Process 153 CR/DL. It's a ripper
  • + 2
 @Lookinforit: But that ain't no 134 Wink
And there's still the problem of those crappy and heavy builds for quite ablot of money... OK I guess i just have to work more
  • + 1
 @Br4inm4n: Oh I see what you meant.... I agree they don't really build them right. It would be best to offer frame only options as well
  • + 1
 Just got done with riding the carbon 29 and the aluminum 27.5 at the dealer launch. Just go 29
You won’t be disappointed.
  • + 9
 I'd love to know how the 27.5 version rides. Is it just an afterthought to the 29er? No carbon version, but slightly different geometry to the 29er, not just a different set of wheels in the same frame with a modified rocker, so looks like they've put some love into it. Is it more fun?
  • + 8
 Kona Process has got to be one of the most underrated bikes out there. Demo’ed an alloy Process 153 in Moab last May. It was an amazing bike, even with some second-tier parts (Yaris instead of Lyrik, for example). One of the only complaints I had was the weight — the bike had to be 35 pounds, at least. Still climbed OK, but you started to feel the weight after a while. My thought was that a carbon build with some lighter wheels and some higher end parts would go a long way in making it even better. And yes, I would prefer carbon chainstays, but unfortunately that’s not an option on the 153. Such a great bike, I was thinking of selling my own relatively new bike (not even 6 months old at the time) to buy one.
  • + 4
 I got my 1st gen Process down to about 14.6kg wich might be about 32 pounds I guess, but using a XFusion Meteic coil and a Vivid coil. So it's possible but not unexpensive unfortunately.
  • + 0
 Have you ridden a Sentinel? It absolutely out-climbs and out-descends the 153 and is lighter.

I rode them both (XL carbon GX versions) at outerbike moab back in October (got a longer ride on each too, not a 45min xc loop). The slack STA on the 153 is a let down for riders over 6' but this new 134 looks great on paper and appears to be a ripper of a bike. No Kona hate, I owned a 111 for a spell before moving back to a bike with more travel. So for me the 153 was a bit of a let down but goes to show demo before you buy.
  • + 1
 @WasatchEnduro: Actually, the Sentinel was my first choice, but the shop I called told me they were out for the weekend, and they hooked me up with another shop for the Process. I would gladly try a Sentinel, too. I think they are really cool bikes. As for STA on the Process, I'm 5-11, maybe a hair over 6-0 with riding shoes, and I thought the STA was in a good spot. For being a beast of a bike and weighing so much, it was a suprisingly nimble climber -- I wouldn't say mountain goat category, but I did make a couple little techy climbs that have given me trouble before. I thought I would be exhausted lugging that thing up climbs, but I was surprised. The big plus was I couldn't believe was how plush and grounded and stable it felt.

@Br4inm4n: Yes, in order to get it where I would want it, I would have to buy the frame and build it, and it would end up being a little over 6k. I just bought a bike last September, so I'm not really in the market, but man was I tempted to sell my new bike and buy this one.
  • + 12
 Die hard 111 owner.....I like what I am hearing!
  • + 5
 So does your water bottle!
  • + 1
 Die hard 111 owner, bought a 153 CR (got a sweet deal on a '19) to compliment my 111 rather than replace/upgrade to a 134. The 111 will live on with more XC oriented tires and suspension setup, while the 153 takes on trips to Moab/Fruita and local shuttle runs.
  • + 7
 Love my 165, loved my 153 before it as well. Kona make the most fun bikes I've ridden. However, I don't love that only the 153 and now the 134 get the attention. C'mon Pinkbike, where is the love for the 165?
  • + 1
 Hate to break it to you, but I think the 165 is discontinued. None listed as 2020, marked down 20%
on their site...
  • + 1
 @oogens: Legends never die
  • + 6
 My 2018 Canyon Spectral AL 6.0 was $2400. It has full GX Eagle, Guide R brakes, DT Swiss M1900 w/ DT370 wheels and Pike RC. Since I'm not yet an experienced rider, the brakes and wheels are more than enough for me, even the geometry.
Bike prices have become absurd when these NX and SX Eagle came out. I miss the days when GX was the lowest spec.
  • + 1
 100% agree buddy.
  • + 9
 Kona with the hard overpriced specs
  • + 9
 Wow, Miranda is a sick rider!
  • + 5
 Top $6K spec comes with the shittiest wheelset you can spec on a bike that costs that much. Seriously Kona? You couldn't finagle at least DT Swiss 350 hubs on your top-of-the-line $6k build? Or an E1700/M1700 wheelset? Everything else looks good except for the f*cking wheels.
  • + 5
 So it's $5K for the CR 29, comes with an NX crank and has the same wheelset then on my $3K GT Sensor Carbon Elite, wich also has a lifetime warranty... I guess my trusty steed will stay for now.
  • + 7
 All you guys that complain about price vs spec need to get real. Comparing one bike against another that has lower spec isn't being real. 3K: you got a RS Sektor RL fork, Deluxe R rear shock, Level brakes and your comparing it to the 5k CR29 with Fox 34 & DPX2?? Price is only going to go up up up.
  • + 0
 @Demoguy: Fair point.
Better comparison would be to the Sensor Carbon Expert: RockShox Deluxe RT3, RockShox Revelation RC, Flow hoops and Truvativ Descendant 7K crank. Still $1K cheaper.
  • + 4
 I think Kona is getting it together a bit more in the build department, and their choices make sense. Good suspension seems to be #1 priority for them it appears, and I agree with that decision. All of the wheels are decent, maybe not light, but will hold up, and who cares about cranks as long as they do their job? Solid brakes, a dropper, and REAL tires too.
  • + 8
 The carbon frames look great but the alloy ones are terrible.
  • + 3
 I have to agree. That S bend down tube doesn't do it for me.
  • + 6
 Curious what the weight is on the full carbons. One of the best looking bikes Kona has put out in a while imo.
  • + 3
 It’s Kona, so, heavy...
  • + 5
 @nyles: You might be surprised, my carbon 153 29 (built from the frame up) weighs 30.5 lb, not too bad. That's carbon wheels, Fox 36, DPX2. XT drivetrain, alloy cockpit, Fox seatpost, 2.5 maxxis rubber. With this bike having the carbon read end, and smaller tubes in general, seems like you could build one up under 30lb.
  • + 2
 @thomas12: that's nice and all, but as for stock builds they're pretty heavy. I worked in a shop that was a dealer and the 153 CRDL 29 in a large came out to a whopping 32 pounds. Even when the rep came in for clinics he was the first to admit they don't care about weight. Heck, it's not even a bad thing really since they do ride so well, but I know I'm someone who cares about weight which is just my preference when other brands these days can perform just as well or better. I can tell that must be true especially given the heftiest rocker link I've ever seen, he even had one off the bike to play with, it's massive haha
  • + 2
 Not really sure what to think. 1st image of the review , bike looks killer, same with some of the smaller images. Then they do a full bike side shot and I,m like WTF!!. Not sure if they are using a XS frame in those shots . But the bike looks dis-proportioned . Really curious if they made any changes to the other Process line-up.
  • + 1
 Exactly my thoughts. It looks super weird in the profile shots.
  • + 3
 Curious how this compares to the Transition Smuggler. Seems most companies are now following this aggressive/mid-travel/29er trend, essentially the same trend 27.5 bikes went through a few years ago
  • + 4
 Hey I can tell you how it compares to the Smuggler because I just came off of a Smuggler and exchanged it for this the 134 Process. The smuggler has production issues. There's a ton of carbon internally that is sharded. Like loose ends of carbon that can grab on your cable and cause sticky shifting. Pair this with a 2.35 rear tire, that when you turn hard, you can feel your knobs on your tire in your handlebar. Also, the Smuggler is definitely shorter than the claimed reach. I rode a Large Kona before the Smuggler and hate the way it fits, it feels like it's about 20mm shorter on the reach. The Smuggler descends well, but quite honestly, feels like a 140mm travel bike on the climbs. In short, I love my new Kona Process 134. I used to have a Process 111 back in the day and thought I was making an upgrade by getting the Transition Smuggler (Carbon) after only a few months I'm back on the Kona. They may be slightly heavier and not have the marketing power that Transition has, but I will tell you right now, the Kona rides better, climbs better, doesn't hurt my back on the climbs and has way better clearance allowing more tire configuration options. I hope this helps you answer your question.
  • + 2
 Looks like my 2015 Norco Sight! There are some serious improvements being made by all manufactures over the years, no question here. It does seems over the last 5 years, there is a revolving door of linkage design that seems like its just making circles through the offerings!
  • + 5
 Single pivot vs horst
  • + 1
 @JohanG: Splitting C***** hairs, implementation is more important then the design itself. You think this would makes a stunningly noticeable difference? Ha
  • + 1
 @zion-i:
Yeah, quite a significant difference, actually. But yes, it does look like a older model Norco.
  • + 1
 @dkidd: Please, inform me. You think you're actually perceiving those difference on the trail? And that they are that large? Common..
  • + 2
 @zion-i: The problem is you also have to be able to look at it and like what you see. I mean sure, we could all ride Marin's because they're all super wicked awesome in terms of performance, but we don't.

In spite of what we want to try to tell ourselves, a lot of life is aesthetics. I mean, I didn't want to hook up with my wife because of her incredible calculus skills...
  • + 1
 @zion-i: I thought the same -- especially the larger-size alloy Norcos that year, both the Sight and the Range -- similar swoopy downtube, similar angles, the rocker being quite a bit lower than the top tube, etc.
  • + 2
 Hmmm... standover grew by 18mm comparing the 153 29er to this in size Medium. But these alloy frames look like they may be able to accommodate a water bottle, unlike the AL frames of the 2018-19 P153... front triangles look larger for the 650b vs. 29ers... Looking forward to a test ride!
  • + 2
 I love my John Deere Green '16 134. Not a big fan of these colorways... But I'd love to try a 134 in 29. If it came to buying one I'd probably get a base model, strip off the SRAM garbage, and install my preferred Shimano components. Same thing if I bought a Hightower.
  • + 1
 +1 on the SRAM comments.
  • + 1
 Gotta say I'm not feelin' it. The swoopy frame design just looks dated and the logo placement doesn't help. Granted those are aesthetics but even though I'm sure the bike is up to par with anything out there when it comes to ride quality, (most are these days) this definitely won't be on the list of potentials.

Still waiting on a decent complete 29er trailbike with an aluminum frame. Got nothing against carbonium, just prefer metal.
  • + 4
 Still riding the original 134
  • - 2
 I had a 14' 134. Had to get rid of it because of a creaky BB. Great bike before wear and tear took it's toll. F pressfit
  • + 2
 @Dlakusta: My '16 134 starts creaking every 200 miles and you know what it is? Those dirty dirty suspension pivots. Every time. Not sure what your experience was but for me it's never the PF BB. Even when my BB was notchy and the bearing was crap I couldn't hear it. Not every frame is the same, though, so I guess YMMV.
  • + 2
 I wonder how that Y connection for the brake hose works, as on most brakes, the hose is installed from the rear. How do I make sure it exits on the side I want?
  • + 2
 Feed in some whipper sniper cord from the top then stick it to the brake hose with gorilla tape and pull it back through. Easy.
  • + 3
 Park Tool IR-1 Phenomenal bit of kit that takes the headaches out of internal routing on even the worst frames.
  • + 2
 put a piece of hose to the front of the channel you want to avoid and start from the rear as you are used to
  • + 1
 Are trunnion mounted shocks going to be more proprietary? If so, I wouldn't buy something that I am stuck with rockshox and can't change it... anyone know because I've never had a trunnion mounted shock?
  • + 2
 I wouldnt say proprietary. There are fewer options at this time but more as time goes on. You can see a fox shock on this bike as well on other models.
  • + 4
 List of manufacturers that make trunnion mounted shocks

- RockShox
- Fox
- DVO
- Marzocci (Fox)
- Cane Creek
- Öhlins

Probably more but too lazy to look.
  • + 1
 SR Suntour @Bflutz625:
  • + 1
 No fox dvo mrp RS and cc all make trunnion. Although the cc inline series are not available in trunnion.
  • + 3
 Actual seat tube angel seems pretty slack...
  • + 2
 Looks rad... any chance I could get the eye-to-eye shock length on this unit?
  • + 2
 Good question.
  • + 1
 Waiting on the new 120/120 Hei Hei. That's what everyone wants to see since it's the closest thing we getting to a new Process 111.
  • + 1
 we shall see
  • + 2
 Fawk missed the video earlier, Now I,m all pumped to go riding again LOL . Killer video @konaworld
  • + 3
 Still pressfit bb? When will they learn?
  • + 1
 Do people really want a bike with slacker seat tube than head tube? Theoretical seat angles don't count, at least for taller riders.
  • + 1
 it looks like they've actually regressed on this front. I'm surprised.
It's also a bit of a bummer PB has failed (again) to call them out on this - the actual seat tube angle is horrible - probably 66-68 degrees...
  • + 3
 True. Effective seat tube angle decreases more the higher the seat is.
  • + 3
 @shredddr: the actual seat tube angle? What about the 76.2-76.5°?
  • + 2
 @granjak: not sure I understand your question. the difference between 76.2 and 76.5 is negligible, but the actual seat tube angle on this bike is probably close to 66 degrees - the higher you raise the seat, the worse the effective angle is going to get, dropping down from 76.5 degrees.
  • + 2
 @shredddr:
I get it, it looks actually pretty slack when the saddle is unfold.
Bike industry should adopt a new measure like the stack or the reach so that we can get the actual value. I just read a review of this new bike and the tester said he had to move forward the saddle to get a better position...
  • + 2
 Miller riding to a Miller soundtrack. Nice job Kona.
  • + 2
 That video was dope. I want one!
  • - 1
 I loved Kona when Barel was riding or Watson. Stinky and all that. But market evolved and Kona stayed behind and was like a farmer bike. However this looks totally cool and elegant. I really like that.
  • + 1
 Transition smuggler and Norco sight are sending regards. looks to me like more of the same!
  • + 2
 6k is a crazy, no way !
  • + 1
 BRING BACK THE MAGIC LINK!! YOU'LL SELL DOZENS! DOZENS!
  • + 1
 Anyone know where she is riding in the video?
  • + 1
 The first dry high mountain section looks like Leavenworth, Wa. I’m guessing the forest part is Squamish.
  • + 1
 I hope there is a frame option-
  • + 0
 Are they keeping the Satori for 2020? This seems to overlap the Satori quite a bit.
  • + 1
 hopefully they'll kill it with fire
  • + 1
 @ATXZJ: yeah I didn’t like it either
  • + 1
 Still spacing the Reverb Kona?
  • + 1
 They probably get it for about 5 cents from SRAM since that's the only way they going to sell any.
  • + 1
 Get the heck out of my way bear cubs! Wink
  • + 1
 What a launch vid. Super amped to go riding.
  • + 1
 Cable routing on that alloy frame like somewhat of an afterthought
  • + 1
 Just what I need right now, more choices. What??? 29er 134 looks great.
  • + 0
 Good job Kona, not giving in to the short offset hype and misinformation campaign!
  • + 3
 Why do you say this? What is your experience with reduced offset forks?
  • - 1
 @ATXZJ: Have multiple forks and 29ers: one with 41 offset (MRP), 42 offset (Lyrik), 46 offset (MRP), and 51 offset (multiple).

Some of the things people claim about offset forks are true, but many things are not. And if you ask any of the engineers that design bikes or suspension they will tell you that much of the current craze is more marketing than anything. One thing I personally don't find to be true is that the wheel moving more toward the rider provides increased traction. That makes sense in theory, right?...more weight over the wheel. But in practice you won't find those few mm mean much. And if it was really true, wouldn't we see shorter offset forks on every DH bike? I'd say changing fork offset changes the way the bike handles, but it doesn't make the bike better or worse.
  • + 2
 @foggnm: If you ask engineers, they'd say most everything in the industry is driven by marketing. Also had multiple bikes with numerous forks/steerer swaps. It all started when i built up a sentinel and went from there. My current ride is a 29" with 120/100mm travel, 40mm offset and a 66* HTA and I love it as a trailbike. The 51mm in my experience took more steering micro corrections at low speeds. The shorter offsets just seem to smooth the bike out. My basher bike has 180/180mm has a 37mm offset fork and a 62.8* HTA. Again, wouldn't go back to traditional offsets.

Can agree that better or worse is definitely subjective a description.
  • + 1
 diggytyyy daaaamnnn!!!
  • + 0
 I’m glad to see that Kona is TRANSITIONing to making a nice PATROL!!!!!
  • - 1
 I couldn't help but notice that Miranda Miller's bike DOES NOT have the garbage stock wheelset.
  • + 1
 All cool
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