First Ride: We Are One Arrival - A Canadian-Made Carbon Enduro Bike

Aug 3, 2021
by Matt Beer  


When a composite product manufacturer builds their first frame and strives for nothing but perfection, what else would you expect? Look at this thing; stealthy, raw carbon, matte paint, and sharp lines. Dustin Adams, We Are One's founder, doesn't cut any corners when it comes to production and demands performance with his history in World Cup DH racing.

"Arrival" doesn't stem from any alien landing reference, but symbolizes We Are One's entry to the enduro bike market. We Are One has begun production only two years since the idea became a plan.

Of course, they take the proud responsibility of constructing the full carbon frame in house, learning from their polished experience in building carbon rims and handlebars. The molds for those products are cut with a CNC machine, so they took the opportunity to produce everything else on the frame, like fasteners and links. The titanium hardware, protective rubber pieces, and Cerakote paint, are inclusive to their 500 mile supplier source circle with an emphasis on reusing packaging.

With 152mm of rear wheel travel mated to a 160mm fork, this 29” wheeled rig has already been quietly proving itself on the Enduro World Series under Kamloops young gun, Johnathan Helly, who currently sits in 15th overall in U21.

Arrival Details
• Carbon fiber frame manufactured in B.C.
• Wheel Size: 29"
• 152mm rear travel / 160mm fork
• Titanium hardware with alloy links
• 2 Cerakote ceramic paint color choices
• 3 frame sizes
• 2 chainstay lengths
• Coil shock compatible
• 14.53kg/ 32.04lb, as tested
• Frames and bikes assembled in B.C.
• Complete bikes from $8,889, $10,999 USD
• Frame only pricing TBD
weareonecomposites.com

We Are One Arrival
There will be two kits available; XO1 mechanical priced at $8,899 USD and XO1 AXS wireless for $10,999. Both trim levels are supplied with a Fox Factory 36 and a Float X2, We Are One’s own Da Package bar and stem combo, plus their Union rims laced to Industry 9 hubs. A Chris King headset, Magura brakes, and Vittorria tires round out the common build components. The prices are on the upper end of the spectrum, because this is a seriously high-end, non-mass produced, specialty product.

We Are One Arrival

Frame Details

You may recognize the suspension layout from Vladimir Yordanov and his Sequence downhill bike, that we featured back in 2018. Vlad has tuned this shorter travel, dual link layout to meet the requirements of We Are One. The design team tested numerous suspension platforms, including high pivots, but found a few characteristics that they felt could be improved.

The frame is made from 3 different fibres; 3K, 12K, and UD carbon. The first priority was not to be stiff or light, but our M/L bike in our Summer Field Test, with control tires, did weigh in at a svelte 14.53kg / 32.04lb. According to We Are One, the lateral and vertical compliance of the frame was tuned to give different levels flex. The rear triangle is created in two halves and then bonded together through another process in order to optimize strength and weight.

We Are One Arrival
We Are One Arrival
The dual links rotate in the same direction and ride on double row premium stainless Enduro bearings, which are pressed into the links, not the carbon.

When asked about the internal hose management, Dustin explained that using a guided tube in tube method doesn't yield the best carbon compaction. The inner tube that the housing would run through compromises how the layers are compacted and from testing other frames, they saw failures due to this. So, they opted for the foam tube insulation around the brake hose and shift housing with maximum attention to detail in the construction on the frame.

We Are One Arrival
We Are One Arrival
Both colorways feature a Cerakote ceramic paint finish that fades to raw carbon on the rear triangle.
We Are One Arrival
We Are One Arrival

The Arrival uses of Super Boost 157mm rear hub spacing, which is paired with a narrower Q-factor, usually reserved for Boost 148mm rear hubs. What this does is provide a straighter chainline for the taller gears on the cassette that see more action, higher torques, and quicker wear, than those found at the bottom of the cassette. The bottom bracket is threaded for less mistakes while removing an old BB or installing a new one, and the rear hub sits on aluminum sleeves at the dropout. We Are One expects to see these bikes live a long and happy life for years to come.

The rear shock also stands out with its short 185mm x 55mm trunnion mount. The leverage curve works well with coil shocks also and Push 11/6 options will be available shortly. There are no flip chips or travel adjustments and those bolts and axles that are threaded, have keyed female nuts, so again, nothing will jeopardize the integrity of the carbon.

Sizing and geo specs for Arrival

Geometry

Similarly to the current crop of enduro bikes, the length of the rear triangles differs between three sizes. The SZ1 and SZ2 get 437mm chainstays while the SZ3 grows to 441mm. The reach starts at 450mm and grows in 25mm increments per size. The head angle sits at 64º with a nice steep effective seat tube angle of 77º and the seat tube length is 437.2mm on the size 2.

Arrival XO1 Cable, $8,899 USD
We Are One Arrival
Frame: Carbon triangles, alloy links, titanium hardware
Fork: Fox 36 Factory, Grip 2, 160mm, 44mm OS
Shock: Fox Float X2 Factory, Trunnion 185mm x 55mm
Drivetrain: SRAM XO1 Eagle 12 Spd
Wheels: We Are One Union/ I9 1/1 hubs, SB+ rear
Tires: Vittoria Mazza 29 x 2.6 F, 2.4 R
Seatpost SDG Tellis, 170mm
Saddle: SGD Belair Gel
Cranks: SRAM X1 Eagle Carbon DUB, 170mm, B148, 32t
Handlebar: We Are One Da Bar 25mm rise, 800mm width
Stem: We Are One Da Stem 45mm
Grips: SDG Thrice
Headset: Chris King Inset II
Brakes: Magura MT5, 200mm F, 180mm R

Arrival XO1 AXS, $10,999 USD
We Are One Arrival
Frame: Carbon triangles, alloy links, titanium hardware
Fork: Fox 36 Factory, Grip 2, 160mm, 44mm OS
Shock: Fox Float X2 Factory, Trunnion 185mm x 55mm
Drivetrain: SRAM XO1 Eagle AXS 12 Spd
Wheels: We Are One Union/ I9 Hydra hubs, SB+ rear
Tires: Vittoria Mazza 29 x 2.6 F, 2.4 R
Seatpost RockShox Reverb AXS, 170mm
Saddle: SGD Belair Gel
Cranks: SRAM X1 Eagle Carbon DUB, 170mm, B148, 32t
Handlebar: We Are One Da Bar 25mm rise, 800mm width
Stem: We Are One Da Stem 45mm
Grips: SDG Thrice
Headset: Chris King Inset II
Brakes: Magura MT7, 200mm F, 180mm R

We Are One Arrival

Ride Impressions
Before even setting off on the Arrival, you can't ignore the low weight of the bike. Then, after you jump on and throw in a few cranks, it's immediately apparent how the bike wants to move forward. And that's the name of the game across the board here. The Arrival is just so efficient; in terms of climbing prowess, how the suspension goes through the motions, weight distribution through the rough stuff, which all boils down to carrying momentum. It just wants to go!

The small bump is superb and propels you forward while the mid-stroke is supportive, but forgiving when charging through consecutive stepped bumps. Even the progression ramped smoothly on big sends to flat landings. The rear wheel traction hooked up when reefing on the stoppers and stayed active through tons of braking bumps. The front to rear weight shift was minimal because there were no sudden changes in the dynamic geometry.

The handlebar height was definitely low in that forward attack position, like a runner in the starting blocks, but the ride was still forgiving out back. The progression in the fork definitely helped counteract large body movements late in the travel, but was tiring as you dropped elevation rapidly. After changing to my preferred 765mm width and 35mm rise handlebar paired with a 35mm length stem, I could relaxed a little more while still keeping the front wheel weighted.

We Are One Arrival


At 178cm / 5'10", the 437mm chainstays may be a touch shorter than some other brands, but I prefer this length to help the 29" rear wheel change direction faster. Trusting the tires through corners was easy with the low center of gravity and predictable through the front and rear centers. The low weight also helps the Arrival flick through corners and dance through technical bits without getting bounced around or off line.

This bike was part of our Summer Field Test, and we'll be going further in-depth in the near future, but initial impressions are that We Are One has built a very impressive bike with fine attention to detail.


We Are One Arrival








417 Comments

  • 178 6
 What a beauty! Love to see more local (ish) bike brands! Especially when they’re made in Canada!!
  • 35 119
flag netracer-enduro (Aug 3, 2021 at 15:49) (Below Threshold)
 HOW MUCH??? with own brand wheels??????.... hard pass Smile
  • 37 6
 @netracer-enduro: WAO wheels a nice aftermarket option. I’ve got a set on my Range and WAO was great to deal with for a recent replacement (Lifetime NQA if damaged when riding).

This isn’t like a Trek dressed in Bontragers or a Specialized with Rovals (though I’m sure those are nice wheels too).

An interesting point to pass all your judgement of the bike from...
  • 3 58
flag DameDeCarreau (Aug 3, 2021 at 23:10) (Below Threshold)
 no, they're made in China
  • 18 4
 The whole world is local if you look far enough
  • 13 0
 @DameDeCarreau: you're kidding right?
  • 16 10
 I was in love until I read Soper Boost
  • 10 0
 @DameDeCarreau:
Wheels are Canadian made as well.
  • 11 0
 @Quinn-39: I think they were being sarcastic (the smiley at the end), but they have already been downvoted into oblivion and I'm not sure if they can be resurrected at this point.
  • 4 0
 @netracer-enduro: Shame no one got your sarcasm there. Great stuff.
  • 3 0
 @Quinn-39: I think you missed the sarcasm
  • 3 0
 @netracer-enduro: no worry bruh, its not for you.
  • 1 0
 @DameDeCarreau: sorry bruh, 100% Canadian made!
  • 1 0
 @netracer-enduro: neg 83 reaction. I take it pinkbikers can't really do humour, even with the smiley face at the end.
  • 155 5
 To the people complaining about price: just LOOK at the amount of content on this bike made ENTIRELY in Canada! Not only the frame (which I can tell you because I've watched it first hand, is a MONUMENTAL accomplishment!), but rims, stem, and bar as well, all assembled in house. Yes, it's cheaper and easier to get these parts from a Chinese catalogue, but they don't come close to comparing. And I believe this is the very first carbon production frame MADE IN CANADA! You really do get what you pay for.
  • 8 92
flag ybsurf (Aug 3, 2021 at 9:35) (Below Threshold)
 Stem is made in Germany but close enough.
  • 23 2
 @ybsurf: Da stem is made in house in Kamloops. 77designz stem is not made in Germany, if that's what you're referring to.
  • 94 0
 @ybsurf: I'm not sure where this information is from, but we have always made our stem in-house. It has been ever since we've launched the Da Package back in 2019.
  • 3 4
 @billyjack: I got a 77designz and I got mine from Germany so maybe they manufacture them in both places?
  • 4 2
 @ybsurf: 77's bar is made by WR1. 77's stem is made overseas.
  • 3 0
 @WeAreOne: awesome that's good to know.
  • 2 0
 @WeAreOne: so it's a collab with 77designz? Are you making the stem for them too?
  • 38 1
 @ybsurf: Yup the design of the system was from 77designz. We requested that we make our own stem, and layup the bar. Giacomo and his team kept their stem with their vendor and are now making the 77desingz stem in Germany. We still make the bars and are still making our stem here. The stems are different as we source a different temper of aluminum and have a different design. Same fit for the bar at 33mm though.
  • 18 0
 i9 hubs are USA made as well thumbs up>
  • 10 0
 @WeAreOne: thanks to clarify good looking bike btw it will be on the short list for my next one.
  • 2 0
 @ybsurf: they worked together on the project. You can order the stem made in Germany from 77designz and a WAO bar (77 doesn't do their own carbon work), or the Canadian made package from WAO.
  • 4 0
 @WeAreOne: Were you guys on this bike a few weeks ago at sun peaks and stopped in at masas for beers?
  • 5 0
 Taking nothing away from this awesome accomplishment, but Guru made all their frames in house in Montreal.
  • 2 0
 @bikerbarrett: custom frames no less....
  • 9 0
 Not sure about that, Guru made carbon bikes in Montreal in the early 2000’s. First carbon mountain bike maybe.

Devinci has been making bikes in QC as well without much fanfare (albeit I believe their carbon has always been overseas), unfortunately they have been slowing that down.
  • 1 0
 @krka73: really sick ones too. Always wanted one.
  • 3 5
 @ratedgg13: I have one of the 77 bars and I must say I am disappointed.
The AL piece can slide but the most disappointing thing that the bonding is not clean. Every cheaper made carbon bar I had was clean. You could see the line inside but not outside. Different story for that more expensive bar.
  • 13 15
 But I live in Europe so why would I care if it’s made in Canada or Taiwan
  • 7 0
 @Serpentras: the bars are all made by WAO (77designz gets shipments). I suspect what you're seeing is the process WAO uses, which is one that results in no sanding or finishing after the bar is out of the mould. A lot of Asian made carbon takes a ton of post mould finishing which WAO eliminates from their manufacturing process.
  • 6 0
 Hope's bike also has a very high number of made-in-the-UK bits on it, and sells for an almost identical price
  • 2 0
 @bonfire: To go further on this, the first monoque frame of all time was an in house built Devinci Leo. Canada literally made the first carbon frames of this variety.
  • 7 0
 @mick06: Most likely one of the crew. We are always up at Sun Peaks.
  • 21 0
 @bikerbarrett: Totally and we aren't saying that this is the first road / mtb hardtail frame made in Canada, but rather the first production full suspension, carbon MTB frame (both triangles). There has been a lot of great Canadian manufacturing and we are hoping to see more of a resurgence.
  • 10 0
 @CM999: the same reason someone from Canada who wants a high end, boutique frame, might select a product that was made in Germany?

Because it fits their requirements and doesn’t necessarily have to do with some sense of National (or Continental?) pride?

I’d also it that WAO are an awesome small company to work with when it comes to supporting their products. I’m not sure you’d get the same service from an off-the-peg, direct to consumer, Taiwanese seller. Not that wonderful people don’t work in the factories... it’s just a very different scenario.
  • 2 22
flag Frontrange (Aug 3, 2021 at 18:56) (Below Threshold)
 Pass.
  • 3 0
 @Frontrange: better than a fail!
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13: yeah it's made by WAO.
Well I see European manufacturers who sanding that also down. Like Schmolke , Hope or Beast.
  • 4 16
flag darkstar66 (Aug 4, 2021 at 0:55) (Below Threshold)
 Tyres made in Taiwan........, cables made in Malaysia, Groupset made in Asia, Battery for groupset made in Asia.....
  • 12 0
 @WeAreOne: I’m pretty upset with y’all warranty. The warranty is fake. Y’all know damn well I’ll never come close to breaking those beautifully crafted union wheels with onyx hubs. And this bike has me wanting to sell my car. I hate y’all. Keep up the great work!
  • 5 0
 @darkstar66: What's your point? We all know it isn't 100% NA produced. Materials for the build also come from the world over. Go on.
  • 1 17
flag darkstar66 (Aug 4, 2021 at 11:18) (Below Threshold)
 @sherbet: I think my point is I'd be more impressed if people started making the smaller components in house. Drive trains etc.....New frame start ups are everywhere......nothing special....certainly not at this price. I've got mates who build frames........now turn it on its head, solid frame with decent geo....but with bespoke in house components? Shimano and sram have dominated the market for years! There's been men's in sheds building frames for decades. Nothing new.
  • 6 1
 Not going to lie, that's a pretty shitty and grasping take. While it would be nice to see more parts made in North America, don't be a negative nancy. This bike is nothing but good news.
  • 6 0
 @darkstar66: I get the feeling you don't understand anything about the industry. If it was easy and/or profitable, people would be doing it. The fact is that the barriers to entry in the market are too high for most.
  • 4 0
 @darkstar66: how much over the price of equivalent Shimano and SRAM parts are you willing to pay for something made in your mate’s shed? 3x? 4x?
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13: I have da package performance wise it’s as good or better than anything I’ve used in 30+ years . Aesthetically they look amazing from 10’ feet away but on the bike the mold line and a number of smalll aerated resin spots don’t look like a 400.00 + bar stem combo . I double checked with wr1 about it and they said it’s just part of the process . I’m not going to get rid of them as they do perform but I don’t think I’d replace with same unless wr1 cleans them up a bit or drops the price
  • 2 0
 @sherbet: This is not correct. Brent Trimble, from Anchorage Alaska made the first monocoque bike frames in the early 80's. He went on to create Kestrel bikes in 87. I have one of his originals from 1982 in my shop. He also created a unique line of mtb frames using one large beam from head tube to drop outs around that time.
  • 1 0
 Those monoque frames never saw full production as far as I was aware. Interesting dude!
  • 1 1
 a bit of a moot point for people who can’t afford it

which btw is likely most of the people commenting here … :-p
  • 123 18
 Any manufacturing outside of Asia is welcomed. Well done WAO! Hopeful more companies follow WAO, Ibis, and GG. However, pricing needs to come down as this is unattainable for most.
  • 14 10
 Agreed in every word inputed in this comment, especially the price tag...
  • 116 4
 I am not sure how much lower of a price you could reasonably expect with that kind of build, to be fair.

I have a 2021 SC Megatower X01 Coil, and it retails for the same price with garbage ARC30 wheels. All of the other components are fine, but the details like a King headset, Magura brakes, and having WR1 wheels on the bike already are massive value adders.

I put WR1 wheels and Da Package on my bike before I even rode it, we are talking nearly 13000$ CAD retail here for a bike that STILL has parts that arent as good.

Yes SC is more expensive, but WR1 probably has the right to be, by a huge margin
  • 25 0
 Reeb is also doing cool stuff out of colorado with locally made frames.
  • 30 0
 What would really help to spread North American manufacturing would be someone creating a legitimate decent volume bike factory and assembler that various brands could work with to manufacture their bikes. Very few bike companies are vertically integrated and rely on outside vendors for manufacturing and assembly. If there were legit options for NA manufacture and assembly it could be possible to circumvent producing overseas. Someone just needs to figure out how to make a profit doing this while being price/value competitive compared to existing vendors, which is not an easy task, but it would be really amazing if it happened.
  • 58 6
 Saying your against manufacturing in asia then complaining the price is to high on a product that is not a necessity in any way all in the same comment
  • 12 2
 @endurogan: I mean, this one is up there on cost. But north American made options can be competitive. I think GG and Reeb are both in line with what similar builds cost from other brands.
  • 7 9
 @adrennan: you have a good point but theyre a super basic linkage with aluminum rear triangles so would require alot less labour to make which is the expensive part of northamerican manufacturing so still a trade off
  • 6 33
flag dresendsit (Aug 3, 2021 at 10:07) (Below Threshold)
 Trek Slash 9.8 XT is $5999 USD ($7500 CAD?) which comes with carbon wheels, carbon bars and XT components.
  • 31 9
 @dresendsit: cool story bro.
absolutely not comparable bikes.
  • 9 0
 @adrennan: Reeb stuff rocks, love my Sqweeb and will likely never buy from another brand after realizing how cool of a company they are.
  • 13 1
 @dresendsit: Not all carbon is created equal.
  • 26 2
 You: I love the bike, it's everything I want, made domestically is a win, but can you make it less expensive?

Them: Sure, we can have it made in Asia or we could pay our workers less Wink
  • 5 2
 @iamtrashman: if the pricing across the pond is the same as other brands, you can get a Propain with travel 10mm either side of that with the same quality suspension drivetrain brakes and seatpost for 3k less
  • 4 1
 Reeb Sqweeb V3 130mm is $2750, no shock, all aluminum welded and manufactured in Colorado. No sure where the tubesets are from. Frame weight around 7.5lbs.

GG Trail Pistol (Pistola Build at 130mm) is $2495 no shock, all carbon, manufactured entirely in Colorado. Frame weight around 6lbs.

Ibis Exie, all carbon, can't get frame only currently, lowest build cost is $8000, made in California. 4.4lbs.

Lenz also produces aluminum full suspension frames in Colorado, and I think they retail for $3000ish?
  • 2 0
 @PHeller: Last Tarvo 160mm $4400 frame 4.6 lbs. Dortmund

Waltworks full-sus $4000 heavy. Park City
  • 31 2
 Well, shit. If one is going to pay the people who make a product a livable wage, guess what? That product will cost more than the one made by people making $5/hr. What kind of free lunch are you looking for here.

Maybe you can reassesse your priorities, buy less stuff in general, and but a great bike made in Canada.

That’d be on you though, and that sucks, right?
  • 4 0
 @bike4life22: Agreed 100%. I run the Sqweeb full 27.5 and I asked if they plan to make a mullet shock mount. Lo and behold a few months later I got what I needed. I love how they're always testing, tinkering and listening to their customers.
  • 6 0
 @ceecee: itd be interesting to test the Tarvo against something like the Arrival or Antidote with more complex suspension designs. My guess is that for most riders the reduction in weight would be more apparent than the changes in suspension performance.
  • 32 1
 Pricing is actually shockingly good considering it's made in Canada and the spec. They just don't offer lower end builds like most companies, I'm sure because production is limited and they'll sell out these more expensive builds.

Here are a few relevant comparisons (and yes I did pick expensive boutique brands for comparison as this is equal or IMO better than any of the below brands)

- Arrival X01 mech: $8900
- Yeti SB150 T2 Turq X01 w/ carbon wheel upgrade: $9,300
- Santa Cruz Megatower CC X01 build: $8,450 note that is not with carbon wheels
- Specialized Stumpjumper Evo Pro x01: $8,600
  • 6 0
 @WheelNut: Greg Lemond is trying to do this in Knoxville, TN. He started a company called Lemond Composites in 2016 and just released a bike not long ago. He is initially focusing on this dutch style e-bike that we can all judge like Porsche releasing an SUV, but his intent is adopt specific carbon technology from another industry and apply it to bike frame manufacturing while also creating a manufacturing facility that can be used for bicycle, aviation, industrial, etc. In essence, he will have a facility that that manufacture carbon bike frames. I think his hope is to have this full scale carbon fiber production line going by end of 2021.
  • 4 0
 WAO's wheels are comparable in price to high end Asia made options like SC reserves and Nobl, which suggests that the cost of labor maybe isn't a huge factor in the overall price of carbon construction. Obviously a frame is a lot more labor that rims, but i'd guess they are figuring they can make a lot of initial investment back off the first release high end versions of this bike, but we might see cheaper versions down the road. If they could get frame only pricing comparable to Yeti or Santa Cruz they would probably sell a ton of them.
  • 2 0
 @RCorlett:

My bike commute is 5 miles one way, but if it were 20, that Lemond ebike looks like a thing I’d want.
  • 2 1
 @endurogan: GG is making the Trail Pistol full carbon for $2500 and weighing about 6lbs.
  • 6 1
 @stubs179: 6 pounds for a small with no shock.
  • 2 0
 @hllclmbr: ya? Most people ride it as a Pistola (150f/130r) and that's a pretty average weight in that range or intended use.
  • 2 0
 @hllclmbr: ding ding ding! Sorry about the downvote, stupid small button.
  • 2 0
 @hllclmbr: A medium Tallboy C is 5.8lbs and a medium Hightower C is 6.4lbs. Yeti frames are heavier than that for the same travel. So a medium Trail Pistol is probably 6.3lbs? Not bad for a super strong US made carbon frame that is best ran at 150 front, 130 rear, IMO.
  • 1 0
 @stubs179: is it? my large Mondraker foxy frame is 6.4lbs with a shock, rear axle, hanger and seat collar.

a small frame with no shock should be 5lbs or less. 6 is pretty portly.
  • 2 0
 @conoat: different frame construction though. GGs Revved frame is very impact resistant, you can put some gnarly gashes in it without any worry of failure. Downside is its heavy when compared to traditional layup.

The point is, GGs frames arent the lightest, and maybe they should be lighter, but they aren’t unreasonably heavy.
  • 3 0
 @PHeller: if you're going to pay that kind of penalty for impact resistance, just get AL.
  • 1 0
 Speaking of GG, am I the only one that thinks the front triangle of this bike looks a lot like the Revved Front?
  • 1 0
 @mixmastamikal: my first thought as well
  • 1 0
 @mixmastamikal: Checking my GG Smash...yep! Great point.

GG rocks. Looks like it's northern cousin does too. Good stuff @WAO! North American manufacturing for the win.
  • 5 0
 @iamtrashman: I don’t understand why people think these bikes are going to be cheap. Lord know how much it cost them just for the molds. Factor in engineering, r&d, advertisement, and overhead. This bike really isn’t that expensive. Mass produced carbon bikes are north of 11k with axs components. I can’t afford this bike but if I could I wouldn’t think twice about buying it.
  • 1 0
 @szed3: If you ever have any issues with it just message Adam at Reeb, he'll respond instantly and is the coolest dude. Can't say enough good things about the Reeb crew.
  • 2 1
 @PHeller: Just as a heads up, that $2750 number you quoted for the Sqweeb V3 includes a DVO Topaz t3 Air rear shock and it can be easily swapped for a DVO Jade x coil for about the same price.
  • 1 0
 @Wthomas: if it's made like Yordanov's Sequence, the molds are less expensive than you think
  • 1 0
 @ceecee:

I think a carbon frame mold is $100k
  • 1 0
 @hllclmbr: www.pinkbike.com/news/sequence-downhill-bike-crankworx-les-gets-2018.html. 'Positive' epoxy molds

@bike4life22: $3200 w/ shock according to Reeb website as of now
  • 3 0
 @hllclmbr: We Are One may (probably) have made there own molds. Definitely metal molds. Check their video, they actually show them being designed and made in the first few seconds.
  • 2 0
 @conoat: Your missing the point that they are basically the same weight as a Santa Cruz Hightower "C" carbon frame. Yeti SB130 "Turq" frame is 6.9lbs, not sure if that's with or without DPX2. But that makes the TrailPistol frame lighter than the "C" level frame. You never see people complaining about the weight of SC or Yeti. Not sure why people are so quick to jump on the weight of GG when they are the same as the big guys with $3500-4500 frames?

Because they use the same front triangle they are actually on the lighter side when you get into the Gnarvana and The Smash travel ranges.
  • 1 0
 @stubs179: I would complain about both the SC and Yeti weights. I have a Yeti SB130 in my house right now, and it's heavy. nearly 33lbs for a bike that would retail for north of $11,000 is a touch ridiculous. now, some if that is the build of course, but there is literally no way to make it under 31lbs with even questionable components for enduro use.

My mondraker on the other hand, in a size large, with a very similar build to the Medium Yeti, is sub 30lbs. real tires(EXO+) too. so you can't say any of your examples are "light" for what they are shooting for.
  • 1 0
 @conoat: who are you people that can run exo+ and not flat all the time? My bike is heavy but I run dh casings because otherwise, I will flat like every other ride.
  • 3 0
 @adrennan: depends on terrain and riding style. If I lived in las vegas and rode bootleg canyon, I would be on DH casing for sure. but in the south of england, it's loam and roots primarily. you could run XC casings and only get occasional flats.

second, it's style. I am "light on the bike" versus smashing, albeit I weigh 185lbs. the ligther you can ride, the more momentum you carry, the less obsticals you put your full weight on, the less flats you get.

smooth is fast.
  • 1 0
 @conoat: while I am neither smooth nor fast. Every time I think I can pull off a lighter casing for a while, my bike reminds me I can't
  • 1 0
 @privateer-wheels: www.youtube.com/watch?v=bADStkO1foE&t=55s. It'd be yet another accomplishment to have faked the mold-making footage. For us mtb machos, the feature at :18 remains constant

@adrennan: stand and be delivered
  • 1 0
 @conoat: I see. I wasn’t trying to say GG’s are light. More that they are on par with a lot of more expensive brands. “GG’s are heavy” always gets mentioned when Guerrilla Gravity is mentioned but I never see it when SC, Yeti or others get brought up. Mondraker’s are very light, I won’t argue with that. They are also $4000 for a frame/shock and I’d assume they are made in Taiwan or China?
  • 1 0
 @stubs179: Not to mention anytime we mention a "light" longer-travel frame like Ripmo or Scott Genius/Ransom people bring up they have lots of maintenance and warranty issues.

These smaller manufactures using carbon construction have to "weigh" (PUN!) the pros and cons of an overly light layup and warranty related returns and repairs. If you go too light, then you'll end up spending all your profits on managing a warranty department, and likely pass those costs onto the consumer in the form of a higher retail price for the product. I imagine WAO weighed these factors as well and decided a burlier frame was a better option.

In this regard, I think GG does a good job. They are cheap(ish), stout, and warranty claims are handled pretty quickly. I'll deal with a 1lb increase for that.
  • 3 1
 @ratedgg13: Of course they're comparable. Only difference is the size of the company and refinement of the process. The dude above just compared a Santa Cruz bike to this bike... but I can't compare Trek?
  • 2 0
 @dresendsit: Fuel EX C frame weighs 6.01 lbs. With Trek you also get a proprietary shock which sucks if you ever want to change it.
  • 50 2
 super boost hub with narrow q factor bb/cranks, thank you!! A chain line made for riding in actual mountains...
  • 2 1
 Absolutely! I actually played with some different sized spacers on either side of my BB on my bikes to get the crank a little closer to the frame. I use the big cogs a lot more!
  • 3 2
 Lets hope the rest of the bike industry gets on board.
  • 2 1
 What is the actual chainline? 52 or 55mm? Either one is preferable to "standard" SB chainline of 56.5mm, so kudos for that.
  • 7 0
 @NoahColorado: The Arrival uses a 52mm chainline and a 168mm Q-factor.
  • 3 0
 @Tinshield: I just run an HG hub so I can remove the smallest cogs and slide the larger ones over...been doing that since 2008: www.pinkbike.com/photo/2581280
  • 1 0
 @rad8: pretty sweet!
  • 1 0
 @Tinshield: Been curious about his myself. I'm assuming you're on a 1x12? Did you notice less friction while pedaling in the larger sprockets? The increased friction was something that I immediately noticed going from 10 to 11 then 12 speed due to the extreme chain angle.
  • 2 0
 @szed3: definitely. It really depends on the bike but usually with a threaded BB you put a spacer on the drive side. I got a pack of varying width spacers and moved the crank in more and the chain pretty much lines up with the middle of the cassette. Worked well on my Devinci Troy. My 2021 Stumpjumper was perfect and I didn’t have to mess with it.
  • 2 0
 @Tinshield: Awesome, gonna give this a try as I have a bit of space between the chainring and the chainstay. Cheers!
  • 2 0
 @Tinshield: second that motion.. definitely, along with a 6mm offset chainring.
  • 46 4
 Funny how everyone laughed at the price of the North American Ibis but are drooling over this thing. Pink Bike Hive mind.
  • 43 9
 well the ibis is butt ugly to me
  • 6 3
 @senorbanana: I barely look at my bike, when I ride it.
  • 17 1
 The ibis is about $2k more expensive for a comparable build. ($10,600 for xo1 with S28 wheels) … and the carbon wheels are still made oversees.

The We Are One builds are competitive in pricing to bikes made oversees with similar spec.
(with the exception of a few direct sales brands like canyon)

Pretty darn impressive for a first bike.



Hopefully they will add some more build options to bring the price down in the future- but with limited production I respect their choice to just offer high end for now.
  • 6 0
 You’ve got an XC bike vs an Enduro bike comparison going here... On a site with a very “big bike” centric user base (at least the most vocal).
  • 37 9
 32lbs doesn't seem particularly light for a 160/150mm bike w/ gucci build & carbon wheels
  • 9 0
 my 2018 Yeti SB 5.5 is about that...I would have thought in the high 20s based on the review
  • 13 2
 @loud8noises

You are correct, 32 lbs is not light to me either. My 150/160mm bike weighs 30lbs with chain/bash guard and aluminum wheels.

This is a rad bike, but the bike market has gone crazy with making everything longer and heavier now, so 32lbs is “light”.

The new Ibis at 22.5lbs is what I consider to be “light”.
  • 7 1
 Got to agree, my alloy bike with the same numbers and comparable build is 31 lbs.
  • 15 2
 The last two reviews by @mattbeer have said how light this and the Bronson are and how lively they feel, but neither bike is light. North of 30lbs and five figures isn't really noteworthy.
  • 9 8
 Plenty of PB commentors will tell you that weight doesn't matter, but I disagree.

Yes, you should just lose weight on your body for much less $$s. Yes, beefier frames can handle more abuse. Yes, you're stupid for paying all that $$s for carbon when aluminum will do just fine.


BUUUT, all that aside, a lighter build makes a big difference. Especially for a "do everything" focused Enduro build.

And for $10K, you should be getting a bike that's one of the lightest in its category. Not a couple pounds heavier than comparable builds that cost a couple thousand $$s less.

I love WAO, and I wish them all the success in the world. But even if this was the right bike for me, the weight/cost ratio would make me think twice.
  • 30 1
 @lukeb: The Arrival was the lightest bike in our Summer Field Test at 14.5 kg / 32 lbs with Double Down and DH casing tires. That is light if you consider what these bikes were put through without any component failures.

The feeling of riding light is also different from actual weight. There are plenty of bikes out there that weigh less, but require more effort to ride.
  • 8 1
 @atourgates: this is such nonsense.

You could put different tires on it and be sub 30lbs. So glad the bike industry is eschewing this prevailing weight theory.
  • 1 0
 If you see how the guys here are riding it you would expect it to be heavier.
  • 6 1
 @bonfire:

Although Brian Park just talked about how much of a difference a light bike makes on the last pink bike podcast…
  • 8 1
 My Ibis Ripmo is just under 31 lbs, with pedals, bottle cage, Assigai + Dissector tires and tools.
  • 1 0
 My Rip Niner is 31lbs, v similar build with reserve wheel set!
  • 4 0
 My Ripmo AF SLX w/ S35 carbon hoops and Cushcore is only 2 lbs heavier but half the price...
  • 4 0
 @mattbeer: What’s the weight of the frame and shock alone? Would be good to know to compare across brands
  • 6 0
 @hardcore-hardtail: my Enduro is 20mm more travel, 3 lbs less, has the same wheels and handlebar and cost $6000 before modifications. Welcome to the world of choices!
  • 4 6
 @bonfire: so every other branch of cycling is making bikes lighter and lighter including dh bikes. But you think trail and enduro bikes are different and should be heavier!!! The only people who like heavier bikes are engineers as it’s easy to design a heavy bike compared to a light bike
  • 1 2
 @Jvisscher: I fail to see your point... you built a really expensive and heavy bike? cool...
  • 3 0
 It’s right in the middle of the spectrum, I’d say.

Those tires weigh 950 / 1100g which is on the light side for all mountain / enduro

My Lg Ripmo with a similar build (including WAO wheels) comes in just under 31lbs. So the frame might be one pound heavier?
I’d put in in the same weight bracket as a Hightower or revel rascal.

Seems super reasonable, especially considering the focus on longevity.

Love seeing Magura brakes! I’ve been running them for years and they are just... So. Good.
  • 4 1
 @hardcore-hardtail: Yup. Specialized Enduro 170/170 29lbs. I also built a Transition Spur 120/120 at 25lbs. Both with WeAreOne Union/Faction wheel sets. YT Tues (with WeAreOne Strife) at 35lbs.

Your point is you can get it cheaper+lighter. But it is made in Asia. And lighter is only a result of the design for the intended use. Nobody I know is riding an Ibis around here (Central BC) without constant durability issues.

You threw an off-topic thing in there for comparison. We do see your point, but it is off-topic and doesn't add much to the discussion. We are talking about locally made, highest-end, non-mass-produced bikes.

I thought it was clear when I threw a bunch of other off-topic stuff out there for comparison. Apparently not.


PS, I broke 2 e*thirteen wheels this year in the first 6 days of riding them. I have thousands of kms on WeAreOne rims and haven't even had to true them. I also broke two carbon frames in the past. I don't mind paying more for fewer headaches around here. I mean, if I rode in S. Dakota or somewhere like that it really wouldn't matter or be as hard on my bikes I guess.
  • 3 0
 @vaedwards: @mattbeer says above the weight was with DD tires?
  • 4 1
 I think people get all out of shape about weight because they immediately jump to the consequences. All other things being equal...lighter is obviously better. But all other things are never equal. Money, obviously, but the wrong tires, a noodly fork, cranks that crack, blah, blah... It's not that weight doesn't matter, it's that we're finally starting to appropriately prioritize weight. I ride a 34 pound aluminum trail bike.
  • 1 0
 @vaedwards: Those tire are DD & DH casing, 1240 for the DHR2 & 1200 for the Dissector = 1/2 pound
  • 1 0
 @rocksandrocks: what casings are you running?
  • 2 0
 @mattbeer: I can't wait for the Summer Field Test. When are you planning to release the videos?
  • 4 1
 @Jvisscher: Current model Enduro? 29lbs? If that's the case you might have the lighest ever Enduro. I call BS.
  • 1 1
 @RMWB: LOL I thought the same
  • 1 0
 @RMWB: Might be possible on a small size frame with some lightweight components. The S4 size has been quoted in reviews online at 31lbs
  • 3 0
 32 lbs is a good weight, especially for B.C. trails (and a few other nearby locations). For regular riding (4-6 days a week) on rowdy trails, lighter builds tend to not last that long. Tires, wheels, frames, cranks, suspension all need to be in it for the long haul. This bike seems like a sensible and durable build. Plus 32lbs feels really good descending! Ascending fire roads and climbing trails on a 32lb bike is totally fine.
  • 4 0
 @vaedwards Our control tires were a Maxxis DHR II 2.4 DD and Dissector 2.4 DH casing.
  • 2 0
 @mattbeer: That's about a pound of extra tire over a typical EXO or EXO+. Fair enough.
  • 4 1
 @loudv8noises: The S works with lightweight tires is quoted at 31lbs without pedals. The frame weight for an s3 without shock is ~8.2lbs Shaving 2-3lbs off what is essentially a top tier build is quite difficult without using some seriously boutique components that don't really match the intended use of the Enduro. @jvisscher also stated he has the same wheels, and those are not light at ~1900g. So until I see some scale shots I call BS.
  • 2 0
 @RMWB: no. 2020 frame model. I have it in S2 and S4. Xtr parts. Next cranks. WR1 faction wheelset. Forecaster tires. Wtb carbon saddle. WR1 da package. Foam grips. No inserts. EDC stem cap. Ultimate Lyric.

For regular/park riding I have assegai tires and cushcore on Union hydra wheelset which adds 3-4 lbs. oneup handlebar and supercrush grips.
  • 2 0
 @Tinshield: I rode the chairlift with my enduro with Matt Beer the day he was testing the electric version of it, the Knevo SL. Just a couple days before he took the photos riding this Arrival for this article. The Pinkbike crew said they were there for two weeks and had a tonne of bikes to test.
  • 2 0
 Haha every setup enduro race bike I’ve ever had has been 36+
  • 1 0
 @rocksandrocks: My ripmo AF is 38 lbs with pedals, bottle cage, coil front and rear, and EXO tires.
  • 2 0
 Offering v2 med @29.6 lbs without pedals, exo+.
  • 43 18
 No internal cable guides, no extra mounting bosses, and superboost? Hard Pass.

If this was released by anyone but WAO, the comments section would read very different.
  • 8 1
 Crap superboost... pass Frown I'm so ready for a new ride.. I need Revel to release a 140/160
  • 4 0
 @JDUBKC: I'd gladly buy an updated rascal or new Revel with 140-150 rear travel and 160 front.
  • 4 0
 I love WAO, but this is so true. Where’s the it’s-not-bleeding-edge-geo crowd?
  • 2 2
 Different goals. Revel manufactures overseas. The Arrival was designed around being manufactured in Canada.
  • 36 21
 Well if that ain't the best-looking enduro frame I've ever seen, I'll eat my hat.
  • 72 11
 Start eating
  • 25 2
 what flavor hat do you have
  • 5 7
 Looks like the Transition Spurs big brother. Well done.
  • 11 0
 Review same day as the release...PB is on it!
  • 11 61
flag specialk1 (Aug 3, 2021 at 8:44) (Below Threshold)
 By "on it" do you mean "paid to review it"?
  • 26 2
 @specialk1: Maybe they do have a good relationship with WaO, but I don't think they're paid for their reviews. Brian Park and company have stated multiple times that they aren't paid for reviews. If a manufacturer sends them a frame, complete bike, or parts to review...they review it. I trust Brian's integrity. Can you prove otherwise?
  • 8 1
 "This bike WAS part of our Summer Field Test, and we'll be going further in-depth in the near future, but initial impressions are that We Are One has built a very impressive bike with fine attention to detail."
they're having the bike for some time now

reading isn't your strengh Razz

JK!! Wink
  • 9 1
 I think what you're talking about is called a "press embargo", a situation where the reviewer is sent some product to try and get a bit of seat time on - but with the understanding that nothing gets shared publicly until XX date. So, it does make sense to release the First Ride and Release all on the same day.
  • 2 0
 @striveCF15: I was half-heatedly joking and just poking a bit of fun at the recurring comment after a product release "full review tomorrow". But PB is really on it with the articles this week. So much good content.
  • 6 0
 @steveczech: can‘t wait for this year‘s fieldtest, some amazing new bikes will be in it (WAO, new range,…) Smile
  • 3 1
 "Summer Field Test", just wondering if that's when Pinkbike pay to play begins.
  • 11 0
 2023 Maestro
  • 6 0
 I’m excited for this bike because I like riding with people and especially people who built what I’m riding. And who can afford to spend time riding because they have good jobs in great towns where we all contribute to the scene in one way or another.
  • 20 15
 Not what I expected from WAO. Pretty sure it rides awesome, but those kinks in the seat tube and the rear triangle aren't cohesive with the beautifully sculpted lines of the front triangle. Honestly, the rear triangle and lower seat tube kink looks like an afterthought. And ugly.

Design lead: "Straight and clean lines look too plain. I want something electrifying! Something to shock people when they look at it!"

Designer: "Say no more fam." *Draws lightning bolts*

Design lead: "Perfection."
  • 4 0
 Kinda agree, somehow reminds me of current Sunn bikes which have really nice head tube, top and down tube and the whole bike is ruined because of some mess making up seat tube and shock area.
  • 3 0
 Exactly. I saw the front and thought it looked great, but wow. There is just way too much going on in the back
  • 5 3
 PB comments every bike looks like a Trek Session. Complains when bikes dont look like a Session.
  • 2 2
 Came here for this. That bike has a frame only a mother could love. It looks nothing like a session; but a lot like that hideous polygon enduro released about 4 or 5 years ago.
  • 1 0
 @Kango: Well the Session actually is a great looking bike.
  • 1 1
 I'm *guessing* the kinks are there for a good reason. The rear trangle brace significantly stiffens the seat stays, which perhaps leads to needing less material. But the brace also needs to be stiff at the lower pivot, whilst allowing relatively short chain stays. So the seat tube kinks to avoid the brace hitting it.
  • 9 1
 Enve - “ introducing our new custom road bike”. We are one- “hold my beer”
  • 5 0
 This is a very impressive debut as a first run product.

It's doubly Impressive that WAO were able to spec the bike as well as they have considering that they are at the back of the spec bus as a nano-builder. Sure, I'll be swapping out a few bits as I have my biases but it is impressive balance of bits hung from those frames. Between the big guys buying everything in sight, 500+ day lead times, shipping container shortages, the rubber shortage(buy all your tires) and the general state of parts availability in general at a consumer level, I imagine the challenge of spec'ing the bikes was almost as hard as the building the bike itself.
  • 15 8
 They should call the bike “the vanishing”. As I’m your bank account vanishing away!
  • 25 4
 Expensive, but it's also a top level build with carbon wheels, built largely in north america from locally sources materials. Hell, a carbon Santa Cruz Megatower with with their XO1 build and alloy rims is nearly the same price - and built in Taiwan.
  • 5 0
 @jayacheess:

should we start a pool for guessing the frame only price? i'm guessing well over 4k freedom units. it'd be awesome to see these come in at less than some far east frames like the overpriced sb150 (4200usd).
  • 5 2
 Many brands offer bikes with comparable intentions, build and price while their frames and wheels come from Asia. Not unreasonable by any means.
  • 4 1
 @jayacheess: spot on...much rather my $$ go to N. American manufacturing
  • 7 0
 Similar design to the Giant Reign. Mainly speaking of the rocker and lower link setup. Similar travel.
  • 1 1
 not quite. the reigns lower rocker rotates about the shock mount point. This is more similar to other DW bikes.
  • 3 0
 @snowbummer: Extend that lower link a few inches and you're there.
  • 2 0
 @snowbummer:don't DW frames have a flat lower link? This one angles down quite a bit from the BB to chainstay. Doubt its considered DW.
  • 4 0
 Will I buy one? Nope, too much $ for my taste but its hard to dislike this bike. Looks awesome, well speced, and has some nice geo. Best of all its made mostly in NA and they are making an effort to reduce plastic use in their packaging. Awesome
  • 4 0
 Kudos to the We Are One team for producing a world-class product in Canada. The Arrival is a beauty and looks like it will be a contender at the races. We have no doubt of great things to come from WAO. Keep it up, guys!
  • 4 0
 The inverse testicle guillotine might be a source of concern, apart from that this bike is an absolute thing of beauty! I wish more companies put together specs like these - the setup is so spot on...
  • 2 0
 What’re you on about?? The top tube gusset? It’s flat on the top.

If you’re smashing yourself on that part of the frame you’re going to be hurting regardless.
  • 1 0
 @Quinn-39: Clearly the humor was lost on you, or it was just a terrible joke
  • 3 0
 The bike looks sick! A test rider from Push was out at my local trails (near Loveland, CO) earlier tonight, and the bike was fitted with an 11.6! Maybe an upgrade from WRO in the works? The carbon weave on this frame just shines in the Sun too. There was a different linkage(raw AL?) too, maybe because of the 11.6. Either way, that thing looked bad ass, and from how he shredder on it, it can handle some big hits and chunk.
  • 6 1
 Calling the completes SP1 and SP2 makes me think of some old Honda Superbikes, but these are marginally cheaper.
  • 5 1
 Another pinkbike review, no Canadian MSRP. But really what makes it worse on this one is it's a made in Canada bike. I don't get it guys. useless.
  • 2 0
 Sorry about that, the CAD is in our press release • Price range: $9999.69 - $12969.69 CAD

Pinkbike being a large global site needs to post in the most common dollar that the industry uses and that is USD on the reviews.
  • 2 1
 @WeAreOne: It's not you guys, it's pinkbike. I know they're global, but regularly have USD/euro/pounds/etc for a bikes made in europe or the US. However, prices in CAD are rarely included even on Canadian bikes and products, I've been complaining about it for years. US bikes that fluctuate with the dollar and can change price, fine that's ok. But as a regular, Canadian bike companies are rarely represented with home county MSRP's, and that's pretty lame.

Again, I know PB is global, but they cut their teeth in Canada for years while they grew and can't even give us Canadian MSRP's for Canadian companies or race coverage now? I saw better British, French and US champs coverage and all we got was a spreadsheet. Loose.
  • 1 0
 @WeAreOne: Is there a frame only option?
  • 5 0
 Same money as SC Megatower equivalent but frame, rims, hubs, stem, bar made in North America. Pretty sweet.
  • 2 0
 Have to say I love the ethos of the 500 mile radius to build this bike. Think it's the way to go forward on high-end builds that as much of the manufacture is controlled in-house. While it is insanely expensive it's pretty comparable to other boutique brands builds. I'd also love to see a comparison to a HOPE HB160 which basically made fully in house
  • 2 0
 Tired of these low stack heights. Now that we've got seat angles getting steeper and chainstay lengths getting longer, stack is going to be the next industry-wide "it" measurement.

500mm reach ain't gonna be 500mm with a fistful of spacers. Every 10mm spacer eats up about 4mm of reach. I'm 6'2'' and wouldn't consider a bike with 500mm reach and 626mm stack. With a 40mm stem, by the time the bars are high enough I'm back over the back wheel like the old days.
  • 4 1
 If I was in need of a new rowdy trail bike, this would be the One. Really like what they have done here. PS. Frame only option is required however.
  • 2 0
 In due time - supply chains are tough in 2021.
  • 4 0
 It is 2021 and it is ridiculous that cables are still running below the BB. Everything looks so perfect except for that.
  • 2 0
 Also, most people wanting to purchase that frame (with any build for that matter) would be happy to see the price point. High end component build with parts you actually want on your bike. Well done WR1!
  • 1 0
 Well done WAO, it's a looker.

Pity there's no frame only option and TBH, by the time this made it's way to Australia it would be nearly $7,000 Australian Pesos. For comparison, Ripmo V2 is $5,700. Love the lines (beauty is in the eye of the beholder) on the frame and the jagged angles for the rear triangle/seat tube works for me.
  • 2 0
 In due time - supply chains are tough in 2021.
  • 1 0
 Using lots of philosophies from Knolly, it seems. Top notch design, hardware, frame manufacturing and build kits with no intentions of being an inexpensive bike. That they are built in Canada is awesome. Maybe they will make the cut when Knolly decides to do another carbon
  • 1 0
 So it is an expensive sight? I like it but that is some serious $/g to save 1kg off my current bike. I love their bar and stem combo though (except when buying the 45mm stem to try against the 35mm then going back to the 35mm anyhow Frown )
  • 1 0
 Love the look. Love the idea of a Non-Asian manufacturing source. The largest size is not gonna work for me unfortunately. I also suspect taller fellers like me may have significant heal rub or clipping on the rear triangle with super-boost and regular Boost cranksets. Not an issue for others not so height gifted.
  • 1 0
 Looks good! Nice design packaging and damn I'm glad to see some more stuff built here in North America, with as much local sourcing as possible.

A) Tougher than a GG Revved frame?
Aa) 29 only? C'mon.
Aaa) Does a CK headset qualify as "bespoke"? Not even the best headsets in the game, by far.
B) Is this next gen carbon layup and molding? I'm good friends with top level motorsport (think WRC and LeMans) and hand laid carbon is really a joke these days.
and....
C) Holy shit, those prices.
  • 4 1
 I can't see the frame alone being less than $4.5k to $5k.

Looks nice though.
  • 2 0
 Also, has anyone else done 157 rear with 148 cranks? First time I can recall seeing that setup.
  • 3 0
 @Binderclip: I was also wondering about this, I have a Knolly with 157 and I don't know if I would want a narrower Q factor, I get a little bit of heel rub and I would have to imagine this is even more prevalent? I also wonder about how well that chainline works vs the accepted "superboost" chainline of 56mm?
  • 2 1
 @Binderclip: I had the same question. I've got an Evil frame with 157 spacing, and the chain drops down the cog when backpedaled in big cogs. Pretty obviously a chainline issue. Was wondering if a boost crank/ring combo would fix the issue.

I complete agree with WAO's perspective that the lowest 8 cogs should be prioritized when setting chainline.
  • 1 0
 @jerrytek: interesting I don’t get that issue with my superboost EVIL. What drivetrain?
  • 1 0
 @Binderclip: I've been using a boost crank/chainring with mine with no issues and it is quieter than my old bike.
  • 1 0
 @DeLaRosaMTB: Full XT, with the XT crank made for superboost spacing. Its on a Wreckoning.
  • 1 0
 @Binderclip: As a side note: I've heard you can use some 148 cranks on superboost bikes, but it depends on the width of the chainstays. In some cases, it won't work. I was thinking of doing this, and someone at Cane Creek recommended using a zero offset chainring to get the right chainline.
  • 1 0
 @jerrytek: This is what I am using on my Salsa Blackthorn, an XO 168mm Q with a 0 offset 32t Wolftooth C-ring or if I want to go a smaller C-ring (28t) I can use a 3mm boost offset
  • 4 1
 So rad looking! Im sure quality will be outstanding... going into my 4th season on my Agent 29 wheels! Great work!!
  • 1 1
 First impression was that it was a lazy design. On closer look at the detail pictures this is actually quite the impressive design. I can dig it. It is not something to behold in 2D profile, rather this is something to be appreciated in 3 dimensional space. The fade to raw carbon is a really cool touch as well. Respectable suspension design. Only affordable by serious racers or Dentists.
  • 4 0
 I'm just here to talk about Matt Beer's forearm
  • 4 0
 It's actually a Fivearm
  • 3 0
 Pricey? Yes.. But, you are talking about a very boutique type of bike... If I had the money, this would be on my list...
  • 2 0
 The weight is without pedals, right? Can one of the Pinkbike team say whether that is the norm when reporting bike weights? Pedals weigh almost a pound or half kilo.
  • 1 0
 Yes it's expensive but compare it to a Santa Cruz or yeti and then remind yourself that those are made overseas, small cost difference really , I'm baffled that they can offer this made in Canada for this price.
  • 2 0
 Just saw this bike in person (with the owner of WAO) it’s pretty stunning. Picked it up, felt light too. I could see myself on one of these someday.
  • 7 4
 Time to sell my Ripmo V2.
  • 4 1
 What tires were on test? Looks like a dissector out back
  • 16 1
 Control tires for the Summer Field Test were a Maxxis DHR II / Dissector combo.
  • 5 6
 @mikekazimer: Weird set-up... supply issues?
  • 10 4
 @islandforlife: Weird how? That's a super effective tire setup.
  • 6 2
 @DirtCrab: Well it works for sure, and not a dig on that set-up, lots of people love it... maybe "weird" was the wrong term... "unexpected" maybe?

But generally, since most people (within the maxxis realm) have settled on a DHF or Assegai up front, it would make a lot of sense for "control tires" to match that consensus. Just like in their previous field tests. And since that's what they did on previous field tests... I would assume they probably they probably had trouble getting the amount of tires in the spec they wanted/need (DD Assegai's in MaxxGrip).
  • 4 0
 @islandforlife: That is a great setup, glad to see something other than the usual slow-rolling DHF/Assguy.
  • 7 0
 @islandforlife: FWIW, in the past 5 years way more WCDH and EWS rounds have been won on front DHRIIs than DHFs.
  • 12 1
 @islandforlife: DHR II as front tire here, all day long.
  • 3 1
 @islandforlife: Agree. DHRII isn’t my choice for the front. It can’t be leaned over as far as a DHF…does straight line brake better. DHF DHRII combo is still the winner.
  • 2 1
 @canuck-rider: You think? I have two inflated next to me, DHF and DHR II, and the corner lugs are pretty much identical. I have never sensed any less traction when angulated. However, the DHR II clears muc and gunk much better.
  • 2 0
 @privateer-wheels: Ya, he's got that wrong... the DHR and DHF side knobs are exactly the same, that's the way those tires are designed. I won't ride a DHF up front anymore because it's tread pattern wasn't designed for the newer wide trail tires and 2.5 widths we ride now. The huge gap between the centre knobs and the side knobs creates a very unpredictable and scary zone of almost no grip until you lean it over more. This is where the Assegai shines compared to the DHF and probably why lots of people now like the DHRII up front vs the DHF.

If I was riding widths of 2.3 or less, the DHF is a great front tire.
  • 24 21
 Superboost spacing. Pass...
  • 10 3
 Its a whole bike, why pass on something that includes wheels, with a great warranty and track record on said wheels.
  • 18 3
 Pick an axle spacing and be a dick about it.
  • 8 0
 @drfunsocks: let’s be real, 99% of us are passing on this because it’s $9k+ before even contemplating the spec sheet
  • 5 0
 @jsobrie: lol. Like in the car forums when everyone says they wouldn't buy a Ferrari without a manual transmission..."thanks for your input representative from the segment we don't care about!"
  • 4 0
 @jsobrie: of course, just say “$9k, pass” instead of making up a stupid reason you dont want to spend 9 grand you dont have on a bike you dont need!
  • 1 0
 Agreed. I gave up on Pivot because of this. Miraculously, there are plenty of bikes on the market that get by just fine without this idiotic hub.
  • 7 5
 This is the best looking bike I have seen in ages. Absolutely killer industrial design.
  • 3 0
 Ah yes, the old sram X1 cranks
  • 3 1
 We Are One "we don't sell crap builds" - I don't see a problem with the pricing.
  • 2 4
 It’s got sram gears so that blows that statement out of the water
  • 3 1
 Looks great. Even better that they matched the size of the back wheel up to the front. Like the good old days.
  • 2 0
 This bike is more than I'd ever need and a more than I'd pay, but I hope this bike and WAO are successful AF. I love it.
  • 4 2
 Devinci to all of you wanting a large volume North American manufacturer of mid-high range bikes "Am I a joke to you?!"
  • 7 0
 Only select models are still made here in Canada, and they have never done Carbon here
  • 3 0
 Doesnt Divinci distribute manufacturing for various products? Like some stuff is made overseas and some stuff in Canada? I thought their carbon products were made overseas.
  • 3 0
 @WeAreOne why not call it "da bike"
  • 3 0
 Arrival vs Range vs Dreadnought vs Yoann's GG build, please.
  • 2 0
 Interesting that it has a 55mm stroke shock for 152mm of travel. Don't most 145-155 frames run a 60mm stroke?
  • 1 0
 Does this bike features the “swimming pool” at the bottom of the shock where the water gathers and stays …like the transition sentinel v2 ??
  • 1 2
 IDK... i appreciate any new bike and I really like WR1 wheels, so I was looking forward to this bike... even knowing it was SUPER Boost... but I gotta say, I might feel a little self conscious riding this. Its got a bit of a Batmobil look going.
  • 1 0
 Looks like it won't work for long legged people as seat angle is too slack. Norco has this dialed. Fine for average height people.
  • 2 0
 anyone engineers want to explain how this suspension is different from a 2009 IH Sunday/ DW Link?
  • 1 0
 It ain't.
  • 1 0
 That has got to be a awsome first ride. look at that rear rotor just arter one ride, was that trail steep or what :-)
  • 9 7
 “Strives for perfection” but puts a Float x2 on it…
  • 4 0
 yeah this bikes screams Push or EXT
  • 3 0
 @Lagr1980: Push just confirmed they have a fitment for this bike for that true dentist build. www.instagram.com/p/CSHnWFArOim/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link
  • 3 0
 As oem builds go, fox factory float 36 and x2 are about as good as it gets. I have the same set up on my bike and it’s been great. The X2 does take a lot of adjusting to get just right.
  • 1 0
 Article says 11-6 is on the way, and nothing is stopping you from selling the X2 and buying a RockShox, EXT, Kitsuma or whatever fits.
  • 1 3
 Seriously, has anyone NOT shipped theirs back to Fox yet?
  • 2 0
 I'm never going to be able to afford a new mtn bike...
  • 3 0
 Eh.......
  • 3 1
 Can’t wait to throw a leg over one of those and go for a rip!
  • 1 0
 A lot of similarities to the Bronson you just reviewed. How do the ride characteristics compare with these two bikes?
  • 1 0
 Dang. What a looker. Surprisingly easy parts conversion from my V1 Offering minus Booster boost! Daydream commencing
  • 2 0
 “Hey kids, can we have a chat about your college fund?”
  • 2 0
 Standover isn’t low enough.
  • 2 0
 If you were riding through a carbon forest, you'd be completely invisible.
  • 1 0
 should have called it The Nighthawk. prettiest frame (and paintjob) i have seen in a while.
  • 1 0
 Sweet looking machine. Looks a lot like the Prime thunderflash in my opinion.
  • 1 1
 so this bike is made by a Canadian Company and yet they are priced to sell in U.S dollars. What is the point in Canadian Currency
  • 2 0
 • Price range: $9999.69 - $12969.69 CAD (This is from the press release)

PB has to keep their articles constant and chooses USD in most cases.
  • 1 0
 I will sell my car, my bike, my camera gear and I could buy one. what the hell is the price
  • 1 0
 Rear end looks like the lovechild of an old Giant (lower linkage, rocker link) and an old Pivot(kinked seat tube).
  • 1 0
 So a first ride review after you've already tested the bike properly. That last bit seems counterintuitive....
  • 2 0
 Has Dave Weagle given up on defending his parents?
  • 1 0
 Definitely good looking bike with premium spec! I would assume e-version of the bike coming later this year?
  • 1 0
 Oh god this is gorgeous. If I could make it work, this would 100% be my next bike. Unfortunately I'm not uber rich.
  • 1 0
 Lifetime no questions asked warranty?
  • 2 0
 Website says lifetime warranty, so yes sounds correct.
  • 3 0
 @gbeaks33: only for manufacturer defects, not the same as "no questions asked"
  • 3 0
 @gbeaks33: no thats not the same thing, lifetime warranty against defects is one thing, no questions is saying its a crash replacement
  • 1 0
 Revel bikes is the only no Q's asked as far as I know? But there may be more.
  • 1 0
 @JDUBKC: yeah man Revel, Reynolds, GG, Hope, there must be more
  • 1 0
 A warranty, but not the same one as for their rims.
  • 1 0
 @mariomtblt: ah ok yeah I guess you're right. I suppose if it doesn't explicitly say no questions asked warranty then you are probably correct. I know a lot of the team at WAO and I'm sure they'd take care of their customers but I see what you're saying.
  • 1 0
 @gbeaks33: well thats good to know, thanks man
  • 6 6
 I'm surprised no one has mentioned the weight. It's 32 lbs. That's a feather weight for Enduro bikes these days.
  • 3 0
 Would be nice to see frame weight. Build weight doesn't mean much with how differently bikes are specced.
  • 5 3
 Except 160/150mm isn't really an enduro bike these days. The weight is, if anything, a little heavier than bikes with similar build kits & travel #'s.

Nothing wrong with 32lb bike but an S works enduro is 170/170 and weighs same or less w/ similar build kit.
  • 3 1
 I will it’s heavy for a carbon frame and wheels. It’s at least 2 lb heavier than it should be
  • 1 0
 @CM999: I have a full carbon specialized Enduro. It's a 2018 small with 27.5 wheels. X01 drivetrain with carbon cranks and 24 spoke carbon roval wheels. 30 lbs. I think a bigger 29 carbon bike is right on par at 32 lbs?
  • 1 0
 not cheap is it. Size small is huge.
  • 2 0
 Reign
  • 4 3
 10k with no crash warranty? idk man
  • 3 3
 Don't crash. Automakers dont give out crash warranties also
  • 5 1
 @Dlakusta: you must be the only rider here who never crashes

but in all seriousness, many brands offer this, ive exercised it twice on my current bike, sometimes I just eat it man what can I say? and if a brand will eat my mistakes, and for a lot less than 10 grand, then the choice is easy.
  • 1 0
 With prices like this what's even the point anymore
  • 1 0
 @weareone any frame-only plans?
  • 2 1
 In due time - supply chains are tough in 2021.
  • 1 0
 Another bike I'm in between sizes on
  • 2 1
 DW-link patent - how is WAO getting around that?
  • 1 3
 Because a DW link usually has two little links, top and bottom, ( similar to the link on the bottom of the bike). And this bike only has one , on the bottom, with a rocker pivot on the top.
  • 1 0
 @Saidrick: Lot's of DW bikes have a rocker upper "link". Pretty sure the patent has expired.
  • 2 0
 @Saidrick: original patent documents show the rocker link - Turner bikes always used the rocker style and some of the Pivots use rocker. patents.google.com/patent/US7048292B2/en
  • 1 0
 @smoothmoose: Good to know, thanks. That's surprising with all of the DW like systems I've seen.
  • 1 0
 @Saidrick: pivot switchblade?
  • 1 0
 @canuck-rider:

Oh , I am used to seeing Ibis Dw link which has the links and the yoke.
  • 1 0
 @Saidrick: It's more about IC migration with the DW patent in whatever configuration. The idea is "basically" that the IC migrates through the centre of the fixed pivot of the lower link. Kind of like a Vice Grip locking. The "over centre". Giant Bikes are one of the only ones that truly replicate this. Others like a Banshee for example have a IC path that stops short of that clunking "over centre" feel to the suspension. Perhaps WAO have studied this and came up with something that doesn't infringe on the extremely broad DW Link patent.
  • 2 1
 Expensive and heavy. 32lb is not light for a bike in this category
  • 1 0
 Now that's a sexy looking ride!
  • 1 0
 Made in Canada. Price in USD.
  • 1 0
 Just like every other bike ever reviewed on here.
  • 1 0
 Go to the WAO website. You’ll be fine.
  • 2 1
 @WeAreOne why did you choose X01 rather than GX AXS for "cheap" build?
  • 1 0
 @Xandr - supply chains are tough to say the least. If you want to build a bike, the wait on parts is years, not months at this time.
  • 1 0
 canadian made, priced in usd. no problem!
  • 2 1
 What a punt one the warranty after stoking people on the rim warranty
  • 1 0
 Congrats WAO, possibly my next frameset.
  • 1 0
 Stealth Bomber--s i c k! Well done!!!
  • 1 0
 jeepers its like Batman Begins but bikes! I wanna be a Canadian too!
  • 2 0
 No kinematics charts?
  • 1 0
 Was definitely expecting a HP
  • 1 0
 32lbs is now considered low weight?
  • 1 0
 Gorgeous bike....damn, nicely done!
  • 1 0
 Hold up, is there really such a thing as an SDG Bel Air Gel?
  • 1 0
 Bleh. Yet another mid travel carbon bike. Boring.
  • 1 0
 What are the seat tube lengths, did I miss it?
  • 1 1
 This arrival was more expected than a flight abroad post-pandemic!
  • 3 3
 The price difference between AXS and cable is crazy…..
  • 5 0
 axs comes with hydras as well
  • 6 1
 Not really when you consider there is, upgraded brakes($200), upgraded dropper($700), upgraded hubs($300), and the AXS drivetrain ($700)
  • 5 1
 Almost as crazy as putting a SDG Tellis dropper on a $9000 bike.
  • 1 0
 @frigofff: and AXS dropper. That’s a big chunk of the upgrade price right there.
  • 1 3
 @stevemokan: is it though? Droppers are the least important part of the build...they literally go up, do down...payign 2-3x as much for a fancy dropper is pointless unless all you care about it bling and weight
  • 3 0
 @SprSonik: have you used the SDG? It’s absolute garbage. And calling it the least important part of the build is a slight overstatement IMO.
  • 1 0
 @RMWB: What about the offset in price of the lower spec parts?
  • 1 1
 Made in Canada eh ! Luv it !!!!!!
  • 1 1
 Holy crud that reach # tho Blank Stare .
  • 1 1
 I heard they were doing E Bikes next year.
  • 1 0
 Way to go WAO!
  • 1 1
 That’s Scrooge McDuck money
  • 1 0
 Hel yeh WAO, nice work!
  • 1 0
 ..
  • 1 0
 We are 1%
  • 1 1
 Can-Down-Duro
  • 2 2
 This looks so good!!
  • 1 1
 Great looking bike!
  • 1 1
 Lovely...
  • 1 1
 Looks - 10/10
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