First Ride: Yeti's New SB130

Sep 10, 2018
by Daniel Sapp  

Hot on the heels of Yeti releasing their SB150 enduro bike a couple weeks ago, Yeti's new SB130 is now in the mix, filling a gap between the SB100 and SB150. The SB130 has some similar traits to the SB150 - it's long and slack, holds a water bottle, and uses Yeti's Switch Infinity suspension design but is slightly more lean and practical for all around, every-day trail use.

The SB130 has, as you would suspect, 130mm of travel coupled with a 150mm, reduced offset fork on the front end of the bike. The bike is designed to be versatile - able to get up hills as well as down. Compared to the SB5.5, the most similar bike in Yeti's line, the big updates are the geometry and leverage rate. The SB130 is also offered in sizes small to extra-large, where the SB5.5 started at medium.
Yeti SB130 Details

• Intended use: trail / all-mountain
• Wheel size: 29"
• Rear wheel travel: 130mm
• 65.5° head angle
• 433mm chainstays
• Boost 148 rear spacing
• Sizes: S-XL
• Weight: 28.6 lb / 12.9kg (size M, X01 build kit)
• Lifetime frame warranty
• Price: $5,199 - $10,099. Frame only: $3,500 USD.
www.yeticycles.com

There are five different build kits available, along with a frame only option at $3,500 USD. If you haven't splurged enough already (the GX Eagle build starts at $5,199 USD) the kits can be upgraded with carbon DT Swiss hoops. The top of the line XX1 Eagle build is $9,199, or $10,099 fully upgraded.

Yeti SB130
Frame Details

There's no hiding the Yeti style in the SB130. There's the Switch Infinity suspension design, and like the SB150 the downtube is a little longer and straighter just before the bottom bracket to allow room for a water bottle. There are internally molded cable routing tunnels and an access port near the bottom bracket to aid in cable routing and keep mechanics happy. The frame utilizes a 180mm post mount on the swingarm so there's no need for a brake caliper adapter. The seatpost diameter is 31.6mm, which Yeti claim decreases the influence the seat-clamp has on the motion of the dropper. They state that the larger diameter dropper also adds strength to the structure.


Yeti SB130
Yeti SB130
The shock is driven by a short link mounted just in front of the seat tube.


Yeti's Switch Infinity system has been around for a few years now. The system uses two small and short Kashima-coated rails - made by Fox Shox in conjunction with Yeti - just above the bottom bracket to manipulate the bike's axle path. As the bike goes through its travel, the carrier moves up on the rails to give the bike a rearward axle path and improved pedaling performance. As the rear wheel continues through its travel, the mechanism moves downwards and reduces the amount of chain tension for better absorption of big hits.

The new and unique two-piece shock extension design provides a few advantages, according to Yeti's Director of Engineering, Peter Zawistowski. It gives the ability to manipulate the leverage rate of the bike within a huge range, independently of other kinematic variables such as anti-squat. This provides the flexibility to position the shock to fit a water bottle in the frame while obtaining the ideal leverage rate.

Zawistowski says that they aimed to design the bike with linear progression (12%) and that a straighter curve aids in shock tuning and also maintains a consistent and predictable ride feel. The bike's leverage ratio is said to have improved small bump sensitivity, mid-stroke support and bottom out control compared to the 5.5, all while still allowing use of full travel. Combining the increase in progression with a lighter compression damping tune is said to give the bike a livelier feel and make it highly efficient in pedaling.

Yeti SB130

Geometry

The SB130's geometry is very progressive for a trail bike, with a 65.5-degree head angle and 460mm reach on a size medium. The seat tube is steep at 77-degrees to make the bike climb well and paired with a reduced offset (44mm) fork. Chainstays are 433mm.


Developing the SB130 and SB150

Zawistowski says the development of the SB130 and SB150 happened at the same time. Yeti wanted to make a Richie Rude approved, EWS-specific 29er - the SB150 - along with a bike that would be an improvement on the SB 5.5, which is where the SB130 comes in. Designing the bikes in conjunction offered several advantages for them. First, outside of the upper link, both bikes use identical hardware. This was done to make it easy to source replacement parts if necessary. Yeti also wanted to the bikes to have a very similar fit in terms of stack, reach, seat tube angle, along with a similar suspension feel to make transitioning between the models natural.

According to Zawistowski, the variables that change between the SB130 and SB150, besides the obvious rear-wheel and fork travel, are head tube angle, leverage rate progressivity (12% for the SB130 and 15% for the SB150) and testing protocol. The SB130 is tested to Yeti's trail standards, while the SB150 is tested to their DH standards. The greatest change to the layup between the two standards can be seen near the head tube, top tube, and down tube. The SB150 also has a 2mm greater wall thickness at the head tube for added strength.





As with the SB150, I spent a number of days riding in the Whistler Valley on the new SB130. Additionally, I brought the bike home to North Carolina to begin getting the miles in for a long-term review. Opposite ends of the continent and quite different trails, but equally challenging terrain.

I was on the medium size frame with the X01 Eagle Race build. The 460mm reach is long, but the steep seat-tube put me over the bike in an optimal place to get power to the pedals and not feel too cramped or overly stretched out. Like the SB150, the SB130 feels well balanced. Uphill and downhill, the bike was comfortable.

I climbed steep fire roads, technical singletrack, and punched up and down undulating terrain, and never once felt the need to engage the pedaling platform on the shock - it simply wasn't necessary. Having the water bottle caged to the appropriate side of the downtube on the SB130 is a significant upgrade over the 5.5 - it's actually usable while riding.

Descending the SB130 is a joy, and no matter the terrain, the bike has a planted and confident feel. It makes the most out of its 130mm of travel, and with the 150mm fork up front it's easily been able to handle any situation I've piloted it into so far. The bike is long and stable, giving the feeling of being locked into a track, especially while riding rough, high speed, unpredictable and exciting terrain. I found myself time and time again needing to check up because I was riding far more committed and recklessly than my standard "80% test speed" - especially on my home trails. This bike wants to run, and it's pretty fun to let it have its way.
Yeti SB130

My opinion thus far is that Yeti have done a very good job with the SB130. It climbs well, descends like a bat out of hell, and manages to strike a nice balance between the two. I'm going to continue putting it through its paces over the coming months to see just how versatile it truly is, and to see how it stacks up against other contenders in this travel bracket. Look for a full review later this year.






279 Comments

  • + 167
 Nah, not interested in cheapass bikes below $10,101.
  • + 175
 Let the peasants ride Yetis, there are Unno's to be purchased.
  • - 18
flag Spark24 (Sep 9, 2018 at 23:34) (Below Threshold)
 I mean... The dentist's need something to spend all of our money on... And $10,099 just ain't good enough!
  • + 84
 “To make a man or a boy covet a thing, it is only necessary to make the thing difficult to attain.” - Mark Twain (from Tom Sawyer)
  • + 11
 The price is so offensive, my retinas are burning just reading those digits in this first impression. I wear a Dakine hip pack with a bladder, so I'll be buying a 5.5 for half the price of a 130.
  • + 11
 @yeticycles is the DH bike next ?
  • + 185
 i was about to ring up Yeti and ask what it cost. Then I realised that wasn’t the phone number but the price
  • + 31
 @LoganKM1982: Fun fact is that a full Factory build Unno is cheaper in Europe than the top of the line Yeti. What is really expensive with the Unno is the frame - the build kits are actually priced relatively competitively.

And that doesn't even say anything about the Unno frame that's hand made in a first world country.
  • + 2
 @zzRider: I'm a tradesman with family and full mortgage.... Not hard to attain at all! Especially frame only!
  • + 5
 @Waldon83: price is subjective depending on one's income level.
  • + 13
 @bohns1: It is not. This is not a Ferrari concept car or one of the Voka's paintings. It's a bike. Excellent bike maybe, but not a showroom piece.

Thing is.. I could afford it. Especially if I manage to hide a price tag from my wife.
But if you can, that doesn't mean that you should.
On the other hand, if you're sure that this bike would give you a wider smile at the trail end, go head. Buy it. Than it's not that expensive at all.
  • + 3
 @Waldon83:

Waldon that's a great idea, actually. Yeah i'm looking at the minimum cost of admission at $5200 which unfortunately isn't out of line with other brands for carbon super rigs and a GX build. It's still alot though. I don't even look at the builds higher than that.
  • + 1
 @LoganKM1982: better yet, Poles
  • + 12
 @pakleni: Exactly. I'm not a dentist nor a doctor and can afford one (what is up with the dentist jokes - I know plenty of Yeti owners that are not dentists). Wife and kids taking all of your money? That's on you. Who cares what the price is if you can afford it and it makes you happy. It sounds like people are deflecting their dissatisfaction of their financial situation to the price tag of a bike.

Bike looks nice but the SB150 seems like a way better purchase.
  • + 5
 @Jaguar83: I would think that would drastically depend on where you are riding the bike.
  • + 0
 Totally - My SB6 is great on shuttle days, but a 4.5 (or SB130) would be the best option for where I live without a doubt.
But I'm not going to buy a new bike just because it's 'Lower Longer Slacker' and has a different location for a water bottle.
Upgrading isn't warranted for me until there is a real drastic change - but that's completely personal.
  • + 4
 15 dentist's didn't like my reply! ????
  • + 0
 @Spark24: None of us are dentists tho! This is not unattainable!
  • + 1
 @autorodtech: So true - that's a good call, my bad. For me, the SB150 makes more sense.
  • + 2
 @heavyp: No, I doubt it, been waiting since they wererunning converted SB66 bikes.
  • + 1
 @Spark24: So boet; these dentist references are really, really old. Just saying.
  • + 124
 Oh I know! I know! It's a 130mm bike so it climbs great and we are surprised at how well it descends for having that much travel. Boom hire me to write all your reviews.
  • + 23
 Hahaha. It's slack and long and is a progressive bike
  • + 24
 @jamesdippy: and very playful yet planted at the same time, it almost feels like an ebike in its efficiency but you have to work it
  • + 18
 the right stiffness not to have any noticeable flex but not being overly harsh, maybe?
  • + 3
 @jamesdippy: so its long low and slack like Geometron G13, or yeti coming already with outdated geo
  • - 12
flag WAKIdesigns (Sep 10, 2018 at 0:52) (Below Threshold)
 @vitality: the issue is that Joeymetron G16 and Pole Is that They have been so ahead of their time that they already started to stink. Like can recycling facility. A fragrance composed of decomposing hopes, bloating ego, empty promises and good intentions.
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: The good news is that Nicolai will make you replacement parts for 10 years. So you'll still be able to get parts when everyone else is just catching up.
  • + 14
 After a monster 4,00 foot descent down (name of trail here), I had no arm pump issues and my hands felt fresh for the next adventure. This may have more to do with the (name of fork) and it's excellent (name of) damper, which gives a great platform to hit things as hard as you dare.
  • + 3
 I'm happy with my Ripley
  • + 2
 @sml2727: crazy right? That bike is the opposite of long low slack yet its a very cool bike (just not for tall dudes)
  • + 21
 Maybe they should move to a new review format:

picture of bike
price paid to post ad/review
pictures of components
water bottle discussion
squish video
marketing blurb

Note the only words in the review are the water bottle discussion, and then the direct from the company marketing blurb.
  • + 78
 @Rasterman: I'd like them to do:

A: Over-haul service tear down and ease of re-assembly
B: Attempting to get parts through their local IBD or web site
C: Attempting to contact the company for help or warranty issue
D: Re-cabling a bike
E: Stating what creaked first and how easy it was to fix.
  • + 8
 @raditude: Now that would be a review.
  • + 8
 You forgot that it's confidence inspiring.
  • + 1
 @jclnv:

great idea for the long term review, which is now in the works. Run with it PB!!
  • + 1
 @Rasterman: awesome business idea. makes loam wolf look like a fuzzy kitten.
  • + 10
 @raditude: The beauty is that Outdoorgearlabs does a lot of this and has a LOT of comparison data too. I REALLLLLY wish the rest of the MTB world would move away from the marketing speak stuff for reviews. There is BARELY any comparisons let alone meaningful ones. That being said, I'm fine with these "first ride" reviews. Its great material...its the longer term "real" reviews that totally are lacking despite having a great format example in Outdoorgearlabs.
  • + 5
 You forgot the most blatant part of every review in the last three years (copied straight from this review): "never once felt the need to engage the pedaling platform on the shock - it simply wasn't necessary."

It's almost like Fox could stop making shocks with levers, and no one would ever notice. Kind of makes you wonder why the bike companies spec them on their builds to begin with, right? They surely wouldn't want us to actually use it.
  • + 17
 @jclnv: I mean, no matter what you write in a review, all that matters is how hard the bike is to work on at your house at 11:49 PM the night before you fly to go on a riding trip and break a derailleur hanger as you're trying to make your shitty shifting work better in an effort to keep up with your buddies because you want to have the eagle 50t you paid for because you've been drinking beers and had to dust your bike off and the trip is already paid for on the card and you got it approved by your wife so there's no turning back now and if i can't get it to work then i'll try to get a hanger at the closest shop when we land and if not then f*ck it i'll just rent a bike
  • + 1
 @stevemokan: Agreed, seems like this has been on every review I have read or watched in the last few months.
  • + 1
 @Svinyard: Looks like a nice site, thanks. bookmarked!
  • + 63
 Wouldn't a bat out of hell ascend? Since hell is below us.
  • + 20
 Finally! Asking the important questions right here
  • + 21
 Not if you live in Manchester
  • + 4
 @sewer-rat: harsh but fair
  • + 0
 @sewer-rat: or Liverpool.
  • + 32
 oh look another overpriced ”made in china boutique”
I just have one question why UNNO on enve is cheaper than mass produced in china boutiques??
  • + 8
 That is the question. But then trek 9.9 costs as much and I’d take Yeti over it anytime. The difference is though that UNNO will not be discounted...
  • + 7
 Not going to get into a debate about pricing, but Yeti's frames aren't made in China.
  • - 24
flag enduroNZ (Sep 10, 2018 at 1:52) (Below Threshold)
 Yeti frames are 100% built in California, but the price whilst may be justified, is just not worth it. Not when trek, giant, specialised make equally good bikes for half the price
  • + 22
 @enduroNZ: California? Think you have the first letter right but the wrong state. Built? Maybe you mean assembled?
  • + 3
 @enduroNZ: When did they move production back from China?
  • + 8
 @WAKIdesigns: They've never produced in China. I think they used to use a place in Taiwan but changed to Vietnam a few years back.
  • + 27
 @speedfreek: Vietnam, the home of high labour rates? Ok, that explains the price :-)
  • + 15
 @headshot: I already said I'm not getting drawn into a discussion on price. Yetis have always been expensive. Always will be. Don't like it? Then don't buy one.

All I will say is that, since the switch to Vietnam, build quality seems to be improving as failure rates have dropped dramatically.
  • + 4
 @enduroNZ: no they’re not
  • + 35
 @enduroNZ: they must make them in the same California factory my iPhone was made in.
  • + 7
 @speedfreek: how do you have intel on their failure rates to make that statement?
  • + 18
 @Ktron: I work for their UK & European distributor, managing sales and service for Yeti in Germany. Done that for the past 5 years.
  • + 3
 @speedfreek: That is was i always wonder, i have heard and read of those cracking a lot specially the rear triangle. I know a owner of one and he said he wanted to sell it bc the 5 yr warranty was about to be up and did want to take a chance. I just read their warranty and not to impress with it considering how expensive the bike is, at least Specialized and Santa Cruz offer basically a no questions ask policy. i Known two people that have use their warranty as a result of a crash and they had their back. The SB130 looks and it seems like a super capable bike, but shelling all that $$$$$ i want to make sure i am cover 100% even if i crash.
  • + 12
 @fedfox: Yeah, but I think if you go looking for problems anywhere you'll find em.. Yetis failure rate is probably not any higher than anyone else's - they'd be out of business if that were the case! I don't know what the global rates look like right now; all I can tell you is that from my experience, the amount of frame warranties we've seen over the past few years has declined quite drastically.

There's no such thing as a "no questions asked" warranty policy, especially not when it comes to frames. It might be that the people you know got lucky, or maybe their claims were found to be genuine. Who knows. I certainly wouldn't bank on any manufacturer warrantying your frame if you wrap it round a tree though Wink

Perhaps some kind of insurance policy might be in order if you're considering purchasing such a high-end bike? I know that my home insurance policy covers against theft and accidental damage (ie. smashing it to pieces in a crash) up to a certain value. Might be worth looking at..?
  • + 7
 @enduroNZ: Just try a Trek, a Giant and a Spech. Then go ride a Yeti and you'll see that they may not be as equally good. And FYI, the Trek 9.9 is $8,000 -- not really "half the price" (that can be said for others too).
  • - 2
 @wibblywobbly: Carah-forhnia...
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: selling my 9.9 to get this! Frame only of course
  • + 4
 @speedfreek: carbon practices have just gotten better I think. Plus Yeti fixed some frame issues they had with their rear triangles midstream into the 5.5 iirc and some other models. It was a known thing at the time. Not a problem any more (sounds like you'd agree).
  • + 2
 @speedfreek: thank goodness.... A unbiased opinion then
  • + 1
 @Svinyard: Oh for sure, though I think a lot of issues seen in the more recent past were caused by inconsistencies in the manufacturing rather than design fault. The 5.5 has been the best-selling model in my territory since it launched, and has actually been the one I've seen the fewest warranty claims with. You get em from time to time but it's rarely the swingarm, it's rarely catastrophic, and it's not often we see the same issue twice.

I guess it's a combination of refinements on the design front and using a vendor who employs those best practices more consistently that lead us to the situation as it is, where things are vastly improved.
  • + 2
 @HairyLegs: I don't think I've presented anything as an opinion, have I?

Just shedding a little light on the discussion, based on my experience.
  • + 10
 @fedfox: they HOSED me on a legit warranty claim on an sb66c triangle. They made a point to be dicks about it too. I won't touch turquoise again. Ibis for life
  • - 1
 @WAKIdesigns: @WAKIdesigns: Seriously? Over a company that has the most experience manufacturing carbon fiber and actually uses impact resistant carbon fiber weave in the parts of the frame most likely to get hit by rocks? And likely weighs 1+ lbs less for a similar frame yet is also stiffer. And the frame doesn't look like it's primary mission is to hold a f'in water bottle? And has a better shock leverage curve? You're on crack bro...
  • + 2
 @ninjatasic: Feel for you man, that rear triangle was one of the reason i stay away from one. Beautiful bikes though
  • + 0
 @davec113: you mean Trek makes better frames from carbon fiber than Yeti?
  • + 1
 @speedfreek: you are right the home insure e.c.t helps (smart to have one) but is the fact that you have to go through extra steps to cover your bike that is not appreciated if the manufacturer decides to say no. You are also right there is no such thing as 100% no question asked policy with the frames, i did said basically Wink is nice to know that they wont give you a hard time over it, at least that was my friends experience. They are original owners of the bikes and had regular crash not dropped from a cliff or car rack going 80 mph.You mentioned also in another comment that the failure rates have drastically fallen, that is good to heard to new owners since Yeti's are good on the eye and good to pedal.
  • + 4
 @ninjatasic: I just rode a 5.5 and a ripmo back to back on captain ahab and the yeti felt like a xc bike with huge wheels. I had to look at the ripmo tires to make sure it wasn't 27.5. Ibis is far superior in my experience!
  • + 1
 @enduroNZ: hahaha. whereyou get that bit? I remember when they were made in Durango, the last time they were made in the US!!! Not counting protests
  • + 1
 meant prototypes!
  • + 0
 @basalt: Ur comparing an older geo yeti with the latest from ibis..
  • + 2
 @speedfreek: Huh, from China to Vietnam. Interesting, and a good move on Yeti's part for profitability as China's labour rates go up.
  • + 1
 @speedfreek: Only one destroyed at TransBC this year, so yes, the failure rate is
going down;-)
  • + 29
 I'm all about function over form but that square-ish seattube area looks horrendous.
  • + 13
 This... Sad to see a departure from the beautiful front triangle they had. I don't care about the water bottle either.
  • + 4
 I've always said that Yeti's ride as good as they look. I hope this one rides better! It will need to do some making up
  • + 27
 That last pic... ooooooo.... I want! Both a bike like that, and terrain. Preferably the trail. Big Grin
  • + 6
 yeah what in the literal f!@# is happening in that photo? awesome....
  • + 9
 Honestly, if I came upon that trail while riding, I'd be a little scared.
  • + 2
 @smartyiak: I'd probably be in pain. I'd only have time to be scared after I'm through it... on the ground, in the hospital, in bed... plenty of time to process it then. lol
  • + 21
 "Yeti also wanted to the bikes to have a very similar fit in terms of stack, reach, seat tube angle, along with a similar suspension feel to make transitioning between the models natural." Oh to be someone who could just casually transition between Yeti models, picking and choosing as they come out.
  • + 35
 What, you don't have multiple $10,000 bikes in your garage?
  • + 7
 Haha, it's less that people would have multiple Yeti's but more about when picking one out at the dealer showroom. For a super long time, companies have changed the geometry & suspension from short travel to mid travel, and this makes the decision more simple for people. Get your aggressive geometry in either, then pick the amount of travel you want and be a dick about it Wink
  • + 3
 maybe they should only be sold in pairs,duh!
  • + 7
 ......only thing Id be “transitioning” between is the couch and the spare room if I Bought just one yeti!!
  • + 15
 I have a sb5.5 and a SB100. I really have no business (financially) owning 2 Yeti's, I'm just at that weird in between where I sorta make enough money to do it but Im just stupid to realize that i don't make enough money. People always assume it's dentists.. Sometimes is just idiots people. Anyways. Who wants a 5.5? Large frame...
  • + 3
 @gooutsidetoday: Lol true. As far as the bike... I'm more of an XL/XXL, but hey, I wouldn't turn a bike like that down... if the price is right, I'm sure I could make it work. Razz
  • + 1
 @Rimrider26: I'd take it!!
  • + 2
 @gooutsidetoday: they might be the best bikes make so owning two is the best period!
  • + 22
 “Tested to Yati’s DH standard.”
They haven’t had a DH bike in like 7 years, DH bikes from back then are now called XC bikes
  • + 19
 Did anyone mention the fact that the $3500 frame has a press fit BB yet?

If there are enough comments about it maybe they will change to threaded on the next one. After all, it worked for the water bottle mount.
  • + 3
 Nothing wrong with pf bottom brackets for installed right.
  • + 17
 Can we see a shootout between the sb100, sb130, and the sb150? Same trail and rider doing timed runs like that vitalmtb 29er shootout. I think it would be interesting to see how of a difference less travel makes on bikes with very similar geometry and the same suspension design.
  • + 13
 "Oh it's SO expensive... only dentists ..." yadda yadda yadda...

SB 130 GX Build: $5199
Trek Fuel Ex 9.8 GX Build: $5199
SC Hightower or 5010 GX Build: $4899
Evil Following GX Build: $5699

SB 130 frame w/ DPX2: $3500
Trek Fuel Ex frameset: $2999
SC 5010 carbon w/DPX2: $2999
Evil Following / Calling frame w/DPX2: $3099


So let me get this straight -- On a ~$5k bike, that it's maybe 10% more suddenly puts it into the "you must be made of cash" territory? Can you make builds for $8k-$10k? Yea. And you can for any of those others as well. Small volume bikes available from dealers cost more. Duh. Odds are you can negotiate that down from your LBS and you can't online. Duh.
  • + 0
 You're comparing to Evil, Santa Cruz, and Trek's high-end. Hello! Why don't you throw an Ibis and a Mondraker in there too? When you compare expensive bikes to equally expensive bikes, yeah, they're the same. Duh. Those are all expensive compared to other (more normal) brands, which was the point to begin with... Duh.
  • + 2
 @mtbikeaddict:

what "normal" brands, addict?
  • - 1
 @mtbikeaddict: Confirmation bias makes the world go round! It's what happens when things like reality, common sense and critical thinking get left by the way side...

Progress! Wink
  • + 3
 @mtbikeaddict: Sure, when you compare to a Giant or a Diamondback, they're more expensive. Are those "normal"? Are they "normal" for a review site we look to for bike porn? BMW's, Audis, Mercs, Lexi (is that the plural of Lexus?) are more expensive than Hondas. Do car mags / sites plaster the latest Civic on the front of the site and tout how it's a great choice for the every-day? Yea - that'd get a lot of us to click and go "oooh!" and click through so they get their add revenue.

Duh - there are expensive brands and less expensive brands. Some buyers will focus more on the cost and others less. What I find stupid is that Yeti seems to get singled out for this here on PB. Why is it that Yeti, far more than anyone else here on PB, gets the "oh it's so expensive" flak in the comments? Reviews themselves note the price and that it's up there with the other, similar brands. But, the comments hit the cost like such a tired, old trope it's ridiculous.

Level it across the board for bikes that cost $X if you like. Heck, the fact that our pedal-powered bikes often cost more than motorcycles built for similar terrain is a bit crazy. Honda CRF250L could let you ride to the trail, go up and over said trail, and ride home (dual-purpose bike) for the same money. Yet, it's a full-on motorcycle with things like antilock brakes and about a million more parts than are on one of our bikes. How can those to two-wheeled devices cost the same? But, let the complaining be across the board.
  • + 0
 @WasatchEnduro: Maybe I should've said brands and models. Even some more expensive flagship models have several more affordable options. I've gotta go work now... if no one else can think of any bikes under $5k before I get back, I might make a list. Razz
  • + 1
 @mtbikeaddict: The point is that everyone complains about Yeti (and not SC, Evil, Trek, etc.) being expensive when they are all the same price...
  • + 1
 @celstark: This. It's jealousy, solely. People are jealous of Yeti's if they don't have one. Yeti has built up a phenomenal reputation (deserved or not - it's completely irrelevant) and people are jealous of that reputation if their bike doesn't carry it.
  • + 3
 @celstark: I complain equally about all manufacturers who have this insane pricing model. Not just Yeti.
  • + 0
 @Jaguar83: Jealousy? Are you F'kin kidding me? Why would I be jealous of someone who spent $6k, $7k, $8k++ on a bicycle? I laugh out loud. Then I bang my head because now used bikes are costing more than new bikes from a couple seasons ago.

Why do so many people equate complaints of pricing to not being able to afford it? I have no shortage to pay cash for a new bike, but when I look at the current state of the industry I don't see much value in it.

We've been using the same basic components, suspension designs, materials, and manufacturing processes for the last 10 - 15 years at least. The only major change IMO has been to marketing/advertising, and THAT is (I believe) the main factor in the massive increases to cost of ownership.
  • + 1
 @m1dg3t: Keep banging your head - you're missing the point, entirely.

Frankly, you aren't who we are talking about. But go ahead and interject something totally irrelevant to this particular subthread if it suits you.
  • + 2
 @Jaguar83: You must be new here? Since when did PB'ers not complain about price, regardless of brand? You obviously missed the "I can buy _ YT's for that price" phase.
  • + 1
 @mtbikeaddict: With every Yeti review there is always a dentist joke or 70...that no other brand gets. Go through the articles...
  • + 1
 Not too far off.

Another comparison.....

Trance Adv Pro 29 1 $5000 (with carbon wheels)

Trance Adv Pro Frame $2800 (with DVO shock)
  • + 2
 @OzarkBike: Good find. Again, a similar priced / classed bike...and no "dentist" BS about the Giant (don't believe me? go to the page itself...).

It's either that people are jealous of dentists or jealous of Yeti owners. Not sure what other option there is?
  • + 1
 @Jaguar83: You just don't get it, do you? @OzarkBike did make a good find, but not for your argument. Yeah, that's another 5k bike. Its not like there's not an abundance... that isn't the point. The point is that Trance and other brands/models is the higher end build with carbon wheels and whatnot... not the bottom of the barrel NX/GX etc. build.
  • + 2
 @mtbikeaddict: THIS IS THE GX BUILD www.giant-bicycles.com/us/trance-advanced-pro-29-1-2019 And there's a Fox 34 on it vs the Fox 36 on the Yeti - similarly priced wheels (look up the MSRP, sheesh). Seriously?!
  • + 0
 @Jaguar83: GX EAGLE. But yeah, I goofed a little on that, that 2019 Trance was different from what I was thinking. One example... sue me. But seriously, you're comparing this to Giant's 115mm bike?
  • + 2
 @mtbikeaddict: celstark gave 3 more examples above. And it's only a 15mm difference - and I didn't even provide the example, but it works for me. And the Yeti is GX Eagle as well. "one example...sue me" - you are 0 for 1, haha.

If people want to complain about Yeti (in particular) pricing - they should just complain that there aren't lower builds. That would at least make sense.
  • + 3
 @mtbikeaddict: who da fuq wants a normal brand! And what is that exactly?
  • + 1
 @bohns1: He/she has missed the point entirely (while trying to make a new point which does not apply).

For the millionth time: Yetis get a "dentist bike" rap while similarly priced brands/bikes do not.
  • + 3
 @Jaguar83: Yes, you have missed the point entirely while trying to make a new point that does not apply. FOR THE MILLIONTH TIME: Yeti gets a dentist rap, but so does pretty much every other expensive brand. Maybe, the problem isn't that Yeti makes expensive bikes. Plenty of more affordable bikes come in 10k models. Maybe, the problem is that Yeti doesn't make more affordable bikes... 5k is the bottom of the bottom. You can get a different bike for under 5k and not be forced into paying more unless you want to... but if you want a Yeti, you have to have the serious loose cash. If you want to (and can) spend several thousand dollars, it doesn't matter, there are plenty of Gucci bikes, and Yetis are just one option, and a good one at that. It's that elitist thing that annoys people... bikes like this cater specifically to the high-end.
  • + 2
 @Jaguar83: It's a simple fact. You can like it or hate it, but you can't argue it's truth... but just keep on telling me the Earth is flat. Dead Horse But as they say, “Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain. On a side note, you told @m1dg3t that he was being totally irrelevant, when he and I were here and actually conversing first. You were the one who jumped in. And can you say something besides telling everyone that they're missing the point? Because what, then, is the point? Your alleged "point" is simply incorrect, and hence you don't have a point.
  • + 2
 @Jaguar83: Ah, ok, I just noticed that you included this in a slightly earlier comment. "If people want to complain about Yeti (in particular) pricing - they should just complain that there aren't lower builds. That would at least make sense." My apologies. Finally, we agree! While some people are doubtlessly complaining about the number on the price tag, I think this, as I outlined, is a main constituent of the issue. Plus the fact that Yeti has become the butt of jokes akin to the way "Looks like a Session" did. Well-worn and slightly inaccurate at times? Yes, but still ubiquitous and fun to create. A (n often good-natured/tongue-in-cheek) scapegoat... nothing personal. Smile
  • + 2
 @mtbikeaddict: Too much typing, not enough biking - for both of us! See you on the trails!
  • + 1
 @Jaguar83: Agreed. Cheers! Smile Salute
  • + 1
 @Jaguar83: sounds like you're missing it brah! All the big boys are price similarly at the better build specs.
  • + 3
 @bohns1: Ugh, haha, I know this. The issue was that people here complain about Yeti being a "dentist bike" when other brands' roughly comparable bikes have similar prices in similar builds, without the "dentist bike" rap. Whatever, doesn't matter. Let's go ride our bikes, "dentist bike" or otherwise.
  • + 14
 Would love this bike. When will Yeti Start to finance?? 30 year fixed?
  • + 8
 To be clear, a steep seat tube angle doesn't make a bike climb well. It's one variable in the equation. Crappy pedaling bikes (I'm looking at you Transition Sentinel) don't climb any better just because the seat tube is a couple degrees steeper.

Sweet looking bike, hopefully the sb5 gets a similar update.
  • + 6
 The sentinel is a crappy climbing bike? What? Did I set mine up incorrectly because it climbs as good as my smuggler did and better than most bikes I've ridden capable of tackling the same terrain.
The other bike I was seriously considering (Norco Sight C9) was only slightly more spritely and much less capable on gnarly terrain.
  • + 4
 @Boondocker390:

Agreed, the Sent is no slouch in the climbing department, especially if we're talking the carbonium version, plus it's a burlier bike than this one in terms of the bias towards descending. Awesome climbing position, and the DPX-2 platform is good enough on it. No sh*t the sb130 should win a climbing contest tho.
  • + 1
 @Boondocker390: the one I ride down in TN was terrible. A 140 travel bike shouldn't need a 3-way climb switch. My 160 travel with a coil shock doesn't have a climb switch and it climbs better.
  • + 6
 @yzedf: transition is kind of known for crushing down and slogging up. It's gotten better but let's not pretend they are some gold standard for climbing.
  • + 2
 I've had the Sentinel Alu for 8 months now. It's not a super efficient climber, but it constantly surprises me with its ability on technical ascent. It out climbs all my previous bikes, when things get rough & tricky.
  • + 3
 @Svinyard: the yeti climbs better then any transition period?
  • + 0
 @MX298: as long as it's smooth single track! toss in a few ledges and the yeti gets caught up every time, it requires way more body english for my style.
  • + 1
 @Svinyard: They're not DW link, and the Sentinel is DH biased, but doesn't pretty much every review of the Patrol praise it as an excellent climber? Plus I find it a little hard to believe that their short-traveled rigs are slugs.
  • + 2
 @mtbikeaddict: last generation Patrol was said to be decent, but not as good as the same vintage Reign for the punchy climbs. That was from Trail Peek over on YouTube, they are Santa Cruz riders, so no dog in that race. I live and ride in New England, all my riding is short punchy climbs and more old school tech and I liked the Reign better. Both bikes have been updated to be slightly more downhill focused. I buy used, so I picked up the Reign. Not being a fashionable bike, I got the SX for under $2000 in great shape and needing nothing but tires and a chain.
  • + 8
 That looks like a super fun bike that would be more than enough for 99.9% of us.

Don't bitch if you can't afford it. There are plenty who can. Yetis are so common in SoCal that I wouldn't really want one just because it's not unique enough. Same could be said for Porsches though Smile
  • + 0
 I don't get it though, what's the difference. What are the improvements in a $10k trail bike over a $4.5k one? It's marginal. Improve your body and skills. Lots of consumer wh*res in Calfiornia who would over pay for anything whether its quinoa or a G-Wagon.
  • + 1
 @Dogl0rd: There's a $5,200 one. Why did you immediately reference the highest build?
  • + 11
 yeti, now introducing the new metric naming
  • + 7
 Geometry for comparison purposes:
geometrygeeks.bike/bike/yeti-sb130-2019

This was leaked to us weeks ago... glad to finally release it to the world! I want one Smile
  • + 5
 I ride a DB Release with 150mm front and 130mm rear, slack geo. After two years of everything from xc to bike parks, I'm convinced the 150-130mm suspension combo is one of, if not the best, suspension platforms for the elusive "all-around bike."
  • + 4
 I gotta say, I had a SB5.5 Turq 2017 and there was the most microscopic hairline 2 mm long "crack" in the gellcoat. Not the carbon. Took a pic of it magnified, had th local shop check it out and they said nothing to worry about but would send it to Yeti if it made me feel better. Yeti said nothing to worry about but better be safe than sorry and sent a brand new frame and the local shop shaped everything out and rebuilt it for free.

I'd buy another Yeti in a heart beat based just on that experience, and not only the that but for a 140/160 29er that thing climbed like an XC bike and was a monster downhill. I regret selling it, but I'm OCD with bikes that way and have ket my eye out for a used one because it was the most well rounded bike I've ever owned.
  • + 1
 LOVE MY SB5.5t! Love the SB150 geometry ... can't justify upgrading though. This also looks real sweet but I'd want the extra 20mil and slacker HA. Still...this looks to be a real nice ride.
  • + 8
 Quick!! Everyone list your 4.5 for sale immediately. But message me first.
  • + 0
 This sparks the question. Is this a replacement for the 5.5 or 4.5....or both? The article seems to indicate that the SB130 is a replacement for the 5.5....but based on the model line up, it's really a replacement for the 4.5.
  • + 1
 @thefazz: It's definitely the 5.5 replacement. The 100 is the 4.5 replacement, then the 150 is not a replacement for anything. Just an addition to their lineup.
  • + 4
 @dualsuspensiondave: I thought the 100 was the ASR replacement.
  • + 0
 Man, from a pure asthetics stand point, I’m just not a fan of the new frame design. Also, the 5.5 and 4.5 geometry was spot on for riding in the ozarks.
  • + 1
 @thefazz: I don't think so as the geo is almost the exact same as the 4.5 but with a longer reach. They also pointed out that it's not meant to be an XC bike, but a capable trail bike.
  • + 6
 "Climbs well, descends like bat outta hell"

So it's like every other bike out right mow, got it.
  • + 3
 I know right? Great time to be alive. If only I could be riding any of those awesome bikes instead of internet commenting...
  • + 5
 I'm loving these mega stout trail bikes with good steep angles, just wish one of the affordable manufacturers would get on board with it.
  • - 6
flag kev-bike (Sep 10, 2018 at 6:03) (Below Threshold)
 santa cruz hightower
  • + 7
 @kev-bike: cough... affordable. Big Grin
  • + 9
 @kev-bike: Hightower is the opposite of steep. As a tall guy, that bike is on auto wheelie every time I ride one on normal climbs. Not cool and also super short in reach (but not as short as previous Yeti). 6-4 here and none of those bikes work well. Nice to see Yeti make a bike that actually fits for once.
  • + 5
 Guerrilla Gravity
  • + 2
 #RideGG
  • + 2
 Smash it baby (GG).

Also the Knolly Fugitive LT, but that one is way more affordable as a frame up as there's no build under $5k but frame only is a hair over $2k.
  • + 3
 GG Smash with an 11-6 shock for under $3k.
  • + 3
 Rear triangles look almost identical, but are not. One must wonder why @yeticycles has not opted for making them indeed identical and interchangeable between both bikes and instead leaving the space to make them in two different CS lengths i.e. 433 and 444?
No increase in production cost compared to this. More importantly bitching crowd, myself included first and foremost, is kept shut.
Would kinematics be so severely compromised between the SB130 and SB150, if they shared the same rear triangle?
  • + 1
 The chainstays are the same length though. SB150 has 433mm as well.

In any case, why not ride it first then decide if you want to change the chainstay lengths? Taking one number in isolation and saying that's how you like bikes to be just doesn't work.
  • + 3
 @speedfreek: I am not taking one number in isolation, but isolated one that breaks it for me. Others are spot on for me.

From experience. Both of my bikes are sporting CS in the 433mm region (FS 435mm, HT 432mm). Being 191cm tall I can even feel the front of my HT (73° STA (=ESTA), 100mm fork) lifting up when it gets really steep. Can a steeper SA compensate for this alone, while retaining the good pedaling position? I doubt. Especially, since ESTA changes from 77° to a slacker number with suspension sagged and saddle in high position, ending up being closer to, I would guesstimate, 73-74° than 77°. Longer and lower front end helps balancing around the rear axle though.

But, even if I'm wrong in my assessment of the CS length needing to be longer in size XL the bike costing $3,500 USD for frame-only should cater to my taste. There should be an option at least. Citing a production cost of two different size CS rear triangles would seem ridiculous at this price level, especially since you could have it nixed with two bikes sharing the same hardware. THAT German direct sales brand offers different CS lengths, respectful of frame size, at 2,299.00€ frame-only.
  • + 5
 12 and 15% of progression is not far from linear... it is indeed an improvement from earlier designs but still. Double these numbers and I will be interested!
  • + 0
 Or just throw a token into the air chamber...
  • + 5
 12% and 15% is because the people that can afford these can’t actualy ride them anywhere close to their potentially. Yeti has to make them feel good to their customers.

Meanwhile, those of us who can actually ride have to mess around with spacers and send the shock out for a custom tune before it’s rideable. THAT is why the price tag is so aggravating. Give those of us who can actually ride real progression for our money!
  • + 5
 @wibblywobbly: exactly! Or make something like Guerrilla Gravity: plush or crush positions for the damper.

@wakidesigns: spacers only helps for the spring rate. Progression also improves the damping properties which is way often neglected.
  • + 3
 It depends of the rider weight as well. There's been an interesting write-up on this in RAAW Madonna test from MTB News. www.mtb-news.de/news/2018/08/30/raaw-madonna-test-review

Interesting part: "For perfect rear-end performance, the perfect interaction of kinematics and dampers is essential. At the same time, the perfect match is always a compromise, after all, the suspension has to work great for a very broad group of users with very different weights. The rear of the Raaw Madonna has a gear ratio that drops very steadily from 2.9 to 2.3 (equivalent to 20% progression, 2.67 on average). This is a relatively high gear ratio, which I have deliberately chosen so that the rear triangle responds very well and can be optimally tuned for light riders.

The Fox DPX2 requires a high air pressure in the Raaw Madonna through the EVOL air chamber, creating challenges for the MTB-News testers. The damper can be pumped up to 350 psi, that's no problem, but then Jens also wanted more damping. Unfortunately, this can not be adjusted externally satisfactorily. One solution for this is the handle to the Float X2 in our configurator. This has a much larger air chamber, so it needs less pressure and would have been the better choice in this case.

In order to further solve the issue in a more customer-friendly way, I plan in the future to adapt the bellcrank, as did the chainstays, to the frame sizes in order to reduce the gear ratio", says the bike's designer Ruben Torenbeek.

So for someone of RR stature 15% might just be a perfect progression rate.
  • + 6
 Yeah more progression equals more better... listen to the vital interview of the engineer. They tried different rates and tested other frames and came to the conclusion it's not better and not faster. Those super progressive designs often lack midstroke support and ramp up extremely in the end giving them a harsh feel if you want to use all of the travel... the Yetis have completely linear rates with decreasing leverage ratio, which gives you perfect shock and midstroke control.
My SB 66 is way more linear with basically no change in LR and it goes like hell through rough stuff.
Also, if you ride a bike with less SAG than most (25-30 %) and a little more compression, I doubt the average Joe has any advantage... they feel more at home on an Capra with 45 % SAG isolating themselves from the ground...

And I think it doesn't seem like Richie Rude has an "unrideable" bike and Graves had no problem piloting that thing to some EWS and DH podiums as well...

I personally love their design decision since I hated the super progressive bikes I rode (Pivot Firebird and Capra)...
  • + 1
 @jzPV: definitely depends on shock setup. I have a progressive bike and it needs a coil to work well, but it is perfect when setup properly. On the other hand, you can't run a coil on Yetis because they're too easy to bottom out, and they rely entirely on a progressive air shock setup (at least the previous generation).
  • + 4
 @dthomp325: actually because of the added midstroke from a coil shock and the linear nature of the leverage ratio without the curve of many progressive systems, through which you also lose a bit of midstroke support, these frames with a coil shock can be pretty close when it comes to the force you need to bottom out. The drawback is you can't adjust it. The real achilles heel for a coil shock are degressive systems (or partly degressive systems to counteract the loss of sensibility from air shocks in the beginning of the travel)... they are finally dying out but only a few years back there were still quite a few...
  • + 1
 @jzPV: what vital interview are you referring to?
  • + 2
 @Happymtbfr: It's part of the SB150 test.
  • + 1
 @jzPV: thanks! I will check that
  • + 1
 @wibblywobbly:

See, wibble wobbles gets it!
  • + 1
 @jollyXroger: I went through the article and cannot understand if Ruben Torenbeek wants to change the leverage and / or the progression of the leverage curve depending on sizing. Then I don't get either in what direction he intends to make these changes. More progression and lower average LR for heavier rider ( = for larger sizes) would make sense at my armchair engineering level of knowledge.
  • + 1
 @jzPV:

jay-z -> side comment. i'm interested in the Alchemy Arktos and see the rear susp design is almost identical to the old sb 66 & 95. thoughts on the design? pivot/bearing issues? same guy designed both.
  • + 4
 @WasatchEnduro: The SB 66 came without Enduro Max bearings at the beginning which could cause some bearing issues, but since I'm all on Enduro Max they are holding up well.
I've got it since 6 years and I changed all bearings once and the non drive side Switch main pivot (the smaller one) twice, which wasn't entirely necessary... the creaking came from the RF Cinch BB (surprise surprise) but I put the bearing in anyway.
Actually I changed both Switch link bearings another time but the shop sold me non Enduro Max bearings under that designation and they just held up for 1 month or so....

I'm not using a hose or pressure washer and disassemble the bike once a year. All hardware is in good shape and all tolerances for bearings and axles are nice and tight and it's a joy to wrench on the bike.

I don't have any problems with bottoming out. I'm running 28 % SAG on the DB Air IL, one volume spacer and 1.25 turns of HSC (from 4.5). And this is still a safe setting without excessive compression as everybody thinks (LSC is normal as well with 7 clicks as you don't need a lot because of its efficiency)...
I only use full travel when going into huge compressions or landing to flat or something seriously goes wrong. One advantage is the relatively low leverage ratio, which leads to a very useful range for suspension settings even for heavier riders as opposed to an Evil Insurgent with 57 mm shock travel for example.

The Switch link really works as you have loads of anti squat in the beginning therefore this things sprints better than most bikes, so easier singletrack is still fun and accelerating out of corners gets you up to speed quickly.
In rough stuff the suspension is decoupled from the chain and it is really efficient with good feedback while still being nimble, so hopping over stuff or switching lines is easy. The suspension behaves very predictable through all of the travel without weird stuff. It really feels like this thing has a split personality.

The one drawback is that it doesn't feel comfortable in slow awkward tech stuff but that's fine by me... the faster you go the more this thing shines. That's probably because of the lower than usual SAG numbers (25-30 % is ideal) and the high amount of anti squat for the first third of the travel. Later in the travel the anti squat drastically drops when the switch link changes direction.
I have yet to find the limit of this bike and I've ridden some serious terrain in the alps, and while I'm no enduro racer looking at strava I'm one of the faster amateurs I'd say.
My hometrails are full of jumps and berms and the predictable suspension and nimbleness make it great for these trails too.
There surely are more ground hugging bikes, but for an active riding style this thing is ideal. The awesome pedaling characteristics also broaden the range of trails and riding styles this thing can handle without sucking all of the energy out of you.
  • + 2
 Want progressive, check out the Capra review.
  • + 1
 @Happymtbfr: To my understanding by lowering the bellcrank leverage ratio (probably seat stays at that as well) he intends to reduce overall progressiveness of the linkage at L/XL frame sizes, which cater for larger, heavier riders.

One thing to keep in mind with different chainstay lengths as is designed in RAAW Madonna linkage characteristics also vary across the bike/frame sizes. It would be interesting to see by how much and in what direction for each frame size.
  • + 2
 @jzPV:

Thanks for the insight. I'm hoping to throw a leg over the Arktos and this bike at Outerbike next month. Too much awesomeness out there.

I remember when Jared took 3rd in south africa on his sb66 (2013). Awesome

#strengthforjared
  • + 3
 +10k with no superboost or new 2019 improved 11.2% optimized Q factor. In 4 months that thing will depreciate faster than a Chevy truck.
  • + 6
 Want
  • + 4
 How did they nail the looks on the sb100 but the 150 and 130 have that terrible looking seat tube?
  • + 2
 Agree, l like the original SB4.5 design so much better. They gotta figure away to slim it down or go sideways with the switch infinity link
  • + 2
 Now you are paying for their lifetime warranty!!! Tomorrow they will release the SB80 & SB180...


Id rather get a GG or fly to Europe and get a Pole (and still save money)....
  • + 4
 No Shimano option, guess I'll have to make my own..
  • + 2
 I prefer Shimano as well.
  • - 2
 @autorodtech: shimano sucks
  • + 1
 @MX298: If you like things that work and don't cost a fortune.
  • + 3
 I am here to hate on yeti
  • - 1
 dissappointed in these releases. The SB 5.5 was an amazing bike just needing modernized. I feel the 150 is too much race bike and the 130 is just a bit short on travel. Granted, this is my thoughts on a bike for WV riding. Sometimes not super steep, but large impacts, and roots. the 5.5 was pretty much the perfect bike for here.
  • + 4
 Where are you riding it in WV? That 10mm won't make much of a difference, long as you're not trying to hucks to flat all day. I've raced the enduro series and have yet to find anything that could be outgun my 130mm Primer 29. Other than Snowshoe, I can't see it.
  • + 0
 @dualsuspensiondave: my local spot is valley falls, numerous hucks there that an extra 10 makes a difference. I went from a 150 mm trail bike that did everything pretty decently there, to theres a few that the 140mm bike is maxed out on. For littler guys, the 130 is probably ok.
  • + 1
 @SnowshoeRider4Life: This Nate? From what I can gather, the 130 is more progressive than the 5.5 which should make up pretty well for the .4" of travel. Throw a leg over both the 130 and 150 maybe? Cheers buddy!
  • + 1
 @dualsuspensiondave: si senor. frame is may be more progressive but i have the shock volume spacered out. should deliver the same ramp.
  • + 1
 Eh...you'll be fine dude. Just tweak up your suspension and go. That 5.5 had one of the lowest reaches for even a mid-travel 29er out of the ENTIRE industry of similar bikes. Not a great design but still a nice bike for some people. They have of course realized their mistake, ridden the coattails of Transition>Ibis and copy/pasting that geo. The new geo+updates will make up for that missing 10mm....or you just get the sb150 and call it a day man Smile . These news bike, the looks of front triangle aside, are really really ridiculously good looking: *blue steel*.
  • + 3
 How is the durability of the switch infinity thingie?
  • + 2
 I love my SB5, Yeti stop tempting me with all these new 29ers. And I work as a poor valet for a living.
  • + 4
 Pole.
  • + 1
 Yeti states if you can have one bike only its the 130. Just playing here but what if you can afford two bikes. What would they be? A 150 and...?
  • + 3
 A SB 130 and a Commencal DH Supreme 29er of course! Watch me! :-)
  • + 1
 This bike is DOPE! It will be the ultimate single quiver machine! All of the improvements I wanted made to my 5.5! Sickness!
  • + 1
 See, I find the travel of the 150 more appealing, but the geometry is a little too much. With this one, the geometry is closer, but want more travel.
  • + 2
 @TheR: I’m currently on a Sentinel with the max size volume spacer in the shock and 20PSI less than recommended, I seldom find myself wanting more. Just add the biggest volume spacer, reduce PSI a bit and GO!
  • + 1
 @Golden-G: yeti’s just pedal beter with active suspension.
  • + 2
 How tall are you riding an M? No word on weight? Whats the frameweight with shock?
  • + 4
 Daniel's 5'10", and the weight has been added in - the test bike is 28.6 pounds.
  • + 3
 @mikekazimer: you da real mvp.
  • + 2
 480 in the large eh?
I have to be honest, something about this bike is just offensive to my eyes.
  • + 0
 Maybe because it looks like an e-bike without the "e"? Think Yeti is testing if the market is ready for an e-bike...SB130e
  • + 1
 @Hansdie: I think it's the big gap in the middle of the frame..
  • + 3
 E bike sense tingling. you could stick a battery in there!
  • + 2
 Is it possible to use plus size tires?
  • + 1
 Looks cool but also looks like theres a lot that could go wrong and getting parts might be effort!
  • + 1
 Nah. It's a pretty straight forward system, and the UK distro holds good stock of spares.
  • + 1
 Quite a dashing frame, UNNO what this reminds me of?

Digging the slightly longer reach tho.
  • + 1
 So is this a press release or a review? It sounds like you copy-pasta'ed the marketing jargon from Yeti.
  • + 2
 Will there be a 27.5 version?
  • + 11
 It's called the SB5, and they make it already. Smile
  • + 2
 @stevemokan: but i want my bottle inside the frame (stamps feet and goes and cries in the corner)
  • + 2
 @deli-hustler:

Yes! That’s what I want to see... A 650b version of this frame.
  • + 2
 @stevemokan: I mean, travel yes but geometry... not even close.
  • + 3
 Wow, tough crowd.
  • + 1
 You had me excited right up until the point where I say the press fit BB. F-A-I-L
  • - 2
 I can't, but even if I could afford one, I still wouldn't buy one as maintaining that Infinity gizmo on top of the usual pivots is simply a deal breaker...... Now I gotta get back to buying that new hardtail I've been eyeballing.
  • + 2
 Its actually pretty simple.
  • + 3
 The infinity is no problem at all
  • + 3
 I've seen long term review that compare the SI to VPP and SI was much easier to maintain than VPP. I think it just "looks" like it'd take more but it doesn't.
  • + 0
 @mxben13: don't call a bike like this simple. hardtails or rigid bikes are kind of simple. single speed bikes are truly simple. unicycle now thats simple.
  • + 1
 @rideitall-bmx-dh-road-unicycle: The servicing of SI is simple.
  • + 2
 These Yetis are a bargain .
  • + 1
 Anyone know the shock lengths for the new yetis? Metric I'm guessing?
  • + 1
 Wow, medium is sized at most others large.
  • + 0
 I'd like to see a head to head of this bike with the new @COMMENCALbicycles Meta TR 29 British Edition. Smile
  • + 1
 At least it’s offered in “non pepto puke blue”
  • - 2
 Yes! Just what we need. Another $3500 frame, and completes starting at $5200 running up to $10100 for the 'top spec' model. LoL

No thanks.
  • - 3
 How hard could it possibly be for Yeti to create a cover of sorts for that switch infinity whatever that they have there, to prevent it from gunking up and getting all kinds of FUBAR'ed?
  • + 5
 Probably quite hard, given the main pivot moves up and down constantly. Also, why bother? If you put a cover on there, crap WILL get in, and then not be able to get out. That'll definitely screw the mechanism.

As it is, the switch unit is very well sealed. Keep it cleaned and greased and it's not really any different to your shock in terms of wear.
  • + 0
 just ziptie piece of inner tube, like its done on all vpp dirt collectors
  • + 6
 It's not needed. I ride my sb6 all through the year in the UK and it is much, much easier to look after than the vpp system on the nomad 3 I owned before, and gets caked in less mud. Honest!
  • + 4
 Lifetime warranty!!! The SI is very simple and easy to service. It is far more durable abd serviceable than any dial link bearing design. It also performs much better.
  • - 1
 Enough with more 29er crap, can we have more of the wheel size that champions like Sam Hill ride please? ????
  • + 0
 Down-country!
  • - 2
 I'd rather ride an ellsworth than a yeti.
  • + 3
 Did you finish writing your comment before hitting submit? Most people follow up statements praising Ellsworth with "said nobody...ever."
  • + 1
 @Hill-Seeker: In case you mis-understood cus you're french... I would rather own, ride, and look at a new Ellsworth, than a new Yeti. Don't care for the brand, the looks of the bike, or the infinity switch system. & in case ya didn't know, opinions are like a*sholes, everyone has one.
  • + 1
 @HARv379: rode the new ellsworths... Horrible pedal Bob.. Every climb needed climb switch engaged.. I'll take the yeti! And many others for that matter
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