Five Ten Freerider EPS - Review

Dec 29, 2016
by Vernon Felton  
Five Ten Freerider EPS Review

Ah, winter.... The mist in the trees, the snow on the ground, the red and angry (or, alternately, blue and numb) toes. The last bit, of course, sucks. It's hard to dress up the romance of frostbite. By the time January rolls around, I dread those moments when I peel off my soggy shoes and see what horrors the sharp end of mother nature has dealt my digits.

Sure, you can wear wool socks. They're great. But they're not enough. You need a proper winter shoe if you're going to be slogging through ice and slush for hours. While there are quite a few options for people who ride clip less pedals, proper winterized flat shoes are still relatively thin on the ground. That's why we picked up these new-ish (they debuted at Frostbike 2016) Five Ten Freerider EPS shoes.

Five Ten Freerider EPS Details
• PrimaLoft insulation from the instep forward, including the tongue
• Single piece leather on forefoot reduces potential for leaky seams
• Fully-gusseted tongue prevents water and mud intake
• Additional foam insulation in the sock liner
• Insulated, heat-reflective footboard
• Stealth S1 rubber outsole
• MSRP: $140 USD (low-top)/$150 USD (high-top)
fiveten.com, @FiveTen

The "EPS" end of the handle stands for Elements Primaloft System. What you're looking at here is essentially a more insulated version of the Freerider Elements model that's already been kicking around a couple seasons now. The original Elements model featured a waterproofing treatment and less mesh than its summertime sibling. This new shoe increases the warmth potential considerably with an injection of PrimaLoft insulation and some smart details on the shoe construction. PrimaLoft is said to mimic the insulating benefits of goose down, but with a superior warmth-to-weight ratio. What's more, the Five Ten uses PrimaLoft Gold, which is treated with a waterproofing agent. Finally, PrimaLoft Gold is supposed to dry more quickly than other synthetic insulators, which should reduce post-ride funk. The Freerider EPS is available in both high-top ($150 USD) and low-top ($140 USD) versions, as well in three different colors--Utility Ivy (shown here), Core (black) and Midnight (close your eyes and envision the electric-blue, leather suit that Eddy Murphy wore in Raw).



Five Ten Freerider EPS Review
An insulated sock liner helps retain heat. The forefoot of the shoe also features a dose of PrimaLoft Gold insulation.
Five Ten Freerider EPS Review
To help prevent leaks, Five Ten uses a single piece of DWR-treated leather across the forefoot. A fully-gusseted tongue also helps here too.

On Trail

The past few months have been full of rain, slush and snow--not so awesome for riding, but perfect for testing these shoes. So, yay....I guess. After more than my fair share of post-holing through the snow and splashing through puddles, it's clear that Five Ten has made strides in improving their Elements model. To wit, my feet stayed considerably drier on average. Was I just imagining that? Nope. There were days when I rode with a Freerider EPS on one foot and a different model on the other. In addition to feeling foolish, I found the Freerider EPS' gusseted tongue and its relative scarcity of seams absolutely helped keep water out of the shoe. Whether the additional warmth comes courtesy of the heat-reflective footboard or the dose of PrimaLoft in the tongue and front of the shoe, I can't say, but the end result was better cold-weather performance.

Note that I said "better" and not "awesome". The shoes aren't achieving that superlative for truly icy conditions. Not yet.

For starters, if you're all about staying warm and dry (presumably that's why you're still reading this), you should opt for the mid-top shoe. You'll lose a degree of mobility, but you'll also have less water seeping in around your ankles. If you plow through deep enough puddles in these low-top versions, you will get water funneling down around the sock liner and when that happens, the temperature around your toes starts to go south.


Five Ten Freerider EPS Review

Similarly, while the PrimaLoft is undoubtedly keeping some warmth in, you're probably still going to come home with a few numb toes when the mercury is hovering just below the freezing mark. The shoe is winterized, yes, but it's not winter-proof. Perhaps no shoe ever attains that lofty appellation, but it's a distinction worth noting if you are considering wearing these shoes during that long-dreamed of hut-to-hut journey in the snow. Or maybe you never had that deam. Maybe I'm the only one. Moving on then....

Speaking of snow, the S1 Stealth soles offer absolutely fantastic grip and wear resistance on flat pedals, but when it comes to hike-a-biking over hills covered in the fluffy white stuff? Not so much...at least not when the shoe's tread is composed of a few little dots. Five Ten's S1 rubber compounds is awesome when walking over roots and rocks or mating with traction pins, but the shoe needs considerably more tread if it's to maintain a grip in snow and ice.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesSo is the Freerider EPS worth buying? Absolutely. At this point, it's the best wintertime, flat-pedal shoe that I own. If your idea of winter is "rain" and the occasional snow day, it ticks off all the necessary boxes. If you are looking for a shoe that will keep your feet warm in consistently-freezing conditions, however, the Freerider EPS does show some limitations. It comes down to this: with the Freerider EPS, Five Ten has made an excellent flat-pedal shoe that stays warm in cold weather rather than a snow boot that you can ride in. There's a difference. Which type of footwear would prove the better choice for you simply boils down to how much time you spend riding in sub-freezing temperatures. - Vernon Felton





152 Comments

  • + 43
 I really love FiveTen, they make awesome shoes. But for years i´m wondering why they don´t just add GoreTex to their shoes, especially if they come up with a shoe, like the one shown above, that is supposed to be used in cold and wet conditions. And if it was for the price: i bet quite a few people wouldn´t mind, cause no one minds dry and warm feet.
Sorry FiveTen, i just don´t get it...
  • + 52
 GoreTex are a challenging company to work with. You essentially have to get the products made in Goretex approved factories, let them approve the design and pay them tremendous royalties for the pleasure of using the material. Some outdoor brands (Rab are a good example) refuse point blank to work with them, because of those reasons.

That's to the best of my knowledge, anyway Smile
  • + 6
 @jamesdunford: That's interesting. "We can't let you assemble our shoe because it has proprietary rubber soles and it would compromise our quality control." "We can't let you use our Gore Tex because it contains proprietary materials and would compromise our quality control."
  • + 12
 Plenty of GoreTex socks (or similar waterproof/breathable socks) that work with any bike shoe. I actually prefer to adjust my socks, per conditions, rather than have shoes limited to one extreme. Just make sure shoes have room to accomodate various types of socks. Speaking for PNW winter conditions that bounce between cool rain and warm snow. Not speaking for fat bikers in the interior, that's different. For that refer to icefishingboots.com, cause it's more survival than mtn biking apparently.
  • + 17
 I've got the freerider elements and the water just runs down your leg into your shoe doesn't really make much difference to be honest.
  • + 10
 I actually hate goretex foot wear in general (hiking/backpacking being where i have really used them). it is an awesome concept until water goes over the top of the shoe. then you are just wearing buckets on your feet that hold the water at your feet. typically if i am dealing with wet conditions when hiking or biking, i am not just dealing with a couple inches of water on the ground. its puddles, streams, foot deep snow etc. i would rather have my shoe freely drain at that point.
  • - 21
flag Kramz (Dec 29, 2016 at 14:33) (Below Threshold)
 I bought "5.10 Freeriders", and they work really well except for they are the worst shoes I've ever owned to put on, and take off. They're like a hockey skate in that regard, so half the time I end up wearing my regular shoes just because it's easy.
  • + 1
 @jamesdunford: I didn't know that it was so complicated to work with goretex, but it makes sense pay high royalties and take aprovoval to their norms, they are the ones who have the best waterproof membrane. I only buy gtx shoes, for mtb I have northwave gran canion gtx and they're awesome.
  • + 37
 @Kramz: you are putting them on your feet aren't you mate?
  • + 0
 @thenotoriousmic: This is them, maybe they're just stiff or something, because they seem pretty normally shaped, but they're hard to put on. i.imgur.com/280kBqv.jpg
  • + 2
 I've had these since they came out, much warmer than the freeriders, but I wouldn't consider them a winter fatbike specific shoe. If you posthole your feet will get wet. They are way better than the freeriders for fall and winter use though.
  • + 3
 neoshell is a much better waterproof breathable membrane . goretex is over priced and overrated
  • + 2
 u can get goretex booties to go ever the shoe, used them a lot when i was a bike courier during the winter
  • + 2
 @jamesdunford: The patent on gortex expired years ago and now the same material is found everywhere under different marketing names.
  • + 1
 @driftmonster: never tried that one, but I will to check if it is better or not than gtx
  • + 1
 @JoaoAM:

m.youtube.com/watch?v=qEImV-37mSo

You tell me what you would rather have on you
  • + 1
 @driftmonster: that's not enough to prove that neoshell is better than gtx, I've got to test an excellent jacket with gtx, like arcteryx, and another excelent jacket with neoshel in the mountains!
Tell me one of the best ones with neoshel
  • + 1
 @JoaoAM:

I don't own stock in the company. Research lol
  • + 1
 @thenotoriousmic: yep this point exactly..
  • + 1
 Gore Tex only allows a company to use their product and only their product. That would mean 5.10 would have to drop primaloft. Gore would be nice but I think 5.10 did a pretty good job with what they had. I recently bought a pair and haven't regretted it one bit.
  • + 1
 @Kitejumping: how are they in the summer? I like the looks of them and would like a 3 season shoe...not winterSmile I pick sliding in the winter over pedalling
  • + 1
 @warehouse: I've had them since they came out. They are waaaay too warm and air-tight for summer use. They are an insulated, water-proof shoe with basically zero breathability.
  • + 1
 @dfiler: good to know. Thanks
  • + 1
 @warehouse: you don't want to wear these in the summer. Even 50 degrees is getting too warm for them.
  • + 1
 @Kramz: big baby
  • + 1
 I used to wear an old pair of walking boots before committing to a set of Freeriders. I never had any bother with cold, wet feet but eventually the soles gave up and the grip wasn't amazing. I looked into the other products from Fiveten as my feet get painfully cold in Freeriders and they do an approach boot called the Guide Tennie. They also do a Gore-tex version. It has a stealth sole too. The main problem I find with cold feet when riding is the water that gets in. It doesn't matter if what you're wearing is waterproof as the splashes run down your legs and straight in your shoes so there needs to be a good way of closing the shoe or boot around the ankle/leg, then add the gore-tex or whatever membrane and insulation. I contacted Fiveten to ask if they'd develop something based on the Guide Tennie for MTB and they replied saying they were bringing these EPS Freeriders out, but I knew straight away they wouldn't do the job.
  • + 2
 @RikkiSH: Try gators or pants that cover the top of the high-top. That prevents water and snow from flowing straight in. Granted, it doesn't help if you step in deep water. Seriously, boot gators might be exactly what you're looking for.
  • + 15
 Practically every consumer review of five tens in the past year or two have said they disintegrate within a few rides, although the warranty generally is very good, which is also regularly mentioned in these reviews.
Has this now been solved with this shoe?
  • + 13
 Not everyone's happy with warranty. 15 rides, 300kms, and my Impact's Mi6 sole completely worn out and with holes, regular wear of the soles they say....
  • + 14
 Its a shame if this is true, My first pair of impacts lasted 5 years before I outgrew them, and my second pair of freeriders are still going strong 3 years later!
  • + 7
 The curse of Addidas... a pox upon the five ten good name and reputation. Overpriced, over hyped, and now poor quality construction..
  • + 11
 I solved it, bought some Supras and had a climbing shop re-sole them with Stealth. Proper leather mid tops with Five Ten grip, been wonderful all summer. Only cost a tenner more than some Freeriders too.
  • + 6
 Ive had a pair of Freerider Contacts - new ones - for about a year and they are holding up great. Wearing only wear I consistently smash the pedals. And even that wear is minimal. Helps with traction Smile
  • + 2
 In order to get the unparalleled grip 510's are known for, a sole with a very soft durometer is used. You want more durability, then you get less grip. I personally haven't had a problem with them wearing too quickly and they have broken in nicely over the years. I throw them out when the sole gets holes. Hehe that rhymed.
  • + 8
 @AZRyder: I see what you are saying about the softer duometer being used for more grip. However, it cannot be ignored that something changed in the formula for the soles. My first pair of impacts lasted me a few years with just minor gluing of the sole when it started to peel off at the toe. This was with riding being 4+ rides a week consistently. I got the impact mi6 expecting the same great quality and they didnt last one year with my riding cut down to 1-2 rides per week... maybe 3 if I was really lucky.

Something changed in the quality of the product.
  • + 4
 the Mi6 sole is like a race tire compound, stupid soft and sticky. not meant to last very long. the standard stealth sole is a harder compound and lasts for awhile the issue im butthurt about is this wasnt really well explained in their marketing. burned up a pair of freerider contacts in less then a season and i was sidelined with a broken collarbone for the majority of said season.....
  • + 3
 Yeah durability does certainly not seem to be a focus of Five Ten. I'm averaging 5,5 months for a pair of Freerider Contacts, and I am not even riding that much (2-3 rides average a week). After two pairs of the Contacts I have now ordered the Access. I hope they last longer!
  • + 5
 It's less complaints of the soles being worn out as that comes with the territory of low durometer rubber. A number of people have said how soles have come away from the upper which seems to happen more commonly now they're owned by addidas.
  • + 3
 That is exactly the issue I'm having. Glue of the sole lets loose. I've contacted 5/10, but no reply yet. Hope it's covered under warranty.
  • + 2
 Not sure what quality problems to expect, but my Freerider canvas have lasted two seasons/over 3000kms and a lot of extra walking/driving so far. There's some visible wear on the soles where my pedal pins primarily make contact, but the rest of the shoe has no issues at all and i can see them lasting another season or two easily. In my mind, they've been fantastic.
  • + 3
 Im also super disapointed over 5.10! I got Impact shoes 10yrs back and they lasted years. Then the freerider came and first models were ok, but now they are horrible! I got holes from pins through the sole in 3 months of riding!! Wtf? Not to mention that the sole became so soft that the foot didt have any support.. These shoes are now sadly of poor quality and overpriced!
Luckily we have local shoemaker who has the Stealth rubber and can put it on any shoe. So I have now a pair of Merrel Capras with Stealth rubber sole and they are awsome! Gore tex, great support, breathable and properly firm sole. Ofcourse for less money than 5.10s...
  • + 0
 That's why I'm way stoked that they are selling older models with a fat discount right now. I bought two pairs from the 2013-2014 time frame and they are beasts.
  • + 5
 My current five tens are 18 months old and have no sign of wear everyone I ride with use five tens as well and they don't have any problems ether. What you guys doing with them?
  • + 1
 @mxben13: my freerider contacts have been stellar. not quite as comfy as the OG freeriders.
  • + 1
 @Jobh: I just krazy glued my sole back on mid season and seems to be lasting well.
  • + 2
 @oneplanka: I've been burning through freeriders before addidas aquired them... The sam hills and impacts have lasted me 3x longer but still get shredded at around the 6 month mark.
  • + 2
 @thenotoriousmic: Just trail riding 5 days a week. Average ride is about 14 miles with 2500 ft of climbing. Mix of tech and flow. It's worse during bike park season with dh. I love their products but they don't last me long.
  • + 1
 @Fix-the-Spade: dope! That's a great idea
  • + 1
 I am in three year old Hellcats. Tough as nails and still look okay. Heavy but tougher than anything else I have owned. I recon the durability issues are to do with weight saving.
  • + 1
 @monstertiki: what usually goes wrong with them? Mine are constantly caked in mud and always wet and they last ages.
  • + 1
 @thenotoriousmic: I kinda agree.... 3-4 rides a week with hike a bikes and I don't have any issues... ran my old pair 3 years till the sole softened.... didnt realize it was soft til I got my new pair....my son is really abusive to ride shoes and his lasted 2 years until he shredded the side wall on a crash.... and his new pair is fine too.....
  • + 1
 I bought the blue/yellow Impact VXi's and they only lasted a few months before the sole separated from the shoe. They were awesome and sent me a new pair in grey/black (my request) and they are running strong after 120+ rides this season with DH and long days on the saddle. I'd wager they would last another season.
  • + 1
 @Fix-the-Spade: How much did that cost? I want to do the same thing.
  • + 1
 I think it partly depends on foot placement on the pedals. If your feet hang over the outer edge like mine do, your soles take a beating from pins. Uppers, no problem here. Resoling oh hell ya
  • + 1
 @austinmc: Re-sole was £45, shoes were £55. You can get the kit (Sole + glue) from Five Ten and do it at home if you're feeling brave, but I've sent a few pairs to the same guys and they always do a better job than I could.
  • + 1
 @Fix-the-Spade: Thank you!! Okay, I'll take that advice for sure.
  • + 7
 got some 510 high tops on clearence last year, and after two rides the soles were seperating. They told me to keep em, and then they sent a brand new pair at no cost. They said they were now using a new manufacturer and fixed the problem. so far so good. Customer service was excellent, and the new ones are going strong.
  • + 3
 Been using a pair of the high tops as my every day commute/trail/bmx/casual shoe for a few weeks and I love em. Warm, dry, sticky and better looking than a pair of boots. Nothing but praise for 510. Have had a pair of the Aescents as a casual/commuter shoe for 3 years and they still haven't worn out.
  • + 3
 I got a pair of the high top blue ones for bicycle commuting and fat bike/cool weather riding. They work great! The only downside is when you get stopped by the snow and have to get off and push: not so good traction in fresh snow. Excellent on flat pedals and worlds better than the snow boots I used last year!
  • + 3
 I have an older pair of Impact High 2011 (made in Korea), very limited wear on the top and some on the sole but still usable,
I bought in 2016 a pair of Impact low, usually I wear size 9, but this time I had to get a 10 size, much narrower than before, finishing was not as good, with some stitches not really well done,

I guess this goes with the MADE IN CHINA label, Adidas is cutting manufacturing costs and lowers the quality
  • + 2
 How can you have a winter shoe with no lace covering ? I know gusseted tongue but really.. Not gonna believe it, wouldn't be prudent.. i know they make one with the lace covering and that's the ticket in my book.
Someone needs to come up with a diminutive gaitor system to keep crud, mud and rain from getting into the shoe around the ankles.. get some water proof socks and layer with wool.. you'll stay warm for sure.
  • + 1
 Agree 100%. I am riding these now. I have a few streams that I go through and not having the laces covered, water does make it through. My feet are still better off with the Primaloft but once water gets in, you start to get cold and it doesn't feel great riding with moisture in the shoe.

btw, these shoes run slightly larger than my normal 510's (I have 4 pairs I rotate through) possibly so you can wear thicker socks -- I'd say you can size down 1/2 size and be okay. I normally wear merino wool socks year round and like the thickness, I wouldn't want to get a thick hiking socks to make these work and lose feel of the pedals.
  • + 2
 @qpcr8tiv: Needs a neoprene gaitor around t your cankles and a lace covering... then you are good to go.
  • + 4
 ever heard of OR? (Outdoor Research). they make a number of small snug fitting gaiters for shoes and boots. i wear a pair over my 5.10's on cool and wet days (so yeah, about 50% of the time in coastal BC) and they rock. also keep debris out of your shoes. recommend.
  • + 1
 @jamesbrant: Yes, and Bingo mate ! I do own a pair installed on some hiking boots. Good to hear that they work well on your 5-10's Problem solved eeh ?
  • + 1
 before i laced mine up i stuck my finger around the gusseting on the tongue, while the sides are fully sewn up the bottom of the tongue on the left and right isnt even sewn, allowing water right through. so while very water resistant not exactly waterproof, just dont go wading in any puddles and youll be ok.
  • + 1
 @jamesbrant: good idea
  • + 2
 I bought myself five ten, very much like to have them)
but when I opened the box and put them
very firm sole, the shoe after the other was not comfortable (
but for a few trips to the forest, I realized that I had bought exactly what I want)))))
  • + 2
 I have the mid-top version of these. I use them for fall and early-winter season riding and fat-biking. I find them to be warm and water resistant enough but when the ground is snow-covered and you have to hike-a-bike you may as well be wearing banana peels. Perfect until you are snow-biking.
  • + 2
 had these for about a month of pretty soggy natural riding a cold and wet winter Fort William - totally impressed. Have had the regular freeriders for DH for two years, and they just got too saturated for winter riding. They shrug off puddle and bog water no problem, but in real serious rain they still let the water in. Not perfect, but very warm and great for general wet winter riding!
  • + 2
 I just got the mid-top version of these. Rode with them at Dry Hill in Port Angeles this weekend. Lots of snow towards the top so I ended up post-holing with my not-so-light bike on my back. I'll echo what the others said about lack of traction but that is my one and only gripe. Feet never got even close to cold and I had dry socks. These shoes are the absolute perfect fit for PNW winter riding.
  • + 2
 The term winter here is loose at best. I appreciate that they at least half admit that this is really just a cold weather/slight snow weather shoe, but honestly everything that's described in this review is like a regular fall day in Michigan. If its not made to step in 6"+ of snow without letting it in your ankles then its hard to qualify it as a "proper winterized flat shoe". Maybe i'm nit picking but lets at least call a spade a spade
  • + 4
 I would guess the majority of people who "winter" ride in flats do so in similar conditions to Vernon's review (there are a handfull of more wintery clipless models). They aren't suggesting this is a K2 summit hiking boot. They are calling it what it is, a winterized MTB shoe. We can't all be lucky enough to have Michigan winters.
  • + 18
 Hey, @scratch01, thanks for the feedback, but I don't think I "half admit" that it's a cold weather/slight snow weather shoe. I say that very thing abut three times in this review. I'm being very clear here about the shoe's pros and cons. To wit, it feels like a "normal" Five Ten (as opposed to a Frankenstein boot), but it's warmer. It's not going to satisfy people who consistently ride in the snow or who are breaking trail in snow. It also has little traction in snow and ice when you are hike-a-biking. But, of course, not everyone's winter riding consists of those activities. I guess the question is this--what kind of winter are you facing? In Michigan, I think you're spot on: it's probably a fall-weather shoe. In a lot of other places with milder winters, it's a winter shoe. That's why my last line in the Pinkbike's Take asked people to consider how much time they actually spend riding in sub-freezing temperatures. Cheers.
  • + 2
 @vernonfelton: Just curious, I read a buyer review that stated the "weather proofing" around the tongue area was less than awesome. ie: soaking wet foot after going through a puddle. Did you come across this situation at all? Just want to say I appreciate your straight forward reviews too. The lack of industry pandering and a willingness to be appropriately critical is always welcome. Edit:this was on the midcut so i don't think the ankle height was the issue.
  • + 4
 @lostlunchbox: Good question. I had no problem with water seeping past the tongue (when water sprayed on that section of the shoe), but as you can guess, going the low-cut option with these shoes was not a genius move on my part. I meant to mention that a lace cover would also make a world of sense on these shoes (it's one of the things I like about the Freerider ELC model)--thankfully, a number of readers pointed it out in their comments.
  • + 1
 @vernonfelton: Yes Vernon. I couldn't remember the model,. and I was to lazy to look it up. The ELC. makes sense. thanks for this additional input.
  • + 1
 @vernonfelton: Well received, i think i was a little hangry when i wrote that and as usual bummed that the "Michigan style winter" shoes primarily cater to those that are clipped in...us flat people need to find a workable hiking shoe or wear boots (though i did wear my maltese falcons out for a nice 30° ride last night and they held their own for a 70min ride). I appreciate your outlining the varying degrees of winter, the review was well written indeed, keep them coming!
  • + 1
 @scratch01: No worries, man. I hear you on the discreprancy between clipless-pedal shoes and flat shoes in the winter realm. There are plenty of really well-insulated and bomber clipless compatible shoes (45NRTH's Wolvhammer, for instance, immediately springs to mind as does Bontrager's Old Man Winter shoe), but those of us who ride flats still have relatively few choices. Living in Michigan, that has got to be a serious drag. I was riding the other day in my insulated Bog work boots--I looked like a loon, but my feet were very, very happy. Cheers and thanks again for the input.
  • + 1
 I was actually scrolling down to congratulate PB on finally acknowledging performance in different winter conditions as part of a review. @vernonfelton - thanks!
  • + 1
 @robwhynot: Thanks right back.
  • + 2
 I have 2 sets of freeriders. My first set is still going strong, although, pretty beat up after 2 years of abuse. My second pair (greay with the orange laces) has a long tear along the fabric above the sole on the outside of the shoe. I think they are really hit or miss as far as durability but I wouldn't ride any other bike-specific flat show. For a lighter-weight summer shoe, the rebok nano's work well in my opinion.
  • + 1
 I think a good compromise to showing unconditional brand loyalty is to demand a strong warranty and good customer service. I love my 5.10s, and I am 2-2 for good pairs. I will absolutely buy 5.10s next time I need bike shoes, but if they fell apart I wouldn't give them a free pass.
  • + 2
 I have 4 pairs of 5.10 mountain bike shoes and a pair of their climbing shoes. My co-workers have had issues with a specific model, but I have yet to have any of their shoes disintegrate on me. I picked up a pair of the Freerider EPS shoes after a few very cold wet rides that left me ringing my socks out mid ride. I think the review is spot on, they are a huge improvement over the normal Freeriders that I usually wear, but you can still splash water into them if you hit a deep puddle. The only other flat shoes I found that seem better for winter mountain biking are the OWN ones, but the 5.10s offer a better price.
  • + 3
 I lived in Calgary and rode all winter including -30 deg C. Wear warm socks and a pair of boots appropriate to the temps with flat pedals. It's not that hard.
  • + 1
 My cold/wet/snowy weather rides while not as common nowadays down south, always lead me to employing a great water proof sock over some wool ones. My my pair for too long is an old pair of Sugoi waterproof socks. These used in conjunction with a pair of DeFeet Blaze socks are super warm. Sugoi no longer makes them unfortunately. I've tried SealSkins, but came away unimpressed and with frozen tootsies. I am considering giving the Hanz a go as they've really good reviews.
  • + 1
 Showers Pass Waterproof Socks
  • + 1
 My first set of 5/10 impacts high top purchased in late 2008, Re-sold them 2 times a years by a shoe repair guy.I was using them as daily construction shoes. They were the best shoes ever!. 2yrs of bike park use and daily driver. I have gone through 2 pairs of the exact same shoe in the last 2 years only riding. Stitching comes loose on day one, been hitting the seams/stitching with a lighter to try to melt it to keep it from coming apart and had total front blow out last week. I need the Impact. just please make them the same as 5-10 specs/quality from back in the day! I will keep buying them because its what i know and need for flat pedal grip, Up the quality that 5/10 stands for!
  • + 1
 I wear Sam hill high tops with wool socks riding my fat bike in Montana. My feet never get cold but riding in snow is hard work. I have a full summer on my freerides and they are fine, all shoes wear out if used a lot, 5 tens are the way to go if you ride flat pedals. Some of my best rides are winter rides. It looks like some people are missing out.
  • + 1
 ahaha, that made my day, cheers mate! =D

on the other hand the question's just as valid as any other.
Admittedly i have never owned a pair of 510s, pro'ly never will, unless they come my way for free, because I really can't justify getting cycling-specific shoes. call me ignorant if ya will, but isn't the 'grip' or 'traction' supposed to come from using proper pins on your pedals + mindful positioning of your body and/or feet?

tbh I can't recall more than a few occasions when my feet slipped off the pedals, even though i'm running flats, (convex preferred, but concaves too) riding in a relatively old pair of globes. definitely personal preference, but coming from skateboarding, I always felt that whatever was comfy (not just good enough, but actually comfortable!) for poppin' a nollie off some stairs surely will be bloody awesome for riding too.

tldr; what's the point in having a warm-ish, water resistant-ish pair of shoes for $140?
I dig the review though, strewn with a healthy amount of criticism, thanks for that @vernonfelton!
  • + 2
 In regards to questions of quality. I purchased my Freeride, iXV 5 years ago, and only now have I replaced them. I have the same model but a more recent year. I am hearing concerning questions of quality.
  • + 2
 It seems to be that the manufacturing has changed locations if what others have stated is true. Seems to make sense--I know several people who have had 5.10s for years now, wear them daily as a street shoe and ride several times a week in them without issue. Only recently have I noticed people having durability issues.
  • + 1
 Does anyone remember the 5-10 Diddie Schneider shoe? Fugliest model they ever came out with. But, ankle high? Check. Waterproof? Check. Shoelace cover? Check. Bullet proof construction? Check. These and a pair of thick merino wool socks have gotten me through several NJ winters.
  • + 1
 I wanted to love those shoes so badly. Looked like they ticked all the boxes for building, but i got less then a dozen build days(probably closer to 6 IIRC) in before they started blowing out and delaminating where the toe cap ends at the flex point on both sides of both shoes - they didn't flex they just tore apart. Not an unusual failure point on boots, but usually after a season of hiking and wet/dry cycles on the material. They were useless in the wet after that and filled up with dirt while digging in the dry. The treads sucked for pedaling in and out too IMO. Way too tight of a pattern for pins to engage. I spent a couple hours cutting out every other line of tread and it was noticeably better but still a poor design. Sounds like you just use them for pedaling though so they must not see the same usage. The ideas were all great, but the execution abysmal for what was touted as a builders shoe. That said, the were comfortable and nicely waterproof for a short while. I for one would be happy to try out a reworked version that addressed those issues.
  • + 1
 Dear five ten.....I love your stuff, I really do, it just doesn't last though!
more thought needs put into your mountain biking shoes please.
It's the little things that make the difference such as a gusset and fewer seams and a good traction sole(that doesn't wear-out in 3 months)...should this not be standard stuff on all your shoes?
  • + 1
 I've been rocking the hightop version of these shoes for the last 4 or 5 months and i am extremely pleased with them. For me they took place of a goretex hiking boot for digging trail in the winter (hiking boots are not fun to ride into the trail with) and have become my everyday wear to work shoe as well as everyday riding shoe. I've had a pair of low top 2015 freerider contacts that soaked up water like a sponge making them stupid heavy and were terrible for wet rides due to this. They rarely were able to dry out on the boot drier for back to back days on the bike, the uppers also ripped easier than i would have thought for a riding shoe. I also have a pair of 2016 maltese falcons which do a much better job of not soaking up water which allows them to dry out much faster. The maltese falcons have also held up to more abuse (pro tip: once you cut the sole out to run clips switching back to flats will chew up the sole much quicker). These new hightops will let water in eventually but the do dry quicker than my freeriders and it takes quite a bit of water crossing to start feeling water get in. For me these shoes strike a great balance between weather protection and being a true riding shoe. The one piece uppers also seem uber durable and the stiched tongue does wonders. Ended up hike a biking (and semi riding) in some deep snow the last couple of rides and they kept my little toes toasty! Rock these in the hightops in the winter with a wool sock and you will love them! Hope this helps some people out!
  • + 1
 Vernon or collective: Can anyone comment on how stiff the sole of the EPS is compared to my Impact VXi?

I live in Michigan, ride flats year round, and ride 3-4 days a week no matter the temperature. Good merino socks and gaiters make the impact VXi tolerable down to teen temperatures, and I have not lost toes yet below that, but its not exactly comfortable.

If the freerider EPS has a stiffer sole than the original freeriders, I may pick up a set.

I would also LOVE if the soles on their winter shoes had a little cutout for the strap on trail running gaiters. They go a looong way towards keeping you dry and comfy during hike a bikes in the snow (which I do, alot).
  • + 1
 Bought these shoes before winter fully set in here in the UK. Absolutely amazing shoe keeps my toes dry and warm due to the one piece design up front which also make them easy to clean. Stealth rubber as always provides grip and comfortability on and off the pedal. 10/10
  • + 1
 SAVE YOUR MONEY! The extra money for these is NOT worth it. I have a pair and my older 5-10 Freerider EPS have a much better sole and keep my feet drier. The gusseted tongue on the EPS channels water into your toebox. I used a spray sealant to stop the water from coming in. These are NOT warmer and the soles tread is not as deep as older models and the the rubber feels harder than past models so I don't think they're as grippy, which in freezing temps where the rubber is going to get harder these are worse. The higher ankle helps, but over-all I'm disappointed. I bought them at a big discount, but I wouldn't again.
  • + 1
 I actually just picked up a set of these. So far, no overly impressed. I used my regular 5.10's last winter with wool socks (1-2hr rides) in temps ranging from 0 to -10c and only had issues at -10. All of my riding buddies laughed at me all season but I really had nothing to complain about.

With the new EPS shoes I'm already struggling to find the right socks to keep my toes warm. I appreciate the effort and the thought behind the shoe but maybe we'll see some improvements in next years model, ?
  • + 3
 Gore-tex socks will keep your feet warm in just about any conditions. Substitute plastic grocery bags if you want to go the cheap route.
  • + 3
 My combo is sock / extra-large condom / sock
And it keeps my feet warm, dry and "safe"
  • + 4
 plastic grocery bags on the feet and latex gloves under my 'winter' gloves - cheap bastard way of staying warm in sub zero temps
  • + 3
 @Grmasterd: I appreciate the Luddite in you.. a true utilitarian.
  • + 3
 @Lookinforit: Different type of stealth rubber eh? I might have to give that a go, I've always wanted a reason to buy extra large condoms.
  • + 1
 I just use a pair of Merrill winter boots. Waterproof and warm to -20F with just wool socks and stepping off the bike into deep snow is not an issue. No need for anything else really. They interface well with the 45nrth Helva pedals, big lugs on the pedals to fit into the spaces on the lugs of the boots.
  • + 4
 Impact Highs are still the best flat pedal winter shoes.
  • + 1
 i have the 2015 waterproof freerider model but they about as waterproof as a teabag and take forever to dry out but that asides i will be buying more as mine have help up great and i love the grip on flats.
  • + 1
 I've got these and they're great. They are NOT waterproof, but even in a wet gloopy UK woods through -C I have warm feet, damp, but warm.

On this basis, I'm more than happy with them ????????
  • + 1
 Got these for Christmas and just rode with them for the first time today. In Florida for the holidays and its 90 degrees so see how they do in winter conditions when I get back to California.
  • + 3
 I would like to see a review of the Freerider Pro, after my regular Freeriders worn out I'm going to try them.
  • + 7
 There's one in the works - I need a couple more months of thrashing them first.
  • + 1
 Well so far over here the winter has been suuuper dry and not too cold (I mean most of the bike parks in the Alps are even open as I write this ...), but could be a good pair of shoes for the wet Wales
  • + 4
 İl stick with shamano's offerings ta very much me 'ol seabass
  • + 30
 i like your username. its very forward thinking
  • + 4
 @jaycubzz: cheers bro. straight to the point username instead of dreaming of riding bikes do something to get quick cash and achieve your dreams instead of sat wishing. Not saying I sell crack, that would be illegal Wink but anyone can get quick cash if you think outside the box
  • + 1
 it does keep your feet dry and warm ,yes no traction to walk on the snow. but i add a pair of traction spikes over the shoe and i can still ride with my paddle . work amazing.
  • + 1
 I like their guide tennie approach shoe. Same sole with better construction, better waterproofing, and a GTX model as well is already out! I have 2 pairs
  • + 1
 I find these way too expensive, I have always had bmx shoes to ride in from my bmx past to now riding dh. Seem to do the trick but I guess iv never experienced five tens.
  • + 1
 I have these and they are as advertised. My world is icy enough to need a lug or two. Stealth soles are great on pedals but not so much on the ground.
  • + 1
 my winning formula for the past few winters... old school Impact high-tops (the leather-like ones with virtually no ventilation), decent socks and toe warmers.
  • + 4
 Seal Skinz Socks
  • + 1
 They need to make this in a 8 to 10 inch gore-Tex leather boot with 600 gram or more insulation. With the sticky sole of course.
  • + 1
 It's a winter shoe that is a low cut and not a 3/4 top ???? They must be buying from sellcrackcocainetofundhobbywhen they decided to make this shoe.
  • - 1
 Got my Old Sombrio's Slats for third year In a row from -20 to +25 just different socks and inner soles, they hold on so great i can't belive my eyes. And for the price of 5.10 I could buy 5 pares of Sombrio's for sale price online. To bad they don't do footwear anymore.
  • + 1
 rock solid shoe... the mid-top style is preferable compared to my Georgia brand work boots. warmer too! DIFFERENT RUBBER!!! S1 lasts way longer.....
  • + 1
 "the red and angry (or, alternately, blue and numb)"

Is this a political post?
  • - 1
 shoes for winter??? serious......why does the bike industry do this to us???? buy yourself a good pair of muck boots and be comfy when its wet and frigid.....

www.muckboots.com/men/cold-weather-snow
  • + 1
 I agree those are really nice boots. but not on a bike?
  • + 1
 @FrozenTreads56: For sure.....just got in from a rip on them....a set of big fat pedals help.....but the rubber is grippy as anything.....
  • + 2
 I have the elements and they are great. Going to ride them right now!
  • + 1
 carrier bags over the merino wool socks and tied tight at the top. blloody works .
  • + 1
 The rustling noise though:-)
  • + 2
 Will these work with my Campagnolo EPS shifters?
  • + 1
 my other comment was supposed to be a reply to this but I messed up... Oh well... still a good one! Pimp
  • + 1
 Regular 5/10 shoes are pretty warm to begin with...put on a pair of wool socks and you are good to go.
  • + 1
 Not according to Vernon. Goodish to go maybe? The only place I ride in the winter is Rays indoor bike park though.
  • + 1
 ohhhh @vernonfelton is old hahah old people get cold easier.
  • + 1
 klove it cause cause freeriders wear those things? not vanbs or etnies right
  • + 1
 Primaloft does not have a superior warmth-to-weight ratio to down.
  • + 1
 Perfect British summer riding shoe here then.
  • + 1
 I'm going to stick to my 35 dollar boots from eBay.
  • + 1
 " love these shoes ,perfect for southern ontario riding "
  • + 1
 Can't fault my freerider elements at all for 60 bucks.
  • + 1
 And I literally just got Hellcats in the mail
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