Foes Mixer: Breaking the Rules ...Again - Interbike 2015

Sep 19, 2015
by Richard Cunningham  

Sure, it has been tried a number of times before, but up until recently, the concept of using a larger-diameter front wheel has failed to capture the imaginations of rank and file riders. Two relatively modern trends, however, have paved the way for a new look at the concept. One is the acceptance of tubeless tires, which eliminates the need for riders to carry duplicate diameter tubes, and the other is the advent of the 27.5-inch wheel. Founder and designer Brent Foes sums up the latter issue from his own experience:

Brent Foes revisits the dual-diameter wheel concept with the Mixer Trail Interbike 2015
Brent Foes began working on the Mixer after one of his best dealers revealed that he was converting his 27.5-inch trail bikes with 29-inch forks and wheels - and selling them like crazy.

bigquotesIf you remember when there were a lot of bike makers making 69ers (26-inch wheels on the rear and 29 up front) they didn't work out all that well. The two diameters were so different that, when the bike was leaned over, the rear wheel would arc so much more than the front wheel, it would screw up the handling. With the 27.5, the two wheels work together and cornering is improved. The rear wheel follows the front and it turns very well - and the bike seems to roll over rough ground like a true 29er.


Foes Mixer Trail

Enter the Foes Mixer, an all-new chassis from the California builder that is designed specifically to use a 27.5-inch rear and a 29-inch front wheel. Two models will be offered, one with 160-millimeters of travel on both ends for enduro and all mountain riders, and a second with 140 millimeters of travel that will be called the Mixer Trail. The concept is well past the experimental stages, but Foes may tweak the geometry slightly to make room for an upcoming 170-millimeter-travel 29er fork that Brent says will be too good to pass up. The 66-degree head angle is one degree steeper than Foes would use on a 27.5-inch chassis. He says that the larger wheel has so much inherent stability that the bike's steering needed to be a little faster to keep the handling nimble.
Brent Foes revisits the dual-diameter wheel concept with the Mixer Trail Interbike 2015
Classic Foes' suspension: a linkage-driven Cane Creek DB Inline shock, powered by a triangulated single-pivot swingarm.

Liteville's 601 was redesigned to feature asymmetric wheel diameters (with a 26-inch rear and a 27.5-inch front wheel), and after putting almost six months of trail time on the bike, we can say that Foes is on the right track. Read the review for the in-depth story. The short version is that the 601 ripped corners at any speed and over any surface... and its smaller rear wheel did not reveal any significant disadvantages in the rough stuff. The key factor seems to be that a slightly smaller rear wheel encourages the bike to track a tighter line around corners. And, putting a larger wheel on the business end of the bike seems to take care of the lion's share of trail chatter, which may negate the need for big wheels on both ends of the chassis.

Brent Foes revisits the dual-diameter wheel concept with the Mixer Trail Interbike 2015
The Foes Mixer uses a 29" front wheel, paired with a 27.5" rear for all models to maximize roll-over performance in rough conditions.
2015 Liteville 601
Liteville pairs a 27.5" front wheel with a 26" rear in small and medium sizes, and a 29 by 27.5" combination for its large and X-large models.


There is no doubt that the asymmetric wheel concept works, but only time will tell us if and when the trend will catch on within the greater mountain bike community. Brent tells us that his team riders are sold on the concept. Reportedly, it's all they want to ride, and they have already scored some impressive victories at national-level enduro and DH races. I'll be picking up a test bike this month, so expect a full Pinkbike review shortly.





167 Comments

  • + 259
 Business in the front, party in the back
  • - 64
flag GumptionZA (Sep 19, 2015 at 12:36) (Below Threshold)
 yep, just like a mullet
  • + 220
 congratulations you got the joke
  • + 146
 this comment thread is going to be a bloodbath
  • + 55
 this bike needs those wtb grips
  • + 10
 With the greatest respect Wayne, I will be ensuring that my handlebars are immediately sawn to resemble the shape of a spearpoint pending the launch of the WTB grips. What could possibly go wrong in locking myself into a system that if you can't replenish the grips creates a handlebar you can do an appendectomy with.
  • + 40
 Big wheel in the front.. humm that was here in 1870's already upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a7/Ordinary_bicycle01.jpg
  • + 28
 They need to knock all this wheel size b.s. off. The bike industry is going to implode on itself like the mortgage industry in the US a few years back. All this nonsense is going to flood the market with incompatible junk. now is this bike boost compatible? let's have one company do boost upfront but not in the back and another do boost front and rear. some companies remain doing traditional 29ers front and rear; some boost 29. some doing traditional 650b; some boost 650b. fat bikes, plus sizes, 26, etc..
  • + 9
 My thoughts exactly. So tired of onslaught of changing standards. Just bought a new bike and already i am stressing on how to upgrade--want a longer travel hard use SC but most the options in this category are 20mm thru. My bike came with 15mm front hub and i really dont want to buy a new front wheel or worry about axle conversions. New lyrik looks nice but 1k starting price in kind of insane. Why the f*ck did we ever need to change any of this sh*t. 27.5 wheels are OK but WHY? We could have just made slightly bigger tires which would have led to better handling and traction--keeping the strength of 26 wheels and no need for a new standard. I just deal with it and keep riding but it all just seems so pointless sometimes. I wish the industry would just stop, optimize the tech and manufacturing so that we can start bringing costs down. Everything seems like a complete gimmick the last few years.
  • + 5
 The capitalism is so, need renovating your goods constantly.
  • + 4
 I guess manufacturers want to sell you a new bike or parts every two/three years. They come up with new stuff, market the sh&t out of it until you want it so badly that you just have to buy it. The most brilliant move was from rockshox holding the Lyrik back when releasing the pike. Mostly, after using something for two seasons you start to think About upgrading Some parts and boom! There it was, the Lyrik. Sram:"bring us you money humans, you want this product!"
  • + 42
 You guys are whacked. Brent hand makes all his frames, has only a few employees, and is using two very established standards that will be easy for you to source to build the bike. Brent is a true innovator. The first builder to make a long travel mtb. If he is building something, then he is trying to create a solution to a demand that riders are asking for. He recently built the first long travel fat bike, for instance. The big boys look to copy what he is doing. Show some respect and save your 'greedy corporate' commentary for companies that have more than a dozen employees and mass produce their parts.
  • + 2
 @rubbereli, i don't think they were referring to brent specifically but rather to the whole bike industry circus.
  • + 0
 Mine was directed at the industry as a whole with this bike as one of the examples. I have no doubt Foes are quality bikes and not accusing anyone of greed. I just think, using Foes as an example, the FXR275, F275, and Shaver-29 should be the standard. Is the Mixer going to replace these bikes or overlap them in the lineup?
  • + 2
 No doubt Foes has always been a trendsetter and made cool bikes. I was just ranting with respect to the industry as a whole. Companies seem to be grasping at staws in an attempt to fleece riders of every last $$ with ridiculous marketing gimmicks and new "standards". I just feel like the tech we have is so good, let's focus on reliability and practical manufacturing solutions at this point--then again no company is going to ever want to be left behind as the guys that are not "progressing", so i guess we might be screwed
  • + 2
 jdendy- are you actually wanting Foes to stop innovating and just continue to make their same models year after year?

leftCoastBurn- Perhaps bikes are good enough for you but I still see terrain I think is undoable on currant bikes amd other spots i will need a full dh rig and, therefore, if it doesnt have a shuttle option it's a no go. Once you can pretty much do anything on a mountain and climb it to boot, then I will say bikes dont need to progress further.
  • + 15
 So could this not be taken advantage of on most 29er bikes that have the right tyre clearance for a 27.5 wheel?
It's also not far off the same size difference between a 24/26 setup up that was universally panned in the early 2000's....
  • + 9
 Still own an 05 big hit; can confirm that it's..... Not that bad, but still feels worse than a 26/26 bike.
  • + 10
 That's because you need a 24x3.0 front and rear.
  • + 4
 What you said makes me think of 27.5+ wheels being interchangeable with 29-inch wheels... I wonder (perhaps at my peril) what mixing a 27.5+ with 27.5 rear would be like. Many riders already run slightly larger tires in front; that could be taken to another level while also reaping the benefits of mismatched diameters showcased here. In theory, this Foes could be that bike with the substitution of a plus-specific fork.
  • + 2
 It makes sense from a grip perspective to increase the diameter and volume of the tyre rather than just increase the diameter of the rim and stick a standard tyre on it imo.
  • + 1
 Bluefire. I've thought of that, too. A new fork and tire setup at 27.5+ for the front of my 27.5 steel hardtail. It would raise the BB a half inch (unfortunately) but slacken the HA to 65 or 64 (thumbs up!) ....Sounds like fun...
  • + 1
 Universally panned? I would say there was a time that 50% of all DH bikes you saw at a park were Stinky's and Big Hits. To this day, if you see someone on an older DH bike, it is usually one of those two.
  • + 1
 That's true. I had a big hit dh with a marzocchi shiver and many of my friends did to. The others either had kona Stinky's, stab primos or norco's.
  • + 1
 The only real "universally panned" part about 24/26 was 24" tire availability... & of course you can find all kinds of good 24" rubber now, when nobody makes the bikes anymore...
  • + 0
 I disagree with the availability of 24" tires compared to 10 years ago. Most people that ran 24" dh tires used intense, nokian, arrow racing and some brand called maxxis. Neither of which make 24" dh tires anymore. Or tires at all.
  • + 3
 still riding my 04 bighit. super fun. 24x2.5 rear and 26x2.7 in front on alex dx32 wheels. shit is so wide, the front tire barely fits in my domain fork! measures about 27.5 in front. 26+ baby!
  • + 14
 Tapered headsets n mixed wheels. Im going to run one flat and one clip.
  • + 3
 We need a style of racing with only left-hand turns... let's call it NASBIK & sell advertising space on the bikes to cigarette companies.
  • + 9
 I've been riding my 2014 Heckler with a 650b front/26 rear all summer for dh duties. Slackens it out nicely. Plus I can run my old minions on the back seeing as they are rare as hens teeth round these parts in 650b flavour
  • + 1
 exactly how I've had my '12 Firebird set up all season.
  • + 7
 I did some testing the other day. When I rode up the hill I was really slow. When I came down the hill - I was so much quicker - even though it was exactly the same route. If I change my wheel size - will this affect my performance and will my track pump continue to work with a bigger tyre?
  • + 3
 Love this comment haha
  • + 6
 I would have to try first for an extended period of time. I currently ride a Specialzed Enduro 29er and can't go back to anything else. Rolls fast, jumps over everything. I see what Foes is saying with a 29 up front and a 27.5 in the rear but looks wise I can wrap my head around it.
  • + 7
 My mate runs a 27.5 wheel on the back of his enduro 29, absolutely loves it, reckons it improved the bike massively
  • + 5
 Really? I guess I'll have to try it and see how it does. I wonder if it slackened it out a little bit. That would be nice
  • + 3
 It would slacken it and drop the bb. And change the steering.
  • + 1
 How often does he pedal strike?
  • + 94
 Whenever they want better wages and working conditions
  • + 3
 ^^^^ this
  • + 1
 I've been on a 29er since 2009, and the biggest benefit I find is high speed cornering and climbing. The first things someone coming from a 26" tire notices is that you can stand up and hammer on a 29er without slipping as much as a 26 on steep and loose climbs. If you lose your 29" rear you lose the biggest advantage 29ers have (in my opinon).

I also have an enduro 29er, and my only complaints are that the headtube angle isn't slack enough and the chainstays are a tad too short. Even the brand new stump 29er has longer chainstays. A 650b wheel might make it feel even shorter.

As for pedal strikes, I also wouldn't mind if the BB was lower, not higher. The smaller wheel would slack it out and lower the BB, but so will offest bushings, except Specialized dumb proprietary rear mount only lets you run one, giving you ~.5 degrees change and maybe 5mm bottom bracket drop. I'm going to put a enduro 650b yoke on mine which is shorter, and slackens it out about a degree and drops the BB about a centimeter. No need to change the wheel size.
  • + 1
 @hamncheez Be careful about the 650b yoke. The rear of your bike can contact your seat tube under full compression and possibly crack your frame....it did for a friend of mine.
If you know a go around for that please do tell as I have one that id love to use...
  • + 1
 @Dustfarter from what I've read on an MTBR thread, its the size medium that doesn't have enough clearance, and I ride a large. This guy did it on a large carbon, and the alloy that I have should have more clearance.

www.reddit.com/r/MTB/comments/2tso4h/how_to_evo_an_enduro_29
  • + 1
 You'd be better off slacking out the bike with offset hardware.
www.burgtec.co.uk/products/offset-shock-hardware/burgtec-titanium-offset-shock-hardware
  • + 1
 @alexsin Specialized, in all their wisdom, only has one bushing in the rear shock, giving you maybe .5 degrees of head tube adjustment. The big S also uses proprietary headsets so you can't use an angleset either.
  • + 2
 @hamncheez My friends was a large...just be careful. I also have a large E29 and mounted the link up to see. With all the air our of the shock it makes contact Frown
  • + 1
 @Dustfarter al or carbon?
  • + 9
 I did not realize that running tubeless negated the need to bring a spare tube on most rides...
  • - 4
flag Rubberelli (Sep 20, 2015 at 7:49) (Below Threshold)
 It vastly decreases the likelihood of a flat. If you're doing it right (I.e. - plenty of sealant in the tire and not dried up), the only way you will completely flat is a destroyed tire or rim. Either way, an extra tube won't last long either. Just bring CO2 to pump up the tubeless if you get a burp.
  • + 5
 Thanks for the tip, Rubberelli.

I haven't run tubes in my bikes since 2005, and I've probably only gotten 4 or 5 flats in that time. Still, I always have a spare tube on me just in case, even if I'm wearing my Enduro specific fanny pack. Have you even heard of Enduro?
  • - 2
 I just got a flat the other day, but when I opened it up, I realized the sealant was all dried up. Only other time I flatted, I could see the sealant coming out and the hole was too big to plug. A tube might have got me back, but I would have had to pump it to 40 to be safe (and who carries enough cartridges for that?)and the more you pump it, the more tube is exposed through the hole. i would assume something would have poked it.
  • + 7
 You gotta keep a square 2 or 3 inch section of an old tire sidewall in your Enduro fanny pack to use as a makeshift boot/patch in the inside of a torn tire to keep the tube from herniating out...

Or a dollar bill, or a cliff bar wrapper, or a Gu wrapper, or one of those small Cheetos bags.

Whichever of these items you choose must also fit inside your Enduro specific fanny pack, along with your spare tube, tire lever, and CO2... Even though you are running the latest version of the most super grippy compound tubeless tires on the market.

Your automobile also has tubeless tires that I imagine are very reliable, but it's also got a spare tire.
  • + 3
 I carry spare tubes because somebody else always get a flat, & forgot to carry one...
  • + 2
 I double flatted my 650b and had to borrow a 26" tube from my riding partner (which proceeded to stay in the tire for several months...) so I'm betting you could carry a 650b tube and use it in the 29" as well, if needed.
  • + 2
 I've used a 26" tube in a 29", for multiple rides, without issue. tubes are stretchy.
  • + 7
 When this is the most innovative thing to come out of InterBike this year, it's a sad sign of the times...
  • + 2
 Ride one first, you may sing a different tune.
  • + 3
 Didn't say it wasn't cool, but the fact that this is one of the coolest things at InterBike is just lame. For InterBike.
  • + 3
 You have to admit that it kind of makes sense. The biggest drawback on my E 29 is the rear wheel buzzing my ass on the air. If I could avoid that and slack my bike a bit more for aggressive riding that would be sweet. Perhaps it's time to build a cheap 27.5 wheel.
  • + 3
 I continue to ride a 2009 mojo sl with 26 rear and 27.5 up front. Although a rear through axel and tapered head tube would be nice upgrades indeed, they hardly justify dropping $5000 or more on a new rig. The slightly larger fr wheel has made pedal strikes a non issue. I can hit jump lines at my local bike park on Saturday and race a 6 hour marathon on Sunday.

It's a wheel size combination worth considering. Surprised Ibis never marketed the hdr with this setup...
  • + 1
 I converted my 26" Ibis SL to 27.5" front and rear for about a month before switching to 29" on the front. There is no way I would go back to any other set up. The bike just climbs and rolls over everything, slacker and more stable. Definitely worth trying before spending big money on a new bike.

forums.mtbr.com/ibis/mojo-2009-coming-out-hibernation-79er-953032.html#post11822491
  • + 3
 Considering I loved the way my last 29er rode, but couldn't stop destroying rear wheels from that spoke length... I think that this may be a really good choice. I may have to have one!
  • + 4
 I had that same issue. Loved the bike but hated my wonky rear wheel.
  • + 1
 I went through three rear wheels on my E29. Then came Derby carbon rims, proper 3x lacing on DT. No more problems.
  • + 1
 @dualsuspensiondave Carbon hoops are your friend for aggressive 29-er riding. I had the same issues but now none since carbon...
  • + 1
 What brand of carbon rims did you get?
  • + 2
 I have owned a Foes Mixer now for about 1 month and wanted to share my thoughts so far. I have been riding an Intense Spider 29er for 4 years prior to this bike. I get out riding about 3+ times a week and would consider myself an advanced rider. So far the Mixer is a great ride. The bike seems more nimble and response than my Intense. Going up hills I get that nice roll over up front and when I really pedal hard I can feel the bike has more acceleration than my Intense. Going down hills the smaller tire in back really does help with drops (I am going off drops where on the Intense I would feel like I wanted to launch over the bars) with a lot more comfort and stability. When the trail has more turns the front wheel performs like my Intense but the back seems to take a tighter line through the curve (I start the curve a bit forward, I then move back over the rear wheel) and the bike will whip thought the curve.
I have no regrets with the Mixer and my level of riding is improving with this bake. Kudos to the folks at Foes and Timberline for coming up with this bike!
  • + 2
 I have had 2015 Specialized Enduro carbon 29r yep rolls fast and jumps great but tight switchbacks huh, 27.5 bike now is a lot of fun not as fast in str8 aways better in switchbacks. I got to ride the Foes Mixer on my locals pasadena trails for 2 days. I would say that i liked it. The front end much smoother on rough section the back just dancing around keeping up. I'm looking forward to hopefully trying it a little longer. I rode El Prieto posting the same strava time i would on my Spesh. I say check it out.
  • + 6
 The new old school big hit.
  • + 2
 I have owned a Foes Mixer now for about 1 month and wanted to share my thoughts so far. I have been riding an Intense Spider 29er for 4 years prior to this bike. I get out riding about 3+ times a week and would consider myself an advanced rider. So far the Mixer is a great ride. The bike seems more nimble and response than my Intense. Going up hills I get that nice roll over up front and when I really pedal hard I can feel the bike has more acceleration than my Intense. Going down hills the smaller tire in back really does help with drops (I am going off drops where on the Intense I would feel like I wanted to launch over the bars) with a lot more comfort and stability. When the trail has more turns the front wheel performs like my Intense but the back seems to take a tighter line through the curve (I start the curve a bit forward, I then move back over the rear wheel) and the bike will whip thought the curve.
I have no regrets with the Mixer and my level of riding is improving with this bake. Kudos to the folks at Foes and Timberline for coming up with this bike!
  • + 2
 Think about it, having the larger front wheel and a smaller rear wheel puts your front hub an inch higher than your rear, this puts your bike in an attack position while going down a hill.The big front wheel helps to keep you back and to keep you from going over the bars. You get the pull of the 29er and the Flickability of the 275. when you are pedaling up a hill it is easier to pedal smaller wheel than a bigger wheel. I rode an Intense Carbine 29, trail riding and resort riding, the bike felt sluggish while trailriding until i got up to speed, but very fast all the time while at the resort, I came to the conclusion that all wheels have a barrier that needs to be broken with speed, the smaller the wheel the easier it is to break that barrier, in other words the smaller the wheel the faster you can accelerate.
  • + 3
 I tried this on my 29er frame, there are drawbacks but huge advantages too - the biggest one being more fun... unduro.co.uk/mtb/behold-the-frankenthumper-aka-project-279
  • + 1
 Now that I've read all the entertaining posts above (some were pretty creative for sure), it dawned on me that none of you have actually ridden this bike. Hopefully you'll come back and write some more after you have. It's cool to have an opinion, but you might consider what the pros at FOES, and the guys that are already winning on this bike have to say about it. Better yet, just go demo it. You might be surprised...
  • + 2
 Please fix the link to the Liteville piece. You have "http://www.pinkbike.com/news/liteville-601-mk-2-review-2015.htmlhttp://www.pinkbike.com/news/liteville-601-mk-2-review-2015.html"! In other words, it's there twice.
  • + 1
 Fixed. Thanks for the catch.
  • + 2
 Just another tool in the arse...anal.
Anyone know of a 27.5" fork that has enough room to squeeze in a 29" wheel? Wouldn't mind trying it. Not hard to just have an extra front wheel in a 29" kicking around
  • + 4
 You won't find such a fork.
  • + 9
 I think there's a few 29" forks that fit a 27.5" wheel.
  • + 0
 Haa @unrooted. Still run 26" wheels and 27.5's on the bike so thought there might be a 27.5 fork I could get a 29er in and also cram in a 26er
  • + 6
 Nope cos a 27.5 is actually closer to a 26 than a 29, despite the name it's not half way between the two it's closer to the 26.
  • + 1
 Thanks man. I guess I was aware of that. Still thought there might be an option out there. My marz 380(26") has plenty of room for 27.5. Thought maybe if there's a 27.5 fork w that much extra clearance a 9er should fit. EZ enough to check at a shop I guess
  • + 2
 "I think there's a few 29" forks that fit a 27.5" wheel"

Shit Specialized R&D should sign you up.
  • - 1
 Try and keep up skippy. Someone already cracked that joke. Besides I thought u were mike sinyards pool boy
  • + 2
 He was commenting on that joke, hence the quotation marks. Who's Skippy now?? Lol
  • + 2
 shit. gonna blame that on my iphone .......or my poor reading. sorry jcl
  • + 2
 Xf revel
  • + 1
 To be clear, with normsl sized tires 27.5 is actually 27.5", but 26 is 26.5" despite the name. Your point still stands though.
  • + 3
 I want to know more about this 29r 170mm fork coming out that will be "too good to pass up." Anyone have any clues?
  • + 2
 Manitou dorado will fit any wheel size.

Except maybe not 36"
  • + 1
 Never heard of a rule that front and rear wheel had to be equal in size. Apparently it sounds progressive to say you broke a rule. I'm still on 26" front and rear and one 24"/26" rear/front combo (Specialized P1). I could see how a bigger front wheel could help on rough terrain but I'm glad also that companies are starting to see that you don't necessarily have to increase the rear wheel. I expect more companies will catch on. As my fork does accept 27.5", I could simply lace up a new front wheel and I'll be all up to date again Smile . I don't think running tubes would have been an issue for the different wheel sizes though. A 24" tube fits a 26" rim just fine so I expect the bigger tubes will fit one size up as well.
  • + 1
 As an avid moto rider for some 15 years now, the idea of applying similar tire size principles to a mountain bike made sense to me, especially for the trail and downhill riding here in Colorado. Not to disparage anyone’s previous attempts at this, but I think what really makes the MIXER special is that it was designed around this wheel setup, so the geometry is right and there’s really no compromises. Reading the description of the Constant Attack Position really made sense and made me want to try it out. Add to that FOES reputation for craftsmanship, and their long history in suspension innovation, I couldn’t wait to ride this bike! Finally got a ride on the TRAIL version this week. It handles as good or better than my 27.5, but the raised front hub and extra circumference up front makes everything so much smoother and faster. I expected this in the downhill, but what really surprised me was that it climbs better than my bike too, especially up technical stuff. This bike is work of art and innovation. With the “Made in the USA” proudly and prominently stamped on the side of this bike, what’s not to love? Great work FOES and Timberline, and big thanks to Mike V for letting me test it out.
  • + 2
 I had a Carver 96er hard tail, and didn't notice the handling quirks you quoted. Only problem was it was a hard tail. I think This concept makes perfect sense. Looking forward to your test.
  • + 2
 I did this with my Maverick a long time ago. I put a 650b wheel on the front of my durance with a DUC32. I also did it for my wifes Matic with the SC32. It really does work.
  • + 2
 Anyone remember the downhill bikes of early 2000's that used a 24" in the rear and a 26" in the front? Whatever happened to that?
  • + 1
 The UCI banned the use of 24in wheels for DH that is what happened...
  • + 2
 Also, manufacturers figured out how to make a dual 26" wheeled bike with lower BBs and slacker head angles. Combine that with people not wanting 2 different tube sizes (most smaller tube sizes do work in bigger tires though), 2 different tire sizes, and potentially 4 different spare spoke lengths it was way more hassle than what it was worth.
  • + 1
 Chances are you'll end up with more than two different spoke lengths with same sized wheels, depending on your hub and rim choice. I even have that with wheels I've built with same type of rim and hub front and rear. And then very often I don't even run the same type of rim and hub front and rear. Then a 24" tube fits a 26" rim just fine. It just won't work with the tires.

UCI banned 24"? Why would they do that? They didn't really moan about the introduction of 27.5", did they?
  • + 1
 Um, it sucked. I had a Big Hit like that. I remember riding it in the bike park and it felt like the rear wheel would literally max out at a certain speed.
  • + 2
 I don't know why the UCI banned 24" but it made several teams who had been testing and thinking about running that wheel size go back to 26".
Personally I've run 26/24 in the past and am now on 27.5/26in and I like it. Not a super fan of 27.5/27.5. The smaller back wheel is stiffer and it accelerates faster.
  • + 2
 Or you could put a 27.5+ rear wheel into your current 29er. Similar outer diameter but a bunch of extra casing volume to protect your rear rim.
  • + 1
 I had a chance to demo the Enduro last weekend. This bike is solid all around....Climbing, cornering, braking, jumping, descending....I PR'd a long climb and PR'd the long descend too.....GREAT bike!
  • + 1
 I remember old BIG HITs with F26'-R24' wheels (e.g. 41.media.tumblr.com/cd2c74fc8e9932832c8357dfb7ffde5a/tumblr_mox912YnYa1qc2q80o1_1280.jpg). 24 bicycles too. This set up can make the bike more sexier imo ! Razz
  • + 1
 I got a custom Ventana made 2 hrs ago with 29 front and 27.5 rear and 160mm travel. Shorter chainstay is possible...best bike I've ever ridden, hands down. Feels like best attributes of both wheel sizes...
  • + 4
 Sassyquash, do you really feel it's fair to say it's the best bike you've ever ridden when it was only made 2 hrs ago? Wink
  • + 1
 Pics or didn't happen
  • + 3
 I hope this catches on only to ensure that there will continue to be a good supply of 26" rims and tires.
  • + 3
 Does anyone actually know someone who rides a foes?

Rare as hens teeth in the uk
  • + 1
 Love my foes!
  • + 2
 Plenty in Southern California.
  • + 2
 my 69er is still my favorite bike. Handles amazingly. I'll always respect Trek for trying something completely different even if sales didn't work out.
  • + 3
 I'm gonna run a 650 front on my dh bike to get like a 61.5 HA. Am I doing it right?
  • + 0
 So no you can buy a bike that has none of the benefits of any wheels size, it wont roll over roots and rocks and have as much traction as a 29r on the steep technical climbs, and then on the downhill will handle like a barge and have poor manoeuvrability thanks to the huge gyroscopic nightmare that is 29inch wheels... Lose lose
  • + 5
 How does tiny Tracey Moseley handle that barge to win all those EWS races?

How are those WC DH racers going faster on 650b than 26" with all that extra gyroscopic energy.

I suggest you do some reading on the gyroscopic effect on bicycles.
  • + 1
 Most enduro riders use 29rs to get up the hills quicker as that's where most time can be gained, they are a benefit there, but not an advantage on the downs, plus with 650b for dh who says its quicker !? Where is there any actual evidence? A large part of me believes the market switched over purely out of planned obsolescence, no evidence of timed dh runs between the two wheel sizes has ever been presented... I ride 650b now and can see it has some benefits for trail riding, but for pure dh, I'm not so convinced, it would be very hard to say either way... But don't take marketing hype as fact, they are two very very different things
  • + 1
 They're an advantage on the downs too. As many stage wins for Leov and Moseley with zero climbing has proved. Having your BB 40mm lower than the axle centreline and that stability increase can't be replicated with smaller wheels.
  • + 4
 Every aggressive 29er I've ridden has been an absolute monster on the downs. Maybe not so great in super tight twisty stuff, but for all out speed and stability over rough terrain, its hard to argue with the way they ride. I think until the last year or so, the biggest drawback to a 29 inch wheel was the lack of quality tire choices. Tires have caught up with the potential of larger wheels now. With wheelset tech in terms of weight and durability taking huge leaps forward, its only natural that you see more and more aggressive riders choosing a larger wheel. I'm fully convinced that upsized wheels across any category except DJ/Slope can provide great benefits, with far fewer drawbacks than we saw a few years back. That said, if you don't like riding a larger wheel, don't. Ride the bike that's fun to ride. Also, a few corrections, most enduro races I've been around have been timed almost exclusively on the downhill portions of the course, and in fields of 200+ in the races I've patrolled, maybe fifteen or twenty guys and gals run 29ers, everybody else in on 650b or 26. Cheers
  • + 1
 Wäre dieses Konzept von Trek , Specialized, etc..., alles sagen yeah, super, grossartig!!

This concept of Trek, Speci, etc... Would all say yeah, sup er great!!
  • + 2
 Whoa whoa whoa PB. Before u test this bike out. How about u test the Evil Following from Feb?
  • + 2
 I'll take two - a dh rig and a trail rig, both with an effi gearbox. That would be sweet.
  • + 3
 I want 27,5 front and 26+ in the back.
  • + 3
 Why am I just now hearing the term 69er?!
  • + 6
 Sheltered life?
  • + 1
 Reminds me when everyone was running 26 frt and 24 rear. Run a 29 frt and 24 rear would be like a modern day penny-farthing. Would handle like garbage though.
  • + 3
 And whats the problem with two wheels the same size?
  • + 4
 whats the problem with two wheels different sized?
  • + 4
 Dirt bikes have been using 21" front & 19" rear forever. Seems like a good idea and I'd like to try it.
  • + 2
 @jlhenterprises but they use different tire front and rear, so in the end the diameter is quite similar
  • - 2
 @zede - Really? foes has both Nobby Nics in the pics, so you still want to stand by that?.. after 3 rear wheels destroyed in 1 year, I'm ready to try it. Ive been thinking about it for a couple years for my SB95, concerned It would lower the BB too much so I havent gone out to buy a 27.5 wheel yet. It would be a hell of a lot stiffer than the 29er flimsy POS that they are.
  • + 3
 @jlhenterprises I'm talking about your comparison with dirtbikes
  • + 0
 "...... after one of his best dealers revealed that he was converting his 27.5-inch trail bikes with 29-inch forks and wheels - and selling them like crazy. "

If I had bought that I'd feel so pissed off right now
  • + 2
 Looks like a nice bike but I've had no real problems over any terrain with my 27.5 wheels on both ends.
  • + 0
 I own a dedicated 27.5 & rides amazing, but can't wait for a chance to demo this 29/275er.
  • + 1
 I had a chance to demo the new Foes Mixer "Trail" today. Epic! It rips & carries monster momentum. The front end feels neutral, planted & predictable--plus it did not push in turns like a std. symmetrical wheeled set up. The 27.5 rear spools up super quick to keep the speed up. Foes usual magic on their USA made stout alloy frameset & the efficient/plush rear. Both ends work together incredibly well. I'm not even close to tip-top, but it had made me feel way better than expected...so easy to ride.

Thanks so much Mike V. @ Timberline Cycles / Sir Brent Foes for making this happen. Imho, dream---come true..
  • + 1
 I have a Morewood jabula designed for 26" wheels. I have a 27.5 rear and a 29 front and i rocks! The bottom bracket is a bit tall but mot enough too complain about.
  • + 1
 I want a 26 up front and a 24 in the rear. But that might just sound crazy to some. No way a company like specialized would ever do that!
  • + 0
 Believe it or not, C'dale did 26/24 on a hard-tail in 1988.
  • + 1
 kind of like Cam Zink's YT at national champs how he had a 27.5 up front 26 in the back
  • + 1
 So is this a 79er?! A 659er?! Surely someone's got a better name than Mixer...
  • + 1
 659er got a god ring to it and and looks god in writing. I vore for 659er.
  • + 1
 Omg... People did not buy the 69ers few years ago, will not buy into this. Doh
  • + 3
 26" ain't dead
  • + 1
 I use to own a Specialized Bighit back in the day, it was a 26" upfront and 24" rear, that's how Specialized design it.
  • + 1
 Trek called, they want their idea back.
  • + 4
 Trek had their chance, now it's time to get it right..
  • + 1
 Basically a bigwheel for grownups
  • + 1
 motorbikes uses diferent whell sizes for ages why not on bikes
  • + 5
 the outer diameter on a moto bike is the same. they run a big tire in the back mostly for traction and to somewhat control the engine. a small tire/wheel out back of a mx bike would be crazy uncontrollable. thats the reason why 450's and 250 two strokes have bigger tires in the back compared to a 25 four/125 two.
  • + 1
 Motos have different size rims yes but the rear tires have taller side walls than the front, outside tire diameters are close to the same front and rear.
  • + 1
 you guys are right about the traction and putting all the power on a bigger tire think its pretty close but not the same outside diameter when whas writing my post was thinking on a africa twin for example, 17 inches wheel back and 21 front. for me this design makes sense, bigger front wheel for better roll over everything and stability
  • + 1
 Which is why a 2.7" on 650b rear and 2.3" on 29" front makes a lot of sense.

In addition, a lighter front rim/spokes, stronger rear rim etc.
  • + 3
 Comparing a moto to a mtb is not a fair comparison in this instance. MX bikes steer with the back wheel most of the time. you need less input from the front wheel compared to that of a bicycle, where the front wheel has more of a role to play in steering and handling. The rear wheel on a mx bike takes so much more abuse than the front, especially in off road racing. MX/SX race bikes use a 19" wheel because of less rotational weight compared to a woods bike, which uses an 18" wheel and larger tire. So in the motorcycle world its all about engine and traction control vs tire size. Not so much the same factors at play with mountain bikes.
  • + 0
 Sorry Wayne, but you have no idea what you are talking about.... On dirtbikes you have so much weight over the front of the bike on every turn and foot out even further to get more weight over the front. I know cause I used to raced motocross. Dirt-bikes are the same as DH bikes just x10 (faster, further & bigger)
  • + 5
 For sure, in the entrance to the turns, but exiting its all back wheel. I used to race too Smile
  • + 2
 In moto we talk wheel/rim sizes, because that's how our tires are labeled. MTB tire sizes refer to outer circumference (ie. your 29er likely has a wheel that measures at around 25 inches, with the additional 4 inches coming from the tire sidewalls). If you measure overall diameter, you will likely find what I did on my KTMs...there was an approx. 1.5 inch total height difference front to rear. Coincidence? Maybe, or maybe not.
  • + 1
 does this mean 26" aint dead!?!?
  • + 1
 anyone remember the bighit? Look back and tell me that was a great idea.
  • + 1
 Anyone remember the old big S Bighits, 26/24".
  • + 2
 Why not?
  • + 0
 My OCD is going crazy with this 29er front 27.5 rear stuff. I couldn't do it.
  • + 1
 I know someone with diagnosed OCD. He struggles to live a normal life, and is on thousands of dollars of meds. How does the diff tire size affect your OCD? Do you cut yourself, or stay up all night, or obsessively wash your hands until they bleed?
  • + 1
 Öhlins fork?
  • + 1
 67º
  • + 1
 Tadpole?

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