Formula, Deuter, Chumba - Interbike 2014

Sep 9, 2014
by Mike Kazimer  
Formula AM Hyperlight 27.5

Formula AM Hyperlight 27.5" Carbon Wheelset

Formula's no stranger to the world of carbon rims, but their previous carbon wheelset was designed for cross-country racers running lightweight tubular tires. The Volo AM Hyperlight wheelset is a different beast altogether, with a 24mm internal and 31mm external width that's intended to allow them to withstand the rigors of all-mountain riding or enduro racing. The rims are constructed from 12k carbon fiber, and laced up in a two cross pattern with 24 straight pull spokes to Formula's own hubs. Hookless rims are becoming more common, but Formula have gone with the more traditional hooked bead rim design. Claimed weight is 1591 grams for the pair (669g for the front and 892g for the rear). Lightweight carbon products typically cost a pretty penny, and the AM Hyperlights are no exception - a pair will set you back $3100 with a two year warranty.



Deuter Attack 20

Deuter Attack 20 Pack

As riders continue to push the limits of their bikes and bodies both on and off the race course, hydration packs with built in back protection are becoming increasingly common. Deuter, a German brand that's been in business for over 115 years, uses an CE and TÜV/GS certified insert made from viscoelastic SC-1 foam in their Attack 20 pack to provide back protection in case of a crash. The Attack 20's hip belt is wider than what's found on most packs, a design that was chosen to keep the pack (and the rear panel) as close to the rider as possible. A hydration bladder isn't included in the pack's $180 price, but there is a compartment to hold a 3.0 liter bladder on the inside of the pack, along with hose guides on either shoulder strap. There's also a detachable full-face helmet holder and straps that can be used to secure pads to the outside of the pack, plus multiple pockets on the inside for tool and food organization. Available in the papaya-spring color shown, as well as basic black.



Chumba Rastro

Chumba Rastro Hardtail

Remember Chumba? Formerly based in California, the company is now located in Austin, Texas, where they are producing steel hardtails, a departure from the aluminum downhill bikes they were previously known for. Their 27.5" wheeled Rastro (Rastro means 'trail' in Spanish) is built from 4130 chromoly tubing and is designed to be run with a fork that has somewhere in the neighborhood of 140mm of travel, which will give it a slack, 67.5° head angle. Chainstay length sits at 425mm, a number Chumba chose in order to keep the ability to run a front derailleur, as well as to preserve the bike's stability at higher speeds. Frame weight is around the 5.5 lb mark, depending on the size, and the cost for the frame alone is $1100 USD.

Chumba Rastro




View the entire Interbike 2014 Product Gallery Here

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88 Comments

  • + 141
 Not paying $3100 for a wheelset any day.
  • + 9
 I'm with you on that one bro..
  • + 12
 Especially considering that the newer aluminum wheelsets are almost as light. Plus you can dent an alu rim, the carbon one explodes and fails entirely. No thanks.
  • + 6
 I'd like to see some evidence of that.
  • + 33
 Especially when the enve are cheaper and have a 5 year crash replacement.
  • + 10
 Or Haven Carbon with 2 year no questions asked free replacement? Formula have a way to go.
  • + 47
 I bought a bike for $3000.... Im having fun and laughing like a jelly fish.
  • + 9
 Are the Kardashians MTB'ing now? I'll stick with the tried and trued.
  • + 4
 Whatever happened to Brad Walton? His edits were rad!
  • + 6
 He's lurking in the shadows and is working on a project that will wow you all. Stay tuned.
  • + 12
 Gonna take 50hrs for your aunt to get a set of those wheels then Wink
  • + 4
 dchucker - very good ha ha
  • + 1
 I know two people that bought enve rims, my dad and my best mate. Both back rims lasted less than a month. And my dad is not fast or heavy. My best mate however, fast and fat...
  • + 10
 Do jellyfish laugh a lot?
  • + 4
 I wouldn't ever pay $3100 for car wheels. Seriously, where is this price derived from? For that price, I'd expect ti spokes and King hubs
  • + 1
 Its not a "what did they cost to produce?" price. Its a "how much can we get away with charging?" price.

Also, 2 cross + straight pull + deep section carbon rims sounds like a stiff ass wheelset. Not in a good way. Sounds like a recipe for snapped spokes to me.
  • + 2
 I'm sure Formula's mechanical engineers considered that.
  • + 4
 I suppose you are right. I mean, its not like anyone has ever released a product which has later turned out to be flawed...
  • + 0
 maybe dueter didnt bother with designing a bladder because the camelbak 3l is so good. i havent used any other systems but the pictures of Osprey, Fox, Hydrapak, etc dont look better than camelbak. in 3 of my 4 big 'crashes' this year I turned my back towards my fall. I wasnt hurt but the back protection on the dueter might come in handy for me on my next one.
  • + 2
 is it me or... ENVE M90 wheels are LESS expensive than this ? wait a minute
  • + 2
 These manufacturers could buy carbon rims off ebay, buy hope hubs off crc, get them built at the lbs, then mark up the price 100% and it would still be half of what theyre charging, errr, hoping to get for these. These prices make no sense.
  • + 20
 $180 for a "hydration pack" with no bladder? Dafuq?
  • + 2
 kidneys sold for bike stuffs that come with no bladder.
  • + 5
 In their defence, they probably had to spend a bucket load of $$$ to develop the back protection and then get it tested/approved. You pay that much for other backpacks without such upfront investment, so it could actually be good value for what you're buying......then again...
  • + 2
 Bit pricey I agree, but I still have my Deuter bag 6 years later with loads and loads of hours and countries. I'd back it. (no pun)
  • + 1
 bike packs will soon get as expensive as snow packs (those with avalanche sys i mean) LOL
  • + 3
 I've been riding my deuter for at least 10 years it's the first version of this pack it's great quality and very comfy would buy it aging
  • - 1
 How else are you going to enduro without an enduro specific pack?
  • + 1
 I've also had this backpack for a few years and it really helped when I had some more serious crashes. Considering that, I think the price was worth it.
  • + 1
 I'm suprised at the Deuter pack. I bought the first version about 8 years ago. They haven't changed one bit other than different colors. The pack is a bit on the heavy side, but then again it does offer a solid back protector. Be aware that these packs have very little storage space! Hard pressed to carry a bulky jacket and enough food and water for an all-day bike epic. Overall, I like it for what it is. Very comfortable.
  • + 2
 No point in adding another brands bladder to a pack. Keep the cost down slightly and let the person buying, select their favourite system
  • + 1
 Have been (ab)using Deuter's attack pack for 5+ years now and the thing is still holding up as the day it was bought. And I am not the most careful or gentle person when it comes to my sports equipment and clothing. The thing is legit indestructible. Yes, a bit on the heavy side and not very roomy on the account of the back protector, but the fit and the way it hugs your back is in a league of its own compared to most other bike packs I've had a chance to try. If you're paranoid about back injuries or just clumsy (as I am) it's not a bad investment Smile
  • + 14
 Quit trying to rip mountain bikers off. It's like mentioning to a reception hall that you're using the venue for a wedding. "Oh, you can just add a few zeros to that price"
  • + 24
 Someones daughter just got married
  • + 2
 WHERE IS PICTURES OF SONY PRODUCTS??!
  • + 8
 Do not buy anything from Chumba, ever. Buy Transition TransAm frame for less, from a good company.
  • + 4
 Or a Ragley, for even less. Either choice would give you essentially the same bike for half the cost.
  • + 2
 And since these bikes are made from Cromo Steel why not build up a frame of your own.
  • + 2
 Kind of a bad example, but if dirt jump frames are made with similar material for half the price of a frame, why would a company like chumba try and sell an AM hardtail frame for over a grand? Different geo, a bit more material and possibly a little more time testing and you expect a rider to pay almost double the price...
  • + 3
 There are a wide range of choices for a LTHT in steel these days, and many, if not the majority, will set you back less than the Chumba for what would be essentially a very similar ride. Privee, Cotic, On-one, Stanton, that can be had for half the price. Chromag make some great ones too at a higher price point, so I want to know what makes the Chumba worth the extra?
  • + 2
 Don't take my previous comment seriously cause I was being sarcastic which I realized doesn't display very well in text, But seriously Chumba really overpriced the bike since there are other companies that build steel frames that only cost half the price and already established a certain pedigree and reputation in that market. If chumba at least price the frame lower then it might actually show some competitiveness in the steel frame market
  • + 3
 I like how the Chumba looks, but it does seem too expensive compared to brands orientdave mentioned. Going with OnOne you could probably have a complete bike for that price or not much more. For less than 1000$ more than this frame alone (you would probably spend more on parts to build it up anyway) you can get a complete, well-equipped NS Eccentric.
  • + 3
 Canfield Brothers Nimble 9 is $700 and is tried and true. Years ago I bought a Chumba EVO, after that experience it was the last Chumba I'd ever buy.
  • + 6
 Being someone who has an older Chumba and has had (bad) experience with the former company, I can say that the new Austin company is light years better! I needed some parts for my HX2 and the customer service was excellent. Also, even though it's not mentioned in the article, all the new steel stuff from Austin is made in the USA, which is partly why the cost is a little higher than the Asian manufactured counterparts. I am glad to see another American product rise from the ashes. I know they have some ground to make up for all the brand reputation damage the old owners caused, but seriously, give these new guys a chance!
  • + 4
 I recall on another MTB forum seeing a Chimba forum with scathing posts about how the company left many owners high and dry with warranty issues and outstanding parts orders that were paid for. If this is a "new" Chumba, it'll be interesting how they address those people. I think it'll be hard for Chumba as a brand to gain traction with outstanding issues from the past.
  • + 2
 1100$ ?!?!
  • + 5
 Hahaha ! Rastro is Slaughter House in Spanish ! I wonder who was the idiot that came up with the translation , i would fire him in a minute .
  • + 4
 Slauther House is " matadero " in spanish (...in spain at least ) .
  • + 5
 @Mystyle exactly what I was thinking

Also the translation is a bit on the loose side, rastro means the trail that you leave to be tracked not a trail as we understand
  • + 2
 Jajaja , me gusta no ser el único a quien eso le pareció mal traducido .

"Trail" cloud be translated with " camino " or " pista " .... I bet they when on google translate where Rastro = Trail !

@enrico650 wasn't wrong saying " I wonder who was the idiot that came up with the translation " Big Grin
  • + 1
 Enrico650 is right... In Mexico "Rastro" is a slaughterhouse.
  • + 2
 There is no right or wrong in this matter ; spanish is not exactly the same in Spain or in Mexico , there are subtle differences !


But we can all agree one the " Rastro doesn't mean trail " thing Beer
  • + 2
 If you're from Madrid it means flea market as well
  • + 1
 In Mexico ,the word trail translates:
Sendero or Vereda .
  • + 2
 So let me get this straight. Easton Carbon Haven wheels came out 3 years ago, weighed 200 grams less than these wheels, offered the same warranty offered by Formula, were considered (and still are) ridiculously expensive only for the elite rider who could afford them. What technology is offered by these wheels, that makes them superior to that of the Easton's, for almost a grand more expensive. My only thoughts are better hub design, (which Easton fixed) and 5mm wider rims. Doesn't seem like a whole lot of revolutionary stuff going on to me, especially not enough to justify a $3100 wheelset.
  • + 5
 "Rastro" also means "slaughterhouse". Seriously.
  • + 0
 You can always slaughter a trail on it Wink
  • + 5
 I completely agree, I'm going to stay with aluminum for a long time.
  • + 1
 Interesting how the new Chumba turns out and progresses. Remember the Saracen name was held in a similar position just a few years ago. Now look at what has been achieved since being resurrected. A name is a name. I for one wish them luck and can banish the demons of old.
  • + 1
 Hyperlights? How about Hardlylights?.......my I9s on Nobl wheels carbon (imported Chinese carbon, quality specced and sourced to ensure quality) are 90 grams lighter, same width, same warranty length, and cost me $1100. Oh, they're also 29er. Even used heavier spokes on the drive side. 4 months of pounding, and they're still perfect. But I guess Formula with all their starving children to feed really really need our money, so we should all buy them.
  • + 2
 Same here, I have the new wider hookless version on Hopes. CXray spoke, strong as hell. I came from haven carbons, and no way no how are 24 thin spokes Enduro ready, not around here. With my Havens, had to tape 2 spokes and nipples to my frame for racing, I went through 8 spokes this summer. That's with proper, religious tensioning. Once one rides a proper wide carbon hookless rim with 32 spokes, one realized how noodly these low spoke count wheels can be.
  • + 2
 Nobl wheels do a kick ass job with their wheels! I've got a set on Hope hubs, hookless, 33mm wide and they are plenty light and crazy stiff - for about $1200. Honestly, I don't know why folks insist on spending more for carbon wheels.
  • + 4
 Over a grand for a steel hardtail? Give me a break. I'll get a TransAM or a 45650b from On One.
  • + 5
 It's mad, I got my steel hardtail frame (which also takes a 140mm fork) for $400
  • + 4
 And nearly identical in weight.
  • + 3
 Nice Piglet. Agreed, the Chumba is not much of a deal in comparison.
  • + 4
 For 3100$ you expect 2 year sucky-sucky and warranty.
  • + 2
 So, wheels that cost more than a complete bike, and a frame that costs more than twice what a comparable steel hard tail frame costs? Kind of ridiculous.
  • + 1
 yay marketing
  • + 0
 Wouldn't hardtails need to be much slacker than a full suspension if they are intended to be ridden with longer travel forks? It seems only BTR are making frames that compensate for hardtails' tendency to steepen under compression. Too bad they cost so much.
  • + 2
 I love a hardcore hardtail, but $1100 just for the frame seems a bit much for something that looks pretty...old school.
  • + 1
 bike compagnie should read comments, in the most part of review on PB people saying it too expesive or over price... well wake up
  • + 3
 these prices look like the end of me and biking.
  • + 2
 go second hand. you can get some great stuff in good nick for a bargain if you look well.
  • + 2
 Wheel sets, hydro packs you really cant. I have the high end stuff but find I am holding onto it longer and longer. I also have 2 kids coming up into biking. The bikes being expensive I can deal with but when the accessories likes tools, waters, wheels etc get to the point of crippling I am out.
  • + 3
 Steal is reel...
  • + 1
 Damn for $3100 I could buy almost any bike on the buy/sell!
  • - 1
 I rode tonight with a buddy and he cracked his carbon wheelset.. No way in hell I would buy carbon wheels.. I hear they brake all the time..
  • - 1
 I shredded on a set of Enve's for 6+ months and they didn't even need to be trued after all that time. They are stronger than any aluminum rim you can find.
  • + 0
 to be fair, i think enves would be the only carbon wheel i'd trust
  • + 1
 I had a rear enve and it cracked within the first 3 days they sent me a new one under warranty and I blow the nipple out after 2 weeks and its not as if theres any extreme riding in st ives
  • - 2
 Who is buying a steel hard tail? I'm not hard core enough to even remotely understand that (steel flexes more than aluminum, but still not getting it). Especially given the price.
  • + 2
 I was on a Norco Torrent aluminium HT for a while and then tried a Cotic BFe... since then a Stanton. The combination of geo, materials and my riding seemed to make for a great ride. I love em. Why not try one and see.
  • + 2
 Selling my FS yeti to finish off paying my custom NS eccentric.
  • + 1
 I love my Nimble 9. KGA dont knock em until you try em.
  • + 2
 You can take my chromag when you pry it from my cold dead fingers...
  • + 1
 CHUMBA WUMBA!

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