First Look: Formula's Prototype Dual Crown Enduro Fork & New Lightweight Brakes

Jun 19, 2021
by Matt Beer  

Formula have a new dual crown fork in the works, an unnamed model that's designed for enduro and e-bike usage. Although it's not a new concept, the Italian manufacturer firmly believes a dual crown design is superior to a long travel single crown for those applications due to the increased precision and steering control that it delivers.

The challenge was to keep the weight to a reasonable level, and to accomplish that Formula are using double butted 35mm stanchions and heavily machined crowns. Of course, turning radius was a large constraint, so the crowns use just one pinch bolt per clamp to minimize any interference in steering. The design weighs in at 2300g with a target weight of 2270g, which would place it in line, or under, some other heavy hitting single crown forks on the market.


Formula also took a conservative approach when constructing the fork using existing parts, such as the lowers from the Selva and Nero single crown forks, 2Air technology and CTS damper system. Like the current Selva, you can choose to run both Boost axle standards; 15mm or 20mm. The axle will also have material trimmed away. A tapered steer tube is a sign that the crowns and stanchions are engineered to share loads and save as much weight as possible. The 29" wheeled fork be released first with a 43mm offset, followed by a 27.5" version with a shorter offset of 37mm.

Formula manufacturers the majority of their parts, like the enduro dual crown fork crowns, in Italy.

The damper is the same as what you'd find in the Selva R fork, which is highly tuneable thanks to the Compression Tuning System (CTS). The preassembled shim stacks can be quickly changed with minimal tools and without removing the fork from the bike. They adapt the fork to a variety of riders demanding different attributes depending on their regions and skill levels. The rebound tune is slightly altered from the Selva to be a slightly more open, but still have a useable range for all weights.

Different shim stacks can be swapped out to alter the fork's compression tune.
Formula have equipped the new fork with a lockout lever.

One feature you might not have expected to see is a lockout switch. Formula chose to add this feature because a 180mm fork has significantly more pedal-bob than shorter travel forks. It's meant to be used on surfaced road climbs, not technical up-tracks.

The fork is set to launch in early 2022, with a price still to be determined, as the fork is still being refined.

The next version of the Selva will be called the Selve MKII

Selva MKII

The flagship Selva R for will be replaced under the moniker: Selva MKll. Available later this year, the single crown fork will receive new crown architecture and the travel bumped up to 170mm. The updated, lightweight axle will be utilized on this fork as well. The color of the crown will be a darker shade than pictured above



Updated Cura 4 & New Cura X Brakes

The Cura 4 brake set will see a small, but mighty update with the lever now having more mechanical advantage and tool free reach and bite-point adjustments. In their manufacturing process of new equipment, they keep retrofits in mind, choosing not to be wasteful or turn away current customers. Formula have built the lever to have a stronger bite, plus more modulation, purely from a mechanical operation. The hydraulic system remains the same.


The Cura X is said to be a cross-country brake with a competitive weight to deliver serious power. It will use a 2 piston caliper and have the same feeling as the Cura. The lever is carbon with titanium hardware and has a material removed wherever possible, even including the lever clamp and the brake pad backing.

Both the new Cura 4 and Cura X are set to be released in early 2022 with pricing undetermined at this time.




All photos courtesy of Roo Fowler and Bike Connection Agency.


204 Comments

  • 132 2
 I'm waiting for the front axle offset to be had from the triple clamps, with a straight leg lower.

This would allow greater steering angle, for what reason I don't know.

Turn downs?
For what?
  • 27 0
 Lil john reference deserves more props
  • 8 0
 Fire up the forks It's another round of brakes!
  • 9 0
 Like a Stratos MX6 fork from the early 2000s?
  • 2 2
 @hellanorcal: Switchbacks?
  • 5 3
 Rotating weight is an issue. OK, it's not that much weight and it's not that far from the center of rotation, but it might be noticeable. I do remember a bike I had in the late 90s, it had a Halson Inversion fork with all the offset in the crown, so all the weight of the legs was pretty far out, and that fork did feel harder to turn than, say, a Manitou 4 with all its offset in the dropout.
  • 1 3
 I’m curious on how weird it would be to go after maximum turning radius and also keep standard at-the-dropout offset aesthetics (as well as keep costs down by continuing to use lowers from single-crown forks) by using crowns that with a huge forward offset with a negative angleset.
  • 2 8
flag silasdbstreeter (Jun 18, 2021 at 22:35) (Below Threshold)
 And you’d effectively have a 50 mm stem from the offset before you even attached your bars
  • 4 0
 Not sure what it would do in terms of increased/decreased side load on the bushings (and associated stiction). Would it be better because the axle is being pushed directly up at the crown? Or would it be worse because trail impacts come form the front?
  • 1 0
 @silasdbstreeter: Not if you put the stem bolts further back.
  • 4 0
 i like this fork
  • 1 0
 @RayDolor: "Nah."
  • 3 2
 If it would still be an "upside up" fork (with the stanchions up) then it would take a different construction from what we see now. The offset of the axle with respect to the lowers not only allows you reach the bolts keeping lowers and pushrod together, but also allow you to reach some controls (typically rebound adjustment) of units which are actually located in the stanchions. So that would be a bit of a challenge. I can imagine if the axle clamp has a hole at the bottom, you may be able to reach the bolt and they may be able to work something out for the rebound adjustment. Just remember that when you open the bolt for service, it is going to spill all the oil inside the axle clamp... One other issue but maybe not so important anymore, the stanchions can no longer dive this deep into the lowers because the axle is in the way. So you need shorter stanchions, hence less bushing distance, hence you get less stiffness or at least a higher load at the bushings. Even my 120mm travel fork for 26" wheels (Magura TSCool has the lowers extending below the axle. But I also see the big OEM brands no longer need that room and even make the lowers narrower near the brake rotor so that the stanchions no longer fit there (Fox does that) so yeah, maybe that is no longer an issue.

The alternative would be an USD fork. Maverick indeed had the axle in line with the stanchions (which are below). But the uppers of an USD fork need to be thicker so they need some space. That said, I haven't heard anyone complain about the turning radius of their dual crown Cannondale Lefty forks, so maybe that's indeed the way.

My suggestion, move the legs in front of the axle. You can still have a conventional upside up construction with all the adjustments easily within reach. And yes, it will look horrible.
  • 2 2
 Problem is, the A2C would be increased by about 30mm minimum
  • 3 0
 This would either increase your stack height immensely or cause you to loose tons of bushing overlap. As it is right now, the stanchions dive down all the way to the bottom of the lowers. If you wanted to keep the same stack height you would need to storten the stanchions by about 30-40mm. This would result in your lower bushings also having to come up by the same length, since you dont want the stanchions to loose contact with the bushings at the beginnng of the travel. You would probably loose about a third of your bushing overlap so binding gets a lot worse.
  • 1 0
 I had a set back on my Craft works DHR. Epic. @JamesR2026:
  • 1 0
 One disadvantage is that it would add weight. Putting the axle ahead of the lowers is a simple and structurally undemanding attachment. Adding lenght to the clamps, and thickening them in accordance (the longer they are the more reinforced they need to be) requires a lot more extra aluminium that than which would be saved by having the axle below the lowers (probably no weight would even be saved by doing that, on the opposite). And things would be further complicated by not being able to have controls and air inlets below the lowers. The axle would be in the way.
  • 2 0
 @S851: ha! I remember the zzyx from mba magazine ads. The one I thought of as the "Dr. Bronners' Soap" label ads, with the fine print and about 100 different products crammed into 1/2 page. Younger me could pour over that fine print for hours, it seems.
I think it was the Cambria ad?
  • 1 0
 Maybe they cannot accomplish a certain Axle to crown length with the setup you are speaking of
  • 1 1
 Wouldn't that screw up your Trail numbers? Not sure It works considering all the bad press the old forks got that had that design. There were quite a few with that design back in the day. Funny how none of them survived.
  • 2 0
 @JamesR2026: I had a mx6 on a specialized fsr with a mrp link in 2000. After that I had a superstar 8 on a disco volante. The frame cracked around the head tube and the fork got slop in the bushings. I got some new seal nuts and some plastic bushing type material for the 8 before stratos went out of business. Ended up getting an Armageddon and a monster triple frame and fork and did a parts swap. I still have the cracked frame and stratos fork and parts and some sweet go ride fork protectors. I’ll attempt to bring that fork back to life one day. It would turn 180 degrees lock to lock. I had a couple different stratos rear shocks as well. One was a remote reservoir called the el hefe, I think, that I bought for the disco frame before I realized it was cracked. Never used it. I really liked that stratos suspension. Rumor has it specializes sued them out of business but can’t confirm. I was heart broken. Never owned anything specialized after that.
  • 2 1
 @gabriel-mission9: Aside from the construction challenges I mentioned if you'd stick with an upside-up design (reaching the bolt at the fork lower, accessing adjustments etc) I wonder how much a deal the increased A2C would be. On a dual crown fork, you can use a direct mount stem. Which can hold the bars lower to the top of the headtube than a regular stem can (which also needs some height to properly hold the steerer and introduce the loads from the handlebar to the fork). And then most enduro riders still install spacers under their stem. So if these frames are designed such that the headtube just sits higher (to allow for the increased A2C), this shouldn't be as much of an issue.

All this said, one issue of most current carbon and aluminium enduro frames is that the headtube area is fairly wide. That's how you make something stiff and strong out of these materials, increase diameters. As Cotic already mentioned on their Geek pages, if room is limited, steel may actually be the lighter solution to reach the required strength and stiffness. On the Cotic Geek page, this was mentioned in the context of seat tube area (where room is limited because of suspension stuff going on there). But if a dual crown fork is desired but steering angle becomes limited because the frame/fork interference, making the frame narrower could be a solution. Making the frame out of steel could be a way to realize that.
  • 1 1
 @Corkster9: nah it doesn’t. He’s overrated. Throw in some Wu Tang and I’m all over that sh*t.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: The problem then is that you end up with a really short head tube, and all the headset wear and frame stiffness issues this brings. The extra inch or so of real-estate that is free'd up by pushing the dropout in front of the lower legs is really valuable, and has very few downsides.
  • 2 0
 @gabriel-mission9: Yeah agreed I wouldn't shorten the headtube. Just thought that it would be doable to just shift it all the way up, so increase stack too.
  • 1 0
 Have fun with low bushing overlap
  • 43 0
 I have both a selva and cura 4 brakes (having owned at least 8 different brake models and various forks from the major brands) and I am so impressed. I am really surprised that formula doesn't get more attention. I've been able to tune my fork to be really supple off the top but the midstroke support is so real!
  • 9 0
 Im the same, I am a convert
  • 4 0
 I had Formula brakes on my 2014 Enduro. They worked flawlessly for 5 years with maybe two bleeds. The only reason I got rid of them is because one of them developed a leak somewhere and the shop could source a part for them (so they said).
  • 9 0
 They’re also a great value. I purchased a set of Cura 4’s from Lord Gun for $280 shipped to the US last year.

My biggest issue has been customer support, however. It’s almost non existent in the US.
  • 6 0
 I wanted a Selva for my current build but the price was nuts. £1300. I bought a Zeb instead. I shudder to think what they are going to charge for this fork in the UK... but I would love one!
  • 8 0
 Maybe they just don't get that much attention outside Europe. Joe Barnes (UK) rides their suspension in the EWS, Alutech specs their stuff OEM on their bikes and Chris Porter (who used to service and tune Fox suspension with his company Mojo) now also works with them. I'd rate Formula way higher than the two major OEM brands. Especially considering it is so easy swapping out damping cartridges, so not all is lost if you don't like them right away. Of course in the past they used to be a bigger name. They had a signature Greg Minnaar brake and Josh Bender used to run their brakes too.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: I had some RX brakes about ten years ago that were very wooden feeling. They also had an issue with pumping up when not in use (no idea how that worked). I had to let some oil out at one point as one of the brakes applied itself between rides.

That said, I would love to be able to get a Selva at a reasonable price. I've seen a couple for sale on FB for 500 pounds, which is less than Fox 36 Performance (not even Elite!) forks fetch. Very strange. i do feel they are overpriced at retail price. If you were going to spend 1300 sheets on a fork, wouldn't you just pony up the extra 200 and get an EXT Era? I would. It's shame one of the online discount places hasn't got hold of them.
  • 4 0
 Same here, big fan of formula from old days, purely for the power their brakes offered. When they have released their first Cura brakes I was WOW the upcoming 4 piston must be something even better, and I was not wrong. As for the forks, my selva tops (personal opinion of course) RS lyrics rc2, Fox 36 Grip2, Cane creek’ helm and DVO diamond all of which I had extended time on. People say EXT fork is somewhat similar and even better. The other top brand must be Ohlins which I have ridden briefly but cannot exactly made it up if it was better or worse.
  • 3 0
 I'd say braking with Formula Cura 4s is more "organic", than with any other brake system I tried. Right now I have a Shimano XT 4-piston, but it came stock with my bike. I must admit, I miss my previous Formulas and that sounds like a great idea for an upgrade in the next months.

Also, I had Selva R with 160 mm travel, so impressive over roots and maintaining speed. Highly tuneable.
  • 1 0
 @jaame:I had some old R1s that were similar - the new ones are a lot better.
  • 2 0
 Formula's brakes have traditionally had a pretty confusing range and they do sometimes produce some crap. Frinstance, the MY2010 The One was an absolutely awesome brake, still stands up against the best today as long as you can live with the lack of pad clearance. But then they spaffed out endless shonky variants and every one was less good- Ones with RX calipers, RXs with One calipers, and rounded it out with a revised The One lever assembly that was about 5g lighter but much harder to bleed. And the The One immediately before that model sucked donkey balls. So people tend to forget the best because of all the chaff. And they still tend to have less pad clearance than most which some people just can't stand, and also which bike journos love to bang on about even though it doesn't really make much difference.
  • 1 0
 hey. They are working with Chris Porter from Mojo. This information explains a lot by itself.
  • 2 0
 @vinay: I still have my Greg Minnaar edition Formula The Ones! Best brakes I’ve ever used!! Shame they can’t be rebuilt and can’t find anyone that can rebuild them to what they once were. They are incredible. I dream of using them again someday
  • 1 0
 Picked up Cura 4s for my Geometron. Now looking for a Selva and Mod plus Cura to replace my Shimano brakes
  • 2 0
 @gonecoastal: I would go for a Mod on my Enduro to be honest. I like the boutique-ness and also the CTS system (or at least the theory behind it).
  • 2 2
 @jaame: Sounds like the slave pistons are too loose in the bores. I understand you probably know how brakes work but just to be sure, when you apply the brakes the slave pistons deform and push the pads toward the rotor. When you release the lever, the pistons get their original shape back and the pads move back with them (either pushed by a spring between pads or, in case of Magura except for Gustav, by magnets that keep the piston and pads together). If the deformation isn't sufficient (because pads are worn), the entire piston slides in the caliper bore and when you release the lever, the port between reservoir and master cylinder opens and the system the increased volume of the system (because of the pistons that have moved) is refilled by oil from the reservoir. So now what I expect that could have happened in your case, is that when you leave your bike stationary, the column pressure of the oil is already sufficient to slide the pistons. Doesn't seem like an easy fix. Maybe the seals at the slave pistons have become loose over time and they could be replaced. Otherwise, maybe store the bike with the brakes applied (like, with a rubber band pulling the levers to the bar). It may sound counterintuitive (and it may not even work), but the idea is that this closes the port between reservoir and master piston so that at least no oil can leak from the reservoir into the system (between master and slave pistons).

Basically, it seems every brand of brakes has gone through a bad time. For many of them, it seems like it has been a bit over ten years ago when the aftermarket sales plummeted as more brands already equipped their bikes with OEM hydraulic disc brakes. Hayes already had that market before that, but then SRAM and Shimano took that position as they could offer it along with the gearing complete bikes needed anyway. (Hayes only holds the B1 PeteSpeed gearbox patent but doesn't seem to be doing anything with it.) So for all these disc brake manufacturers to survive, they needed to be able to offer more affordable brakes to be spec'd OEM. And for many of them, apparently it was hard to uphold the quality and durability. Better/more accurate CNC equipment probably solved that in more recent years. Either way, I'm still using relatively old brakes at the moment. The masters are from the last batch of 2006 Magura Louise, the slaves are 2007 Louise (as I need PM calipers on my current fork and frame). They still work.
  • 1 0
 @Northwind: For the time the One's were amazing and it's natural to have fond memories, but I replaced them with some 2015 SLX's for the better. Definitely higher and more sustained power on the long downhills. What they still have going for them is the lightness. Last time I used some was on the front of my XC bike, but have since replaced that with a MT5 lever/Saint caliper combo.
  • 1 0
 @DavidGuerra: Super old response, but- I still have these old The Ones on my dh bike, and my enduro bike (done the mega and 2 rounds of the EWS with those), and also on my fatbike because they're light enough for XC. You couldn't pay me to replace them with any modern Shimano brake tbf- I did get some modern Saints for the dh bike and took them right back off.
  • 1 0
 @Northwind: how do you keep them running?! I’m having a hard time getting my the Ones back to tip top shape
  • 21 0
 Interesting. Wonder if this & the MRP Bartlett are a sign of things to come from more major manufacturers? Really competitive weight, considering.
  • 13 2
 The mrp has been out for years and years. I don’t think it’s gunns be a thing
  • 11 0
 @freeridejerk888: Bartlett is heavy compared to the 38 & Zeb, but this isn’t. I would like to know how this lightweight DC concept compares to the new 1.8 steerer that some manufacturers are pushing for. They are alternate solutions for the same (apparent) problem.
  • 6 4
 At what point in the shortest offset race do we just put the fork on backwards?
  • 10 0
 With the weight of the zeb and 38 so close to a boxxer this makes sense. Share the load instead of all the stress at the fork race/crown interface. With this and the boxxer the weight is fine for an enduro or emtb application, they just need the turning radius for those euro turns
  • 5 3
 Won't be a thing.. maverick and specialized Enduro forks have left the chat.
  • 1 0
 @scary1: Just do your lowers, it'll all work out...
  • 4 0
 Interesting that it is on a Nicoli/ geometron with Chris Porters connection and his morc crowns and that he distributes Formula in the uk
rideformula.co.uk

www.mojo.co.uk/mojo-morc-crowns-3-c.asp
  • 11 0
 @ninjatarian: 1.8 is mostly cosmetic to match with the freaking huge headtubes that are trendy on e-bikes
  • 1 1
 @justinfoil: I know cosmetics was what Suntour originally stated about 1.8, but now some companies are looking to 1.8 for actual performance gains (Pole isn’t the only one)
  • 9 2
 @ninjatarian: we don't need 1.8 theres a reason we ditched 1.5 upper and lower...
  • 6 0
 @scary1: Walmart had been doing it for years!
  • 1 0
 I'd be ok with 1.8 only because you could have both reach adjust cups and an angle set as an option. Just a standard tapered steerer tube on these dbl crown forks is fine, because "standard"
  • 2 0
 I presume it has a tapered steerer the combination of compatibility with modern bikes ,weight and stiffness as the crowns are quite minimal so some stiffness comes from the tapered steerer @won-sean-animal-chin:
  • 5 0
 @won-sean-animal-chin: they won't let it happen. To save weight, like specialized and giant they will ditch the cups and do just bearing. Hence not allowing for angleset
  • 2 0
 @gcrider: definitely some added support from both the taper and the top crown. In the early 90's straight blade forks were all the rage for a minute, until the rash of snapped forks right at the crown/steerer interface. Spreading the liad out is a win win win/weight savings, durability and stiffness, when you get to long enough travel
  • 3 0
 @makripper: specialized is now putting adjustable headsets in their frames. So far just the stumpy, levo, kenevo but thatll be on a lot more next year. Its already happening. Of course specialized will have their own interpretation like giant will eventually. Its the circle of non standard reinvention of the wheel Wink
  • 3 0
 @won-sean-animal-chin: yeah that's fair. I forgot they went there. Marketing 101. Invent the wheel, scrap, reinvent
  • 2 0
 @makripper:ha yup. They need to reinvent their reinvented wheels too because theyre still weak
  • 1 2
 I'm really not sure if MRP distinguished themselves for being particularly innovative in the past... Only thing I usually hear about them is customer complaints about sticktion and worn out bushings.
  • 8 0
 Maybe they will actually review this one when it comes out. Unlike the Barlett which somehow gets ignored.
A 170-190 dual crown with a 15mm TA and a low A to C. C'mon PB. What gives? Crickets on the Bartlett
  • 1 0
 @BenTheSwabian: meh they are good peopleand I guess the mrp ramp thing was innovative.

But their damping is primitive particularly the way the hsc is activated and blown off.

Its just a plastic plunger with a spring behind it.

The spring is non adjustable and pretty heavy too heavy for alot of riders.
  • 1 1
 @reverend27: What damper are you talking about? I’ve had 4 MRP forks, and their dampers are anything but primitive; if anything, that’s where they shine. They use a twin tube design which is difficult to incorporate in a fork, and the low speed compression uses a magnetic blow-off which is an innovative way to provide a consistent and reliable platform. Most manufacturers uses a shim (spring) to close down the low speed circuit which wears over time.

I think where MRP could use some updates is with their bushings (they can be tight and a little sticky) and the air springs- mine have had a habit of sitting down in their travel.
  • 2 0
 @ninjatarian: I have a Ribbon originally air now coil 160 29er.

Its not a bad fork if you are the right weight. If not you are screwed.

I actually went as far as to try and source a lighter gauge spring for the "high speed circuit" but then it was too light also tried different damper oil weight.

At around the same time I got a deal on a Trust Shout which I love and now the Ribbon is leaned against the wall in the garage...


But ya open it up and look at the top cap on the damper side..see that plastic bobber wit a spring behind it?


That is your hsc.
  • 1 0
 @gcrider: MOJO is the UK supplier of Formula.
  • 2 1
 @broccolirob: Bartlett is just a Ribbon with dual crowns. Same crappy damper. Nothing to review there.
  • 15 1
 "so the crowns use just one pinch bolt per clamp to minimize any interference in steering"

What? The tubes are the things that get bumpers. They are what limit steering. What does one bolt or two have to do with anything?
  • 1 1
 I was trying to get my head around that too, I just don’t get it.
  • 4 1
 They are using it as an excuse when they really did it for weight.
  • 3 1
 Look at the lower crown of a Fox 40 or Boxxer (both of which use 2 pinch bolts) then look at how much less material there is combined with the shape of the lower crown on this fork. Its clearly designed to maximise steering angle and minimise weight.
  • 2 0
 @morewhitenoise: it´s not the crown that hits the frame but bumper that is either on stanchion or the frame it self. Design of the crown has no influence on how much steering lock you can get, stanchion spacing and offset of the crown is all that matters.
  • 3 0
 @Mondbiker: It does if you have a bike with crown bumpers. Wink
  • 2 0
 @rideformula: Did you address the Cura4's inadequate MC fluid volume? The reservoir fluid runs out before the pads fully wear, requiring mid-pad-wear oil top up. Major problem with an otherwise good brake.
  • 14 1
 Every fork I have owned has had some kind of csu/stanchion creak, all 160mm plus single crown forks. Its about time something like this became available.
  • 10 6
 and thats why press fit anything is shit, i dont get why the stanchions are not threaded in, would solve alot of issues... theyd be easily replaceable...
  • 2 5
 For me typically that being resolved by new headset (180mm 27,5 single crown owner)

Also barspin and x-up not possible on dc fork, so not one size fit it all;

Returning to 1,5 or larger steer will address the issue I believe
  • 9 2
 @mtbtrekracer: Would be super interesting to, say, slap a berm really hard to left and unthread your steerer.
  • 6 4
 @hirvi: Yes, just like all those times you back wheel hop and unthread your rear axle, or pedal backwards for a moment and unscrew your bottom bracket.
  • 7 0
 @FuzzyL: Those are entirely different load cases and you know it.
  • 2 0
 @hirvi: That’s why he said threaded stanchions, not steerer.
  • 1 0
 @nickmalysh: I don’t know how a new headset is going to fix a csu/stanchion creak.
  • 1 0
 I would say me Lyrik have none but I have mount a 223 mm rotor to it and heave beating in it this afternoon. Well there is my creak now...
  • 1 0
 Ohlins. Zero creak, single crown. You're welcome.
  • 1 0
 @mtbtrekracer: If they were 1 pc. stanchions maybe but you have a weak point between the threaded part and the press-fit stanchion tube if not which may end up creaking too I would imagine...
  • 1 0
 @mtbtrekracer:

You say this as if nobody ever had a creaky threaded bottom bracket.
  • 1 1
 @Ehlingerj: it will not, however majority of time it is not the fork
  • 1 0
 @nickmalysh: I’ve had a whole pile of warrantied forks that say otherwise.

Creaky CSUs are a VERY common problem.
  • 1 1
 @hllclmbr: i havnt? lol. atleast threaded stanchions mean you could undo it and grease or loctite or w.e they come up with.. vs sending it away and eventually getting a replacement each time
  • 1 0
 @hllclmbr: Case in point, I’ve got one at the moment. The one PF BB I’ve had was flawless.
  • 11 0
 Dual crowns weight as much as the Z1 Coil I have on my hardtail. I mean, hell, why not. Plan A is just to keep on giv'n'r. Yeah, that's a plan.
  • 2 0
 Anyone know if formula has a Canadian distributor / service centre?
  • 3 0
 @ratedgg13:https://albadistribution.ca/collections/formula
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13: Matt and Ben are great to deal with at Alba! Can’t say enough good things about them.
  • 3 0
 My Z1 Coil is closer to 2.55kg I think. This thing would save weight!
  • 16 4
 And those of us riding 2080 gram, plenty stiff, non creaking, well dampened Manitou Mezzers just keep smiling.
  • 7 1
 If your fork is well dampened, you might need to bring a towel on every ride.
  • 1 0
 Hell yes
  • 9 0
 Considering the weight, I wouldn't say no, look how heavy is the Marzocchi with Coil or Fox 38/Zeb, really would like to try due to stiffness
  • 9 0
 "the Italian manufacturer firmly believes a dual crown design is superior to a long travel single crown"

But here is also a long travel single crown fork anyway!
  • 3 0
 Is it this guy?

m.youtube.com/watch?v=5LxYM8IOI3Q

Is thorough long-term testing proved some benefits.
  • 2 0
 @lastminutetech: nice video
  • 4 0
 It is superior. The primary problem has always been weight, and getting within 300ish grams of a Fox 36 and less than 100 grams of a Fox 38 might be the time we start to see these high-travel enduro bikes switch to dual crown if more of them can get into a weight class like this. Now, it remains to be seen how the smaller stanchions and dual crown works out.
  • 2 0
 @nickfranko: it should work out about the same as it does on the Boxxer
  • 1 0
 @nickfranko: I was making a joke about how they told us how duals are superior and then introduced a new big single, implying that single must not be that bad if they're making one too. Nothing to do with the actual superiority of either.
  • 7 0
 I'm currently using a dual crown for trail riding and the steering angle is a non-issue, and with the weight being less than 38mm single crowns, there is no reason not to buy this.
  • 1 3
 You mean: except from the shitload of money it will cost.
  • 6 0
 I have a 29" formula nero r dual crown with triple air spring hsc lsc and rebound. It has the lowest axle to crown of any fork i know of wheel size and travel considered, about 20-25 lower than an equivalent singlecrown. Ran it against Fox 36 160 and lyric 180 and its much stiffer and more precise. Ran it on 160mm rear travel enduro bike at 180mm. Running it at 200mm travel on my 180mm am-fr-dh bike and it performs great downhill and is not so long that its unwieldY long For climbing. Its my only bike and happy to pedal this 200mm fork. Great turning radius really recommend the formula dual crown.

Wish this fork had the same damper and air spring cause they are great
  • 1 0
 That's what I wondered/wanted. Saying that I'd expect a Nero damper/spring should be posible in this
  • 2 0
 @gonecoastal: yeah i hope so. I recon they should just Offer thIs and nero with lower offset lowers and fork crowns for the nero and visa versa.
  • 2 0
 @getsomesy: The Nero and Selva use the same lowers. That's how the Boost 20 Selva is a thing. The Nero offset is built into the crowns. The old 51/46 Selva was the same and I believe the 43/37 ones are as well.
Technically one could have a Selva 20, Nero 15, or a Nero with the Selva DC tree.

Lets hope for the silver/polished crowns on Selva SC/DC.

Stoked to get my paws on some Formula squish in the near future.
  • 1 0
 @gonecoastal: good to know, thanks.
My nero is 52 offset i think, it has a great turning radius. As much as i like lower total offset number. I think the offset should be reduced at the lowers Rather than crown to retain turning radius.
  • 1 0
 @getsomesy: IIRC the Nero is either 50 or 56.

I agree to an extend. I don't know how much more the front axle can be reigned in before running out of room at the bottom of the fork lowers. The Kabolt on my GRIP2 is pretty close. DC turning radius reduction is likely a greater liming factor on big tubed carb0n frames. And this 1.8" HT likely wont help matters. Saying that I can't really recall doing any lock to lock turns on my DH bike. But I've seldom if ever tech climbed with it. Wink There is a grouping of riders on Geometrons that are riding everything on their BoXXer/MORC40/MORC36 with reduced offsets so it's possible.

I wonder if the Selva DC will be 43mm or something else haha.

I enquired with that guy making offset crowns in PNW if his crowns would work with a Nero but he was unsure at the time. I figured the BoXXer ones might if both it and the Nero use 35mm stanchions
  • 9 2
 Shut up and take my money. I will have that fork. Period. Gimme! Come on. This is it. WANT!!! I need this. Yeeeeah! Bingbingbong! Brrrr! Wowowo! Dingding. Need. Fork. On. My. Bike!
  • 8 0
 If this solves my god damn creaky csu I’ll give it a go. Every freaking one. Creaky
  • 3 0
 Buy Ohlins. Single piece CSU, zero noise.
  • 1 0
 @nickfranko: I was looking at that. Apparently they've also moved to pressed csu joint. Sounds like the one piece was a fabrication nightmare.
  • 5 0
 I’m in love with formula brakes, best bang for $ in terms of performance/wight/ price ratio, too bad in us u pay extra for spare parts to be shipped;

However happy customer and always recommend their products to friends;

With fork, i did not get adjustability thing, for mid level joe, since set and forget is the best, never tried their shock tho
  • 6 0
 The Cura is such a good looking brake. I was hoping an update would include a bigger reservoir as that is the one and only complaint I've heard about it.
  • 5 0
 I wonder if having a lockout on the fork even helps overall, since it pushes you farther back over the rear. You'd have a slacker STA, more suspension sag and less anti-squat (on most designs)
  • 1 0
 For gravel road climbs, it’s the cats ass.
  • 2 0
 Same thought here. But pair it with the lever on the Mod or Storia and you've got a gravel grinder LOL
  • 3 0
 This fork is super supple, more than any SC fork out there, and it has 180mm travel. If you want to do long uphills with your enduro bike you want to have a lockout on a DC design.
  • 4 0
 Everyone considering 1.8 single crown should take a look again at what those headsets are going through when heavily loaded through fork/crown/steerer flex. Sometimes I'm amazed some bike stuff works at all.

This DC fork has a lot going for it. You could also do some interesting stuff like one-off crowns, different 35mm lowers, etc.
  • 3 0
 Now not all enduro bikes can accept a dual crown without voidind the warranty and risking damage to the sides of the head tube in case the stachions come slamming in it (crash and so on). My bike sure can't: manufactuer said so in an email...
Have 2 36s that's both been creaking (29" 170mm). I was considering a boxxer 180 (same AC). But can't... So I let some Loctite 290 seep in at the stanchion-csu and csu-steerer interfaces and it seems to have gotten rid of the creaking on one of them. Forks seems to feel more "stout" too (though probably a placebo effect of the now silenced csu).
  • 4 0
 Yep but it’s a bit of chicken and egg situation with the frames. The long travel 170mm+ enduro bike segment is clearly growing. It’s a real shame that more bikes like the giga, spec enduro, nomad, Capra, torque, super foxy, etc aren’t designed for dual crowns. I run a dorado on my torque and the benefits are very real, it’s not just the creaky csu.

If you’re going to use loctite, dribbling it around won’t do anything. Even a creaky steerer will still be a gas tight connection. You need press it out and apply, let it dry, then press it back in. A local machine shop will be able to do it for you and probably not charge more than a few beers.
  • 2 0
 @Afterschoolsports: Capra can handle a dual crown without voiding warranty
  • 1 0
 Slayer too. @WAKing93:
  • 3 0
 Since the previous generation levers were interchangeable between the 2 piston and 4 piston calipers, I wonder if the new levers will work on the cura 2 as well as the cura 4…
  • 9 0
 Yes, they do, every new formula technology is retro-fit.
  • 3 0
 Cura X brakes are available to buy on r2-bike (and were available from beginning on the spring), but still not listed on Formulas' website.
And as for Cura 4, love mine, they are awesome.
  • 5 0
 I wouldn't mind a lightweight dual crown future.
  • 3 1
 Boxxer is 2565g, not that much more than the Formula @ 2300g.
  • 5 0
 In what way would more pinch bolts on the crowns affect steering angle?
  • 4 0
 In no way, just marketing BS to save weight
  • 5 1
 Hell yes. More dual crown enduro bikes and more 20mm axles please. More crowns is more betterer
  • 2 0
 Dual crown 160 would be awesome (serial crown creaker). Not that many trail/enduro ish frames rated for one though. Anyone got a lid ton the top of their head? 150-160 rear travel.
  • 1 0
 Doesnt really matter cause Axle to crown is less than a single crown, leverage on fork is lower. Only issue really should be fork bumpers not to damage ht area
  • 1 0
 I wonder if this would be a good approach for shorter travel forks, say 130-150 with even smaller diameter stanchions. Dual crown just seems like it picks up so much rigidity, like holding a baseball bat with one hand vs. two.
  • 5 2
 Finally they’re getting the right idea. Enduro courses can be pretty extreme these days. Dual crown is the way to go.
  • 2 1
 get a lockout shock for your dh bike (although there's no need if you crank up lsc well), problem solved
  • 3 0
 The Cura 4s look promising. Sounds like they resolved that ambiguous feel. Might be worth a try.
  • 5 0
 Was that an issue? I've tried Sram, Shimano, trp, Magura, and formula. So far formula wins in feel, bite, and fit and finish.
  • 3 0
 @SkullsRoad: from the ones I've tried yes. I can't speak to all, but I did try a set of the current gen cura 4s, and the bite point just felt a bit soft for my liking. I prefer a more positive feel.
  • 4 0
 That fork got me selvating
  • 2 0
 Would love the DC. Have been tempted to short travel a Boxxer. Don't really care about the little extra fork weight given the stability and plushness.
  • 2 0
 This is awesome. I may just have to get one of those forks. I’ve been tempted by a formula DC fork previously but ended up getting a deal on a new dorado.
  • 1 0
 Would be interesting to know whether they take advantage of servowave design for this lever redesign. It should be out of patent this year and quad 18mm piston calliper is a great use case for it
  • 1 0
 No, just no.
  • 2 0
 About F'n time!!!

Stiff, no more CSU creaking, (like every singlecrown I've owed in past decade)
  • 1 0
 what are the forks you have owned?
  • 2 0
 The e150 was the right idea all along! Now to bring back that proprietary 25mm axle...
  • 1 0
 Sooo sexy. Wonder if all that machining goodness is going to make it into production...

If I owned one I had trouble focusing on the trail Wink
  • 1 0
 on my sb6c.. some time i use for big enduro and old boxxer 32 x)27,5 tire are ok.. on this
  • 1 0
 I have a Selva R 27.5" 180mm Cura Brakes and Formula wheels on my bike. They all work fantastic.
  • 1 1
 Now.... if we could have some adjustable offset yokes Great weight, good work
  • 1 1
 The next version of the Selva will be called the Selve MKII - wow, thats unexpected to call second version mark 2.
  • 1 0
 What a way to contribute to the comment section...
  • 2 0
 @haen: MK2 commentators have arrived.
  • 1 0
 Turnover = vanity
Profit = sanity
Looks or results, results every time
  • 2 0
 Italians are back !
  • 2 3
 "Updated lighteweight axle" Sounds like lighter and more breakable to me...
  • 3 0
 Unless you’re breaking axles, it’s not a problem. You only really need strength at the two hub-to-dropout shear joints.
  • 2 0
 @MaplePanda: Bike axles arent meant to take shear loads. The tolerances are way too loose to get a good connection between the axle and inner breaing race anyway. The axle only acts as a draw bar to preload the hub end caps aginst the fork lowers. The hub is kept in place via friction. In extreme cases the axle can take shear loads, but its not meant to do so on a regular basis.
  • 2 0
 @MaplePanda:

20mm axles ARE stiffer
  • 2 0
 @endoplasmicreticulum: I’m not 100% convinced by that, if only because front axles such as the RockShox maxle are tightened by hand with a little lever. With a bolt-on axle, sure, but with those style of axles, you’re getting what, 6Nm of torque?
  • 1 0
 @MaplePanda: Ah, that is good to know. No, I don't break axles Smile
  • 2 0
 @MaplePanda: You are right, my phrasing was crap. In an ideal world, this is how axles work.
With many axles having these tiny preload levers that isnt happening though. Then you take these axles out you can sometimes see wear from where the hub contacts the axle and transfers loads. On my bikes, I only use axles with a hex key, so I can tighten them to around 25Nm. This Is more than the manufacturer recommends, but the large threads can take it no problem. I dont know, maybe I am the idiot in the equasion, since technically youre not getting an ideal connection with lower preload, but It also doesnt seem to be an issue, since people dont break axles.
  • 1 0
 @endoplasmicreticulum: Ah, that makes sense now. Thanks for the info!
  • 1 0
 @getsomesy: I’m not sure how that is relevant? Yes, they’re stiffer, but we are talking about strength (with a lighter axle) here.
  • 1 0
 @MaplePanda: it is relevant because steering precision is generally less than ideal, especially for harder and heavier riders. By having a stiffer axle it will increase steering precision.
  • 4 6
 Beautiful products, just stay away from the plastic and it will be perfect.
  • 7 0
 When I look at my Formula levers next to my Maguras, I laugh. Not only are the plastic master cylinders a joke compared to formula, but the hardware they use is super cheap. Even formulas rotor bolts are beautiful.
  • 1 1
 Enduro is the new DH
  • 1 4
 Dual crown enduro fork?!
When you really want your enduro bike to look like a session.
  • 1 0
 yes
  • 1 4
 Are these forks also targeting newer riders? It looks like it'd be a great match for those beginner Intense bikes.
  • 2 4
 dual crown enduro fork :rolleyes:
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