FOX Factory Series Float 34 - Review

Mar 31, 2015
by Mike Levy  
FOX made a giant leap forward last year with their new 36, a fork that has arguably put them back on everybody's radar when talking about high-end suspension on a mid-travel bike that's going to be ridden hard. In fact, the new 36 was so impressive that we named it our Suspension Product of the Year when there were some impressive offerings from their competition. FOX is looking to set the bar high once again, but this time with a lighter weight package that could be just the ticket for a trail rider who doesn't need the burliness of the 36 but could still benefit from an advanced damper.

The 2016 Factory Series Float 34 that's reviewed below weighs in at under 4lb and can run anywhere between 110mm and 160mm (in 10mm increments) of travel depending on wheel size. FOX has developed a completely new Float air spring for the 34 that's both lighter and simpler, and clip-on volume spacers can be used to tune its progression. More importantly, though, there's an all-new FIT4 damper that replace the not so loved CTD unit that has been in use for a few years now. The final product is a fork that's a decent chunk lighter than a 36 (the previous 34 didn't weigh that much less), which makes for a clearer separation between it and its larger legged big brother. The question, though, is if it can offer similar air spring and damper performance, a feat that would make the Factory Series Float 34 a real contender for the front of a lot of mid-travel bikes.


FOX Factory Series Float 34 Details

• Intended use: trail / all-mountain
• Travel: 110mm - 160mm depending on model and setting
• New Float air spring
• New FIT4 damper
• Three-position compression adjuster
• Optional handlebar mounted remote
• Low-speed compression tuneable in Open mode
• Volume adjust via clip-on spacers
• Thru-axle: 15QR
• Weight: 1,769g / 3.9lb (29er, 140mm)
• MSRP: $875 USD
www.ridefox.com
FOX 34 Float review test


FOX 34 Float review test


New Fork Chassis

The 2016 FOX 34 looks a lot like the 34s that came before it, especially when you stand a few feet back, but that couldn't be further from the truth. Not only are the internals completely new, the 34's entire chassis, including the lowers, crown, stanchions, and even the steerer tube have been re-worked with weight savings in mind. The claimed weight savings for each individual item is modest, but the numbers add up to a decent amount that any gram counter is going to appreciate: 34g out of the steerer tube, 31g out of the crown, 53g removed from the upper tubes, 49g out of the lowers, and a whopping 130g cleaved with the new Float air spring. All told, the 2016 34 29er with 140mm of travel is said to weigh 1,769g / 3.9lb, which is 297g / .65lb lighter than the comparable model from 2015. The 160mm travel, 27.5'' fork comes in at 1,746g / 3.85lb, which is 219g / .48lb lighter.

For comparison's sake, and just because that might not be enough numbers for you, the 2015 36 Float 27.5 160 FIT RC2 weighs 1,923g / 4.24lb (claimed), which is 177g / .39lb heavier than the 2016 34 Float in the same travel and wheel size. While that's less than half a pound difference, those who are aiming to build up a competitively light do-everything bike should take notice, especially given that the 34's new damper and Float air spring offer 36-like performance (more on that below) in a package that might be better suited to how a lot of us ride.

FOX 34 Float
Fresh shaping to the crown is a subtle hint that there's new things afoot.
FOX 34 Float
The 34's lowers are entirely new, with the 29er's casting said to weigh 49 grams less than in 2015.

It's interesting that, aside from some obviously different shaping to the arch and on the crown, a lot of riders might not be able to tell the difference between a 2016 34 Float and a model from previous years, especially when you consider that the fork reviewed here is a completely new animal inside and out. FOX has certainly continued as per normal when it comes to appearances, but they are also planning on offering a version with a sort of neutral grey coloured lowers that will set it apart from its predecessor.



New Float Air Spring

FOX debuted a revised Float air spring system last year on their burlier 36, but, surprisingly, they haven't used that system inside the 34. Instead, they designed a completely new Float air spring assembly that actually takes cues from their Float rear shock. ''On the 36, the transfer port was on the shaft, allowing travel changes with spacers and by repositioning the shaft height,'' Mark Jordan, FOX's Global Marketing Manager, explained when questioned about the difference. ''On the 34, we’ve removed the shaft and need for a seal to make it lighter, and now the transfer port is on the upper tube, just like with our Float shocks.'' Two birds with one stone, as the saying goes, by using a system that should offer less friction due to depending on one less air seal, but also one that's a remarkable 130 grams lighter when talking about the 140mm travel 29er fork's air spring.

FOX 34 Float review test
  The 2016 34's Float air spring is said to be simpler, lighter, and offer less friction.


Lighter and simpler should always be the goal, but it's also worth mentioning that riders who want to change the travel of their 2016 34 will find that it takes a different technique compared to what the Float air spring in the 36 requires. Now, rather than repositioning the shaft height and swapping out negative spring plate spacers as on the 36, you'll need to change the entire rod and spring plate assembly on the 34. The job is super simple - we actually did it while at the trail head of one of my local mountains - and it requires a similar amount of disassembly. The different approach is required because the Float's air transfer port is now on the stanchion tube, just like on FOX's Float shocks, rather than on the air shaft. There's also a new and very easy way to tweak the 34's progression, with a set of simple clip-on volume spacers that snap into place and that each account for 10 CCs of volume. The first one slides onto the underside of the fork cap, while each one clips onto the one above it. They're also shaped to not rattle against the inside of the stanchion tube, with small fins of sorts that extend out to keep them from moving around.
FOX 34 Float
The new volume spacers, which affect the fork's mid-stroke and bottom out, snap into place onto the underside of the fork cap



FOX 34 Float
  The FIT4's compression adjuster (left) allows the rider to choose between Open, Medium, and Firm modes, but it's very different than CTD. The black dial in the middle adjusts the amount of low-speed compression in the Open mode. Rebound speed is still a single red dial at the bottom of the same leg (right).


New FIT4 Damper

Here's the news that many riders have been waiting to hear: FOX has ditched their CTD system in favour of their new FIT4 damper. The new damper still uses a three-position adjuster, but the Climb, Trail and Descend nomenclature has been replaced with more traditional Open, Medium, and Firm modes that function very differently. ''The FIT4 damper uses architecture from the RC2 damper found in the 36 and 40, featuring a 10mm shaft design that increases oil flow to the base valve,'' explained Jordan. ''We improved the flow path design in the base valve for the three compression damping positions to provide more adjustment, sensitivity and control. We also increased flow through the rebound circuit for faster recovery from deep stroke hits.'' The new three-position FIT4 damper is said to have a wider damping range than the old CTD system, and FOX also listened to many riders who were asking for a more traditional low-speed compression adjuster dial that would allow them to have more control over how the fork performs - there's now an anodized black dial to adjust LSC when the fork is set to the Open mode, with twenty two clicks that go from nearly overlapping the Medium mode to offering extremely light damping.

FOX Float 34 FIT4 damper
  With an expanding bladder and sealed design, the new FIT4 damper looks a lot like the RC2 unit in the 36 and 40, but it offers very different adjustment options.

FOX Float 34 FIT4 damper
The FIT4's bladder expands to allow for fluid displacement as it's compressed. This means that the system can be bled completely free of air to offer more consistent damping.
FOX Float 34 FIT4 damper
The redesigned seal head that plays a big role in how sensitive the 36's stroke feels is also used on the 34's FIT4 damper.







Riding The Factory Series Float 34


Sensitivity - FOX made massive strides with the 36 in this department last year and it's very clear that they've put the same sort of effort towards the new 34. In fact, the two feel nearly identical in this regard, although there were times when my test fork actually felt like it trumped its bigger brother - I can't imagine anyone wishing it to be more supple and active than it already is. The smallest of edges are dealt with extremely easily, which surely must help in the traction department, especially in wet or loose conditions. The improvement in sensitivity at the top of the stroke over the previous generation 34 is large enough that I'd be surprised if any rider didn't nail which was which in a blind test, and the difference is night and day in these times when companies often tout the most minuscule of gains as being life changing. The general lack of friction in the fork is also appreciable past the sag point and deeper into the stroke where the fork would spend most of its time, not just something that you'll notice on the showroom floor.

Having a fork be extremely supple and smooth not only feels great when it comes to smaller impacts, it can also make for a wider setup window that doesn't force a rider to sacrifice small bump compliance when running a stiffer spring rate, either for more support or better pedalling performance. I ran the fork with as much as 90 PSI in it at one point during testing (I settled on 75 PSI when running 120mm of travel, by the way) and there was next to no loss in small bump compliance at an air pressure setting that was very clearly too high for my 170LB weight. The fork was more supportive and 'sporty' feeling, but still took in the small edges from rocks and roots extremely well. FOX says that this is down to a combination of the updates to the chassis and stanchion tube finish, their 20 wt Gold lubrication oil, the new Float air spring, the low-friction seal head in the FIT 4 damper, and especially the refined low-speed compression damping characteristics, all things that are carried over from the development of the latest 36.
FOX 34 Float
I ran the 2016 FOX 34 Float 29er on the front of an Ibis Ripley in both 130 and 120mm travel settings.



Air Spring - A large part of the new 34's great performance has to be put down to the fork's reworked air spring design that has more in common with the company's Float rear shock than the Float air spring layout in the 36. The change means that the air transfer port is now on the stanchion tube, and that there's one less air seal in the system, and it feels like FOX got a lot of things spot-on here. It's smoother than what they've offered in years past, but it also transmits less harsh spiking through to the handlebar when you're already well into the travel and come up onto a high-speed impact. Yes, the damper plays a role in those type of events as well, but the 34's air spring is very un-air spring-like in a lot of ways. That's saying something when you consider how far air sprung suspension has come, and that steel coils are now an odd thing to have inside of any competitive mid-travel fork.

FOX 34 Float
  The clip-on volume spacers make a massive difference in how the fork feels past the middle of its stroke.


The 34's new Float air spring also uses an equally new volume adjustment system, with clip-on spacers that account for 10 CCs of volume per unit. They're super easy to use, so long as you have the tool to remove the top cap and a shock pump, and adding or removing a single one makes a noticeable difference to the fork's stroke from about the mid-point on. I shuffled between four and six spacers while tinkering with things and depending on whether I was running the fork with 130mm or 120mm of travel, but I ended up settling on six for either travel setting. FOX says that this is the maximum amount of spacers for both of those travel settings (four is the max at 160mm), which puts me at the outer range of the adjustment scale. However, I certainly don't need the fork to be more progressive than it is with six spacers in it, and I do admit to riding a short-travel bike a bit like a more-travel bike, which isn't really what the majority of riders might be asking of their cross-country or trail machines. Also, there's a good chance that a larger rider than me would step up to the 36, or at least be running the 34 at 140 or 150mm of travel.



Torsional Rigidity - Torsional rigidity has to be my least favourite thing to make a call on. I could ramble on for hours about damper and spring settings, or anything else for that matter, but one man's perfect can be another's not enough when talking about a fork's flex. My disclaimer is always this: given all the possible variables - basically everything on the front of your bike - this is always a tough one to gauge. Simply using a different front wheel, a tire with a stiffer or more forgiving casing, or even changing tire pressure, can alter your perception of a fork's torsional rigidity. I know that some of the European media is all about putting forks and frames on testing jigs to measure this and that, with them basing a lot of their reviews on what machines tell them, but a lab is not the real world and flex can be a good thing.

Anyways, is the 34 torsionally stiff enough? Yes, and I didn't feel anything in the way of winding up or imprecise steering feedback. At 170 lb and with some fairly rowdy local trails to test on, I don't think the 34 needs to be one iota stiffer in this regard. Keep in mind that my 34 was set at both 130 and 120mm of travel for testing, not 150 or 160mm. The 36 and Pike are likely going to be more rigid at those numbers, but there's also a weight gain there, so it all comes down to what sort of balance you're looking to strike. For me and how I ride, I'm more than happy with what the 34 offers.



Damping - The CTD damper in the previous generation 34 took a lot of heat, much of it justified, and while FOX did eventually sort out most the CTD system's issues, they were aiming to take a larger step forward than what sticking to that layout would allow. They've managed to do exactly that with the new FIT4 damper, and the performance on tap shouldn't really come a surprise when you consider that the architecture of the 34's FIT4 damper is very similar to the RC2 unit tucked up inside the 36 and 40. The 34 feels very much like a pint-sized 36 when talking about damper performance, with ample low-speed compression support that avoids that wallowy feeling that, while being forgiving, can lead to a vague handling bike at the best of times, and a downright sketchy one at the worst of times. The fork stays high in its stroke without having to depend on an excessively stiff spring rate to do so, but it also allows the front wheel to move up and out of the way of impacts in speedy manner. The more time I spent on the new 34, the less air pressure I ran and the less low-speed compression damping I felt I needed, going from fourteen to eleven clicks out of a possible twenty two as I began to trust the fork's damper to do its job. Bracketing (starting at the extremes and working towards a happy medium) showed that the black LSC dial that adjusts low-speed compression in only the Open mode is very effective, and running it either all the way out or all the way in provides a drastically different sort of performance that should be enough for pretty much any type of rider or terrain.

FOX 34 Float
  The FIT4 damper still offers three different compression settings to choose from on the fly, but all of them are much more useable than what the previous CTD system allowed for.


The difference between the older CTD damper and the new FIT4 unit is most noticeable when you compare the middle settings of either. Yes, the most recent CTD damper could be adjusted to offer more than adequate support if you were looking for something to push against and a more responsive ride, but it wasn't until I began to put time on this new 34 that I realized just how unforgiving that 'Trail' setting really is. Flipping the blue compression lever on the FIT4 damper provides a similar level of support, but it manages to do so without passing nearly as much chatter through to the rider - it's simply far more forgiving. I suspect that some of that is down to a much more refined air spring as well, but regardless, the Medium damper setting on the latest 34 is a revelation compared to what I admittedly already thought was pretty decent performance from the most recent version of its predecessor. Will anyone miss the three-position Trail setting of the old CTD damper? I very much doubt it, especially when you consider that you can use the Open mode's LSC dial to tune in a firm ride that feels nearly as supportive as the damper's Medium setting. The Firm setting does offer some bleed-through, but it's more than stiff enough to please any cross-country whippet out there that's looking to set a new KOM up their local gravel grind.

FOX 34 Float
  With 36-like ground tracking abilities that make the previous 34 feel like a dinosaur, the new FIT4 damper performs nothing like even the most recent CTD offering.


Moving between the three damper settings while on the go is an easy task - just reach down to toggle on the blue 'fin' on the dial - and the throw between each isn't excessive or short enough as to be confusing. Anodizing on the dial does make it clear which way to turn it, and there is a nice, firm index to each one, but there are no clocking marks that make it clear which of the three settings the fork is currently in. That's a pretty minor quibble, but I did find myself reaching down to down check that I was in the desired mode every now and then during the first handful of rides.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThe 36 and 40 have received the lion's share of FOX's attention over the last few years, so it was high time that they took the 34 back to the drawing board. What they came back with is impressive. If you skipped all the tech talk and riding impressions typed out above, all you really need to know is this: the new Factory Series Float 34 offers damping performance on par with FOX's much heralded 36 RC2 forks and RockShox's Pike, but in a sub-4lb package. I'd also argue that, as good as it is, the 36 is overkill for many riders, and that's where the 34 should come in - its FIT4 damper is a thing of beauty in action, and it's an overall lighter weight package that just makes sense. - Mike Levy




Visit the feature gallery for high resolution and additional images.




About the Reviewer
Stats: Age: 34 • Height: 5'10” • Inseam: 33" • Weight: 165lb • Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Mike Levy spent most of the 90s and early 2000s racing downhill bikes and building ill-considered jumps in the woods of British Columbia before realizing that bikes could also be pedalled for hours on end to get to some pretty cool places. These days he spends most of his time doing exactly that, preferring to ride test bikes way out in the local hills rather than any bike park. Over ten years as a professional mechanic before making the move to Pinkbike means that his enthusiasm for two wheels extends beyond simply riding on them, and his appreciation for all things technical is an attribute that meshes nicely with his role of Technical Editor at Pinkbike.



221 Comments

  • + 104
 The first gen CTD was the single worst mtb related decision Ive ever made in 20 years....and that includes a hardtail,single speed 29r. How they let that garbage out the door,i dont know. Its hard to trust after that. Im sensitive like that.
  • + 3
 I wonder what their official statement is on binning the CTD on this kind of fork..
  • + 26
 "The FIT4 damper still offers three different compression settings to choose from on the fly, but all of them are much more useable than what the previous CTD system allowed for"

It's not dead yet.
  • - 6
flag WAKIdesigns (Mar 31, 2015 at 8:41) (Below Threshold)
 CTD was a stupid move indeed just like 15mm axle, but what people forget is that at this time Rockshox's counteroffering was motion control, now revamped to 3 click RCT3 (not charger!), which have been utter crap as well, unusable on anything above 100mm of travel. Let's face it, compression damping on Revelation and Sector is shitty - either divey or chattery as hell, nowehere close to Mission control on Lyrik or RC2 on 36. So I get it if people were bashing CTD by comparing it to RC2 but I don't think it was the case.
  • + 10
 I had a first-gen CTD Float 32 that came new on my 2013 Giant Trance X 29er. Bought the bike in spring 0f 2014; after less than a year of use (and despite good maintenance habits), it crapped itself. No, it didn't fail completely, just got worse and worse over time. My LBS (Bikesport in Bellingham) did a lot of work to diagnose (free of charge - they ate that time in a display of great customer service while also keeping me rolling with loaner bikes, unlike the shop where I bought the bike, who couldn't be bothered), but in the end the fork ended up at Fox. And despite this being a known issue, and the fork still being under warranty, they didn't replace or fix it, just offered me a "crash replacement" (roughly half cost) instead. Sure, I'm a little better off with the new fork I got (2nd gen Float - so that should cut down on some of the issue), but it's left a bit of a sour taste.

Two lessons for me - one, a great LBS is a really good thing (I'd have been without a bike for the time the part was at Fox, and would not have had the local support to figure out what was going on in the first place); two - Fox seems to have a curious attitude regarding standing behind their products (including those that were the unfortunate results of first gen offshore production quality problems well known throughout the industry).
  • + 3
 I feel like Fox just keeps forking over the consumers.
  • + 4
 what I really want to know is (and I wish the review had stated)
What is the service-ability of this fork? And does it have the typical ludicrous fox-suggested maintenance schedule?
  • + 11
 Just because FOX says to do it that often does not mean that your fork will explode if you don't do it. Just because Rock Shox doesn't suggest so tight intervals, does not mean that you should not service it as often as Fox to get optimum performance. As to voiding warranty, Fox cannot prove you were not servicing their product so often.
  • + 0
 It's the fork owner's responsibility to prove that they DID have it serviced as required to maintain warranty. If they can't provide proof (via service and part receipts) that the service was done, FOX is within it's rights to refuse warranty work.

FOX has no responsibility to prove you DIDN'T do the service. That is impossible.
  • + 4
 "That is impossible" yes, for Fox to prove in court that they have a right to deny you Warranty rights based on nothing, and they cannot force you to do it at the bike shop so you have receits.

If you want warranty return and you come to them with worn out stanchions then it is another story... But if you snap a crown they cannot put it on outer leg service intervals.

Be realistic for fks sake, think!
  • + 20
 if it's not BOOST i'm not BUYING
  • + 4
 I am plenty realistic. I was clearly speaking in general terms about maintenance and how it relates to proper function of the for. I was not giving blanket license for the manufacturer to shirk responsibility for an unrelated failure.

Of course, maintenance on seals, oil & such have nothing to do with a catastrophic structural failure. Any manufacturer has to hold to the product they manufactured.

That is a different story than something like a damper failing because it has seen no service for several years and many miles of use. These things (bikes, forks, chains, etc.) all need maintenance to perform as desired and intended over time. Avoiding that and having a related failure is the owner's problem not the manufacturer.

Would you run 50,000 miles with no oil change in a car and blame the maker if the engine blows?
  • + 4
 Since I've personally overheard men and women at gas stations asking the staff what the "red teacup light" on the dashboard means... I'm pretty sure there are folks out there who really do skip the proper steps to maintain something and that manufacturers do have to enforce the terms of the warranties. And the law will back that up. Don't like it, lobby your MP (or congressman if you're a yankee) to change the laws so they'll be more nanny state like to ensure stupid people get to drive the prices up for the rest of us.
  • + 5
 would not touch another Fox single crown fork again..I've owned too many (32,34,36) that have ended up with horrible creaking / clicking due to the dreaded "CSU Creak" after the assembly grease leaches out of the light weight crown's press-fit fitment with the stanchions.

Always seems to happen just days or weeks after warranty expires and then you are looking at stupid money for a new CSU and a full fork rebuild.

I've spent time talking to their techs in the UK when my forks have gone back for this issue, and they admitted this is a known problem, which is accelerated by regular bike washing, and its a result of the design brief being to make "light weight" forks which is what consumers want?

The fact they are claiming they have taken even more weight out of the crown does not fill me with any confidence.

I'd like to see a heavier crown with better stanchion overlap for longer durability please!
  • + 5
 This is why Craig at Avalanche Down hill has so much business, the charger dampers fail too and I am my LBS!
  • + 5
 @g-42,

Had the complete opposite experience with Fox this year. My 2011 36 Float developed a steer tube creak, so I was planning to sent it back for new Heritage decals and asked them to confirm my suspicions; they sent it back with a new CSU with 2014 Kashima free of charge. Guess it depends on who you get when your stuff goes back for service. :/
  • + 4
 @waki yeah waki.... lugn oxe!
  • + 8
 meh, think ill stick with my pike
  • + 3
 I read on another site that intervals had been pushed from 30 hours to 120.

"Through better sealing and more advanced lubricants (especially the new Gold Oil), service intervals are now 120 hours of riding, which is far cry more manageable than the 30-hour intervals of yesteryear!"

flowmountainbike.com/tests/tested-2016-fox-34-fork-and-float-dps-shock
  • + 0
 Charger damper's have a 200 hour service interval recommendation too. . . . . We had two worn out, shot charger dampers after 50 hours . . . . And yes they had been serviced too. They never felt good after servicing either. There is no way these dampers can go 120 or 200 hours. MX forks get serviced after 20 hours. I hope fox has this figured out!
  • + 9
 I didn't bother reading the review because I already know it says this fork is awesome just like every other time, true or not.
  • + 8
 P.S. open bath marzocchi forks never need to be serviced! They measure service intervals in decades, not hours!
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns you're arguing with a european mindset. They can do anything there as long as there's an exclusion clause written in the warranty. It's not like in here where there are rights you cannot give away in a contract.

By the way, I'm all for the CTD hate, but be honest, most of its bad fame came from O/C entry level forks. FIT wasn't that bad, especially in its latest iterations.
  • + 6
 Also, I believe there's a lesson to be learned here... if you're going to enter the lower end of the market, either do it with good products or clearly differentiate your branding. If you give the same name to cheap and top forks thinking to increase lower end perceived value (and prices) you can be pretty sure your whole brand will be damaged at the end.
  • + 2
 just ask GT
  • + 0
 @AMGoran - skitunge!!! gas gas gas!
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns Braaapp!
  • + 0
 I'm getting rid of my fox float evolution, bought marzocchi 55 cr instead. I never had the response that I wanted form fox and I'm not saying that they are crap, the rear shox I stick to fox but front one it's a no no 4 me.
  • + 0
 My 55CR has been awesome. Very, very sensitive. Useful range of adjustment. Shorter service intervals than my DJ though.
  • + 2
 @zenis

I took a gamble and bought Manitou cheap from CRC (cheaper than new CSU and rebuild from Mojo for my Fox).

Really impressed with the ride quality, damper performance and structural rigidity.

I'd rather have a slightly heavier fork that works great and is durable, than a light weight fork that is a little twangy under load, damper a bit 'meh' and develops structural issues after a season
  • + 0
 hampstead - I am not denying what you are saying and not putting your riding credentials to question, God forbid, but in my "peer group", there are some really fast riders using Fox products (mainly 36 and 34) since years and none of them had the issue you describe. I bought a well used Fox 36R (judging by how scratched it is) and no sign of that problem either. I rode a 140 32 float for 2 years (let's say once a week), that I bought second hand off a bulky rider, and had no issues either. I mean, that's a quite big volume of samples. The issues I know of were worn out uppers (may have happened due to poor servicing) and blowing bladders, apart of all Talas units going to crap. Anyways that's a record common for Rock Shox as well. Manitou might have stepped it up, but Marzo is going down again, with plenty of people having issues with their golden coating.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns

thanks for the input.

Mojo (Fox UK) confirmed that Fox in the USA were very surprised at the amount of warranty claims on creaking CSU in the UK.

Their educated guess is we ride all year round, in bad conditions, meaning riders are constantly washing their bikes with products like Muck-Off, which leaches the assembly grease out of the stancion / crown interface - causing the clicking or creaking under braking or sudden loads.

Few years ago I would not have touched Manitou with a bargepole due to well known QC issues. I have been pleasantly surprised with my current Manitou fork.

Something I do remember with older Manitou was the quality of their damping tech, bearing in mind some of the current team at DVO were key players at Manitou
  • + 1
 Cleaning may be an issue. In 2008 I bought Nomad frame as new, and it said in the user manual quite clearly: we suggest to clean your bike as little as possible Big Grin

I personally have a good place to store my bikes where it does not matter if they are clean or covered in mud, so I enjoy the luxury of keeping them muddy. I only clean stanchions, chain and rotors and thanks to that I can spend that extra time 3 times a year to clean it with cloth and water from the bucket.
  • + 2
 I was speaking to the Marzo blokes at the Taipei show and they said that light gold colour was giving them a lot more problems than the darker colours. That's why they have changed to brown. Apparently the coffee brown scratches up just the same, only you can't tell.
  • + 25
 Mike Levy is 34 and he likes Fox 34 - this evidence of protourish science proves Mike to be biased and this is a paid infomercial. Nothingto believe, PIKE is still to be superior!

Jokes aside, anything close to RC2 in XC/trail package is good. And I agree with Mike, stiffness is overrated, Let lab rats stay in ze lab. For everyone who thinks the stiffer the better, should go to a rooty, rocky offcamber section and confront USD fork against Fox40.

This fork makes me MOIST
  • + 13
 Well said but the use of "moist" makes me slightly uncomfortable.

I'd wager that 99% of riders couldn't tell the difference between this 34 and the 36 as far as stiffness is concerned (even at the 160mm mark). The dollars and grams saved on the 34 make this fork a smarter decision for most.
  • + 7
 fox404ever
  • + 15
 I'm inclined to agree that stiffness in trail bikes may be overrated in some respects. Then again, for bigger riders (I'm 210#), a lot of standard stuff is a bit under-built. With all the different spec packages that the big manufacturers are pushing out with their bikes, it would be great if instead of just differentiating builds on bling/weight, they'd have separate versions aimed at different rider weights. For example, a technically skilled 170# 6' rider and someone like me (reasonably athletic, 210#, 6'1") are likely to look at the same size frame. To be happy long term, though, we have very different requirements - the technically skilled lighter guy doesn't need super beefy brakes (might even find them too grabby), and might be better off with lighter wheels (as he's less likely to pick poor lines or make awkward landings that will damage them), whereas I would gladly accept a little more weight in exchange for a bit higher margin for error. Same goes for fork stiffness - at a higher weight, I'd rather accept a bit more weight, but then have the fork not flex on me under load. I know it's hard/expensive to spec too many different builds - but there may be a niche for a Clydesdale version of the more popular bikes out there.
  • + 5
 Depends on what kind of stiff it is. Lateral and torsional maybe less important but when your fork flexes forward to back it sucks. I hated my 2010 float 32 for that reason.
  • + 9
 Unless you are talking about cake or towelettes, using the word moist makes us no longer bro-dawgs: theoatmeal.com/comics/moist
  • + 4
 Yo mama thinks stiffer is better
  • + 3
 i always knew you were a girl waki Wink
  • + 5
 i can tell a difference. i like to take the worst lines possible sometimes.

bigger stanchion forks is a big deal to me. thats why i have a 36 fork on my 130mm trail rig. Smile
speak for yourself waki.
  • + 1
 Depends on taste, but stiffer can be better. Ask rides who like the boxxer over the fox 40 and you will see that flex can be a good thing too.
  • + 1
 For those that say that the majority of riders couldn't feel the difference between a 34 and 36mm(or a 35), you couldn't be more wrong. We have a short loop nearby where we sometimes swap bikes between laps. We all have different levels of experience and that's one of the first things people comment about on each others bike(without prompting).
  • + 0
 its stupid to think, fox is producing a 40mm fork altough stiffness isnt that important or noticeable ... depends on taste... and its a compromise between rough stuff and fast corners
  • + 3
 DH is the extreme though. People who ride a lot of flow trails aren't going to feel any benefit from a 36 on a 120-140mm platform. Hit a lot of roots and baby heads, off camber rough stuff and then you notice. Locally there are a lot of guys who live on the flowy trails and hate the gnar. These might make up a majority riders on sub 150mm travel bikes. Personally I want a fatter fork on my 140mm travel remedy, but many of the pikes and 34's I see locally are wasted on manicured lines.
  • + 1
 Fox 40 has such thick stanchions for one single purpose: bending of uppers under load, especially on nose heavy landings. If they bend too much, they cannot go into bushings anymore, so it's about fork working under heaviest loads, it has nothing to do with handling.
  • + 1
 I do hear a lot of people saying it is the standard in stiffyness.
  • + 4
 Why are we italicized?
  • + 1
 @waki so? stiffness for riding hard.... huger forces... better be stiffer
  • + 1
 At about 215 nekked, I can feel the difference. Also, the more you weigh, the smaller a percentage .38 pounds is of the overal weight of the rider/bike, so the benefits of a lower weight are lower (pun intended)
  • + 6
 Mmm, too stiff affects handling negatively I am told. Then I rode this really old usd fork and traction in rock gardens and off cambers is unbelievable whereas I get bounced around on 36. Add wide carbon rims and you better pay really close attention what goes under your front wheel atwhat angle.
  • + 1
 I went from a 2014 Fox 32 Factory at 140mm to a 2015 36 at 140mm and I didn't really notice any ill effects from going to a much stiffer platform. I will say this though, the new 36 is outstanding whenever you point it downhill, but don't get out of the saddle to pedal cause it's just too fluid. I wish Fox had released this new 34 a little earlier, it would be nice to have a slightly more adjustable pedaling platform. I suppose I may even try a Pike, 26 inch wheels are out of style so I can pick one up cheap and give it a whirl, for what I do it might be a better match.
  • + 2
 @taletotell I noticed the italics too. It helped distract me from all the stiffness and moistness comments. Maybe our regular text has too much flex to the right?
  • + 5
 I don't care what is better 36 or Pike, as all those forks are very comparable. First gen CTD was utter crap, both forks and shocks. CTD Evo seemed better to me than old RLC, comparable to non charger RCT3. But they all are worse than RC2 or RCT3 charger usually at comparable price. Revelation costs almost as much as Pike and saves 100g off of it same with 34 against 36, but such reasoning is not always the case because many of us buy in 2nd hand market and there you usually take what comes along, closest to your criteria. I buy quality products at second hand market that cost little and come at mint condition. I bought two Fox 36, Van RC2 and Float R, in like-new condition for ca 400$, and you hardly find a used Pike for that money. In three years I will highly likely jump on a PIKE or 2015 36 or maybe even DVO. Price, condition and availability are my only concern, I piss on ultimate performance. I just refuse to pay more than 400$ for a fork. Having said that I encourage everyone to buy new stuff off the shelves to feed the second hand market. We all have a purpose in this world.
  • + 1
 Seconded, WAKIdesigns. I bought my current fork, a 36 Van rc2, in mint condition for 300 bones. Prior to that, I've had a Pike 454 for about 350, two Boxxer world cups for 450, etc, etc. All close to mint (if not mint) condition. I used to buy only brand new, but it has been pleasantly surprising how good the second hand market is, compared to brand new.

On the note of stiffness, each individual has to decide for themselves how stiff and beefy of a fork they need. I've enjoyed my 36 immensely, although I've not ridden a new 34 or pike to compare to. Having said that, I've always been a fan of usd forks, particularly the old Shiver. We've come a long way from the Shiver to the newest DH forks, but how much have we really progressed, ride-wise? I know modern forks have lost a lot of weight and are pretty darn good, but it's hard to beat the smoothness, linear spring rates, and durability of those old Shivers. I liken it to the new trend in mx bikes going to air forks. Is the weight penalty that great that we need to sacrifice good ride for it? I know they can be adjusted for any weight and skill of rider, but for coil forks, once you get the spring rate right, you're good to go. You don't have to check the stupid thing before every single ride. I'm gonna end this rant before I get myself in trouble.
  • + 2
 cliff notes: 34, 36, ctd, rc2, dvo, van, pike blah blah blah oh CTD sucks! - said waki
  • + 2
 @biking85 - I bought a Shiver SC 120 recently, it is very cool, tracks like a dream and eats roots on breakfast. Unfortunately it bobs like a btch, so you can forget about sprints. If I were a rich man dyby daba dyby doo , I'd pay Avalanche to make me cartridges for it with air springs Big Grin but that would easily cost 1-1,2k if they'd do it at all. Still, it would be half price of RS-1 hahaha Big Grin
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns www.avalanchedownhillracing.com/Marz/Marzocchi%20Shiver.htm If I'm not mistaken, the "Shiver Urban" option is for the Shiver SCs. You can also retrofit a RC2 cartridge into the DCs, makes me wonder if there's a similar cartridge you could retrofit into the SCs.
  • + 1
 I like what I am hearing, you mean Fox RC2?
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns why not just go for the revel?
  • + 2
 Because it costs a fortune, maybe it will pop up on buy sell for half price in 3 years or so? I bought Shiver SC to make FS bike for my kids.
  • + 2
 Then it's a bummer because my old 66 rc2x bobbed as fk as well Big Grin

I bet Ava can tune it for XC/trail.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns What about the Maverick DUC 32? My Buddy still rides one
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns Look, heres one

www.pinkbike.com/buysell/1712548

Sux that ur in eastern Europe, the used bike market must be much slimmer there
  • + 20
 Amazing what some decent competition will do Just a pity it took them so long...
  • + 12
 I was lucky enough to get to visit the Fox headquarters yesterday in Scotts Valley. I actually got the see/play around with this fork and it's amazing how light and plush it felt. All I have to say is Fox is gonna come out swinging with the new line they are gonna release this year, especially in the DH sector.
  • + 8
 c'mon spill the beans
  • + 1
 Shhhh! Don't let the cat out of the bag. Haha.
  • + 3
 Everyone already saw it on Minaar's IG feed. New DH coil... Ugh. So hot right now. But the upcoming trail stuff? Oooooh, yum. Sea Otter is gonna lose it's damn mind.
  • + 9
 Fox 41 BOOST
  • + 11
 PUSH doing volume spacers to Fox Float 34 2013-14. In fact, simply pour oil into the air chamber (15-20cc) and we have a nice, progressive fork. I just did it and I am very satisfied. I like my CTD damper. Due to the fact that others do not like it I bought my fork for 25% of the price. Mint condition. Almost new. Thank you malcontents.
  • + 1
 CTD good? How dare you?! You obviously haven't tried PIKE Big Grin
  • + 16
 WAKI, it sounds like you obviously haven't PUSHed your fork.
  • + 8
 Please stop forking around.
  • + 3
 Obviously haven't tried the Mattoc... Blows my Push'd 36RC2 away!
  • + 2
 And never tried the Push Factory Fork System Elite. Wink
  • + 2
 Waki if u add oil to air chamber , will it not transfer to negative chamber over time and affect small bump sensitivity ? someone suggested to add a closed cell foam to air chamber instead
  • - 1
 It will transfer yes. Closed cell foam is easily sourced (light weight grips) but if there's a wine drinker in your family...corks are free.
  • + 1
 ha! i modded a cork to fit snug in a friend's deville am air spring. worked like a charm!
  • + 1
 Waki I tried pike, but I prefer trout (6,99sek / kg in the Willis). What else I like in the older CTD is that the negative spring is made of steel instead of air chamber.
  • + 2
 @irus, I was being cynical - I am tired of Pike hype hence I am picky on it, I am happy to hear you found something that works great for you, we gotta ride together finaly Big Grin
  • + 1
 I know it was cynicism. That's why answered jokingly. When you have time just let me know. I am happy to meet with you. It is always better to go with the better. Man learns and develops his skills.
  • + 1
 @deeeight the float air springs call for 15cc of float fluid per fox's setup instructions. why would adding more float fluid to the air chamber to make the spring more progressive cause the float fluid to transfer?

and, if it did, i don't think the negative chamber is completely sealed off from the lowers of the fork on 2015 and prior air springs, so at worst, wouldn't a tiny amount just migrate into the bath oil?
  • + 13
 Is it just me or did someone from Marzocchi sneak their logo in when that crown was cast.
  • + 1
 That's how I identify the new forks from a distance. Just look for the M.
  • + 1
 I noticed that!
  • + 2
 Had to come back, To mention that yes... They probably will now.
  • + 5
 Speaking of Torsional Rigidity - One of the main reasons I ditched my Fox 34s (had two) and went to Rock Shox was the large amount of creaking at where the head-tube is pressed into the crown after a season of vigorous riding. I certainly hope that is another issue which Fox has resolved.
  • + 6
 Will the air spring assembly be retro-fitable for the older 34's? I already have an Avalanche Cartridge, so the dampening is covered, but a smoother air spring would be appreciated.
  • + 3
 You beat me to it. It'd be nice if Fox did what RS did for the charger damper on their Boxxer and make an option to retrofit an older fork. Would be a nice nod to those who bought the previous version of the 34 and have been a little disappointed.
  • + 2
 previous stuff has been retrofittable, so it's not unrealistic to hope... sometimes the pricing on a damper is enough to make you consider buying new (on sale) anyway in my experience.
  • + 1
 That is...I under you're speak of the air spring but, just sayin'.

Of course if we could update both the air spring and damper on the older forks then there would be little need to buy the new fork. I need more coffee; I'll shut up now.
  • + 1
 @powderturns- very true
  • + 2
 I'm not sure about that, because the new 34 won't come for 26" wheels and so, the air suspension assambly might be a way to long.
  • + 1
 Air spring? I don't think so. The new air spring requires a dimple in the stanchions like a Pike Solo Air or many air shocks in the market. From the article above "Float's air transfer port is now on the stanchion tube, just like on FOX's Float shocks, rather than on the air shaft"

You would need to replace the uppers too.
  • + 1
 i'm using an avalanche cart as well, so i'm in no hurry to upgrade my whole fork either. I'm not sure if the air volume between the 2015 and 2016 air springs has changed, but i'm wondering if, at the very least, we could just swap in a 2016 top cap with spacers (assuming it would be around $40) instead of having to drop $80 on the Push topcap spacers
  • + 5
 ''On the 34, we’ve removed the shaft and need for a seal to make it lighter, and now the transfer port is on the upper tube, just like with (the rockshox pike/SID/Revelation) our Float shocks.''

Just seems like they took a pike, and replicated it in a fox manner.

Volume spacer attaching to the top cap???? Rockshox bottomless token.

Fit4, does the same as a RCT3 damper, no?

Pretty embarrassing for fox really.

I'm no fox hater, if it's good, it's good. Just doesn't seem like they've done any of their own work on this one.

hey're also copying the debonair air cans now too.
  • + 15
 How so, the fit damper has been around a lot longer than the charger damper, and volume spacers are nothing new rockshox didn't invent them just gave them a nice name and the marketing appears to be working, RCT3 is the same as RLC in years past, which fox should have never gotten rid of the low speed compression when they switched to CTD. If you think the pike was a original idea then you have been sold because all these companies do is take idea's from one another its simple business.
  • + 1
 basically they are all so paranoid about what each other are doing that they end up copying each other for fear of being left behind and so end up making the same fork, so stop being a spanner about it it means more competition and keeps companies from being able to just put prices where they like them
  • + 5
 The 36 is not overkill if you want 26", 140mm, 20mm axle and 1 1/8" steerer; it's your only choice. And since when is stiffer overkill when it's only point whatever a kilogram heavier?
  • + 3
 Clip on volume spacers = Pike did it first
3 position FIT 4 with LSC adjust = Pike did it first
Air spring with air transfer port that requires changing shaft for travel change = Pike did it first
Flangeless seals = Pike did it first

Funny thing is that one of the guys that designed the Pike left Rock Shox last year and went to Fox.
  • + 3
 What was cutting edge three years ago is crap today......my guess is if Fox (and other companies) were not locked into this short design cycle they would have enough time to test and release good product the first time. I personally do not like Fox because their customer service has sucked everytime I needed it.
  • + 1
 Their philosophy of treating me like I'm too dumb to know how to bleed an oil circuit, while lowering the service interval of that circuit, is my beef.
  • + 2
 RCB droppin' a trrrrrrrrrrrrrrruth bomb from PDX!
  • + 3
 I have an idea. Kill the 32. Maybe make an 80mm thing for the superlight crowd and otherwise use this 34 and up. For RS take the pike and put it on everything 100mm above up to 160 then switch to the lyrik up to dh then use the boxxer. They can use the rs1 for the xc crowd. I have a revelation and it is not bad, but it is still either wallowy or harsh depending on whether you want soar wrists of a lively feel, just like the fox float 32
  • + 3
 I agree with Mike that a 36 is overkill for a lot of rider – it certainly is for me. I'm pretty happy with my 2105 Fox 34, but if they've managed to take half a pound out of it whilst making it simpler, more adjustable and more responsive, I'm in.
  • + 8
 you're 90 years ahead of your time
  • + 0
 I'm fat, what now?
  • + 4
 For me, at 230lb in riding gear with a pack on, the 36 is a beautiful, beautiful thing. It's so tuneable that I'm not sure exactly what about it is "overkill." You can make it whatever you want it to be in terms of ride quality.
  • + 6
 If the 36 is overkill, you're A: not climbing enough, B: not doing enough pushups or C: not going fast enough. Wink

+obvioustrolling
  • + 1
 Using a 36 FIT RLC right now because 34s weren't available back then, the RC2 wasn't out yet either and all the 32 reviews were bad IIRC. It's probably overkill on most trails but that's all that made sense. I used it even on DH tracks and that thing just refuses to flex, even on head on square bumps. It makes my boxxer feels like a wet noodle. Once revalved, I really started loving it even though sometimes I find the LSC a bit wacky.

When 34s came out I was like "oh noes" but then they were CTD i think and the 29er one got abysmal reviews.

I still don't get why they made a 36 with lockout. Fox took some weird decisions in the last few years...
  • + 1
 Hey ambatt, all three!
  • + 3
 Hmmmm announced the day before 1st April. Bit like the debonair last year.... Can only mean one thing... New Santa Cruz 29er announced tomorrow with these specced as standard...
  • + 1
 Perceptive!
  • + 3
 Available in 2016? Interesting choice to announce at the start of 2015 buying season as I'm not sure I'd be buying a bike with a 2015 Fox fork when I know if I wait a year I'll get something that is "night and day" better.
  • + 2
 I really wish there was a 26" version of this, but then again, I guess if you are gonna drop $900 for a new fork, you may as well put it toward a new bike. First world problems.
  • + 3
 The problem is that I like my frame, wheels, cockpit and drive trail, I just want a new fork. So at the minimum now I need new wheels, tires frame and fork just to get a NEW fork. I will probably for a used fork now instead but it would have been nice to get one of these new.
  • + 4
 Yay, finally Fox is admitting the CTD damper was a terrible, terrible design. Only about five years too late.
  • + 2
 2-3 years. It was actually released summer 2012 and called a 2013 model. So technically they used CTD for 3 model years; 2013, 2014 & 2015. 2016 gets the new damper above.
  • + 1
 Oh surprise surprise Fox again, shove your crap up your ass the other companies are better priced and better treated than your crap, look at CTI forks crap all failing like crap then you charge more money on to fix them over a shit design Fox made. Shove them thanks bloody rip off crap.
  • + 1
 Ok got my Fox34s back a few days back now, after a service and the Fit4 upgrade for £184. The forks feel nice now. The only thing is, (and It might just be my ocd) the top Adjuster dial on the rebound side has lateral play. I phoned Mojo and they said this was normal, so I dropped into my LBS where they have a bunch of bikes with the new Foxs 34,36 and they are the same.
  • + 4
 best fork ever! said no one ever. only fox every year when they release a new one because the old one sucked!
  • + 2
 So, show 2016 fork at beginning, admit current design is crap, everybodtycontinues to buy Pikes.. Can't say i ever liked Fox forks, but the CTD is so poor i ruled out any bikes with Fox shocks on it For my new bike.
  • + 3
 So instead of ctd it's now omf? Same thing just with a different name and better execution. Do we really need 3 settings in a fork? Glad to see ctd go, sad to see omf come.
  • + 2
 The CTD King is dead! Long live the FMO King!
  • + 1
 Anybody want to buy my 140mm 275 34? Not so excited to ride it in Downieville this weekend. But need to pay the bike off before slapping a new PIke on the front of my ride.... this new 34 was released way too early. Looks exactly like the charger dampener And still has a renamed ctd function. I don't get it?
  • + 3
 Great congrats but, I am still buying the Mattoc. Fox should offer this fork as a warranty replacement to all those poor guys who paid for the previous 34.
  • + 4
 $875USD is pretty damn good...

I'm intrigued. And happy to have a FOX option if/when I need a longer travel bike.
  • + 3
 if only the CAD is at par with USD.....
  • + 3
 Exactly. Been having to remind myself to add almost 25% to any price I see nowadays. Making online shopping a nightmare!
  • + 1
 I wonder how much the TALAS version is...
  • + 4
 so I guess us 26-4-lifers are shit outa luck? or is there a version for us?
  • + 2
 Come on Fox, solo air spring, volume spacers and bladder damper? Since you are doing a replicate you might as well get the name right. The new Fox Pike.
  • + 3
 I love that it comes in 120, and is lightweight. Perfect upgrade for a Tallboy/Ripley.
  • + 1
 seems like the 32 would be more targeted at those bikes. seems like you'd want this more on one of those new, slack short travel Transitions. The chart in the article does show a new 32 coming soon, one wonders where it'll slot in, weight wise. google says that a TALAS 32 weighs 3.7lbs, I wouldn't be terribly surprised to see the new ones, with the same damping setup as here, somewhere around 3.0, which is a full pound lighter than this. Aren't there DT swiss & magura short travel forks already cracking that 3.0 lb barrier? I'd be surprised if your average Tallboy(non-LT)/Ripley owner wouldn't opt for a pound less fork weight.
  • + 1
 Any of these sound good. What I'm after is stiffness. The 32 feels a little frail when you push hard on heavier chop.
  • + 1
 I did'nt read the whole article as I am a 26errrrh, and nothing seems to pertain to me anymore. Is the Fox Float 34 available for 26 in wheel configurations (with the 15mmerrrh/20mm hybrid axle)?
  • + 1
 Sound like Fox hit a home run with this new model! For the price I'm betting a lot of riders will choose this fork over the 36, especially now that the dampening is very similar!
  • + 2
 So Fox basically took the air spring and damper designs from a Pike. Nice work on the R&D work to fix the crappy old 34 forks Fox!
  • + 3
 Basically, Fox made a Pike.
  • + 3
 Without having to read the article at ALL. Only thing you need to see is "CTD is GONE!"
  • + 3
 "The FIT4 damper still offers three different compression settings to choose from on the fly, but all of them are much more useable than what the previous CTD system allowed for."

The old CTD is gone, but CTD v2 is still around.
  • + 2
 Yeah...I knew that would be the quick response. Agreed that it is really just V(2) of CTD. Maybe they have at least improve on the pile of garbage that was the original CTD.
  • + 2
 I'm amazed the 34 120mm will be only a little bit heavier than my old 100mm 32. Amazing. If I didn't have a pike waiting to be shoved in my new frame I'd be dreaming of this.
  • + 3
 Queue the Rockshox fanboys in 3... 2.. 1...
  • + 2
 Just link them back to the RS-1. Smile
  • + 3
 Too bad they start creaking after a week of riding.
  • + 1
 Press Fit BBs?
  • + 2
 I would consider buying a fox 34 again but only if it had a ohlins damper unit in it ! Nuf said !!
  • + 2
 Waiting for this unicorn Ohlins damper to make another appearance. Probably not Sea Otter? Next Eurobike?
  • + 2
 I'm happy to see more competition but I'm keeping my new pike on my trail bike without a doubt
  • + 1
 There's some information missing relevant to most peoples' bikes. The article doesn't say how much the 26" version will weigh..............................................
  • + 1
 if they even make a 26 specific version
  • + 1
 there will be no 26er Option for the 34...
  • + 7
 Haven't you heard? You can't have fun on a 26" bike any more. Soon you will only be able to have fun on a 27.5+.
  • + 1
 Can you not put a 26" wheel in it?
  • + 2
 No, the offset difference between a 26in and 27.5in specific fork would make putting a 26 inch wheel into a 27.5 detrimental in the handling department. People do it but as you go to the bigger wheels the offset changes which changes your trail numbers.....there's a lot more to it but I wouldn't recommend smaller wheels in forks designed for bigger wheels, it will dramatically affect your steering.
  • + 1
 True, but if you're hanging on to your 26" wheels, you're going to have to make sacrifices.
From a manufacture's perspective, there is ZERO OEM demand for a high end, longer travel fork. The casting for the lowers is a significant cost for the minimal aftermarket return.
Moving forward, tires will be in the same boat...
  • + 1
 Yea, it's such a dramatic effect, that some brands are labeling their 27.5 forks "26/27.5 compatible." It's different, but it doesn't destroy your handling. 27.5 forks work just fine for 26" wheels. Just like 26" forks work just fine on 24" DJ bikes.
  • + 1
 @groghunter, If there are manufacturers labeling their fork for both wheel sizes I'm betting that they have chosen a middle ground for the offset. Small changes make a big difference in how a bike steers, 27.5 specific forks run more offset than a 26 in.specific fork, more offset equals less trail. Go too far and it's no bueno.
www.pinkbike.com/news/To-the-Point-Wheel-Diameter-VS-Fork-Offset.html
  • + 1
 Yes, if you go too far, it breaks things. the difference in trail between a 27.5 fork & a 26" fork? not nearly enough. as I said, just like the offset on a 26" fork doesn't make it work poorly with a 24" wheel.
  • + 1
 Yes, it may not work poorly or it might. I only pointed this out when the wheel size and fork question was asked because I went through it myself and had to learn the math after having Fox tell me they didn't recommend a 27.5 fork on a 26in. wheeled bike. The difference between the 27.5 version of the 36 and the 26 version is 7mm more offset in the crown of the 27.5. 7mm didn't sound like much to me until I started using my enemy google. The extra 7mm of offset reduces the trail by almost the same amount and while 2-3mm is no big deal, 7-8mm you will definitely feel. Yes you can get by with the quicker steering on some bikes but honestly I felt the difference and swapped the CSU/uppers to the 26in specific one after trying it out a couple rides. Personal experience aside, I am sure there are times and frames that this kind of change won't mean squat.....but it could.
  • - 1
 Not light enough..would choose a 36 every time..if 3.5lbs..then sure makes sense..I can see that the marginal weight savings is enough for riders ONLY riding the same type of trail-aggressive trail, all Mt'ish etc..but the 36 will cover aggressive trail-just shy of needing a dual crown..
  • + 1
 It might be more intended for aggressive trail riders, vs people hitting what-we-needed-a-DH-bike-for-10-years-ago type trails. I'll certainly be sticking with a 36 equivalent on my AM bike, but I'd consider this over a 32 for a 100-140mm travel 29er, since I don't ride like a 24hr racer.
  • + 1
 I've seen new graphics on the 40s, does anyone know if they are going to be released soon?
  • + 1
 not buying into this....i will let you all try it first. report back with a rider review when done.
  • + 2
 "The new volume spacers, which effect..."
Affect, fwiw.
  • + 1
 Can anyone commente new 2016 F34 vs Pike 140?

Would rater experience over opinion.
  • + 1
 Nice to see Fox to really be getting back in the game, should take away some of that Rockshox domination on trail bikes.
  • + 2
 Little competition doesn't make for good options for the consumer.
  • + 2
 not a big fan of the new grey colorway
  • + 2
 And holy shit those Ibis 941s make the Nobby Nics look square!
  • + 1
 2017 will be out soon. Interested in these. 36s seem like overkill for so many trails
  • + 0
 It's crazy how all forks are the same have been the same and always will be the same inside from the get go. (more or less).
  • + 1
 My 2014 34 Factory was warrantied twice within 10 rides. Probably won't buy Fox again in a hurry.
  • + 1
 Interesting how pretty much all the big mtb websites are running articles on the 34 and guide ultimate today.
  • + 9
 Not interesting, it's the end of the embargo. So all the mags that have had them and tested for a while can now publish without penalty. This is a very common practice in other industries (auto and such too).
  • + 1
 Still interesting, everything in your comment is common knowledge but I have never seen so many sites with the same two products on the same day.
  • + 2
 no news about the 2017 models?:-(
  • + 1
 2016 come so fast,I have not even seen the 2015 in material object!
  • + 1
 I want it to be 100mm travel...so there is no way thats possible huh....?
  • + 1
 卧槽我15款还没看见16款就出来了。。
  • + 1
 Industry affiliations / sponsors: None

Mike don't lie.
  • + 1
 I take it's not coming in BOOST 110...
  • + 1
 I do no like the stickers
  • + 1
 What I see is just $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$.
  • + 1
 Great, now my 2015 team float is worthless and outdated
  • + 1
 Are you $hitting me?...my 2015 damper upgrade arrived 3 days ago...
  • + 1
 I wonder how it stacks up to the pike?
  • + 1
 Read the article and find out!
  • + 3
 The WHOLE article should have centered around how it compares to the Pike. They barely even mention the Pike.
  • + 1
 @Alias530 Bingo! That is exactly right. I couldn't believe Mike didn't spend more time on that comparison. Honestly that's all I cared about: how does it stack up to the Pike?
  • + 1
 When will the new dh stuff come out?
  • + 0
 i payed to much from a blown fox, never again.
  • + 1
 2016!?!
  • + 1
 Seriously! I guess they were in a hurry to get it out, and had to call it something!
  • - 3
 Can I afford them? No...end of that idea then!!
  • - 5
flag christillott (Mar 31, 2015 at 8:08) (Below Threshold)
 i know the feeling... unfortunately. stick to my rockshox
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv14 0.076751
Mobile Version of Website