Riding FOX's New 36 - First Ride

May 27, 2014
by Mike Levy  
FOX 36 Original photo by Colin Meagher

FOX's new 36 lineup is, without a doubt, one of the most pivotal in the history of the company. In the last few years we've seen mid-travel suspension go from being nothing to write home about to offering next-level amounts of control and friction-free performance. It's no secret that the Pike has been leading that charge, and, having been available for about a full year now, it's firmly entrenched in many riders' minds as the fork to have on the front of their their all-mountain or trail bike. With all that in mind, the new 36 range has to not just work well, they all have to blow riders' expectations out of the water if FOX hopes to reclaim the crown that many would say was once theirs. FOX certainly isn't shying away from that challenge, though, and to prove it they invited us to spend part of the first day in Moab on whatever fork we brought with us that we'd like to compare the new 36 to. With an invitation like that, It should come as no surprise that the majority of our small group showed up with Pikes attached to the front of their bikes. Game on.


Same Name, New Fork

Don't be mistaken by the similar appearance and familiar name, FOX went back to the drawing board when designing many of the new fork's features, as well as taking some of their already proven layouts and tweaking them to fit the 36's requirements. The chassis features new lowers that are said to be lighter and move back to using a traditional pinch-bolt setup, as well as being compatible with both 15mm and 20mm thru-axles by way of interchangeable inserts, and the crown sports a lower profile to drop the axle-to-crown hight. Even the Kashima stanchions see a revised treatment that FOX claims makes them slipperier than before. Internally, the FIT RC2 damper has its valving changed to better reflect both the support and suppleness that today's riders are looking for, as well as updated sealing that should further aid the latter. FOX's new hydraulic TALAS 5 travel adjust system has been dropped inside on select models. Much of those changes came about as a result of FOX's Racing Application Development program (RAD for short) that I was able to sample last November. I spent two days in Moab, Utah, riding the 27.5'' compatible Float 160 FIT RC2 model - the air-sprung, non-TALAS version - on the front of my 2015 Knolly Warden, and you can read what I make of it lower down on the page. For now, let's jump deep into the tech.

36 Float 27.5 160 FIT RC2

• Intended use: trail / all-mountain
• Travel: 160mm / 6.3''
• Adjustments: rebound, high-speed compression, low-speed    compression
• Volume adjustment
• Travel adjustable down to 130mm in 10mm steps
• Spring: air
• Thru-axle: 15mm or 20mm convertible
• New lowers, crown, revised Kashima coating
• Weight: 4.24lb (claimed)
• MSRP: $1,050 USD



Options Galore

The tenth year of the 36 sees it become an entirely new animal, although that's only half of the story here, and it should be mentioned that FOX is giving the consumer a myriad of options when it comes to finding a 36 that suits their needs and the bike they'll be fitting it to. There's the aforementioned convertible 15mm or 20mm axle system, but there are also models to work with 26", 650B, and 29" wheels, and stock travel variations that range from 110mm to 180mm depending on the model and if it makes use of the travel adjust TALAS system or the new Float air spring. Let's not forget that stroke can be adjusted by a further 50mm on Float models as well. Want a 110mm travel 36? That might be a bit extreme, but you can do it. There are also a handful of straight 1 1/8'' steerer tube options to fit older frames should you have a bike that you'd rather not part with just yet, and even a 180mm travel, coil sprung fork with the FIT RC2 damper. There are thirteen different 36s in total, but they all have one thing in common: they're all 'Factory' level FOX forks, meaning that they all sport Kashima coated legs and sit at the top of price range. That will likely change in the future, but for now you'll have to spring for the high-end offering if you want a taste of the new 36. You can check out the 36 landing page to see the entire lineup.

I travelled to Moab to sample the new 36, but FOX also had other news to share that will affect their entire range of production forks:
bigquotesWe've always had a hand dyno at the end of the production line, and a person would run through the fork to make sure the knobs felt right and to do a compression test. Now we have a full dyno that we've implemented in the last year that does all that, but also a friction test. It's calibrated for every single fork model, and it has a range. If it doesn't spit out numbers that fit into that range, the fork gets rejected. It's allowed us to really increase our consistency and really quantify things - it's not a guy giving the fork a feel and going 'oh, this one's bad'. We still do use a hand dyno because there's no substitute for someone feeling each knob, but having real numbers to look at has helped us make things really consistent. That's one of the hardest things... you can make a pretty rad product, but can you do it ten thousand times? - Mark Jordan, Global Marketing Manager


FOX 36 Photo by Colin Meagher
  A new crown, lowers, and Kashima coating can all be found on the new 36. See those small threaded holes on the backside of the fork arch? There's a chance that FOX will offer a smartly integrated fender that bolts into place.


New Chassis

The 36 sees a revised Kashima coating applied to its stanctions, an updated crown and steerer unit that helps to keep fork length as low as possible, and totally new lowers that FOX says are lighter than the previous version. That last point is aided by the move away from a quick release thru-axle system and all of the hardware that comes along with it, but there's also a much more aggressive approach to removing as much unneeded magnesium as possible - there are actually five different taper zones on each side of the fork lowers. ''The 36 hadn't gone through the full chassis revision that our other forks saw in 2013,'' Mark Jordan, FOX's Global Marketing Manager, told Pinkbike. ''There's three things that we look at when we're doing chassis design, and they all go together: there's torsional flex, independent wheel movement (trans-shear) and also fore-aft flex. It's how those work together, combined with the damper, that gives you the ride quality. This fork actually takes notes from the 40 with how we've actually tuned its flex into the design.'' Bushing overlap is said to be another major factor, with FOX telling us that the new 36 has the most of any of their single crown forks. The 36's new thru-axle setup allows for either 15 or 20mm axles to be used by way of aluminum adapters at the axle clamp. The adapters are pushed into place, and a shim extends down into the gap in the clamp that the pinch bolts are run through. There is no quick release thru-axle option, but FOX says that this new compression-less design allows the fork's lower legs to stay in better alignment. ''We're including both axles with the fork,'' Jordan said when asked about consumer availability. ''And you'll get four volume spacers, with one installed in the fork already. We wanted to make it so that when someone buys an aftermarket fork, they'll have everything that they need. And if you look at the wheel size and steerer tube options, there's everything that anyone could ask for.''

FOX 36 Photo by Colin Meagher
  FOX had this nifty see-through model on display that gives you a good idea of where each component sits within the fork.


While the fork's new crown and steerer unit might not be as glamorous as a fresh lower leg design, the new CSU used on the 36 might actually have a bigger impact on those who are sensitive about handlebar heights. In the past, a 160mm travel 36 was taller than a 160mm travel 34, but Jordan says that's no longer the case: ''The new 36's crown architecture is a lot lower than a 34, which is a result of all the testing and the bigger tubes,'' he explained. But why is that noteworthy? ''What that does is reduce the axle-to-crown length a little bit, and now every 26" and 27.5" 36 fork is comparable to a 34 of the same travel in length, and the new 26" 36 is about 9mm shorter than the older 36. Some of our racers are actually able to run more travel because of this.''



Revised FIT RC2 Damper

FOX has been using their RC2 damper cartridge since 2005, and while it's evolved over that time, the same basic principles still apply in 2015. That means that it's still a sealed design that depends on an expanding bladder to compensate for displacement, and also still offers external low-speed compression, high-speed compression, and low-speed rebound adjustments. ''The RC2 damper uses the same sealed layout that we've had since 2005 when the 40 came out, and it's the most consistent and best way to control damping,'' Jordan says of the design. ''We've used the bladder system, which allows for more sensitivity, for a long time now, and it's basically an improved version.''. There's little doubt that FOX wants everyone to be aware that their sealed cartridge and bladder layout was in use nine years before a similarly executed system showed up in the Pike, but they're also hoping that those improvements allow the new 36 to compete with that very fork. One of the most important updates, according to FOX, is a new longer seal head that greatly reduces friction, something that has come from the race-focused RAD 34 fork.
bigquotesWe're talking about stiffness and the new chassis, but the number one goal with this project, I think, was to make a fork that feels really smooth. It felt like we had a lot of stick-slip in our older forks, and the big difference that consumers were noticing was that some of our competition had a lot better feel to it as far as friction and sensitivity goes. That was the biggest goal with this project, to come up with something that offers an amazingly supple and smooth feel, but still offers support when you need it. - Ariel Lindsley, FOX Fork Expert Engineering Technician


FOX 36 Photo by Colin Meagher
  Although it may appear to be similar to the previous RC2 cartridge, there are a host of internal updates aimed at improving control and sensitivity.


The cartridge's damping has been altered as well, with a revised compression tune to increase sensitivity that is said to not sacrifice support. ''The re-valve of the RC2 damper added a lot of sensitivity to the fork,'' Ariel Lindsley, FOX Fork Expert Engineering Technician, said of of the changes. ''We started looking at our notes from the race department and test riders and saw that most people were running it really far open for a lot of their settings, and that told us that this thing was way over damped. We changed our low-speed circuit, we changed the orifice size, and we changed other things in there to get a more sensitive off-the-top feel for the fork while still being able to use that low-speed adjuster in situations where you need it.'' There's also been a change to a new, lower viscosity 5wt fork oil in the damper, as well as new 20wt Gold lubrication oil that has been treated with a tackifier that helps to keep it where it's needed most, which is on dynamic surfaces instead of running down and pooling low in the fork.


FOX 36 Photo by Colin Meagher
  The 36's Float air spring is brand new, with a self-equalizing negative air spring and simple volume adjustment spacers.


New Float Air Spring

While the fork's RC2 damper has seen some important updates, its air spring system has received a total overhaul. The old coil negative spring has gotten the boot, with a new air negative spring in its place. FOX cites the new system's consistency rather than the 94 gram weight loss that accompanies it, with the self-equalizing design meaning that the fork will always be at the same resting length regardless of air pressure. This wasn't the case with the older coil negative spring, with it compressing further when the rider ran higher spring pressures, which would then slightly change the fork's axle-to-crown length. The new self-equalizing design automatically fills the negative air chamber to the correct pressure by way of a bypass port on the inside the shaft, a very similar setup to what you'll find on many air sprung shocks on the market. The 36 is currently the only fork in FOX's lineup to make use of the new Float layout, but we expect it to show up on other models in the future.


FOX has also built-in both volume and travel adjustments into the Float fork's spring leg, with a wide enough range on both to satisfy pretty much anyone's setup requirements. The key point to remember here is that they have created a massively wide range of volume adjustment that is intended to be taken advantage of if you feel the need to run your 36 with less travel than it came stock with. Remember, the less travel you have, the more the spring rate might need to ramp up if you are pushing your riding hard. It's for this reason that four volume spacers - either 7.6cc or 10.8cc each - can be installed in the fork. Jordan explained that it would be very, very rare for any rider, no matter how large, to require all of the spacers if they're running the fork at full travel, and that most riders will only need one or maybe two at most. Drop the travel down by 50mm - the maximum amount - and you could require all four, though. And speaking of travel, it can be set to five different positions in 10mm increments by adding aluminum spacers of that size to the underside of the negative spring plate (shown at right). The job looks pretty simple, although you'll also have to make a quick adjustment to match the height of the negative air chamber bypass hole to your new travel setting. The 180mm Float can be taken all the way down to 130mm, and the 160mm travel fork can be lowered to 110mm, meaning that we could see some interesting setups out there. Want a super burly dirt jump or cross-country fork?


36 TALAS


While previous versions of TALAS utilized an air transfer system to raise and lower the fork in its travel, FOX moved to a hydraulic system in 2014 that allows the fork's stroke to be tweaked in 5mm increments and 30mm of overall change, and this is exactly what you'll find in the 2013 36 TALAS forks. The revised layout uses just one dynamic seal as opposed to the older system's three, and it's also decoupled from the fork's air spring, giving FOX more flexibility when it comes to tuning the spring curve. The design works by transferring oil from one chamber to another by way of check balls that block the oil's passage. When in long travel mode, the TALAS unit sits at full extension at the top of the cartridge, with the majority of the oil in the TALAS unit itself. Turning the lever to the left allows the check balls to move, opening up ports that let the oil flow from the larger TALAS chamber to a zone between the cartridge wall and the outer wall of the TALAS unit, thereby pulling the TALAS element down into the cartridge and effectively shortening its overall length. The 36's air spring is still adjusted via a schrader valve in the center of the TALAS dial, with a long tube running down through the center of the unit and into the air spring chamber.

FOX

The latest TALAS system has also given FOX a simple and quick way to adjust the fork's travel when in its shorter travel setting, with clip-on spacers that snap over the outer tube of the TALAS unit. These 5mm spacers adjust the position of the shorter travel setting by limiting the movement of the hydraulic travel adjuster. If you're looking to tune how much travel the fork has when dropped down, simply unthread the spring-side top cap and clip on one or more of the 5mm spacers that restrict the total movement of the TALAS unit.

FOX 36 Photo by Colin Meagher
FOX 36 Photo by Colin Meagher
  FOX encouraged us to put in an initial ride on the test lap with our bike's stock fork before swapping in the 36. In my case that meant I'd be comparing FOX's new 36 to its main competitor, the Pike.








It isn't often that I fly into a product launch with my own test bike, a 2015 Knolly Warden, and am encouraged by my host to spend the initial ride not making use of their new offering. That is exactly what went down during my recent trip to Moab, Utah, to evaluate FOX's new 36 Float 27.5 160 FIT RC2 fork, though, with the first lap of our test loop being ridden with the bike's stock Pike on the front of it. FOX wasn't shying away from a straight comparison, you see, but rather inviting a head-to-head, back-to-back, cage match of sorts, with maximum ride time and minimal propaganda. Brave, but refreshing. The plan for the first day was to smash out three laps, the first on the stock Warden, and then roll by the FOX pits to swap in the new 36 before doing two more longer laps. The second day consisted of even more saddle time, all with the 36 under me, and plenty of the rocky, rough, and unforgiving terrain that Moab has become famous for - it's the kind of place where every inch of ground looks like it has teeth, and where knee pads feel as mandatory as a helmet.

FOX 36 Photo by Colin Meagher
  The 36 was bolted to the front of Knolly's 150mm travel Warden, a bike that we're very familiar with.


There are a few points of comparison that we'll be talking about below, but the most important, at least in my mind, has to be how the 36 compares to the Pike when talking about its ability to support the rider by staying high in its travel without feeling harsh. This sort of thing is all about finding the correct amount low-speed compression damping - too much and the fork will ride harsh, too little and it will dive deep into its stroke when you're on the brakes - all while creating the most supple action as possible. And that's one of the other things that FOX must hit out of the park: sensitivity. The 36 has to absorb the smallest of trail chatter like a sponge absorbs water. Effective damper adjustments, just the right amount of progression to its stroke, and chassis rigidity can't be forgotten about, either.

Sensitivity - It feels like FOX has matched the Pike in this regard, with the 36 offering up friction-free travel straight out of the box. This is a big step up for FOX, as their older forks never seemed to be the most active on the market. That issue looks like it has been solved, though, and I'd say that the 36 is as supple throughout its travel as its main competitor. The one caveat that I should mention is that the fork I put time on in Moab isn't actually straight off the production line, but rather assembled with 2015 production parts in an area where the FOX factory gears up for assembling consumer forks. However, I was told that it didn't see any sort of special treatment (no bushing re-sizing or special lube ect), which means that there's no reason that a production 36 shouldn't be equally supple.

Air Spring - The 36 felt to have more than enough ramp-up in its stroke to keep me from hitting bottom harder than Toronto mayor Rob Ford, and its volume adjustment system looks like it could be tuned to keep even the square shaped, crack smoking Canadian politician from blowing through all the travel. I kicked off testing with the fork pumped up to 77psi, and while I admit to expecting to have to give it a few more pumps of air, I actually ended up dropping it down to 70psi and feeling pretty good about it. Granted, this is also surely a function of the fork's well sorted damping, but I'd say that FOX looks to have got the 36's spring curve to behave in a very useable way. Looking back now, I likely started a touch high due to how sensitive the fork's stroke is, a trait that had me nervous about it going through its travel too fast, and ended up preferring the more forgiving ride that the lower air pressure offered. Of course, this wouldn't be possible if the new 36 didn't have adequate compression damping, but I'll touch on that later on.

FOX 36 Photo by Colin Meagher
  Very typical Moab terrain, which is why FOX chose the famous location to debut the 36.


Torsional Rigidity - Given all the possible variables - basically everything on the front of your bike - this is always a tough one to gauge, especially when you're talking about riding an unfamiliar fork on even more unfamiliar terrain. Simply using a different front wheel, a tire with a stiffer or more forgiving casing, or even changing tire pressure can alter your perception of a fork's torsional rigidity. That said, with the 15mm thru-axle conversion kit installed, the new 36 felt every bit as flex-free as the Pike or X-Fusion's Vengeance platform. Situations where this sort of evenly matched comparison is evident would be moments when you're forced to corner hard at the bottom of a steep slope or compression, or even landing on uneven ground. The pinball-like sections found on Moab's LPS trail were also a good proving ground, and the 36 seemed to have no trouble in any of it, as we'd expect given its size.



Damping - And now I get to the deal breaker. FOX is well aware that if they stumble on this, the most important aspect of any high-performance fork, the 36 would be panned and that respect from aggressive riders who know what works and what doesn't might not ever return. Yes, the 36's FIT RC2 damper is an entirely different animal to the CTD cartridges used elsewhere in their fork range, but they simply can't have a repeat of 2013's underdamped offerings, can they? FOX obviously knew that as well, because the new 36 is very, very impressive when talking about balancing low-speed compression, high-speed control, and offering an effective adjustment range. How good is it? Good enough that, after two days of hard riding in Moab, I'd say that it at least equals the Pike in those areas. The big one for me is the amount of low-speed compression control on tap, with it able to strike the hard to find balance that offers good support without verging on harshness,
something that RockShox might have beaten FOX to by a year but that the 36 now matches. Again, I actually ended up dialling out the fork's LSC dial from thirteen clicks to ten, and experimenting at the extreme ends of the range showed that there's a wide enough span to make the setup process a cinch. This low-speed control, paired with the excellent spring rate, added up to what I like to call "invisible suspension". What am I talking about? It's a reference to when something simply works so well that you no longer register it during the ride, a sign that you've got a dialled setup going.

The issue of reliability aside - two days time obviously told me nothing on that front - my only real complaint is the amount of noise that the damper makes as it works to control the fork. It's actually loud enough to hear when bombing down a rough 4x4 road at a good pace, and while I'm sure it has little to no effect on performance, I did find it a bit annoying at times. It's definitely louder than the Pike, the Vengeance, and Manitou's new Mattoc, and sounds similar to SR Suntour's damper when it's working hard.


bigquotesTwo days of riding, however rough and challenging, certainly isn't enough for me to comment on reliability, or even on any sort of longterm impressions. But, given the terrain and my familiarity with the fork that FOX is trying to out-perform, it is enough for me to make some strong calls. How do I see it? The new 36 equals the Pike on all fronts, at least in my mind, and while the basic layout of their FIT cartridge and appearance of the fork remains the same, they've obviously made huge strides in the execution of both. For those who are looking at numbers, its retail price is extremely close and fork weight is within grams of the Pike. It might sound like I'm taking a bit of a soft stance by saying that the new 36 seems to be equal to the Pike rather than better or worse, but two days time on it isn't really enough to make such a definitive call. What I am sure of, however, is that FOX has made up ground on their competition, and that is good news for anyone who likes to ride their mid-travel bike hard. - Mike Levy



www.ridefox.com
Photos by Colin Meagher


279 Comments

  • 183 1
 I'm so glad that Mike did what we all wanted him to do: compare it to the Pike and not just the past version of the 36.
  • 32 3
 I am hoping for a head to head with all of the competitors.
  • 16 2
 Just got my new Pike Dual Pos Air on Friday, after a decade on Fox products. Gotta say I'm blown away. I don't doubt that in another year or two, we will have some amazing forks to choose from while these two companies go head to head to make the best fork out there. For now, I love my Pike, but I'll be curious to see where things stand by 2016.
  • 9 2
 There is one critical question though, will it be as reliable as the new Pike is turning out to be? In a market with the Pike and Deville on one side and the 55 Rc3ti on the other Fox really have to deliver on that front before all others.
  • 11 0
 no more 55 the 350 is there new 160mm travel fork.. we need some fork shoot outs pb! im still waiting on a downhill fork shootout! or maybe just a full review of the marz 380 Smile
  • 25 6
 Same price as the Pike, you can pick an RCT3 up from certain retailers in Germany for around the £400 mark. I bet it will retail in the UK for over £1000. Therer is no way this fork will rival the Pike on price. And for £600 cheaper Id buy the Pike all day long.
  • 4 2
 So we need to fork out more money whilst we can just the pike.
  • 6 3
 @TheKayo, Marzocchi are still selling the 55 RC3ti and Micro at 170mm travel. The 350 is a lot lighter, air sprung and aimed squarely at the E word. Given the sheer number of 55s out there and how reliable they are I hope Marz don't kill it for 2015, it's the only fork to buy when you want minimum down time and truly long term reliability (my 2010s are still great).
  • 3 1
 i am aware the 55s are still being sold i am just stating that there new high end am fork is the 350
  • 24 9
 In my opinion the lack of a quick release is a bit of a step back, ain't no one wanting to get a Allen key out and undo 5 bolts every time they want to take the wheel out. Pike is still going to be king.
  • 6 2
 Desperately trying to match the pike for weight thats why they have done that.
  • 2 0
 Interesting that theyve gone for self balancing air spring this time rather than coil negative of the previous generations. wonder if it has that slight bit of give that RS solo airs do when unweighted?
  • 5 4
 throw an xfusion on there and now you got something
  • 7 0
 How much for the super cool clear version? LoL
  • 3 0
 It's a good fork, but does it read your mind? Pike users know what I am talking about when I say that the pike does everything you want it to right out of the box. It's almost as if it sees the trail ahead and adjusts accordingly
  • 2 0
 I ain't gonna lie. I really want one. Seems like they have made some major improvements, and I really like the 36 chassis.
Would love to here Mikes perspective on what he would do if given the choice. Starting with a 29" Factory 34 Float CTD. Get the 34 Push'ed, get a new 36, get a Pike, or do nothing. That's my predicament anyway.
  • 4 0
 No matter how great "Push" stuff might be, it doesn't make much sense to me to pay more money to send (what should already be) a good fork off to get extra work done to make it (try to) ride like the current forks out there. I would rather buy a fork that works right in the first place than essentially "polishing a turd". I had a 26" Factory 34 Float CTD, and it was a decent fork, but with how killer the new stuff is out there I would opt for grabbing something new rather than trying to fix what you already have. Just got a new Pike last week and it was worth every penny, as I'm sure this new Fox stuff is. Just my two cents.
  • 2 0
 Nice, thanks dude. That's what I've been thinking all along. I don't want to invest a bunch of cash into marginally improving the 34, when I could opt to save a bit longer and get something that really stands out in performance. And would still have the 34 to repurpose to another bike or sell off in the future. I get along with it fine, but it's just impossible to dial in and get it to run properly which is Fracking disappointing and frustrating to say the least. It's even worse with the rp23 CTD shock though. Hope they've got this shit sorted out with the new 36.
  • 2 0
 I replaced my Float 34 and Float CTD rear shock with a Pike Dual Position Air fork and the new Float X rear shock and my bike has never felt better. That's not a bad road to go down, if you can. That 2012-14 Fox stuff just wasn't that impressive but it seems anything you buy from this point on is pretty solid. Good luck sorting it out, at least buying new stuff for your bike is money well spent!
  • 62 11
 This article has really left me suspended on which fork I should run
  • 49 5
 Will be interesting to see if Fox is really on the rebound here....
  • 65 8
 I was just about to buy a pike, but the article really put a damper on my purchase
  • 72 7
 Every article I click on has these damn puns. What the fox going on?
  • 53 9
 But who can fork out a grand for these?
  • 10 43
flag fracasnoxteam (May 27, 2014 at 9:01) (Below Threshold)
 ...
  • 38 9
 This fork definitely won't cushion the blow on my wallet
  • 26 3
 Keep your suspenders on, it's only a first review...
  • 23 5
 Looks like FOX have sprung back into action
  • 24 4
 The graphics are getting me rigid.
  • 22 4
 We really need to lockout all these puns.
  • 7 29
flag Bike-In-8bit (May 27, 2014 at 13:07) (Below Threshold)
 Now we know the answer to the question what does the fox say.
  • 18 4
 As far as Fox is concerned, they have a long travel to the top.
  • 16 2
 The competition for this category of mtb forks sure is ramping up!
  • 101 4
 I think I'd take the Pike. I don't have enough kashima wallet for the Foxes.
  • 19 1
 I'm sad, nobody understood my suspension points
  • 12 3
 I’m losing traction with all these forking puns.
  • 10 2
 That article I found to run very smoothly
  • 17 4
 Seems to me Fox are doing a good job on gaining traction here~ they've really bounced back; to be fair, the Pike piston their party, bringing a real damper to their sales.
  • 11 3
 I'm so excited to try the new 36, I can barely hold my bladder.
  • 9 16
flag Kmans (May 27, 2014 at 15:41) (Below Threshold)
 Just go out and ride your Pike!
  • 8 3
 These forks have definitely put a spring back in fox's step
  • 13 8
 These puns, I cant stanchion it any more.
  • 3 7
flag FaastEddie (May 28, 2014 at 22:21) (Below Threshold)
 All things being equal..... Damping and rebound, the pike is still lighter and has a quick release. The first time you have find the Allen key to change a fucking flat tire in the hot ass summer you will hate yourself if you have the fox. Pike for the win!!
  • 4 0
 two real hot competitors here but it has left me at quite the fork in the road
  • 49 13
 Since probably half of your readers are not American, it might be a good idea to also put the weight in kg Wink

We have no idea how much 4.24 lb is, and we are waaaay too lazy to look it up ourselves Smile
  • 14 2
 1.92 kg FYI
  • 7 3
 cheers Big Grin
  • 23 6
 1923g.
I (an American) also prefer the metric system for components. I only like imperial pounds for full bike weights.
  • 10 24
flag seraph (May 27, 2014 at 10:14) (Below Threshold)
 2.2 kg to a pound. 454g in a pound. It's really an easy conversion.
  • 3 2
 yeah, i don't like weight in lbs as well. grams would be nice.
  • 10 0
 Its ironic how we Canadians prefer the metric system but we always weigh ourselves in lbs and measure our own height in feet and inches. Go figure. It must be because we are close cousins to the states Smile
  • 3 3
 @seraph. if its such an easy conversion why can't pinkbike do it for us?
  • 7 5
 Because math isn't hard. Conversions are really really easy.
  • 3 1
 Glad to see others feeling the same way I do. One of the reasons I stopped reading MBA was their component tests always had weight in pounds and ounces instead of grams. Never really learned all the imperial weights and always found ounces in weight and volumes confusing as hell.
  • 8 18
flag seraph (May 27, 2014 at 12:20) (Below Threshold)
 It shouldn't be confusing if you understand conversions. Basic multiplication and division. If something weighs 1900g then you divide 1900 by 454 and you get 4.18 lbs. It's really really easy. I can't stress that enough. If you're too lazy to bust out the calculator or, god forbid a piece of paper and a pencil, and do the math then I feel bad for you.
  • 1 1
 Only a minority uses still imperial units: a href="http://www.metric4us.com/worldmap.gif" target="_blank">http://www.metric4us.com/worldmap.gif/a>
  • 4 2
 @seraph, the conversion obviously isn't so easy for you! Please don't do conversion consulting for PB.
  • 4 2
 @bogey I think your math must be off, because 1900 grams equals 4.18878 lbs, using 453.59 grams to a pound.
  • 7 1
 Oh, I understand the conversion factors easily enough and can do most of the math in my head. As a Canadian, we are metric but I still measure my weight in lbs, my height in feet and inches. I can convert km to miles, litres to gallons, kg to pounds. My point is that Imperial is far from intuitive and Metric is much easier to use and am still amazed that the Imperial system has been kept alive.
  • 1 1
 I agree with that last part.
  • 3 2
 @Seraph: of course we can find it out ourselves. If google "4.18 lbs to kg" it will give you the answer right away. My point is that for an international website (and an article that is probably sponsored or at least supported by Fox) you'd expect them to also note the weight in 'kg' since half their readers only use that. We can all find out if we really want to, but most of the readers won't do this and won't find out one of the unique selling points of this new Fox 36, and won't know if /how much the weight has changed according to the 'old' model.
  • 3 0
 we do the same in the uk. I'm 5ft 9in but no idea how many metres that is... what gets me is that we measure fuel consumption in miles per gallon, yet we buy fuel at the pump in litres!!
  • 3 1
 The imperial system (sometimes called "English Measurements" in the USA) has been kept alive because it is familiar to us, and therefore easier than learning an unfamiliar system. Parents want their kids to learn the imperial system because that is what they use at home and the cycle repeats. Kids are taught the metric system in science classes, but unless they become scientists they don't use it anywhere else so it never really stays familiar.

Oddly, I use the imperial system in everyday life (gallons of gas, degrees Fahrenheit for weather, pounds for bodyweight) but professionally, as a biologist, I use the metric system.
  • 9 1
 I use both systems every day of my life (engineering).

I must say, the day we Americans kill the Imperial system will be the greatest day of my life.

Probably won't be for a while. We have too many old farts running the show. Frown
  • 4 0
 What, there was no wheel size shit to argue about, so we've reduced ourselves to units of measurement? :-)
  • 1 0
 @seraph (in reply to your first reply to my initial comment) of course maths isn't hard but if i have the option for someone to do it for me then there is no question. I think they should just write the weight in both units
  • 1 0
 Nah, it's lazy, stupid farts that resist the change.
  • 5 0
 @seraph, you clearly stated that there is "2.2kg to a pound". That's just bass ackwards dude! Nice work.
  • 2 0
 @slish, I hope that's not the only reason you stopped reading MBA
  • 1 0
 I'm wondering if there is a browser extension which automatically converts imperial units to metric?

3 seconds later...http://goo.gl/PY1kh9

Viva la internet!
  • 3 0
 America still uses inches for measurement so machinists and factories didn't have to buy new tools. I went to elementary school in Britain and used metric for everything. But talking to machinists (I'm also a machinist by trade) about metric system is like banging your head against a wall. They all say," It don't make no sense!" We'll have to wait for old timers and rednecks to die off before Americans convert to the more logical metric system.
  • 2 1
 America uses inches because our dicks out too big to measure in cm. Duh!
  • 1 0
 you can measure anything in anything if you can do standard form maybe thats why americans use inches...
  • 1 0
 No really, American industry threw a fit when former president Jimmy Carter suggested we adopt the metric system in the late 70's. No American politician has had the balls to bring it up since.
  • 3 0
 Well maybe now that corporatism has destroyed all the workers unions, it'd be easier to get the metric system going here. I'm sick of going to places and seeing people waste time using calculators to do mental math that would be much simpler using the metric system Americans are dumb enough as it is, but unfortunately, too dumb to even realize it's far superior
  • 19 2
 the Sealed dampers is great specially from Rock shox, but servicing the fox's seal damper is not very easy or user friendly. That alone will keep me on a pike. Rock Shox are much more user friendly products.
  • 2 0
 true, fox needs to much servicing, every 30 hours is 4 times a year for me for lowers and two times for FIT, the bloody bladder keeps popping out, i'm switching to 55
  • 2 0
 This is why I stopped riding Fox. My 36 Van RC2 started feeling terrible after about 20 hours of riding. Opened it up and found the bladder peeking out from under the cap that was supposed to hold it in. Tried to put it back together, but it appeared that it was incorrectly assembled and/or tolerances were off. Called Fox and was told that I could send it back and would get it back many weeks later (this was mid-summer, in Tahoe where the riding season is relatively short). On top of that, the tech told me that because I had opened the damper (actually it had opened itself...) they probably wouldn't warranty it and that I would have to pay for service or replacement. I hung up and have not bought a Fox product since. That was in 2006.
  • 1 0
 the new damper is upside down now so you don't loose rebound at the beggining of the stroke (and small bump compliance) if air enters the system, still service intervals kill it
  • 1 0
 No kidding, 30 hours is 2-3 weeks of riding for me. Yeah, sorry, no thanks, I don't have that much time to wrench on my bike. I'm going riding.
  • 2 0
 Don't know for the new 36, but lubrication service (50hrs) and cartridge bleeding process (100hrs) are really simple on the pike.
You can perform it yourself as I did with a minimum of tools, it only takes half an hour if you're not an experienced mechanist (I'm not).

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nninf6lN0SA

Fox big issue was that you have to send back the fork for service. Rock Shox has not the same politics and I find that smart for us.

Maybe Fox improve the new 36 service process in order to make it home mechanist friendly ?
  • 19 2
 I'll take that clear fork please!!!
  • 2 1
 Same here, it looks awesome. I only doubt there's any suitable material which could be used for that.
  • 1 0
 I wonder if people would buy a fork that weighed a pound more, but had clear lowers/uppers. I know physics will never allow that to happen... but I'm curious how people would respond if it were possible.
  • 4 0
 I'll take that Knolly please!!!
  • 1 0
 I'd take the fork, but I don't want the dental work that comes with it.
  • 1 0
 remember clear grip shift...?
  • 1 0
 Diamond lowers will make it possible
  • 1 0
 Diamond is like glass; after first fall it would shatter into pieces.
  • 1 0
 Well thanks for shattering all of our dreams. Frown
  • 13 1
 I like everything thats presented, however I don't always understand the tech info like I'm supposed to. I ride a good amount, and even work at a bike shop but I just would like more real world explanation. Maybe I'm slow but I'm trying to get on board. Maybe if I understood how to set up my current fork in a very advanced way, not just to rider weight and rebound control.. IE; dampening, torsional rigidity, sensitivity I could compare this to my current 34 and see if I could really notice the differences. I could definitely use an article on full set up of a fork, really fine tuning it to how I ride. What one adjustment does and what the other does, to see if it makes a noticeable difference. All I can say is setting up the pressure to my weight, and turning the little red rebound adjustment knob doesn't always give me the performance I'm looking for, and before I drop 1000 dollars on an upgrade, I wanna know that its an upgrade. Not just tech talk with fancy terms. I appreciate the article and the writer doing his best with little time, but not everyone understands or needs to know the internals of a fork, they just want to know how its gonna ride and perform in real world situations. If I'm lost or sounding stupid save me, lol I really would like to learn more.
  • 2 0
 I'll upvote that. I myself skipped most of the tech jargon b/c it means very little to me. I wish I understood it, but mainly I air up the fork and hardly mess with anything else. I should prob just start reading manuals that come with my forks.
  • 4 0
 The thing is though, a generic tuning guide isn't that useful. There's quite a few articles on PB and elsewhere which talk through the theory of tuning a damper but when it gets down to it (www.pinkbike.com/news/technical-tuesday-fox-dhx-setup-2010.html & www.pinkbike.com/news/technical-tuesday-setting-sag-2010.html for example):

1) actually the way you tune each damper is different, even when they apparently offer the same standardish "RC2" type configuration. You really need a guide per damper and even there you get variations through the years and model ranges.

The responsibility here lies with the suspension manufacturer as they should know *exactly* how to get the best from their units, but it seems that what is produced is inconsistent and sometimes just wrong. For instance Marzocchi tell you to set sag on their 55 RC3 using the air preload, but just about every review I've read screams out to not touch the air but use spring preload. WHY WHY WHY?

2) even for a specific damper, people seem to come to completely different conclusions. You read any tuning guide and you'll get a huge range of opinions.

So really, these untis should be supported by informed, and consistently correct tuning advice by their manufacturers and sadly that's not the case in most cases (honourable mention goes to Cane Creak for their CCDB set up database).

However, if you want a really short guide:
  • 7 0
 most units have 1) spring preload 2) rebound 3) some form of compression (separate low speed and high speed = C2)

1) set sag. On an air spring use the air; on a coil spring try to get the right weight coil so you don't have to apply preload, as spring preload should be fine-adjust; then fine adjust with spring preload

2) wind off all the compression and rebound, so that there is none applying. First of all work on rebound.

3) Rebound is the damper which slows down how quickly the suspension returns. Too much and the bike feels unresponsive to pumping and generally a bit dead; you will also find the suspension packs up over successive bumps and you run out of suspension in the end, which starts bucking you around a bit. Too little and things will feel like a pogo stick; this is particularly undesirable when landing from jumps and drops, where you want your bike to settle immediately and not sproing you back in to the air

4) Low speed compression relates to weight transfer. It doesn't mean you are either going fast or slow, it's just weight transfer. Examples are: braking - does the fork dive badly? G-outs - again do you find the suspension using up too much of its travel front or back and leaving you none for the brake bumps? Too much and typically your suspension will feel harsh on the small stuff, which translates in to a reduction in grip.

5) High speed compression is square edge hits. You want your suspension to be bottoming out only on the very biggest hits you're going to take. If it's not then leave HSC alone, if it is, dial it in until it reduces.

that's the basics, but there's a whole bunch more advanced tweaking on some suspension, which can allow you to rebaseline the entire unit's range for instance.
  • 5 0
 If you change the viscosity of your damper oil, you can move the overall dial up or down the scale; but just remember that it will affect LSC, HSC and rebound the same amount.. I found my 66 didn't have enough compression damping even on fully applied, so increased the viscosity of the oil. Now I don't have any rebound set at all, it's just fine, and have more compression.

And there's shims, which allows you to tweak the curve of the compression. I can't say I know anything about this but would be interested if someone does.

And there's volume adjusters for air shocks. Generally by reducing volume you make the spring curve more exponential which in the end becomes very spikey; and if you increase the volume you flatten it off but have to put more pressure in it. Volume can be adjusted with special plastic bits designed for the job, or a few cc's of suspension fluid equating to the same volume. Generally rear air shocks have increased in volume over the last few years since it allows the suspension designer to work with a longer flatter curve which can then be controlled with dampers.

Anyway that's my Internet opinion. Cheers
  • 2 0
 Agreed. Sometimes I just want to know what the top 5 products are within a certain price range, then I know what to compare things with and what to buy. More often than not pink bike will review something super expensive and then rave about it, which is so predictable, whereas I'm more interested in the best performing products that are actually attainable with value for money.
  • 8 1
 I ride aggressive XC/Trail/occassional downhill. 10-35mile rides with mucho steep fire road climbs and geared up I am 230ish. The 36RC2 was always my fork either with an RC2 or RLC set-up with a Push Tune. The majority of my rides always have some sort of extended climbing and I was either constantly tuning the SC way up to compensate than having to stop and count my clicks to get it back. I plopped down some serious cash and purchased 2 Pikes $745 each. Got a good deal for purchasing 2 and paying cash for them. I should say this may be too little too late from Fox for me. I even replaced my rear shocks with RS units (Although I will probably be changing to CC DB Inline shocks when they become available). I rode the Float X but again I felt my devotion switch. Agian too little too late. Where Fox loses me on this new offering is no easy way to remove the front wheel when throwing my bike in the car and no functional lockout for when I ride an hour to the trail head or am grinding up my 5 mile steep fire road climb in the 95 degree heat of the summer and all my misery is focused on my damn fork bobbing. Doesn't happen anymore with the Pike. The first time I rode my Pike I actually noticed how much stiffer it was than my 2012 36 RC2. Even though I love to lust after the latest and greatest parts and enjoying selling stuff to finance my new Purchases. I think my Pikes are going to be spending a long time on both of my bikes before I even slightly begin to consider Fox again. Also i have been able to actually work on my Pikes which I never felt confident enough to do on my old Fox Unit's. Trust is a hard thing to earn back once it has been lost Fox. Just saying.
  • 8 1
 Rabble rabble rabble. I just purchased a 2011 36rc2, unused for 300€, it feels better than Lyrik MC-DH. Say whatever you want about the PIKE, but it's a lot of cool aid added. Rock Shox finaly made a damper with a bladder and there's a huge halo about it. 36 has one since 2006. RS even made it similar style to CTD, but nobody seems to have noticed. Sure if you must have a new fork, go for Pike, solely for the price. However if you for instance already own a 36rc2 or Lyrik then buying a Pike or the new 36 is not really going to objectively change your world. Those "old" forks are already freaking amazing. Now this 36 really looks great and the axle drop out is a huge bow of the company towards "never buy at MSRP" pricks like Pinkbike users.
  • 2 0
 ^ too much sense talked. Pinkbike might implode
  • 12 2
 I love the Rob Ford jokes.
  • 8 4
 So "the new 36 equals the Pike on all fronts", but no! The Pike is light, less pricey, and its on step ahead, because its in the market test, not on Pinkbike test. Today X-Fusion, Marzoc and others brands offer much better technology x kashima. Fox now trying to go back at head market... maybe they spend some years to do that.
  • 1 0
 they did the gold thing, what else is there to do, i think they're busted lol
  • 1 0
 Surely it's not a like-for-like comparison, the RockShox equivalent of a 36 is a Lyrik and the Fox equivalent of a Pike is the 34
  • 7 1
 dont bother with either, just buy some 160 TRC bos devilles, shit on any fork out there END OF !!!
  • 4 1
 Pikes, RCT3 £829 RRP
Fox 36's were £899 or less depending on model.

Rock Shox tend to have more available stock in the UK via Fishers than Fox do via Mojo. The result is that RS get discounted more as they push them at dealers. So whereas you might see 36's at £100-150 off list you see Pikes at up to £300 below list. There's also the product sourcing to take into account, RS are a cheaper product, made with less expensive labour than Fox forks, (that's not a slight on the product quality, just stating a cost of production fact).


A 36 owner.
  • 4 0
 i just love that there are so many options: 26, 27.5, 29, 15mm, 20mm, 5-position travel adjust, 1 1/8, tapered... good on ya, Fox! I'll pay extra for a fork that actually fits my bike!
  • 6 0
 'We still do use a hand dyno because there's no substitute for someone feeling each knob' Snigger
  • 7 2
 Hey @mikelevy will there be a review on that Knolly Warden coming out soon?
  • 15 0
 For sure. I've got a ton of time on it here in B.C., in Moab, and even in North Carolina - it's been around the block and you'll get to read all about it.
  • 2 0
 After a short demo, I have one on the way. A truly amazing bike in my eyes. People may knock 4x for not being super efficient but with todays shock tech, all is just fine. Open the shock up for everything else and WOW!
  • 10 5
 Fit damper sucks, such a chore to work on. Customer service is better at sram too.
  • 11 1
 That's a good topic - I've had a chance to work on the Charger cartridge and it is quite easy to get at. Past FIT cartridges have certainly been more difficult to work on.
  • 4 1
 Sounds like you've ridden the Mattoc, when are we going to get a review on that? Also, all things being equal, Pike is easier to service.
  • 1 0
 The FIT gives me a fit. Its such a hassle just to change up oil.
  • 5 0
 "enough ramp-up in its stroke to keep me from hitting bottom harder than Toronto mayor Rob Ford" LOL good one.
  • 5 0
 The "and now I get to the deal breaker" made me think the damping was going to be shite.
  • 3 0
 the deal breaker is service every 30 hours Frown
  • 3 0
 I got my hands on one of the new Talas 36's and I can attest that it is a MUCH IMPROVED fork. It feels more active than my Lyrik RC2 and I actually like the ride more than a 2013 Float.
  • 1 0
 I recently swapped the TALAS cart in my 180 to the new hydro version - holy crap, what a difference! I'm pretty sure the mid-stroke support I had before was actually stiction. With the new cart, it's unbelievably supple...
  • 2 0
 Good jorb fox. I am glad to see you are back.
Just acoupleconcerns
But what is the recommended service interval? The old fox always wanted some like 22 hours, while RS went 50.
Also, considering this fork measures up to the vengeance, which is way cheaper I think i'll look there for my next new fork.
  • 4 0
 30 hours again, i'm getting rid of mine mostly for that reason
  • 1 0
 Yeppers, that's what I figured. Fox needs to figure out how to get that under control before the fork will be good for average Joe.
  • 1 0
 i'm going Marzo for that reason, i like to service, finetune and fiddle with my suspension but i'd like to have something i don't have to think about for a change
  • 2 0
 nice review! i'd get the 1 1/8 steerer, 26", 180mm coil version Smile
but that's when i decide to change my 2005 marzocchi drop off 2. its regularly serviced and runs like a champ! the stanchion coating hasn't even faded over time. haha
  • 2 0
 Does anyone else remember when cartman craps out of his mouth? Fox fed the author of this, or his wallet, some bs. Pike will live long and prosper on shredders bikes. Fox can own the mx, atv, utv, snowmobile, pikes rule bikes!
  • 2 0
 I see two issues here:

1. In EU Rock Shox Pike RCT3 can be had for a little over 600€. The list price of the 2015 Fox 36 Float 27.5 is 1099€ and you never see Fox stuff discounted here. The review says that the 2015 36 is as good as Pike, but you can almost get two Pike RCT3's for the price of this Fox!

2. Recent buyers of many 150mm-160mm 27.5 bikes can't be too happy. Majority of those bikes have been and are still specced with Fox 34, which in 2013 had bad damping. 2014 damper is better but still that chassis is too skinny for many of these bikes. Think something like Scott Genius LT 700 Tuned - 170mm bike with Fox 34! We were clearly in transition period last year with 150-160mm 27.5 forks, where Fox 34 was the only option because Pike was just coming out and Fox 36 was not released.
  • 2 0
 LOVE the 20mm option. Love the Pike but they needed to do that the first time.

If riders had the choice, they'd all pick 20mm over 15mm...too bad forks can't be banged out like chainrings and cogs otherwise riders would dictate what they would run (like they've done with drive trains) and there'd be no &^%$%&!@!! 15mm . I will never get over what a shitscam that forced standard was. Until I start thinking about pressfit BB's. No, 15mm takes the prize.

OK, back to the 36.
  • 13 10
 If performance is equal to the Pike, i will take the cheaper and/or lighter option. Sounds like the Pike is still the winner...
  • 16 4
 Just to be clear, depending on the model, they weigh within grams of each other and basically retail for the same USD.
  • 18 0
 Mike, I'm curios: Are you trying to say that the 36 and the Pike weigh within grams of each other and retail for roughly the same USD?
  • 4 0
 +10 for @gtill9000
  • 3 0
 nah, i think what he's trying to say is that the 36 and the Pike weigh within grams of each other and retail for roughly the same USD.
  • 1 0
 Yeah,but let's see if the claimed weight offers the same numbers in reality ;-)
and then again pike is far under msrp and Fox up until now has been known for almost staying at this price. . .who wins then? :-D
  • 5 3
 Only in 160mm? Is the single crown 170-180 fork dead? Little disappointing in that regard, but cool to see a 160mm trailbike fork from fox that has good ol high & low speed compression adjustments instead of CTD.
  • 3 1
 So they keep saying that they're trying to keep the axle to crown length low.... How long is it? I personally don't like the idea of running a fork with a lower a2c than others in it's travel range...
  • 3 0
 Looks like you were testing on Captain Ahab from the bottom pictures. Is the first shot up in the mag 7 area? Good choices to ride.
  • 3 0
 Am I the ONLY one around here still shredding on a frame with a straight steerer headtube?! Thank you fox for allowing at least the option to order.
  • 1 0
 Props to Fox for giving us lots of options. There was a lot of whining on PB when the Pike launched on 15mm axle and tapered steerer only. Though you have to wonder whether they could knock the price down to Pike real price levels if they had followed a similar streamlined approach Other than the price and service issues mentioned elsewhere, it really is a shame that they've no QR system at all. I'm a fan of 20mm thru axle and happy they went that way which makes it an even more disappointing fail. Doing those bolts up every time is one of the few things I hate about my old 66s. Lastly, am interested to see whether the new seals are retro fitable. The small bump sensitivity is my biggest issue with my 2010 36s and I'm fairly sure the seals are the culprit
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy, how does the rebound action of the Fox 36 compare to the Pike? IMO, this is a strong suit of the Pike with the Rapid Recovery circuit reacting AND controlling rebound better than anything before it. Did Fox do anything to challenge this?
  • 2 0
 fool me once shame on.....you, you fool me I can't get fooled again. -George W. Bush
same rc2 dampner since 2005, just different shims and ports? pinch bolts, interchangeable front axels (really).
  • 1 0
 Mike, your titles suck.

"Fox Hits Back" www.pinkbike.com/news/FOX-34-TALAS-FLOAT-X-FIRST-IMPRESSIONS.html
"Fox Fires Back"

Very creative. Exactly who are they retaliating against? You make it seem like Fox has something to prove. Oh, wait. And where is Fox in the comments? You seem to be the only one supporting them here. It is a very nice fork on paper, by the way.

P.S. Nice pic (The first one) of you popping off the slick rock. Thumbs up. You actually look like you can ride.
  • 1 0
 getting a 36 to try out, hopefully its as good as it sounds, have run a Pike for 6months and a Vengence XF HLR for a year before that, to be honest I miss the XF its a match for the Pike in Dampening, but heavier, not heavy but def nlticable compared to the Pike, unlike Levy though and many LBS theyre is a massive difference in stiffness and flex or twist at the axle esspecially, I do. lt care what any spin someone trys to feed me, 20mm tracks better in rough bomb holed corners and ruts and roots, the XF Veng is the stiffest fork bar none, so if the new 36 gives me back 20mm and can better or match the Pike and XF in damenping perfromance Ill be stoked as its way lighter the XF and while not a weight weanie it helps on longer rides. will keep this posted.
  • 7 3
 Still ridiculously short 25 hour recommended service intervals though, eh?
  • 5 1
 Surely thats just so warranties are invalidated.... No one except pros services their forks every 25hrs - thats 6-7 rides for me!!!
  • 2 0
 Yep. But the Pike's recommended lower service interval is 50 hours, there's something to be said for that surely, going longer between your services even if you don't stick to the recommendations. I used to do a lowers service on my 2012 Float 36 every month which is probably about 60-70 hours and they always felt noticeably smoother afterwards.
  • 2 0
 Fox does need a lot of service, and it feels much better after, i'm just so tired of doing it anymore, i'm going italian next Wink
  • 2 0
 Be carefull with service intervals: 30 hours fox interval and 50 hours rock shox intervals are only for cleaning bushings and changing oil bath (lubrication oil) in the lowers.
Which is very simple (at least for the pike, don't know for fox).
Damping system (cartridge) service interval is100 hours for both rock shox Charger and fox FIT.
  • 1 0
 @ Brigand
Check the service intervals for the new marz 350 CR: cartridge oil replacement is due for 25 (intensive) or 50 (nominal) hours.
Oil change (don't know what they are talking about) is is due for 50 (intensive) or 100 (nominal) hours.
So, given their documentation, marzo intervals are the same or shorter than fox & RS.
  • 1 0
 i'm after 55CR. Getting lowers off is a major pain, undo cap, LSC knob, undo HSC knob, redo cap, knock it in, pull legs, find that bladder has crept out again from FIT... Float side is easy, damper side is what i hate doing several times a year... even as a skilled mechanic it takes me 2-3 hours to do them after wrenching all day at work. Marzo feels great even if not serviced so regularly, Fox needs it to perform.
  • 5 3
 From my experience with Fox, no chance i'm buying one in the near future. X-Fusion Metric looks like a GREAT fork. or might as well wait for the Lyric to be updated...
  • 2 0
 I can't wait for the charger damper to be put in the Lyrik (if it ever happens) because I loved the Lyrik RC2DH that came on my Kona Entourage.
  • 2 0
 Just ordered a metric!
  • 1 0
 @loamydog
awesome! tell us how it is after you spend some time on it
  • 2 0
 Will do. I only have a 2014 Fox 34 TALAS CTD to compare to though. It's awful.
  • 2 0
 (The 34 is awful). Metric write-up comes in two weeks hopefully.

From my internet riding however, I can tell that the Metric will be king.

It's got the same lowers as the RV1 and pressure equalizer valves for cryin out loud. I don't know what single crown fork (for 650b) says "please ride me downhill" more than that.
  • 1 0
 The previous versions of the 36 set the performance bar pretty high. Nice to see the industry getting better. I would like to see pricing be more attainable for the average rider.
  • 2 1
 Yup Ive got 2012 36 factory 160 and it is a nice fork. So plush and and sturdy and fits a 650b wheel nicely (wtb i23 with maxxis dhf2.3 max terra 3c). I bet the new 36's withe lower A to C measurement don't fit a 650b wheel that 9mm is i bet enough to just make it undoable.
  • 1 0
 Wouldn't that be based on the arch, not the profile of the crown and the A/C length?
  • 2 0
 Nope you still have to account for clearance at the crown when at 100% compression. Otherwise good hard hit then your tire could be blocked and orb you go at high speed.
Let all the air out of shock to test for 650b clearance at crown. So if the new ones have 9mm less a to c then its got to be its coming straight off of tire clearance.
  • 1 0
 I have a 2013 36 Talas RC2 and hate it! I want to convert it to a float in the hope I might gain a little small bump compliance. Would a 2015 float air spring system fit the fork and make any improvements?
  • 1 0
 My buddy and I both have 2013 36 Talas RC2s and he took out the Talas cartridge and his fork feels much better. I'm doing the same once I get the time, I highly recommend doing that (I never use the Talas feature anyway).
  • 1 1
 I like the sound of all the choices. Axle sizes etc. Seems like the 36 has taken a step in the right direction, just wish the looks were more exciting; I think if the looks had a revamp it would help shake the bad image of the last few years' models and provide a bit more excitement.
Also so much healthy competition about-pike, mattoc, x-fusion and the dvo diamond. The main winning point there is setup choice for fox.
  • 1 0
 for the price of the new 55s being £400 i'd rather get a set of them thanks, less maintenance and just as equal in performance and they look pretty much the same, FOX are a f*cking rip off.
  • 2 2
 Credit to Fox for listening to the voracious feedback over the last year or 2. Looks like many good updates. But only time will tell how it goes and matches up! For me no biggie about qr vs pb. But main things are performance! Serviceability, ease of maintenance, cost, information, tools required and tunning adjustability eg not just rebound LSC HSC. Cost vs XF, Pike etc USD makes no diff to me I and many othere do not live in the US. Fox have done a great job making options for hub compatibility and wheel sizes so props for that, good work, I also like how Fox setup the initial test see if same happens in production and a top end fork shoot out would b good too fwiw. But I will definitely be sitting on the fence with any Fox product for awhile 40 being exception maybe.
  • 1 1
 Ugly as sin and no QR really...I run Fox on everything but this just doesn't work for a big piece of the riding public IMO. Tried a Lyric DH coil for a season and it worked very well. I suspect we will see a quick revamp on graphics and QR option...
  • 1 0
 May have been said already, but so nice to see a company offering a more flexible product, both with the drop outs, and the lowering options, and the plastic clear fork would be a fantastic toy to play with!
  • 1 0
 I think the Pike is a better all round trail riding fork but the 36 is a better descender, which a few other reviews highlighted, ie. www.freshmtbreviews.com/fox-36-float-160-fit-rc2-review
  • 3 1
 Say I drizzle some of that gold "tackifier" lube on the trails; can we attain rock-crawler-like traction?
  • 3 2
 What I don't understand is why they didn't have a QR axle in there. It's not a huge thing, but man would it suck not to have a multitool at the wrong time.
  • 1 1
 Ja,no QR? I'm not lazy either but it is 2014.

the reason that is written above, "There is no quick release thru-axle option, but FOX says that this new compression-less design allows the fork's lower legs to stay in better alignment" sounds suspicious. I think tightening the bolts is like compression or?
  • 2 2
 WAIT... over on Vital " The pinch bolt clamp design was used because it’s 65g lighter than the previous 20QR system".

so there we have it, they did it for weight weenies...
  • 3 1
 It's easy, just use the multi-tool that you should have on your ride anyhow...
  • 3 1
 too complex for enduro
  • 1 0
 I would really like to see a review of the new 2013 Marzocchi 55CR fork since it feels great and is a lot cheaper than the above mentioned forks.
  • 1 0
 mikelevy, one question what trails did you ride in moab there, just asking cause we are from austria and going there in june, thanks!!
  • 1 0
 Captain Ahab, and lower porcupine single track (which is part of "the whole enchilada" a long sequence of downhill trails, which starts at Burro Pass).. Amasa back is another good one to check out. There are lots. Get in touch with Over the Edge sports, they'll hook you up. Have a great time.
  • 1 0
 thanks shrockie, it thought that it is Captain Ahab, i was in moab already, last time we also did Rockstacker, i think Ahab is in the same area right going up Amasa, right? thanks for your information!
  • 3 1
 so it seems fox has finally woken up............after screwing up the last two years
  • 1 2
 Thank god they have gotten rid of the extraordinarily mediocre CTD damping system and provided us with a fork that can actually be tuned to be ridden hard by someone who knows how to ride a bike. Like seriously whose decision was it to make a performance fork but essentially remove all damping tuneability? I ride a CTD 34 and am not overly upset with it, but not excited by it either. It is an OK fork, but bikes in this day and age are much better than "OK" and deserve a fork that can live up to that potential, glad Fox finally made one again, only wish they did it sooner! The new 2014 40 on the other hand is much better!
  • 2 0
 36s has never been equipped with CTD. Always RC2, RC or R.
  • 2 0
 Can you tell how it compares to X-Fusions Vengeance/Metric, especially the damper?
  • 1 0
 So, any chance of being able to slap the damper or air spring into my older Talas? Doubt it, but would be a worthy upgrade if ya could.
  • 1 0
 I wonder if the new air spring would fit my Rlc? Like you said probably not
  • 2 0
 I know the Fox might be awesome to ride but I think I am going to go with a company who gets it right the first time.
  • 1 0
 old Boxxers were crap and had many issues. short memories, hey kids?
  • 1 0
 I was just specifically talking about producing a solid all mountain fork within the last couple of years.
  • 1 0
 Unless it's a familiar trail, why would you switch your equipment after one run? You're obviously going to feel much more confident and much faster on your second run.
  • 1 0
 FOX- when you get your shit together and quit changing things every freeking year, you might have my attention. Also, your crowns look hideously weak. That is all.
  • 1 0
 The boss changing out the forks in the pictures - I bet no one tells that guy "No." I bet his kids listen the first time as well.
  • 4 1
 WARDEN REVIEW !!!
  • 8 0
 It's coming...
  • 4 1
 "with the Pike on the front, its great, and with the 36 on the front, it at least equals the performance of the bike with the Pike."
  • 8 6
 Pikes are £535 in UK.
2015 Fox 36 Floats will be circa £1000
  • 3 5
 wrong. fail
  • 3 1
 Looking at some of the big distributors in the UK, the 2014 Pike RCT3 is available with free shipping for £561.99 - £583.99 (RRP£749.99 - £779.99) depending on travel/wheel size variant. The Fox Racing Shox 2014 36 Talas 26 Inch 160mm FIT RC2 Fork is £950.00-1050.00. As the Pike is already proven to be reliable and with comes with amazing warranty support, I am finding it hard to understand why you would choose to buy the latter? Not to mention the fact that RS might well update the Pike in the next 2 years and move the whole shebang on another country mile.
  • 2 1
 Seeing the current price, we realize that they really sold wind in the past
  • 2 1
 I'm sorry, but where does this leave the Fox 34 that comes equipped on many 160mm bikes?
  • 1 0
 Next up for RC2 revision, perhaps. RIP CTD
  • 1 0
 at least there is no shit ctd going on in it but il stick with my pikes at least they do not need warrantying every 5 mins
  • 1 0
 Does anyone offer a fender that works with the 2 holes on the arch of the lowers yet?
  • 2 1
 "PIKE has lead the CHARGE" I get it!!
  • 1 0
 Able to run the 27.5 version in 170 or 180mm travel? If not, pass.
  • 1 0
 170mm version is the longest one for 27,5
  • 1 0
 will be perfect if we can lower the fork to 80mm like sometime before
  • 2 2
 pinch bolts? i thought a tooled axle removal system was a thing of the past.....
  • 2 2
 It still won't be as good as a Pike. Certainly doesn't look as good as one.
  • 1 0
 LOL for all the guys at top
  • 1 0
 that knolly warden is siiiiiiiiick!
  • 2 0
 I love the decals
  • 1 0
 I have the New pike. Amazing piece of kit
  • 1 0
 Pike is a year ahead that tells you something already!
  • 1 0
 But I want a white fork Frown
  • 1 0
 BOS are far better than the competition...
  • 1 0
 Great write up Mike very informative.
  • 1 0
 I was tryng to find out what is the tire size limit on this fork, anyone?
  • 2 2
 i like to ride my bike with a pike.....
  • 2 2
 Sweet fork. Not digging the colors tho
  • 3 0
 They have the other options as well, which is cool.
  • 2 0
 oh I did not know that :p
  • 3 0
 Yeah, they have the retro logo's (which are the one's above), the stealth logo's (which you can barely see cause they so stealthy), and also a variety of other color's which has never been available.
  • 1 0
 sweet thanks!
  • 1 0
 鹿島 Coat
  • 1 0
 holy knolly
  • 1 0
 Want clear lowers!
  • 2 3
 nice)
203 disc will be too big for bushings?
  • 1 0
 i don't know about that, but with a 180mm post mount configuration it does make it hard to find an adapter to run 203mm rotors. anyone have more info on this detail?
  • 1 2
 If it's a new fork why not give it a new name? Just sayin
  • 2 5
 And by the way I own 3 sets of Fox forks and one set of pikes, so I'm no troll...
  • 3 5
 pike wins cause its all black.
  • 4 1
 Guess you haven't seen the stealth version of the 36...
  • 3 6
 maybe ill get one in 2020
  • 7 10
 Pike's black stanchions look better! That's what really counts! 8-)
  • 2 5
 I want to get married
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