Funn Releases New FastAir Hi-Flow Tubeless Valves

Feb 19, 2023
by Seb Stott  

Sometimes a good idea catches on quick. Reserve's Fillmore valves, released in 2021, re-invented the Presta valve with a coreless design that promised three times more airflow, making tubeless tires easier to install. They cost $49.99 USD a set. Now Funn has a coreless valve that is also claimed to triple airflow, and they cost $35 USD a pair.

Reserve's valves boast a lifetime warranty, so I asked Funn what they offer: "It has a warranty. Not a lifetime warranty but we have a robust replacement warranty in place."
Funn FastAir Details:

• 3 times greater airflow than traditional Presta valves
• Easy to install
• Compatible with tire inserts, CO2 inflators & sealant injectors
• Fully rebuildable
• Air release without removing the cap
• "Robust replacement warranty"
• Price: $35 USD
• More info: funnmtb.com

photo

While the principle is similar, they're not a carbon copy. The Funn valves allow air to exit through slots in the side of the valve, making them compatible with foam inserts as the insert won't block the valve when releasing air. They're CO2 inflator compatible and can be rebuilt if they get clogged. Funn say they play nicely with sealant injectors too. The cap is designed to release air without having to entirely remove the cap, making it easier to fine-tune tire pressures.




Author Info:
seb-stott avatar

Member since Dec 29, 2014
305 articles

138 Comments
  • 128 22
 Why not just use schrader-valves?
  • 29 8
 Came here to say the same! Beyond me why people keep using presta for tubeless.
  • 12 1
 There is even a cheap conversion kit vom Joes so you dont have to drill bigger holes. Ive been using it for 1 year and it inflates like on day 1.
  • 41 1
 watch out, you can't just go around and be rational without attracting the haters
  • 21 0
 Older rims were narrower and they didn't want to have bigger holes in them for the valves, but with modern wider rims Shrader is definitely an option.
  • 19 3
 @optimumnotmaximum: hmm, after lookinf into it, what does the schrader conversion improve in comparison to the presta valve?
Constricted air flow and clogging appear to be the same. Remaining advantage is not to be able to break the core.
  • 23 3
 @styriabeef: you could pump up your tires at the gas station
  • 6 0
 I just have an adapter on me at all times, so I can use my Ridgid digital inflator.
  • 2 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: where did you find the conversion kit ?
  • 7 2
 I drilled my rims and went Schrader years ago. Never going back to Presta. Amazon has some options. Just got new ones there. Also just learned that I drilled my rims just big enough for the valves but regular rubber coated tube valves are too big to fit in the hole. I found that out the hard way. Going to look for a new spare tube with metal threaded valve. Don’t get why everyone wants to reinvent the presta.
  • 28 0
 @styriabeef: Schrader valves allow you to push significantly more air through them compared to a presta valve, both with the valve core in or with it removed. The parts are also dirt cheap, they're available at any auto store, and they're super-easy to service. You're more likely to find a pump that works with your schrader valve in a pinch, because now even cars sometimes come with them as their spare tire kit. Finally, unlike these things, you don't have to disassemble the tire and wheel to deal with clogging.

In conclusion: they fix many, many problems that Presta valves have. All without having to attempt to make some more expensive, proprietary "solution" that still suffers from the clogging issues you mentioned
  • 9 1
 mind blown... I'm ordering $10.00 tubeless schraders right now... I hate everything about presta. Only advantage i seem to remember was they helped with road tires? But i ride 22 PSI. Thanks for having common sense.
  • 12 0
 @Crankhed: This is the one I use. www.ride-air.com
The ConvertAir is used without the presta core so it's also easy to add sealant. I use the RideAir can to set the bead.
And it's easy to find dice shaped valve caps
  • 5 0
 I think I went with schrader over two decades ago, when I got scared of presta valve cores popping out when I removed the valve cap. Presta valve caps thread onto the valve core, so incredibly stupid. Is there any advantage at all, of using presta in the first place?
  • 6 0
 @vinay: Presta valves are a smaller diameter. Especially in times were we used smaller width wheels, this might have had an impact on rim strength. Now? I'm not so sure.
Another thing is that because of the design of a schrader valve, where it's recessed, things can fall into the valve area that have to be blown out. Whereas the presta valve is all external and you don't have to worry about this. You also don't have to worry as much if you lose the cap.
The other thing I can think of is that you can uninstall a presta core with just an adjustable wrench, whereas a schrader valve essentially requires the tool. But, again: the tool can be found at pretty much any auto parts store, costs almost nothing, and sometimes even comes as a kit with spare cores.
  • 6 9
 Which one is presta and which one is schroeder I always forget Car and road bike is what I call them
  • 14 3
 @HughBonero: Presta is the one you have to press to let air out - that’s how I remember it!
  • 2 2
 @Crankhed: bike24 "Joes valve converter". 10 € for 2.
  • 2 1
 @styriabeef: the converter makes it basically a shrader with a slimmer bottom tube. It does not clog, you dont have to thread to pump and it does not break. If airflow is a problem remove the core- but after 1 year i had zero issues. With presta it was constant pain.
  • 1 0
 @nickfranko: Thanks, I truly didn't see the advantages so thanks for the explanation.
  • 3 0
 @mtbschrader: I'm curious if you can remember which size drill bit you used? I believe we use a 21/64" bit at work.
  • 2 0
 @nickfranko: in the summer I always have to top up my sealant by removing the valve core. It's way easier than removing the tyre bead. Is that possible with Schrader (genuine question, I've only had them on tubes)?
  • 2 0
 @HughBonero: 9mm for the inner wall (the one inside the tire). The rubber cone of the valve needs to push in a little to seal the valve properly. 8mm is sufficient for the outer wall (the one pointing towards the hub).
  • 4 0
 @tremeer023: yes, you can use remove the Schrader valve core to top off the sealant. One word of advice, replace your valve cores anytime you’re topping off the sealant. I have experienced the core getting stuck slightly open with a sealant clog. Schrader valve cores are super cheap. Buy a bag of 100 for $9.
  • 1 0
 @barp: I can’t remember. I just tried a few in a piece of wood to figure out the fit. It’s not a huge difference from the presta hole.
  • 3 0
 1000% on schrader. I’ve been drilling my rims for over 10 years now. I'm using motorbike valves from ebay.
  • 1 0
 @tremeer023: Stans injector and valve removal tool and you're good to go. Also you can remove the valve and get more air into seat the tyre. You can't use Stans Race with the injector tho.
  • 3 5
 @HughBonero: Hard to find metric drill bits here in the land of Freedom Units. But I guess 8.334375 mm is close enough for our purposes
  • 2 0
 @Landonarkens: @fartymarty thanks for the info, I'm surprised more people don't run them. I'm not crazy about the idea of drilling my rims though tbh.
  • 3 0
 @tremeer023: Yup, just use a core puller to open it up, put in sealant with a syringe, then replace the valve core. As was stated, cores are so cheap that you can just replace them for pennies.
  • 4 0
 @tremeer023: yeah its easy, just remove the core and inject it down the valve, squirt some clean water in after to remove sealant from inside the valve and you’re ready to roll
  • 1 0
 @nosamsemaj: Probably because they can't be bothered drilling rims.
  • 1 0
 @iduckett: I used to do that with my rigid. Cut the end off and install a combo head. It’s the way to go.
  • 1 0
 @txcx166: Wait, you mean the valve or the pump?
  • 1 0
 @iduckett: fancy guy, might have to add that to my ridgid collection
  • 2 0
 @tremeer023: you dont have to, there are converters: unscrew core, screw on converter - done.
  • 1 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: I've just been Googling up on it. Can't believe I didn't look at it sooner, that's life changing. To think I was about to shell out on one of these.
  • 2 0
 @iduckett: just the head. I used a lezyne head. Then you can do both types so you can inflate your DJ and MTB or whatever. Those adapters are an added step of frustration. Gotta get the efficiency going. Haha
  • 2 0
 The valve to be clear.
  • 3 2
 The Schaeder misconception. They use the same core and have the same I.D. as Presta. Its essentially a Presta with a rubber casing and heavy brass threads.
  • 1 0
 @mtbschrader: Specialized tubes are threaded Schrader, without the rubber coating found on most Schrader if you are looking for those without enlarging your hole slightly.
  • 1 0
 Because road bike
  • 3 0
 @Paco77: But don't you have to press the core of a schrader valve to let the air out... Or am I missing some serious sarcasm here?!
  • 1 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: Conversion kit? Do tell
  • 2 0
 Here’s the head I used…


LEZYNE Dual Valve Alternative Bicycle Pump Head, Presta, Schrader, and Dunlop Compatible, for High-Pressure Tire Floor Pumps a.co/d/jkVbEcO
  • 1 0
 @Paco77: ??? you press shrader to get the air out too
  • 2 0
 @pakleni: joes conversion kit, just google
  • 44 2
 Everyone is trying to reinvent Presta valves when all along the answer has been Schrader.

I guess they can’t patent Schrader valves and charge a fortune for them
  • 33 6
 Not sure I understand the problem that high flow valves are supposed to be addressing? I run normal Presta and have zero issues.

New tire install: install one side of bead, pour in Stan’s race sealant, install other side of bead, remove core, blast in compressed air to set bead, reinstall core, set pressure with hand pump.

sealant refresh: remove core, inject Stan’s (non race), reinstall core, set pressure with hand pump.
  • 11 5
 You don't even need to blast anything. Modern tyres and rims can be set up with a regular floor pump.
  • 9 0
 I didn't have an issue until I did.

Pesta cores coupled with sealant (especially fibre filled) can lead to sealant doing its job on the core and clogging it.

The work around is replace the cores every so often and carry a spare in case you face a clogged core on the trail, or the fragile thread snaps off when trying to work on it with freezing hands and/or gloves.
  • 7 6
 @diggery: ive used stans for the last 5 years, and been using the same valves since forever, never had air leakage or anything

I don't get what other people are doing wrong
  • 1 0
 @Auxx: That can in alot of cases, but why would you
  • 2 0
 not everybody has compressed air available all the time, and not everybody is using the same rim/tire combo as you. so what simply works for you does not work for everybody.
  • 1 0
 It doesnt solve a problem, it just airs up tires faster and easier which is nice, they can make a shitty pump feel like a nice one. If you need valves I think it's worth spending a little more on high flow because they take so much less pumps and seem easier to hit the right PSI, but I wouldn't run out and replace all my valves that are working fine already.
  • 1 0
 Just going to leak 3x faster
  • 2 0
 I shoot sealant through the valve because I don't want a mess in case there's a problem. Only issue is they can eventually clog but a paperclip through the valve clears it up.
  • 1 0
 @way2manyhobbies2keep: the question is why wouldn't you? Setting up tyres with a floor pump is a lot faster than walking to a garage, setting up a compressor, attaching an adapter and then cleaning everything up.
  • 3 0
 @Auxx: Who sets up a compressor, its already set up as a permanent fixture, I grab one attachment and pull the hose down from my hose reel. Saves me loads of time and effort seating and inflating things.

Sounds like you have extra steps in mind.
  • 11 0
 Gonna replace my alveoli with these and become unstoppable
  • 1 0
 @meditationman I want a lifetime warranty on my alveoli. I guess I'm shelling out for the fillmores
  • 16 7
 Let's reinvent the wheel (size) to sell more bikes
Let's reinvent the valve to sell more valves
  • 6 1
 let's reinvent the bicycle!
  • 49 2
 Lets not make anything better, ever.
  • 1 4
 that's the least of the problems, the problem are sheeple who go along with it AND trolls shilling for it
  • 2 0
 @jamesbriancrilly: longer bikes were a step in the right direction, all that was needed really back in 2011
  • 2 1
 @qirill: e-bikes already entered the chat
  • 3 1
 But let's not reinvent the drivetrain! Anything better would make less money!
  • 3 1
 @jamesbriancrilly: except most things companies are releasing nowadays doesn't make anything better, just another gimmick/ standard that bragging right is the only benefit
  • 6 0
 I’ve been using an air compressor and a rubber tip blow gun to seat new tires on rims with presta valves, works with Schrader as well. Adapt and overcome.

Once the tire seats it doesn’t matter if the presta check valve doesn’t go in quick. Then I top off with a floor pump.
  • 9 0
 This has to be one of the most refreshingly helpful and positive comment sections on pink bike in quite a while.
  • 16 11
 Here’s my main issue with these valves… and it is a serious design error in my opinion. The reason why these valves will never go on one of my bikes or one of my customers bikes is because the base of the valve is so tall that it will make a rim crease (or crack) when an impact occurs at that location. I’ve seen it before, and it is sure to make a wheel fail in a way that rim design is not factored. You do not want to have a protruding cylinder creating a high-pressure stress riser at the site where the rim is most vulnerable! It’s tragically flawed in this aspect! All valves should sit within a few millimeters deeper than the rim hooks, just in case there’s an impact near the valve. This will surely cause many failures which the rim manufacturers will not be happy with.
  • 14 3
 yes, I can confirm that. I destryed an Weareone composites union rim like that with reserve fillmore valves. Had a hard impact on a rock and the valve was pushed into the carbon and the rim cracked. This valve is even bigger so more likely to happen for sure.
  • 7 19
flag damagemydirt (Feb 19, 2023 at 11:02) (Below Threshold)
 That logic is like saying. I'm not going to ride my MTB because it may get damaged. It's an offroad vehicle that will break. I get minimizing parts prone to failure but the odds of a rock hitting the valve are very rare. Most likely if the rock or stick damaged a tall stem it would do the same to a short one. If you want your bike to not break. Don't ride it.
  • 5 1
 @damagemydirt: while I would agree that it’s unlikely the valve would be hit on any one impact, the chance is there and using a valve stem that’s lower profile is about as low hanging as low hanging fruit gets. Especially since I don’t know a single person who’s said they really wished they had different valves. Having a valve sit proud of the rim like that is asking for trouble.
  • 5 0
 @damagemydirt: No, this logic is more like saying "no part of your car may be lower than the bottom of your rims", for safety in the event of a bottom-out. Which is in fact a law in many places.
  • 4 1
 Man i had to go back and look at that, Your not bullshitting; that definitely wouldn't be Funn!

Also looks like sealant would collect around that cage and cause boogers to form like a witches nostril!!
  • 5 1
 This.
Having the valve stick out beyond the rim sidewalls is a ticking time bomb. Sooner or later you will hit it (certainly the first time you get a blow out and cant stop within 1m) and that will put very high loads into a very thin part of the rim that just isn't designed to take any impacts. Aluminium rim will deform and possibly leak and eventually crack and almost certainly leak.
Also, looks like the holes in the valve cap will fill with muck which will work its way into the threads and around the needle every time you inflate etc. Any crap in the gap between the needle and the main body can work it's way down to the seal (you will actually pump it down) and potentially will stop the valve closing fully.
  • 7 3
 In over 3 decades as a mountain biker and mechanic I've never really had any issue with a presta valve. I've had customers not understand how they work and break the cores or bend them but that's about it. Haven't really had any issues with a schreaser valve either other than the occasional crack from a slipping tire. I just remove the predsta core when setting up tubeless, takes about 10 seconds. Having said that, it's cool to see new stuff that will make things just a bit easier.
  • 4 0
 If Iam correct Reserve also claims no clog. I would probably drop the 15 bucks more to avoid this and rebuilding but I don't see a big difference in the design.
  • 8 4
 76Projects also claiming no-clog, they were also first to market iirc rather than SC. Not had mine long but they are really good so far

76projects.com/products/hi-flow-no-clog-tubeless-valves
  • 2 1
 Reserves don’t play nice with inserts (I had this problem). These look like they would solve the problem.
  • 1 0
 @mashrv1: thanks for a tip, was a bit scared when the magenta ones loaded up Big Grin
  • 1 0
 @MikeW75: I'm not using inserts, but it's good to be ready for it
  • 3 0
 @bok-CZ: embrace* the magenta!

*yeah I wasn’t brave enough either
  • 1 0
 @mashrv1: I have a pair of these, they work great. My only wishes is that they had a shorter version for low profile rims and push on chucks would be compatible.
  • 1 0
 @carraig042: I lucked out a bit there. OneUp pumps work fine but I needed the adapter for my screw-on track pump
  • 1 0
 @MikeW75: sticks out pretty far into the tire, not sure how this would affect the seating of the insert. Fillmores with small insert holes work like a dream
  • 9 3
 FUNN has good stuff
  • 4 1
 Have fun getting sealant stuck up in that micro tube. Like the 76 valves these would clog and have less flow than the Fillmore.
  • 3 1
 When did tubeless valves get so expensive. Was at my local lbs yesterday and wanted to grab a set but 49.00 for tubeless valves is pretty ridiculous
  • 3 0
 1.90eur for a stainless tubeless valve at ZTTO m.nl.aliexpress.com/item/1005002027623861.html
  • 3 0
 "They're CO2 inflator compatible" i was told sealant does not like the cold air from CO2 cartridges. Anyone to confirm?
  • 1 0
 my sealant stays decent (albiet a bit slower) at -20*c riding studded plus tires. Joys of Canadian seasons....
  • 2 0
 It can definitely freeze water (which I believe is an ingredient in many sealants). My concern, though, is that CO2 dissolves in water to create carbonic acid.
  • 2 0
 CO2 is a smaller molecule, so it’ll seep out of an otherwise sealed tire faster. Maybe it affects the sealant, but that’ll only be a minor concern as well.

Point is, there’s no reason to not use one to get you back to the trailhead. The back home you can refill the tire with normal air.

It wouldn’t hurt to refill the tire with a normal pump when you get the chance.
  • 3 0
 @pmhobson: Here's a reason: compared to a mini pump, which is limited only by your ability to use your arms, using CO2 cylinders is a finite resource.
  • 5 1
 @barp: ... and cartridges create waste. I thought these cartridges were actually made for racers in competition to save time fixing a flat. Though I'd say the repair jobs are part of the game. If you race unassisted, you inflate the tire unassisted. In e-bike racing, you can opt to bring a compressor and power it with your e-bike battery. Disposable cans of air are stupid. I know in the lobby for tubeless we've often heard the complaint of tubes being left trailside. I've hardly ever seen this (which makes sense as it is always worth the effort to bring the tube home and patch it) but too often I've come across ditched empty CO2 cartridges (which indeed are useless and apparently worth littering). What's wrong with just bringing a pump and using that?
  • 1 0
 @barp: yeah I know. I never carry CO2 cartridges. Sustainability of single-use, compressed air isn’t really what we were talking about though.
  • 1 0
 @pmhobson: CO2 is a smaller molecule?!?! Than what? O2, even though it's an O2 with a C added? Or N2 (which is bigger than an O2)? It might have a slightly smaller kinetic diameter but I very much doubt that has any bearing on leakage.
  • 3 0
 @G-Sport: looks like I had the effect right, but for the wrong reasons.

Basically, CO2 readily /suffuses/ through rubber and especially butyl tubes, hence the age of the “wisdom” that a tire filled will CO2 instead of atmospheric air will lose pressure faster.

www.exploringoverland.com/overland-tech-travel/2016/3/25/3izopxom72k7p3vxpvjtfuhk7ouscc
  • 2 0
 @pmhobson: Well there's a whole fascinating rabbit hole, thanks. Does suggest that CO2 would also permeate the latex in sealant which is probably not good. I gave up on CO2 cartridges (in favour of a mini-pump) a long time ago for other reasons, a mini-pump never runs out and the disposable cartridges can't be very good for the environment, but now there's another reason.
  • 1 0
 How can you tell the pressure with a regular pressure guage if the air blows out the side? Who cares about the volume you can put through it if you can't tell how much is in there?
  • 2 0
 I think the savings comes from the money they didn't spend on music for the video. Wink
  • 4 2
 Finally a thread where all the Presta haters can united! Preach my brothers, Preach!
  • 3 0
 I need some Schrader valves in carbon fiber.
  • 1 0
 I can't say I've ever been out on a ride having a great time but then suddenly thought 'aw shit I need 3x the airflow from my presta valves'
  • 1 0
 « Funn needed a reason to sell their valves 35$ » would be a fair title
  • 5 2
 Schrader life!
  • 1 0
 Lots of people here saying this. Where do you get these tubeless schrader valves and are they rubber or metal ?? I did not know of this but would like to look into it.
  • 1 0
 @barp: That's really cool! can i get them in Blk or other colors tho? I gotta have Blk at least.or guess i could spray paint em
  • 1 1
 The fact it only lets 3x the air into the tire when it is like 5x bigger than a normal valve according to the diagram is kind of underwhelming!
  • 2 0
 Waiting for these to show up on aliexpress in a few months time
  • 2 0
 Presta valves, because I am too chicken to drill out my carbon wheels.
  • 1 0
 Do these guys get a desing innovation award now?
  • 2 0
 Well, that blows.
  • 1 0
 Hi flow valves... so hot right now.
  • 1 1
 I like it, I like it a lot.
  • 2 0
 Though I’ve never had a problem removing a presta core and ramming out the old sealant with a thoughtfully sized nail.
  • 5 0
 @iduckett: I like to use the threaded end of a spoke. The threads are good at grabbing the bits of congealed sealant.
  • 2 3
 But it is impossible to top up sealant through the valve, am I right?
  • 1 0
 "Funn say they play nicely with sealant injectors too"
  • 8 1
 @PBUsername: Oh sorry, I even read that and seamingly forgot it within seconds.
However, I think my prefered method won't work. I remove the core and use a syringe to fill in the sealant. The tube diameter seams to tiny for that.
  • 3 0
 @MadCyborg: I do this also. Works every time.
  • 5 0
 I've had no trouble using the Reserve valves with sealant top up. Best thing I ever did. Way better than standard valves. Seemed expensive at the time, but now I no longer curse the standard valves. They are a pleasure to use. These perhaps one step up, as the valve base sits in a pocket as such, so would play better with inserts by the looks ot it.
  • 3 0
 @FuTAnT: the reserve valves are awesome, until they aren't!

Once it gets clogged/jammed it basically doesn't work. You can't even pump up your tyre.
  • 1 0
 Yeah you definitely don’t want to do that
  • 3 5
 What about the ethirteen valves? Exist for a decade and work great with sealant!
  • 2 1
 Work great till their unnecessary seal between the two halves of the valve fails and leaves you stranded
  • 3 4
 Funn sells on Amazon. Obvious knock off product. Kind of sad.
  • 1 1
 i love this valve idea
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