Garbaruk Xtender for Shimano XT 11-speed Cassettes - Review

Sep 15, 2016
by Richard Cunningham  
Garbaruk Xtender


Garbaruk hails from Kyiv, in the Ukraine, where the company's founders, Valeriy and Yuriy Garbaruk, machine a comprehensive range of drivetrain products, including: oval and round narrow-wide chainrings to fit almost every popular crankset; one-piece-machined wide-range cassettes (ala SRAM); extender cogs; wide-range derailleur cage plates; and the three-cog Shimano cassette extender which we review here. The Garbaruk Shimano Xtender has an aluminum spider with steel cogs, and is a direct replacement for the three-cog segment of Shimano's 11-speed M8000 XT cassettes. MSRP is $119 USD, and $139 with the recommended derailleur-cage extension kit.


Garbaruk Xtender
The Xtender, alongside Garbaruk's chain-take-up-plate upgrade kit for Shimano XT M8000.



Details:

• Material: 7075-T651 aluminum spider, 1066/1566 nickel-plated steel cogs .
• Compatible with: Shimano XT CS-M8000 11-40 and 11-42 cassettes.
• Options: 32-38–45T, 34-40-48T, or 34-40-50T
• Gear ratios:
Using an XT 11-40T cassette: 11-13-15-17-19-21-24-27-34-40-48(50)
Using an XT 11-42T cassette: 11-13-15-17-19-21-24-28-34-40-48(50)
• Cassette range comparison:
Shimano 11-40T cassette = 363.6%;
Shimano 11-42T cassette - 381.8%;
With Garbaruk 34-48T Xtender - 436.4% (454.5% with 34-50T Xtender)
• Note: Garbaruk recommends purchasing the Garbaruk 48 or 50T Xtenders with their modified rear derailleur cage for Shimano XT M8000 or XTR M9000 derailleurs to improve shifting.
• Weight: 246g (34-48T with spacer), 258g (34-50T with spacer)
• MSRP: $119 USD Xtender, $139 with derailleur cage extension.
• Contact: Garbaruk
Garbaruk Xtender
Garbaruk's Xtender replaces Shimano's 42-tooth segment (top-left).


Why Use an Xtender?

For those who might need an explanation, Shimano's smallest cassette cog is an eleven tooth, while SRAM offers a ten tooth - which is the key to XX1's wider, more useful, 11-speed gearing range. Shimano one-by owners who need a lower gear for climbing can opt for a smaller chainring, but then that eleven tooth kills their top speed. The addition of a 48-tooth or 50-tooth extender-cog, like Garbaruk offers, allows the use of a larger chainring (34 or 36-tooth) to maintain or to increase top speed in the highest gear option, while also providing a slightly lower climbing gear. Garbaruk's three-cog Xtenders don't alter spacing of the first eight Shimano cassette cogs, so it also suits riders who want to enjoy the close-ratio gearing options of the standard Shimano cassette, but with the addition of a couple of stump-puller climbing gears. I chose the second option, pairing a 32-tooth chainring with Garbaruk's largest Xtender option - the 34, 40, 50-tooth combination.

Garbaruk Xtender


Construction

Garbaruk's Xtender is a one-piece assembly constructed from a CNC-machined 7075-T651 aluminum alloy spider that is riveted to three nickel-plated steel cogs. The cogs are machined with shifting ramps and angled tooth profiles to assist the rear derailleur, and the overall construction and finish is top notch. The Xtender replaces the existing three-cog segment of the XT cassette and maintains the same alignment and spacing. Shimano's spider assembly has an aluminum 42-tooth, but the weight difference was minimal: Garbaruk's 50-tooth Xtender at 258 grams and Shimano's assembly at 235 grams. Shimano's 11 x 40 and 11 x 42 cassettes differ by one tooth on the eighth cog position, (27 or 28T), so keep that in mind, as that difference can be felt when shifting to the Xtender's 34-tooth cog. I converted an 11 x 42 and the shift felt proportional.

Assembling the Xtender is simple: Remove the cassette, line up the Xtender with the wider indexing-spline on the Shimano cassette, slide it on, add the included aluminum spacer, reinstall the remaining eight cassette cogs, and then re-torque the retainer ring. The larger cog necessitates adding some chain links, up to four in the case of a 50-tooth, so take care of that before you get excited and spin test your new transmission.

At this point, you can choose to run a standard Shimano XT M8000 ot XTR M9000 rear derailleur and screw in the B-tension adjustment until it shifts up to the larger cassette cogs, or remove the derailleur and install Garbaruk's longer chain-take-up arms. I installed the arms, which required a small amount of fiddling, but the task should be an easy one for an above-average home mechanic. Give yourself 30 minutes and have a spare derailleur cable laying around in case the existing one can't be reused.
Garbaruk Xtender
Garbaruk's aftermarket chain-take-up plates increase the offset of the upper pulley, which allows the derailleur to follow the cassette cogs more closely.


Riding the Garbaruk Xtender

Remarkably, after resetting the derailleur cable tension, the modified cassette shifted perfectly without the need to turn an adjustment screw. Shifting was crisp and quiet until the 50-tooth, which made a buuurp sound as the changer hefted the chain upwards. The 50-tooth was slightly noisier than the stock Shimano cog, but not enough to worry a fastidious ex road racer. If Shimano's shifting was a ten out of ten, then I'd rate the Garbaruk Xtender cogs' performance an eight, with SRAM XX1 rated at nine. I'd call that good and not complain.

Not having used the standard Shimano derailleur chain-take-up cage, I have no information to offer there, but the Garbaruk cage, with its longer arm and additional offset offered a consistent distance between the upper pulley and the cassette cogs and required no B-tension screw adjustment. I'd call that a win too. The hybrid rear derailleur shifted effortlessly under load and never waivered when I asked for a shift at an inopportune moment.

Problems arose when I back-pedaled the drivetrain while it was shifted in the big, 50-tooth cog - a situation which often caused the chain to jump from the 50 and land somewhere in the middle of the cassette. One revolution in the correct direction would set it all straight, but that single turn of the crankset was occasionally, the crux move I needed to top a nasty boulder. In defense of the Xtender, as the steel sprocket teeth started to wear in, I found that I could back-pedal more frequently without risking a jump. Using a non-Boost chainring would move the drive sprocket inwards three millimeters and could solve the issue entirely.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesGarbaruk's 50-tooth Xtender spans the gap that Shimano's existing one-by drivetrains have yet to fill by sufficiently widening the standard gearing range without requiring a different cassette. I found the spacing of the 50-tooth option to be intuitive enough that, beyond climbing at a walking pace, the only signal to remind me that I was using an alternative transmission was the "bruuup" sound of the final shift. In retrospect, I would also like to try the 48-tooth version as well, to experience if the closer final ratio would be a benefit. If you can forgive the occasional meshing issue when back-pedaling - also a problem with many 11-speed one-by transmissions - then you should consider Garbaruk's beautifully constructed Xtender when the time comes to expand the gearing spread of your Shimano XT transmission. - RC






198 Comments

  • + 140
 Call me lazy, but I cant help but think if I'm needing a 50T rear i'd probably just get off and walk...
  • + 98
 Some 15-25% grades and 1,000+ ft climbs are pretty tech and definitely warrant a wider cassette, also the range off the top of the cassette lets you run a bigger chainring for more torque in the lower gears. Not as stupid an Idea as it may seem.
  • + 135
 Why walk a bike if it's possible to pedal it?
  • + 10
 @Kyle201: Why not, if it'd be faster to get to the top of the hill. Also it is good for your back to switch between bike/walk.
  • + 50
 Tell you what, I have eagle and have already smashed my derailleur off because it is so stupidly long and low to the ground. I wish I had have gone for the xtr di2 drivetrain option instead
  • + 6
 I guess the need for this type of thing depends on what your riding style is and what you enjoy.

For me, here's how I figure out my gearing.
Q1: Did i wind out a lot last time down the hill? Yes? Up the size of the chainring.
What happens at the walking speed end of the cassette I don't care too much for....
  • + 152
 I wonder if someone could invent a way of fitting multiple front chainrings?
Then there wouldn't be any need for these kind of bodges.

....oh, I'll get my coat
  • + 24
 @IllestT: I know you say that as a tongue in cheek remark, but considering the great lengths people are going to get the range of a double chairing while "simplifying" their drive train, I can't help but wonder when what is old will become new again...
  • + 22
 Clearing ultra steep or tech climbs can be a rewarding challenge. It may be harder or slower than walking, but most people pick mtb'ing for the challenges.
  • + 7
 @Bersekr: So your suggestion is to not have a bike and just walk up hills instead if it will be 'quicker'? What an awful argument that it.
  • + 5
 @Chadimac22: Yeah, re-hashed old ideas being marketed as BRAND NEW is right on trend at the moment.
Dropper seat posts - originally from the early 1990's
Oval chainrings - again, 90's
Massive top-tubes/slack HA's - 90's

In fact, even massive cassettes were originally trendy in the late 90's (remember "Mega-range" cassettes?)
  • + 5
 @IllestT: Presumably you still ride only a 1990's bike then? As I guess it is impossible to have advanced and improved immensely on anything from the 90's of course. Calling things a 're-hash' is just odd really, as technically that would make any modern frame a simple 're-hash' of what existed in the 90's.
  • + 14
 For the guys who always chime in with 'i'd rather just walk': why do you feel the need to part of a gearing argument anyway? Fine for you if you don't care to pedal, but then this discussion is between people who do.
  • + 13
 @Bersekr: just go for a walk then
  • - 7
flag HankBizzle (Sep 16, 2016 at 7:00) (Below Threshold)
 I know the potential benefits and all that jazz but it's getting a bit ridiculous now. It may let you run a bigger ring at the front, but let's be honest, unless you have a 44t chairing you should never need a 50 at the back!
  • + 5
 Ummmmm ... could just stop doing this... I think it's pretty clear everyone has their own opinion on the matter. Two camps "50t is stupid" "50t isn't that stupid" ... we get it.
  • - 7
flag theorifice (Sep 16, 2016 at 9:35) (Below Threshold)
 @rrsport: The only way you could have smashed the cage is if you fell over while climbing. Which is likely what you did.
  • + 2
 @Bersekr: I've done lots of riding where my low gear allowed me to pedal my 8 pounds of tire up steep hills, and I always end up way ahead of my buddy who walked that whole section. Maybe it's less efficient, but it's definitely always faster to pedal. I agree that it can be good to switch up of positions... but isn't really necessary unless you have back problems.
  • + 5
 @IllestT: I still love using 2x. Seems like it's getting pretty rare these days.
  • + 2
 @HankBizzle: You must have a light bike and no steep hills.
  • + 2
 @Bersekr: Why would you ever even consider such a move... Pedal that damn thing!
  • + 2
 Or you could just spend a fraction of the cost on a lower range front ring.. a 34T on a 42T is already pretty friggen easy
  • + 2
 @NWshredSauce: Bigger gears, less wear, more watts, more range. Easy as that. Just like in a car, you can redline the engine, but only for so long.
  • - 2
 @siderealwall2: A simple 11 spd set up can clean a 30 mile alpine ride in the Cascades no problem with descent fitness. I'll take my $500 savings and put it somewhere more important like damper servicing- $400 for a 12spd cassette and $130 for three rings seems like highway robbery to me.
  • + 2
 @IllestT: Be fair oval chain rings in the 90's were clocked 90deg the other way which was nuts, completely different concept to what modern ovals are doing.
  • + 0
 @theorifice: Its actually pretty much its most protected when you're on the 50. Its mid cassette where it hangs down like crazy and doesn't take much to smash it
  • + 1
 @rrsport: pretty sure I wasn't thinking that when I took out my xtr mech a couple of weeks ago. Going past a rock on a technical climb. Since then I have put a saint short cage in as it works with an old school 36t cassette. I only run a 33T up front as that's all you need in the UK, after that..... stay off the brakes in the corners is far more important.
  • + 1
 @IllestT: ditto!!!!! My thoughts exactly
  • + 7
 @Chadimac22: having used a 1x10 on all of my bikes of the last 5 years I think, now back to 2x10 with a 28/36 front (on my 29er of all things) and everything just works so much more smoothly!
I think I'm happy where I am now, long live 2x10!
  • + 3
 might as well go full e-bike and call it a day.
  • + 2
 Lol the neg votes. I think I know when my own eagle groupset and how it sits hahaha
  • + 7
 I guess I could always get an E-bike?
I am running a OneUp Eagle garage hack cassette using an Eagle cage+ 50T cog and a 45T cog on a 11-42 M9000. It works great (except for the 5T drop from 18T@3rd to 13@ 2nd positions) but is way more expensive than this Gabaruk setup.
Looking at those cogs they probably don't shift as well as the OneUp. But being steel the Gabaruk probably has better longevity.
I may try this Gabaruk setup once my OneUp is worn out.
You can definitely walk a steep climb faster than pedaling this setup, but those gravity challenged and bad knees folks sure like setups like these. Remember us old geezers are keeping this sport alive with our $$$. Left to you young skinny guys you wouldn't have half the shit available to trash on PB.
Now get off my lawn.
  • + 1
 @IllestT: 10-50t rear cassette with triple ring up front!!!! Be like watching a fast and the furious movie with all those different gears to grab!
  • + 0
 @Chadimac22: When a dual front ring system is engineered to keep better chain retention without the use of a clutch. Like a N/W, but is capable of shifting.

I just dont have the money to prototype it!
  • + 1
 @XCMark: I have a dual ring on my fat bike with a clutched slx and it keeps the chain on pretty well to be honest. Shifts well too.
  • + 1
 @IllestT: I agree completely. I'm racing and winning on a triple close ratio chainring setup (26-34-40) on a 27.5 which gives me two full more lower gears than a typical 1 x 11 setup and the 40t chainring lets me have a top speed to be as fast as any 29er with a 36t single chainring setup. This close ratio means only 8 gears difference between my inner 26t chainring and 34t middle chainring, and only 6 gears difference between the 34t middle and 40t outer. This small difference between chainrings makes the shifting faster and smoother.The triple also lets my chain stay more in line with the rear cogs, and keeping my 26t steel chainring means 90% o the time 'Im on the lowest gears, I'm also on steel cogs front and rear which translates to much less wear and tear than climbing on aluminium chainrings or cogs. It also keeps the unsprung weight off my rotating rear wheel ( rotating a larger diameter mass and weight means more effort). Using this I'm completely happy and ready for any occasion racing cross country with a 27.5
  • + 68
 I might never give up my 2x10 drive train for this headache. I can keep a 26/38 up front and out climb while keeping a higher top speed than anyone with a 34 or 36 up front. Plus with one shift, I can drop or pick up the front gear and be in a dramatically different ratio instead of pushing the right thumb 5 times.
  • + 61
 Just wait two more years and it will be the new innovative thing again.
  • + 19
 a good 1x designed bike and 2x equivalent cassette would probably change your mind, plus you can use an actual chainguide
  • + 2
 @MmmBones:
"2x equivalent cassette"

So I should also carry a chain whip when I ride?
  • + 4
 26t chainring with a 36t cassette has the same low gear as a 34/46, and a 38 with 11 is the same as a 34t on a 10t cog. So your range can be well exceeded with e13s new 9-46 cassette, or matched with the older 9-42 and a 32t chainring. (All these 'the same' ratios sre to the nearest cog). As cassettes like e13s or a 10-50 11spd option becomes more affordable it really will kill the front mech. Also look at the new box one stuff, 4 shifts in either direction.
  • + 29
 I hated 2x10. With the old 3x9 you would spend most of your single track time in the middle ring and only use the other two chainrings in extreme situations. With 2x10, I found I was doing a lot more front derailleur shifting at critical spots on a single track ride. I have now gone 1x10 on both my bikes (one with a oneup and one with a sunrace cassette), and won't be going back to 2x any time soon.

Can't wait to upgrade to 1x11 when I break something.
  • + 9
 I can't wait until someone starts developing chain sets with 3 chain rings to remove this need for massive cassettes.
  • + 2
 @bigtim: why would you want more weight, less ground clearance, more calf danger, more dropped chains and more wear items when you can have a wider ratio version of something you'd have to have anyway? Wide ratio drive trains are by far the best thing to happen to mountain bikes since suspension.
  • + 10
 @inked-up-metalhead: I think you may have missed the ironic undertones to my post.
  • + 3
 @bigtim: its the Internet, no undertones are obvious without an accompanying emoji, in this case one of eye rolling.
  • + 10
 I rencentIy switched to a nice sIx 1X (32 front ad 11-42 rear) and you have to try it before you bash it, it works so weII and it's nice having onIy 1 shifter and just the right amount of gears... It takes a IittIe time getting used to but now I wouIdn't want to go back

TBH you aren't riding a MTB traiI if you spin out on your 11 tooth cog...
  • + 2
 I have no plans of giving up my 2x drivetrains either but the ability to use larger front rings in association with these massive rear cogs does do something really nice by reducing the stress and force taken by the chain. Next project: pick up a Shimano 11spd cassette, make up some kind of 7spd 14-48 frankencluster and pair it with a 30-38 double somehow. The chain line would be amazing and the chain would be so happy!
  • + 4
 i feel a Hammerschmidt, 2.0 discussion should be had... (for the 150mm and above crowd) If you could take some weight out of that design, you would really have something cool.
  • + 1
 I agree. Couldn't wait to convert my first, and I guess only 2 x 10 to a narrow wide single up front. Missed the butter soft single gear change up front and went back to the front derailleur. Did change out the front little ring to a 28 from a 24. Works for me. Could care less if my bars are a bit "cluttered"
  • + 4
 @Brakesnotincluded: Well that isn't really a fair comment. I spin out on my 11t with a 36t front ring when I'm at the bike park quite often. I never do it when I'm on tight singletrack, but on the jump trails I have no issue reaching my max pedal speed. Not a big deal for some folks but for me it's rather irritating.
  • + 1
 @burnadette: I had a Hammerschmidt on a Transition Covert, loved it...albeit it was a little heavy.
  • + 1
 @jdsy2154: Does the sunrace cassette shift well? I am thinking about going with one on my bike.
  • + 1
 @burnadette: miss my hammerschmidt
  • + 3
 @WhatToBuy, @hamncheez: I want to take and old hammerschmidt and put some hollowforged cranks on it... annnnnd machine about 8lbs of material away from the planetary gears inside the mechanism.
  • + 3
 @burnadette: it made narrow-wide rings obsolete before they even came out.
  • + 0
 So you are saying you are faster than Richie rude and his 1 x drivetrain. I think we have a new challenger. But wait barely anyone can keep up with him unless he's sleeping
  • + 5
 That "one shift" is fickle and extremely unreliable under load compared to the 5 on the right though, at least for me. Generally I can completely forget about using the front shifter if not on perfectly flat ground, I love 1x11 because I can get to that granny gear whenever I want.
  • + 3
 @MmmBones: i run 2x10 xt and just bought sram 1x11 carbon bike ,the low weight of the carbon bke compensates for the higher bottom gear so, so far can climb same trails
I do miss the closer ratio's of the 2x10 but both have plus points
  • + 2
 @burnadette: I think of the Hammerschmidt as a possible contender or crossover to the gearbox. If they could make them as light as a 2x crankset+front mech, I think many would rather have a Hammerschimdt over a 10-50t rear cassette and long cage derailleur. Unfortunately, just like gearboxes, the Hammerschmidt will be very difficult to make light enough to compete with a 1x11 10-50t setup.
  • + 2
 Yeah 2x is sick! Will be rocking it for quite some time still. I use a 20t granny in the front. It won't make you weak. I pedal 8 pounds of tire up steep shit,
  • + 2
 @PHeller: It was already as light as a 2x crankset+frontmech+chainguide, but there was only ever one iteration of it. I bet they could get the weight down by 20-30% without too much trouble.
  • + 4
 @mxjeremy: I don't have a lot to compare it with, but it's fine. I am using an XT derailleur and the b-screw is at the limit; if I had an extended b-screw I would use it.

I have a OneUp extended Sram cassette on my other bike and the shifting feels a bit crisper; however the sunrace cassette has a better spread (it was built to be what it is).

I have the lighter, more expensive Sunrace MX3. For the price I couldn't find anything to match it. I would buy another one over the OneUp.
  • + 1
 @jdsy2154:
Amen. Trying to anticipate EVERY front shift on a 2x or 3X is the bane of every rider except the super fit and committed maniacs out there. The 99% of riders hate the grinding mistimed shift and dropped chains . I will never go back to 2x/3X.
  • + 1
 @cueTIP: bike park is a different story, that's why I have a DH bike... 1X11 is designed for trail usage. Besides at those speeds pumping the terrain is way more efficient plus you remain stable on your bike
  • + 1
 @inked-up-metalhead: To a point. I wont even play with 11g and 12g until the backpedal issue is resolved through design and not extra component additions.
  • + 1
 The best part about a 1x for me....not having to downshift on the front chainrings when suddenly confronted with a steep, punchy section. The kind that sneak up on you....and you CAN't downshift off the front rings cos of physics or whatever. Just up the back cogs and off ya go... Not sure that alone is worth some of the other headaches....but 30 or 32 up front with xt 42 in the back is pretty dang sufficient......
  • + 46
 Now is see why we need 29er. On 26" the derailleur-cage extension kit would scratch the floor. Maybe in two years we just roll on a 98-tooth cog. No wheel needed.
  • + 28
 They'll probably come out with something like an electric mountain bike.
  • + 1
 We call that a tank. Good point? No flats!
  • + 43
 Derr, I don't need this product, ergo no one needs this product, derr.
  • + 6
 I can't wait to see who writes the first review. So we can shame them.
  • + 3
 @XCMark: probably the same losers who needed disc brakes first. Total chumps.
  • + 2
 I reckon my mates would bully me if I bought this.
  • + 27
 Why are people debating gear ratios again? To each their own.
It's a review, the point is to inform how it performs, not to argue who needs it etc.

It's pretty simple :
10-42, 11-42 or even 11-36 is enough? Then enjoy 1x simplicity and lightweight. 11-45 if you want, whatever is the limit.
Need more range? 2x is cheaper, gives more range and saves weight for a given price. You can even go electric so no worries about 2 shifters, still less unsprung weight, shorter cage, better chain line... than eagle.
You want more range AND bullet proof chain retention? Then wide range 1x is the solution (11-50, 10-50, 9-44...).

What did I miss?
  • + 37
 You missed the fact that pinkbike commentators require conflict in order to survive. Being nice and happy is NOT a natural state of balance over here...
  • + 14
 Logic, calm and balanced arguments have no place here.
  • + 2
 @SintraFreeride: If you think this is bad, you should see the Wheels and Tires forum on **** (name redacted to keep PB from getting their panties in a bunch). Picking a wheel size, drivetrain type, etc. and then being a d*ck about it seems to be part of the allure of the sport for some people.
  • + 1
 @RunsWithScissors: Oh I am well aware of all that. I tried suggesting forward geometry on a roadbike as a new idea in the pinkbike forum and was surprised how narrow minded and hateful most of the people on there were. Hope Chris Porter gets around to testing that concept too.
  • + 1
 @SintraFreeride: Check out my gallery for a forward geometry "ish" road bike. 68 degree head angle, 415 chain stays, long top tube for my body and it rips off road when it has to.
  • + 3
 @SintraFreeride: NO ROOM FOR ROAD BIKE TALK HERE
  • + 1
 @keewi: That is a step in the right direction. I would like to make one with the following geometry:

Reach: 520mm
Head angle: 68º
Seat angle: 78º
Chainstays: 440mm
Wheelbase: ~1250mm
  • + 2
 I think that was very precise and concise.
  • + 1
 LOGIC !? Run away !!!
  • + 11
 I think Hammerschidt should jump in - lighten up the planetary system and cranks, add carbon and lighten the heavy spindle, etc. explore the ratios with 8, 9, 10, 11 or 12 cogs on the back, there would certainly be some benefits for obtaining better ground clearances, shorter cages and quicker shifting - The 'double headed eagle' ? - sorry, its been a long day.
  • + 1
 I loved mine, it was a bit draggy in overdrive was my main issue. Look at weight off these big cogs and it wasn't that bad..
  • + 11
 I've been running a 34t 1 X 10 and have kept the granny ring. I finger shift if I really need that low gear as generally its for when a long slog sets in. The addition weighs very little my bars are de cluttered and I've got a bail out option on long rides. Also means I don't need expensive additions to an already pricey disposable part
  • + 1
 Same here but with a 30t and a 22t "manual" granny. The moment I need the granny is usually during a long climb and the moment I am anyway in need of a breather. Which is a about 0.01% of all my riding....
  • + 12
 They come from Ukraine not the Ukraine. Check your up to date maps
  • + 4
 ...beat me to it!
  • + 9
 All i see is a lotus leaf at the center of the Xtender - guess it could be turned into bike jewelry after you rip off your rear derailleur.
  • + 1
 I'm not that interested in the product for different reasons, but I was admiring the machining. It's a pretty part.
  • + 7
 I guess I am in the minority...I've been running the OneUp Shark 50T and cage extender for a little while now and absolutely love it. I was able to bump my chainring size up to 34T and still have a bailout gear. So far, after a few months, still shifts perfectly, have no problems backpedaling and I have used the 50t for steep grinding climbs. One thing I will note, the lower cage of the extended derailleur does expose it to more damage. I have clipped mine in a few situations where I'm pretty sure the stock derailleur would be fine. But it's shrugged off some good hits, even two days of hitting a bike park and some big crashes. I would be interested to try this one!
  • + 9
 Just grow a pair of quads and save all that money why dont ya?
  • + 11
 Growing huge quads requires eating a lot, and food is expensive too... You won't get away with your money...
  • + 5
 @Mountain-Dalek: just eat mud, that's what I do. Cheap and plentiful. Lots of iron in it too.
  • + 4
 sunrace 11-46t is also a strong contender here. Cheaper than current 10-42 or 11-46 low-cost cassettes, good ratios, good finish (except puny lockring that strip its thread quickly). Still issues with backpedal but work great with XT 11sp derailleur.
  • + 3
 How many hacks does it take to realize 1x doesn't delivery as promised for most of us? That derailleur doesn't look too happy stretched out like that. Why even mention the 1 t difference in the smallest cogs when the top end comes from being able to run a reasonable size chain ring when the massive cogs are added?

Not only is this putting chain wheels as large as the outer rings on the triples we got rid of years ago its putting 10 tooth jumps back in the mix. You've moved the FDR shifting parameters to your back wheel with this. What a joke.
  • + 0
 The industry is pushing 1x hard. Apparently you, me, and the Shimano engineers are the only ones who think this is getting ridiculous.
  • + 6
 If I buy this can I get a discount on a helmet with a removable chin piece?
  • + 7
 I can hear the derailleur screaming in pain
  • + 7
 aftermarket chain-take-up plates aka "cage"?
  • + 2
 I'm 1x for life (I took off my last front der during the 9 speed days) but I just can't get excited about these 50t cogs. It's just so huge & ugly. I'll stick with 10-42, or maybe a 44 when/if I wear out the 42, & keep my chainring small enough for that to work. I don't ever spin out in the 10t at a time when it matters anyway, & I don't really want to change my antisquat values by running a bigger chainring than the bike is designed for.
  • + 4
 Zerode Taniwha anyone? Surely a gearbox is a far bitter solution than running dinner plate cassettes and long derailleurs like these for Shimano or Srams eagle.
  • + 2
 I think those products are elegant solutuins for a front derr. Wait for this. www.bike-eu.com/sales-trends/nieuws/2016/3/kappstein-debuts-2-gear-bb-drive-system-10125982. Or buy this www.vyro.com

I do like to read some review by pinkbike about these products in future.
  • + 2
 Lot's of BS on here about why you do or don't need. Who cares. The real issue I have is that you take a comparatively cheap XT cassette and more than double its price. You may as well get something from E13 or Hope at that price.
  • + 5
 Wait a minute " eleven tooth kills their top speed "

Tell that to Richie Rude !
  • + 1
 Shimano got it right sticking with 2x as an option. 1x will always be compromised. Seems the only solution to achieve wider range, is to keep going Iower in gear, so to put a bigger chainring for top end. Soon enough, people will start complaining their 34t/50t low ratio isn't low enough.
  • + 1
 generally speaking -- I think trails out there in la-la land simply aren't built with such steepness that you'd need that low of a gear ratio. most trails are designed around multi-purpose use --- ski/bike resorts are generally designed around just getting a lift to the top and then blasting down..... for me, I think it's silly riding a bike with gearing that low cause there simply isn't anything out there I can't climb with my old-skool 32, 34's or 36 toof's at the very max rear cassettes.
  • + 1
 Its good to have options, but why are the extenders more than the original cassettes? Also, it is a limited audience that is going to take a frugal cassette option then turn it into a heavy ~300 cassette with all the add on's. Why not just start with a wider range cassette to begin with.
  • + 1
 these replacements are great (even though a full XT cassette is cheaper) but I wear out and knock off teeth on my cassette on the 42. Was gonna do the One Up 45T but this is better.

And the One Up 44T replacement for XX1 cassettes is great. Saves me from throwing a $300 cassette in the garbage over 1 ring.
  • + 1
 Almost everybody I know has an issue back-pedalling with the chain coming off in the 42 (pre boost, less of an issue with SRAM). So nothing new there! Can be somewhat adjusted out with a different offset front ring. That being said it's nice to have a steel option!!!
  • + 0
 When will this stop, when mech cages are so long they rub on the ground?

One of my bikes, my lightweight hardtail is just going 10 speed, only because 9 is expensive and hard to find now.

11/23 cassette and 36/44 up front, lots of gears and all of them fast.
  • + 2
 No worries, they will ad 3rd pulley, 2nd spring and make cage from 2 halves ;-)
  • - 1
 1x9 with 34 Hope N/W on my H/t.. Still manage to climb it better than some on wider range drive trains.
  • + 4
 Am I the only one who is still happy with a 11-36 cassette?
  • + 2
 Despite being total bullshit from visual point of view it is really beautiful piece of machinerySmile Much nicer than Eagle cassette.
  • + 1
 After the ten speed I thought it would be nice to upgrade then looked at my local trails and realized my bike just needed a front mech. So stoked for options. Cheers my friend!
  • + 3
 Seems a little late to the party when Shimano now makes a cassette that goes to 47.
  • + 1
 I am waiting the moment when bike corps introduces the max possible amount teeth of cassette cog- cut straight to the rear rim LOL Razz
guys, start to riding hard, otherwise you can start looking for ebike ...
  • + 1
 Is 11-42 and a 30 ring up front not adequate? I love my XT drivetrain, I really just don't imagine this is necessary.... Don't like SRAM eagle is either....
  • + 1
 Ditto. If I can't ride the hill it gives me something to train for.
  • + 1
 Plus my geometry isn't overly climbing friendly... I need a way longer top tube to keep the front down if I were to get lower gears.
  • + 2
 What ever happened to getting in shape? Now it is all about e-bikes and extended cassettes...
  • + 9
 the industry just figured its too late for fat people
  • + 15
 Idk what's wrong with running a bigger chainring and getting more range on both ends.
  • + 26
 You can spot people who don't live in the Alpes or properly mountainous regions. People here in Switzerland are frequently still running 3x systems to have the range needed for high alpine riding.

A day riding in the mountains can easily see 2000m of climbing to have any decent descents. A 50t and/or a harder gear can make or break a trip.

I hate ebikes, they are totally against why I ride - however it's also not uncommon to see 70+ year olds on long alpine climbs enjoying the outdoors, something they'd find much harder on non ebikes.

There are 2 sides to every coin.
  • - 4
flag WAKIdesigns (Sep 15, 2016 at 23:25) (Below Threshold)
 @Marc2211: have you ever passed a healthy 30-50 year old hiker when cranking 22-34? I doubt it. Have you ever seen Greg Minnaar or Danny Hart run chainring larger than 38t? I doubt it. So not tripple chainrings - no... This 50t sht is ridiculous unless you want a 40t front. If I'd go riding in the Alps I'd get a 26t granny and probably never use my largest 42t sprocket, since If I would Like to, I'd be faster pushing or carrying the bike
  • + 10
 @WAKIdesigns: Dude, I'm reasonably fit, but those 2000m mountain days are a killer on 32:42! I want some energy left for the descents, so I can definitely see the appeal of a wider range.
  • + 1
 There will be some nice bikes to buy for parts and what not, for cheap, once grandpa passes!

When I'm going for a long ride in Capital Forest, I'm going to slap on my 2x for saving energy on the ride. If I'm just going to the bike park or a short ride, I'll just use the 1x(34t-11-40). I leave my 26t granny on, even when I just using 1by, because I can slide my 2x-36t and my 1x-34t over my pedal and up the crank arm to the spider.
  • + 1
 @OllyHodgson: it exists, someone makes it and sells it. He isn't murdering anyone, partying hard under my window every second day, or tagging me in pictures of 50 year old dudes in DH for life jerseys. Hence I don't care, if you want to use please do. Good luck to everyone involved. Just don't give me any arguments relating to reason, because the fact is that once you run gear ratios under 0.7, you will have way better time walking, unless off course you run 32"er or can run cadences above 120RPM. Same goes for descents, as I said above, DHillers run 38t chain rings max, it's enough for them and I know well enough that 36t to 11t back is what I use only on A-line kind of trail if I fk up something and ned to pedal into a next massive jump. Definitely not a remote descent in Alps.

What annoys me is that 10-50 fits only some extremely unique set of circumstances while industry motivates the use of it for everybody. In fact company like that is where it is most justified, that's why I am all for it. As opposed to releasing tens of thousands of Eagle sets which is plain ridiculous and can be compared to 35mm bar clamps, fking it up for everybody. Huge cassettes mess up suspension design, adds unnecessary unsprung weight to the rear. So basically we are getting beyond the point where single ring setup makes sense. it is trying really hard to skip front mech, or just the granny gear.
  • + 1
 @OllyHodgson: Bike total weight also plays a part. I run 30/40 lowest gear on my 16kg bike and I get by but I wouldn't say no to switching to a 42T for my off season riding in the Alps. However, when I ride at lower altitude 30/40 becomes overkill.
  • + 2
 @retswen I think your onto something, imagine how much faster Nino Schurter would be if he didn't run a 50t and got into shape.
  • + 1
 @dirtydog11: yes, he got sooo much faster after getting the eagle and racing last 3 season on 10-42. Great idea to go what-do-pros-ride retard Wink
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Well the point being , you can be in shape and run a 50t, its not just for the out of shape. I'm no fan of 1X, horrible chainline/ backpedal features, so will be sticking with 2X with it's 2 tunable levels of anti squat, lighter unsprung mass and useable chainline, although I can appreciate it's not for everyone.
  • - 1
 @dirtydog11: if I lived in mountains where I climb for 30 minutes or more with rare ups&downs then I'd totally run 10sp with granny (no front mech though), 11-36 cassette and 36t front. I could even consider getting rid of the dropper post.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Just curious. What type of terrain do you ride?
  • - 1
 @guycharlesvalois: up&down all the time, often steep both way (in places, as steep as climbable things get) sht loads of rocks, boulders and roots. Miniature Squamish. 14,5kg 160 bike with 950g minion front and 1000g Slaughter in the rear. 36t front, 11-42t rear. Whenever in big mountains I have no issues to climb things that are climbable at paces faster than walking speed. I grew in mountains where 800 vertical meters was a norm so I know how to pace myself. No probs hitting a 1500m climb every other day, when I'm at Lago Di Garda. Judging by local Strava, I'm a better pedaller than descender since only 2 hardcore XCers beat me, occasionally.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Then explain to me why every group of riders I run into sees my Eagle setup and become envious and goes home and orders one themselves. It is not a fringe need. OneUP is very aware of this. Riding in many areas is very steep and unless you are superfit (most are not) this gearing option keeps people riding. Even if it is slower than walking. Because after all, walking sucks.
  • + 2
 @chasejj: there is nothing that sucks more than a mountain biker that struggles to outride a hiker... Back in 2010 I was considering going 1x. Had 2x system, 22/36 front with 11-34 back. I rode up a hill spinning my granny and suddenly an actual granny, or rather grandpa passed me running up. Yea, sure he was not a regular 70yr old and I may have had a couple drinks too much the day before but this experience left a mark and a week later I had 32t front and 11-36 back. Now... I often ride in areas with plenty of terrain runners and they give me a hard time. If I was worried about some cadence, heart rate bollocks, they'd be laughing at me by passing me. Three years ago I was climbing a LiteVille 403 towards 2000m high Monte Tremalzo (from Garda Lake at 70m), famous among fireroad warriors. Over 3,5 hours I passed at least 10 of them on the way up, got passed by only 2. I'm not exactly a strong rider and I was on a muuuch bigger bike than they were. Few days before I passed two guys spinning like idiots on nearby Monte Baldo. 2050m.

You know there is this app calculating how fast you go depending on gearing you chose on what size of a wheel and tyre... 32-50t is walking speed on a 29er... I'm tired of this bollocks... please ride 9-56, I'm sure as sson as someoen makes one and you buy it, your buddies will be jelaous and order one.
  • + 2
 @chasejj:

"Then explain to me why every group of riders I run into sees my Eagle setup and become envious and goes home and orders one themselves"
__________________________________________________________
Poor impulse control
  • + 1
 I cycled cragg vale (uk, 968 feet over 5.5 miles) on a 36T crank with 32T cassette, on my DH bike. Pretty sure I'll walk before I can justify a 50T cassette.....
  • + 1
 3% average grade. Impressive.
  • + 2
 Hmm and here I was happy with my 1x10 36-36 for climbing... Guess I was wrong.
  • - 1
 iam happy with mine too. Smile
  • + 14
 No, you just ride different stuff to some other people. No biggie.

Or is this "pick a chainring size and be a dick about it"? ;-)
  • + 2
 Hmm and here I was happy with my 2x10 24-36 for climbing.. Guess I was wrong, all I need is 36-36.
  • + 3
 Come this is 2016 we cant torture chains!
  • + 2
 Dam that chain looks ugly as sht in the top pic.!
  • + 1
 Damn straight!!
  • + 1
 This isnt a part. Its bike jewlery. I dont care what it does its beautiful to look at.
  • + 1
 I'm waiting until they figure out a way to attach the chain to the side of the rim.
  • + 1
 I'll stick with the Sunrace 11-46 cassette with better gear spacing instead of these cogs with a giant bailout gear.
  • + 1
 I'm interested in a review of their aluminium billet 35-44 extender as well.
  • + 1
 I though riding your bike more often made climbing easier. Oh wait, that's a fact.
  • + 8
 It never gets easier, you just get faster............
  • + 2
 first glance almost vomited
  • + 1
 Compatibility shimano 11v and sram 12v, correct and precise operation.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeA8PUIOzUc
  • + 0
 Soon the largest cog on the cassette will be as big as the wheel, seriously.
  • + 1
 So what's the total weight of the cassettes with the different "xtenders"?
  • + 1
 Wow this is an awesome alternative to a move to sram
  • + 2
 Ukraine rulez!
  • + 1
 Macknovtchina!
  • + 1
 holy fuck thats some pretty machining
  • + 1
 I'm pumped I don't ride up anything that needs a monster like that.
  • + 1
 Would anyone here that has switched to a 1X go back to the 2X??
  • + 1
 Look at that length... For 29" only
  • + 1
 Say goodbye to clean shifting forever!!
  • + 1
 That poor derailleur
  • + 1
 would it work on xtr?
  • + 0
 I can climb anything with my 11-40 and a 32t chainring
  • + 3
 Thanks for let us know.
  • + 1
 Wet lettuces.
  • - 2
 Is this a joke? the 42T on the 1x11 is more than sufficient at pushing the rider up a wide variety of steep, technical and difficult climbs.
  • + 0
 eastern european boner enhancement
  • + 1
 OneUp already has this
  • + 2
 +1 for OneUp Shark...
  • - 3
 Idk about climbing a 25% grade but a 24/28 ratio suits me just fine on a 15-18% on an old 40lb d.h bike. I suppose a 36t cassette could get me up to 25% but I'd have a hard time keeping the front wheel on the ground lol.
  • + 1
 Eagle who?
  • - 5
flag Jokesterwild (Sep 15, 2016 at 21:10) (Below Threshold)
 I don't understand the need for eagle. I never ride up on my biggest ring on regular x01 cassette.
  • + 10
 @Jokesterwild: so why do you have xo1?
  • + 0
 LOL, troll much?!?
  • - 1
 @Twenty9Hardtail: I don't see your point. What other drive train option would be possible for highend 1x. You propose I yank the rings im not using off? I'd like to see the trails people seem to need these massive gears for.
  • + 0
 Perhaps single speed and a bit of determination would suffice.
  • - 1
 I use a 10-24t cassette with a 34t ring...for hills.
  • - 2
 everybody trying to help Mrs Shimano catch up Mr Sram
  • + 2
 i hate it when I make a comment after way too many pints that I wish i could delete.
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