Garmin Launch Solar-Powered Edge 540 & Edge 840

Apr 12, 2023
by Seb Stott  
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Garmin has launched two new GPS devices that can charge themselves from the sun as you ride: the Edge 540 and 840 Solar. They use a technology which Garmin call POWER GLASS™; which consists of transparent photovoltaic solar traces embedded in the glass, allowing the screen to also act as a small solar panel. It's an example of a transparent solar cell, which are being developed to potentially help power buildings and cars by harvesting some of the unwanted solar energy that passes through their windows.

Currently, transparent solar cells aren't very efficient and Garmin's solar screen isn't designed to be a primary power source. But Garmin says it can extend battery life by up to 40%, with up to 60 hours in battery saver mode or up to 32 hours in intense mode. Presumably the phrase "up to" is working pretty hard in that sentence.


Both devices are available with touchscreen or button controls; they feature multi-band GNSS technology for accurate location data, and training features such as suggested workouts and adaptive coaching. For mountain bikers, they have ride-specific routing and "MTB Dynamics", which claims to track jumps, measure how well you flow through tricky sections and gauge how hard a trail is, using factors like gradient and corner angles. In addition, Trailforks is available on all Garmin Edge devices.

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The Edge 540 and 840 Solar are both priced at $550 USD with a touchscreen and $450 USD without. The non-solar equivalent is $100 less.

For more, head to garmin.com.




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seb-stott avatar

Member since Dec 29, 2014
306 articles

105 Comments
  • 166 0
 Can we have a version with a little water wheel on the side for those of us in the UK please?
  • 85 0
 They've done that already, but the model isn't compatible with British trails because the wheel is on the left side
  • 19 0
 And a version with a small windmill for us in Denmark
  • 5 0
 I'm adding this to my list of things I need to make for my channel.
  • 3 0
 @brendancarberry: Only if you can blow on it to charge it up for the not so windy days.
  • 7 0
 Easily the best function of 840 is the chime sound it makes whenever I’m jumping. Makes me feel like Mario collecting coins. Which is fun.
  • 2 0
 @JSTootell: just need to ride faster, I think?
  • 20 4
 I don't ride with a computer. can you guys convince me to get one? Does it help you find trails? Why do you like them, what are the benefits?
  • 50 4
 It fulfils a kind of Freudian 1980s gadget fantasy where we are an android fucking gliding through the matrix. But apart from that no, go ride your bike.
  • 31 0
 I get lost as a mothercucker and my orientation is null, I just load the route on my garmin with the stats I want, plus I like to race against myself Also I use the heartrate monitor and other sensors for gravel and stuff
  • 6 2
 I dont ride with one either. But sometimes, when I'm exploring new trails, I think it might be useful. What I do today is to check my phone, which requires me to stop, open my backpack and check it. When you do it 5x in 5 minutes because you dont know where to go, its kinda annoying. On the other hand, I wonder if those devices are actually precise or it would only work on fireroads and well known trails.
  • 6 0
 I look at mine like a Fitbit expansion pack when paired with a power meter. Being able to track my progression in power output, and cardio improvements is a great motivational tool (if you ride frequently). I don't really use the live map section too much, so someone else could chim in on the benefits.
  • 12 0
 It can help when you are riding new trails by yourself. Otherwise, no... unless you are training and need to track data, the benefits are minimal at best. And I saw this as someone who pretty much always rides with one. But I'm a nerd who enjoys looking at worthless data.
  • 30 13
 I have one it is by far the stupidest thing I own on a bike

I was hoping I could use it to follow new trail systems better and stop pulling out my phone every 5 seconds just look down for a quick sec and know where I’m going. The screen is too small and the zoom is too screwy to make this useful without stopping (garmin 5:30) I pull out my phone most times

Even preprogrammed routes it sucks and is not accurate enough to keep you on course or recognize you are on the right course in complex trail systems(the main place you want it).

Failing at its core function it is heavily laden with useless crap like asking me how
Much water I drank during a ride and how many calories I consumed or providing worthless affirmation “nice jump” when I roll a log.

It’s too frequently “acquiring satellites”. And will many times miss a ride

On the road it has crash detection something that has false alarmed many times to the point I turned it off

If you ignore it being a near useless expensive POS It’s fairly robust and has good battery life and as such I still take it with me in the event my phone dies or is broken and I need to navigate out as fast possible. However I consider the spare inner tube strapped to my bike unused in the last 2 years to be a more valuable accessory
  • 7 1
 I've been conflicted for a while. I love the idea of trailforks in front of me so I don't have to keep checking my phone and waiting for the GPS to update. But I've tried to get into metrics in things like Strava or old bike computers and find I just don't care at best, and it distracts me from the pure joy of mountainbiking at worst. I'm still on the fence for now. Maybe when I do my next trip away from home into trails I don't know, I'll bite the bullet and get one.
  • 16 0
 If you’re not interested in racing, data collection (HR, cadence, etc.), or running a power meter, it’s probably not for you.
  • 3 1
 @browner: that's a great take on it.
  • 3 0
 Big rides, where you need navigation. I really enjoy having a bread crumb track to follow. That being said, simpler is better and these devices keep getting crazier.
  • 2 2
 @Mikevdv: if yours is finding satellites too often, the new ones have a better satellite system. Would that change your opinion at all? These do sound way to gimmicky. Give me route finding and a cyclo computer and ignore the rest.
  • 2 0
 @Mikevdv: Thanks for the great real-use summary. Any thoughts on if having a touchscreen version would help? I've read that trailforks is much easier to use on the 830 than the 530 for that reason.

Regardless, I guess it's kindof an unimportant question since it sounds like the rest of your experience means I should just skip this thing and hope that we eventually see Trailforks on more smartwatch platforms.
  • 2 0
 In the back of beyond, far from civilization, they can prevent you from getting thoroughly lost in an area where things can get wild fast if you are exposed to high heat, and far from fresh water. In those circumstances going 1000 or more metres down in the wrong direction can get pretty dangerous.
  • 3 0
 I do use a GPS watch. For commuting, if you have to go somewhere it is convenient to prepare a route so that I only have to look at the watch every now and then so that I take the correct turns etc. Just like how people who travel by motorized vehicles use navigation devices. The watch doesn't show a map nor does it adapt my route when I deviate. But so didn't the piece of paper I used to scribble back in the days when I prepared a route. Aside from that, it is like taking pictures I guess. You can transfer your recorded route to the computer or phone to see on the map where you've been. So when you've found a cool section in a place you haven't been before, you can reconstruct om the map where that was. I don't do convincing. This is what I use my watch for, decide for yourself whether it can be useful for you too.
  • 2 0
 I’m selling one if you wanna give it a try. If you like useless data it’s a fun toy.
  • 12 0
 I only got mine because they have these colorful rubber protectors you can put on them to match your bike.
  • 2 0
 Really just navigating very unknown trail systems, big backcountry rides, and adhering to prescribed training plan rides outside. If I didn’t use for that, I wouldn’t have one, it’s a lot of coin to drop.
  • 3 0
 I use a last gen Garmin Fenix watch with a bar mount. It has basically the same functionality, can also be used for non bike sports and day to day health tracking, it even displays the time! During my usual rides I really only look at my heartrate and from time to time the maps can be helpful when you don't want to look at your phone at every crossroad.
  • 1 0
 @deez-nucks: Correct answer
  • 26 2
 @Mikevdv: Sounds like 99% user error.

Zoom and scrolling on the touchscreen is easy. With the non touch screen zoom is still easy, but the scroll is less intuitive.

You have to be smarter than the GPS. It isn't a private guide. A paper map would be no more useful if you don't know how to read it.

You can turn off the water and calorie tracking. While it is fluff to me,you can just turn that off. Some people actually use that though. You can also turn off the jump tracker, but I find it to be pretty accurate for me, and kind of fun once in a while.

I usually have a satellite lock in seconds. Usually by the time I turn the power on and put on my helmet, it is ready. But I also normally turn it on when I get to the trail head, so I have several minutes of bike prep to do anyway.

I have luckily enough have not to need crash detection, it has been great for me. Every time I actually crash, it prepares to send an alert (and once did when I didn't get it canceled in time). Knowing I will likely not be laying on the side of the trail unconscious after an incident is nice. I rarely get false detections. But I will take those rare false when it does work on real incidents.

That said...most people really don't need one. If you don't feel the need, then save your money. For me it is a need. I ride 20,000 kilometers a year (mixed road, commute, and MTB), the data is useful for me, and the functions add to my life, especially since I like to explore different route as often as possible.

I also have a Fenix 6 (I also run ultra marathons) along with an 830. They are a great combo. But a waste of money for most people.
  • 2 0
 @vinay: +1 for GPS watch. I think unless you're wanting to do interval workouts with a power meter and stare at your watt numbers constantly, the watch gives you everything you need. I basically just want to check my distance, elevation gain/loss, and HR periodically. Plus you can use it for running, hiking, skiing, etc too.

I will say, in long gravel races it would have been nice to have numbers right in front of me (mainly HR to see if I'm overdoing it). But navigation-wise, I've been led astray by people following the dots on their GPS head units enough times (and then being rerouted via some absolutely insane route) that I'd probably be whipping my phone out as a sanity check periodically no matter what if I don't know the area.
  • 2 0
 The more serious you are about training the more useful it is; and the reverse is true.

The data it captures is useful if you are interested in looking at it after each ride and tracking and adjusting to changes over time.

During actual rides the most useful data points I look at are heart rate, power (only on my road bike), and duration (how long I’ve been riding) and I look at the rest of the data later (elevation change, Ave heart rate, power, temperature, route covered, recovery, calories consumed, time spent in different heart and power zones, etc.).

If all you are interested in is checking where you are on Trailforks then your phone is a better device.
  • 5 0
 I have an Edge 530 but I only use it on my road bike. Bike computers are super helpful for road riding/training where you want to know stuff like power, cadence, heart rate, speed and info about climbs (ClimbPro). I've never even thought about putting it on my mountain bike. I can pull out my phone to look at Trailforks if I need it and I don't care about any metrics when mountain biking. Could see XC racers using it maybe?
  • 4 0
 data collection, maps, pacing.
  • 8 0
 #1 - (Which far outweighs all the other reasons) - I'm a geek and like geek stuff. I enjoy knowing details about my ride as I'm riding, and reviewing them after.

#2 - Unlike other posters, I've had pretty good luck using my Garmin 530 to ride new areas without pulling out my phone for directions nearly as much. It's not perfect, but I'd say that on average, it lets me get my phone out of my pocket 75% less when I'm finding a new route.

#3 - It can be motivating on a climb. When I see that I'm getting close to a PR, or beating one of my friend's times, it can help me suck it up and go a little faster.

#4 - It's a nice "reality check" when you're riding, comparing your perceptions of your ride with the reality. Feel gassed? Sometimes it's nice to look down and see that you've really done a lot of distance/climbing, and other times it's useful (if not as nice) to look down and realize you just need to suck it up because you haven't really done that much.

All that said, they're stupid expensive, and if I were buying right now, I'd buy the discounted 530 that you can sometimes find for ~$150, instead of the new solar powered 540 that's $350.
  • 2 0
 They’re great if you’re training for races. You can hook up a heart rate monitor and/or a power meter to get on a good consistent training routine. GPS is really nice too for riding trails you’ve never done or setting routs for areas with a lot of intersecting trails. I could imaging the solar one is great for bike packing too. If you ride for fun and know most of the trails you ride it certainly not a necessity.
  • 1 0
 @Mikevdv: Thanks for the feedback. This is exactly why I want one too:

"I was hoping I could use it to follow new trail systems better and stop pulling out my phone every 5 seconds just look down for a quick sec and know where I’m going."

My barrier is cost: That does not seem to be worth ~$300 (CDN).
  • 1 0
 @aug7hallak: They’re not perfectly precise but they’re a lot better then most phones. All the sensors they come with too are really precise. They won’t show any unofficial trails but they’re super solid for everything else.
  • 1 0
 @Repmuj7: Thanks - an interesting approach that also might be a good solution instead of a dedicated bike computer.
  • 2 0
 @big-red: touch screens work by looking for a dielectric constant of a material within an expected range of a human finger…which because of our make up is really close to that of water water

So snow, rain splashing water dripping sweat gloves and or sweaty fingers alone or in combination are all likely to make a touch screen not work or work without being touched.

820 was crucified for this so I avoided it

buttons are the way to go….they could make the zoom easy…they just didn’t…..the screwy part is there is a when stopped zoom (easily adjusted) and while riding zoom that is way too hard to adjust. Couple this with the unit not really knowing if you are moving or not accurately a small screen where zoom becomes crucial and you not knowing if this is the stopped zoom or the moving zoom which both look the same and you get some really screwy unintuitive trail maps….which should just be a Fkn simple button press.


Bigger screen would likely help as would better software
  • 1 0
 @bkm303: problem with that is some of those watches are 3-4x as much a simple headunit. Otherwise I whole heartedly agree.
  • 1 0
 As for the people claiming it is a huge lot of money, I think that's primarily for those with a color screen that are able to show a full map. If you already have a phone that's able to show a color map, if you're going to buy something that complements it then do that. That is, think whether you really need the color screen etc. If you've decided which trail you want to ride or if you've mapped out something, transfer it to your watch or bike computer and take it from there. The dotted trail and maybe a few other markers will usually be enough for you to navigate during the ride. And a device that's able to show you that can be much cheaper than the prices I see mentioned here. I'm currently using a Suunto Ambit 3 and a Suunto 5. I can prepare a route on the phone (possibly import it from Trailforks if I want to), send it to the watch and use that. Not sure how strong these bike computers are, but at least these watches are pretty strong. I've had chunks coming off a Casio G-Shock (though admittedly it is still working), the Suunto stuff doesn't flinch. I wonder whether these bike computers keep working when you go OTB and they happen to hit into a rock. These watches are somewhere around 200 euros when you buy them through Suunto directly. Maybe other channels or brands are even cheaper.
  • 2 0
 @Muggsly: I mean yeah if you want the top end Garmin watch and to look at topo maps on your wrist (why???) they're pricey, but it's about the same cost as an Edge 1040. But you can get GPS, HRM, altimeter, and route navigation for $400 (Coros Apex, for example) and use it for all sports, not just cycling. Or if you don't need navigation and just want to log HR, distance, and elevation gain/loss then there are options under $200. I think watches and bike computers are pretty similarly priced, but if you do other sports I think the watches make a lot more sense.

Personally I can't see myself manipulating a topo map on a screen while pedaling, so I don't really see much value in a lot of the mapping features. I'll just pull my phone out if I'm lost.
  • 1 0
 @carlitouk: I can do that with my phone, GPS signal is independent from mobile signal, so not sure why I need to buy this toy to tell me same...
  • 2 0
 @gooral: Sometimes you don't want all your battery power one place. But if that works for you, happy days.
  • 1 0
 @carlitouk: Fair enough, something for me to consider, better to have a back up if you are alone and really remote. Would probably just get another cheap mobile phone tbh, can get a phone for £100 with working GPS, I personally do not care about any data that Garmin, etc provide
  • 1 0
 With the Garmin Edge 530 and 830 series, when you do jumps, the device will beep instead of you belching out in glee!
  • 2 0
 I have an Edge 530. It was kind of an impulse purchase (well, gift actually) and an experiment to see the MTB analytics. I like it well enough but could live without it. The biggest issue is Garmin’s interface and UX is a better for for 2005 at best, not the 2020s. It’s appalling how bad it is when we’re all used to Android and iOS.
  • 2 0
 @gooral: There is a lot a phone can do. I think the biggest issue with modern phones is that they work with touchscreens, so they don't work well when it is wet or when you're wearing gloves. Once you've uploaded the route to your watch, you can just operate the buttons with your gloved hands and it will survive water and impacts that would damage a phone.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: Not an issue I am willing to spend £/€/$500 to resolve. Each to their own I suppose
  • 2 0
 @gooral: That's a lot of money indeed. I think my watches (Suunto 5 and Suunto Ambit 3) were below 200 euro when I bought them directly through Suunto. But at least I never feel the need to be careful with them. They've happily taken more of a beating than I'd dare to subject a glass cellphone to.
  • 2 0
 TBH, the Garmin Edge 830 unit wasn't even in my radar list because it was waaaay too expensive. I had lost 2-3 tiny computers that had barometric pressure for elevation readings. I'd lose one out on the trails every year. Each of them were like around $50-$70. I tried to get those same computers again but the companies that make these tiny bike computers don't make the same ones and their new mounts aren't compatible with each other. So, I looked at more expensive ones like Lezyne. I almost pulled the trigger on one of their models. However, the Lezyne computers don't have one thing that Garmin had, the capability to tether the computer to the bike's handlebar with a lanyard cord. I finally pulled the trigger on the Garmin Edge 830 MTB Bundle and never looked back. It's been 4-5 years now since I have it and I haven't lost it yet. So, if I still have it after 10 years, I think I'll be well ahead of the game. The Trailfork integration was great - much better than the navigation on the cell phone device or other mobile devices. The battery time for the Garmin Edge 530/830 is quite good as well. I like it a lot actually. With the mounts, it's actually pretty standardized and you can get different mounting gears for it. I had it on top of my stem at the start but my knee kept hitting the buttons at the bottom of the device. So, now I use the Garmin handlebar mount and it's turning out to be pretty nice.

Oh, the other thing that's great about the Garmin devices is that they use ANT+ signals rather than electro-magnetic signals. If you have ridden at nights with LED lights, you'll know that the LED interferes with the signals to the computer and essentially stops the computer from recording anything. The ANT+ signals aren't affected by LED lights. In addition, you don't need to have a speed sensor since the device can use GPS to record your distance albeit probably not as accurate as one with speed sensor. You do lose some distance in more sheltered areas in the forest.
  • 1 0
 @Mikevdv: Spot on, hahah! In addition to the that laundry list, it also stravascrews you on the reg.
  • 1 0
 I use an "old" 830 which loads up automatically to Strava when I'm done with a ride. Allows me to keep a live track of mileage and feet climbed, heart rate and cadence coming into play on training rides, getting a gravel bike with a power meter here shortly so it can track that as well. I also do a lot of very long unsupported rides and simply upload a gpx file that gives me turn by turn and climb info for said route. It can be a great tool for lots of reasons.
  • 2 0
 @Mikevdv: sounds like you have other issues at hand like not allowing it to connect before you take off, not updating satellites or firmware, or using dodgy gpx files. I've used my 530 and 830 for thousands of miles of routes and rarely have any issues outside of my own delirium while nearing triple digit miles and occasionally junctions with multiples of trails
  • 8 0
 "Presumably the phrase "up to" is working pretty hard in that sentence" . Lovely. Nevertheless, as gimmicks go, this is a nice one.
  • 7 0
 To be fair, I have an Edge 530 and with brightness turned down, connected to a couple different bluetooth devices, I get around 40 hours of battery life.
  • 3 0
 DC Rainmaker said that the non solar numbers were conservative at least. I am surprised how long the battery on the 830 lasts.
  • 7 1
 In case anyone is interested, the biggest updates appear to be USB-C and the touchscreen now also has functioning buttons. As noted, solar charging is probably a gimmick, especially for MTB.
  • 6 0
 USB-C is very welcome. Depending on how fast it can charge, solar power would be nice for long road & gravel rides. My 530 lasts a full 10 hour day with navigation on though, so not for me.
  • 2 0
 The replaceable back wings is super important!!! I've had to toss or sell for cheap a lot of Garmin's cause the back clips broke in a minor crash
  • 2 0
 Solar charging still makes sense for MTB. Put it in a windowsill when you're done riding, and she'll charge just sitting there. Most of us aren't doing a week of back to back 10 hour days, so it's possible you'll never have to charge it again. It doesn't need to be ridden to charge. Makes a ton of sense for people bikepacking, but it still does make a ton of sense for longer distance mtb, or plain and simple regular use. It's the biggest feature of this unit for me.
  • 1 0
 @sherbet: the solar charging is so slow and inconsistent
If your bike packing you should have a power bank for your phone and bike packers are such a fringe case imo
Just plug in the 540 and you'll be good for 20h+
You work on your bike each night post ride so it's not too hard to just plug it in
  • 2 0
 You can do all of those things in tandem. I'd still want a powerbank, but knowing less of it is being used on a long ride is definitely a bit of peace of mind. It's a feature, and a welcome one to many of us. Most riders I know are weekend warriors and would have 6 days of leaving their unit on the windowsill as far as charging goes. That will be a decent amount of charge.
  • 1 0
 Why is it especially a gimmick for mountain biking?
  • 1 0
 @pmhobson: trees.
  • 2 0
 @Gdg1: yeah, no one rides in the desert or open plains and no roads are well shaded.
  • 1 0
 Garmin should test this out in January in Bragg Creek when it's -20C outside when daylight hours are short. I had a half charged Edge 830 that actually froze and stopped recording just 5km to the end of my 20km ride. Luckily, just before the Garmin's battery completely froze, the device saved my ride recording. I was able to retrieve my ride once the computer warmed up while I drove home. The battery was still near half charged.
  • 2 0
 @CSharp: any thoughts on how other battery-powered devices would fair in similar conditions when mounted to your handlebars?
  • 1 0
 @pmhobson: Actually, I had my iPhone go dead on me while it was recording my ride with Strava. It was only -5C outside and a little less than half way through my 30km ride. I know that my iPhone battery can freeze quite easily even sitting in my car when the temperature outside is -30C. With the Garmin Edge 830, I have gone outside for rides for a couple of hours at -5C to -10C without any issues, even with the device half charged. Once in a while, the Garmin does complain and flash that the battery is low and lets you conserve the battery by turning off the screen.
  • 10 1
 Time to grab a 530 on sale.
  • 5 8
 If you didn't need it when it was the premium model, you don't need it now.
  • 7 2
 @mi-bike: it's cheaper so it's easily justifiable
  • 1 1
 @mi-bike: Or I have been waiting for it to get cheaper, so that I can replace my 520+ with a battery life that's half of what it used to be.
  • 7 0
 DC Rainmaker said it best: You can get the same amount of charge plugging it in for 2 minutes as you'd get solar charging for 4 hours.
  • 5 0
 I purchased the 530 for trail guidance as I like to travel around BC riding new spots; it's great. That being said, all the other features have grown on me over time. Most features are not a reason to buy it but are nice, like AXS battery level, hill profile, and ETA. I even added a Cinch power meter to track my fitness levels and better understand what I have in the tank during rides. That said, I have zero issues with the battery and don't really see a need for the 540.
  • 1 0
 I wish my Cinch didn't break, and wish they still sold them so I could replace it.
  • 5 1
 I bought the full suite of Garmin shit when I got back into MTBing a couple months ago, figured it was pretty much necessary now-a-days...fast forward to today, I have a super expensive set of peddles and super tiny and expensive computer bolted to my crappy indoor trainer because all the tech shiat was detracting from the fun of actual mountain biking outdoors. F-ing computer needs to be charged updated and calibrated damn near every ride it seems like. To me the little Garmin computer was about like trying to use the manufacturer navigation in your car, no matter how new its still completely and utterly outdated and unintuitive compared to how a phone works. Love my Garmin Fenix 7x watch with a built in flashlight though, no joke.
  • 3 0
 The flashlight is my favorite part of my 7x, I use that daily
  • 2 0
 Anybody knows if Garmin finally fixed the physio TrueUp and the activity from your Fenix etc. watch is synced with the Edge computer activity?

Why the solar panel area is not covering the whole black frame? It would increase solar panel efficiency.
  • 1 0
 They introduced Training Status 2.0 which if you are on the newer gen of watches works well.
  • 1 0
 I use the Edge Explore, never off my bike, i have it sync'd up with Komoot, to make days out etc or to load in routes that others have done, found soo many different trails and epic long days out with it. Batt life isn't the best get best part of 7/8 hours with it on but i usually just have it hooked up to a small battery bank in my enduro strap, works a treat and a fraction of the price that Garmin offer for the extra power bank.
  • 1 0
 Can anyone tell me the model of mount that is used in the pics? I recently bought an 830 unit and want to mount it on the stem like the pics but I don't have any spacers above the stem to use the mount Garmin and K edge sell. I've searched and don't see anything like in the pics which appear to mount on the bar and rotate backwards above the stem
  • 1 0
 You can get mounts that replace the compression top cap, i can't use them on mine due to the stem, another mount replaces one of the spacers and sits before the stem, but if you are reading a map it tends to be too low. cheap on amazon for both mounts
  • 1 0
 That's the "Mountain Bike Mount" -- www.garmin.com/en-US/p/596570
  • 1 0
 @Gdg1:

Perfect thx!
  • 3 0
 Does anyone know if they’re gonna update the software on the 530? If not it seems really shitty to gate software functions for the hardware
  • 2 1
 This is the (Garmin) way.
  • 1 0
 The 530 has been out for 4 years now, it's had a pretty good run. Plus, software is most of the incentive to buy a new Garmin. They'd be seriously shooting themselves in the foot if they updated the 530/830 to the 540/840 software.
  • 1 0
 I have a Garmin 530 and love it. I used to use my watch but the battery dies on longer rides where as the bar mounted devise lasts forever. You can pair it with a smart trainer as well to load rides for training etc.
to be fair I am keen for a bit of data but more just logging my rides and use the navigation for exploring new routes. The old version is not great and pan and zoom on the map as it’s a little clunky but does work. Stay clear of the expensive maps though as there is alternatives out there with excellent detail, as good as OS but make the device next level.
  • 3 0
 Finally the computer will last as long as my ride. I hate having to stop and charge my Garmin.
  • 1 0
 It lasts for a good 20 hours of riding
  • 4 0
 Not great for the UK
  • 18 0
 Hopefully they'll make a wind powered one for us up here in Scotland
  • 3 1
 Why not have a dynamo so you can charge it yourself. I would love to see them make a comeback.
  • 3 0
 Always wondered if there is the possibility to make a dynamo to charge ebikes/ecomponents. Dont ride either of them, for various reasons, but it'd be dreadful to wake up for a ride and see that you forgot to charge your shifter.
  • 1 0
 @aug7hallak: It is possible to charge 5V USB stuff from the front hub dynamo. This dynamo is typically used to power the bike lights and I've read somewhere that you're not allowed to charge USB devices when you're supposed to have the light running. But yeah, you could charge your USB stuff whilst riding during daytime. Shimano has the cheapest of those 100x15mm hubs I've seen, others have more expensive ones which may be better. I haven't looked into the other axle standards. The side dynamo also gives you 6V but I chances are fair your mountainbike tires won't live long with a side dynamo. Similarly, I don't think you can draw power from the Reelight system.
  • 2 0
 @vinay: I run a Remedy with a dynamo hub. Unless you're riding on the flat for long periods (which you shouldn't be, because you're a mountain biker) charging USB devices doesn't work. You're either going uphill, too slowly to charge anything properly, or you're going Downhill fast...for just a few minutes at a time. Which, again, doesn't charge anything properly.

For lights that always work though, it's bloody great.
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 @MildMildWest: To be fair I've never tried to charge a device from my front hub. I love it for powering my lights but that's it. When camping, we have one of these 5V3A solar panels but I've learned that phones (and maybe other devices too) switch off the charger when the power isn't stable. Even though it sounds inefficient, what you need to do is use the solar panel to charge a powerbank and then use the powerbank to charge the phones. This panel and a pair of powerbanks was enough to power the smartphones for eight people, so it wasn't too bad. Either way, I can imagine it could be the same for these front hubs. You may have to use it to charge a powerbank so that you can use that to charge other devices.
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 I read it as "riding on violent trail." Was disappointed when my uncaffeinated brain finally registered "violet trail..."
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 and when you ride rock-garden in a downhill course you realize at finish that somewhere you lost half of your GPS because Garmin didn't secure it with screws
  • 1 1
 Can I send SOS messages, both emergency and non-emergency? Also, can my wife check my location, when I should of been home hours ago?
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 Yes, all of this is possible to some degree if you want.
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 Wahoo FTW!
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 iphone not working?
  • 2 1
 Not after the battery went dead when you needed to make a call, or the $500 to repair screen got cracked again after hitting something in a crash.







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