Gear Guide: 7 of the Best New Cold Weather Riding Kits for Men

Dec 13, 2019
by Nikki Rohan  


Well, it's about full-on winter at this point and light, warmth, and clear skies are a limited commodity. Beards are starting to take on that untrimmed caveman look, flannel flashbacks are a nightly occurrence, and the thought of one more oatmeal stout actually starts to sound about as tasty as a cup of gas station coffee. A surefire way to cure these winter maladies is to venture out into the great outdoors. And what better way to do it than kitted out with some new MTB specific technical apparel designed to keep you warm and dry when the weather goes to hell in a fanny pack.

This fall, Nikki and I have been testing a large range riding gear targeted towards cold weather riding. Not north of the Arctic Circle cold, and not even New Brunswick winter cold, but good Pacific Northwest cold. We have tried everything from military-grade outer layers that could almost stop a bullet to feathery light jackets that you can stuff into a pocket. There are several options out there for both your top and bottom that you can mix and match to meet your specific needs depending on what winter looks like for you.

One thing you will see in the following commentary is where Nikki and I have tried to look into some of the environmental impacts of each of the pieces tested here. You know, just doing our part for the environment by testing about 40lbs of brand new gear from seven different brands shipped from all over the country and Europe. Thank me later. That being said, we do appreciate when brands make an effort to reduce environmental impacts.


About The Tester:
Pierce Martin is 5'11" tall, has a 31-inch waist, and weighs 160lbs on a low beer week. Usually, he is right in the middle of the bell curve wearing medium for most cycling shorts, jerseys, gloves, and helmets. Pierce lives in Hood River, OR where he spends his working hours as a desk jockey in the cube farm.



Velocio


Velocio cranks out some high-end cycling apparel that might be targeted more towards your inner "roadie". But don't let the fear of some tight (aero) trail shorts scare you away, their tech is good. Velocio offers advanced fabrics with high quality and durability that are designed and tested for all-day adventures on the bike. By creating new designs from the ground up specifically for biking, the design of Velocio apparel is more slim and sleek fitting but is tailored for the riding position, so it feels good and works well for you when actually riding on a bike.

On the sustainability front, Velocio's jersey collection is made from recycled fabrics. They are also beginning to use recycled materials for bibs and other apparel where possible. Additionally, Velocio is also one of the increasing numbers of companies that donate 1% of all revenue to environmental causes. Bio-degradable packaging rounds out the commitment to a "Better Way" that guides Velocio's philosophy. I can get behind these efforts and I hope they can continue to lead and innovate on reducing environmental impacts. Kudos!



Merino 160 LS Base Layer
MSRP: $99.99
Sizes: Adult XS-XXL (M tested)
Colors: Light Grey (tested), Dark Olive
Link: velocio.cc

It seems that wool is finally making a come-back, and I couldn't be happier. The Merino 160 Long Sleeve Base Layer from Velocio is a versatile shirt made from mid-weight Merino wool. The fabric weighs in at 160g/m^2 (feels pretty mid-weight to me) and is super soft with a large waffle-like pattern that is comfortable yet wicking against your skin. Most companies these days have settled on a polyester/wool mix to improve durability and reduce drying times, and this base layer is in line with that, made of 28% wool and 72% polyester. The fabric is almost see-through due to the waffle print but still does an excellent job at providing warmth, while at the same time being very breathable.

This base layer is somewhat on the slimmer side in the size medium I tested, and I found that it fit quite well under every outer layer I tested this fall. It has a pretty long cut so keep that in mind if you don't like your base layer peeking out from under your outer layers. The neckline is pretty open and doesn't go up on your neck very far, but I was ok with that as I relied on outer layers to keep the chill off my neck if needed. The two-button henley style collar allows you to get a teeny bit more breeze if things are starting to get real steamy.

I really, really like the warm yet highly breathable aspect of this piece. Wear it on its own for the climb up if it's dry and you still stay warm but with plenty of airflow through the porous fabric to keep that working out in a sauna feeling at bay. Once you get to the top, just slap on your wind layer to seal off those little pores so you can stay nice and toasty for the way down. To top it all off, you get all the stank odor resistance of Merino wool.

This has become one of my all-time favorite pieces of gear and I find I have been using it as a base layer for everything from hobby jogging to skiing down snow-laden backcountry pillow lines. Oh, wait, scratch that last part, that was a dream. The PNW has pretty minimal snow as of yet.

Velocio Merino 160 LS Base Layer shown in Light Grey (size M).

Trail Short
MSRP: $159.99
Sizes: Adult XS-XXL (M tested)
Colors: Navy, Coral Red, Titanium (tested)
Link: velocio.cc

Ok, these are some spicey little numbers, don't get me wrong. Slim, form-fitting design, check. DWR water-resistant fabric, check. Nice white color, check. Wait a second, white shorts? For fall riding? Maybe not the best idea, see Exhibit B below.

Color choices aside, the trail shorts from Velocio are a pretty standard trail offering that pair well over a base layer for fall/winter riding. The advantage of having a water-resistant short is that they provide more breathability than a pant but still can keep your thighs (and most importantly, your chamois if you roll that way) from becoming completely soaked while pedaling around in a drizzle. This is often the case for us here in the PNW during the fall/winter where a lot of times we will be pedaling around out of the full brunt of the rain under tree cover, but still getting lots of small raindrops scattered from overhead. These stayed pretty dry for me when riding this fall in all but the heaviest downpours.

These are some of the slimmest shorts I have tested, so keep that in mind if you plan to layer over bulky insulation or wear heavy knee guards. Things can go all Michelin Man in a hurry if you're not careful. Despite being pretty fitted, Velocio's assertions of the cut favoring actual riding do seem valid, as I hardly noticed these when pedaling or enduro-ing. A slightly longer cut in the front of the knee gave a little bit more coverage over light knee pads or base layers, but inseam the is still pretty short. A single waist adjuster and a thigh pocket on either side keep the garment weight low compared to other options out there.

Velocio trail short. Velocio's fabrics look and feel high end.

Exhibit B - That's why white maybe wasn't the best choice.

Ultralight Rain Jacket
MSRP: $349.99
Sizes: Adult XS-XXL (M tested)
Colors: Ultramarine, Gold Yellow (tested)
Link: velocio.cc

Velocio's Ultralight Rain Jacket seems more targeted towards road and gravel riding than MTB, but it's still a trusty switchblade that belongs in your winter shredding arsenal. First of all, this minimalist jacket is quite lightweight without many pockets or zippers to add m to the whole mg equation. It's easy to stuff in a hip pack, "just in case". The fit is 3D shaped and, as per the shorts, it's designed and cut for a riding position (meaning no bulbous jacket beer belly hanging down as you ride). Finally, the jacket is constructed out of eVent fabric that claims it doesn't need a build-up of moisture or heat to start becoming breathable. Great for those big climbs in the rain, followed by a high-speed descent. Trust me: you don't want to be experiencing a steamy sauna inside your jacket for the ride back down; it rapidly turns into a freezer.

Again, similar to Velocio's other pieces, the fit is quite slim and as such, it isn't the easiest to layer up under, especially if you need more than mid-layer insulation. There is a mild drop seat hem to help keep some of the rear tire spray at bay. Personally, I prefer having a hood on a rain shell just in case I want to use it, but Velocio's offering doesn't contain one. As compensation, the collar is pretty tall and did a good job of sealing up around my neck (with a nice soft fleece lining). On the arms, the lycra/elastic cuffs are soft, yet provide a snug fit for keeping water out (I put them under my gloves instead of over, which worked well for me).

For rain protection, the eVent fabric did an excellent job keeping all moisture out: I had zero water intrusion. Of particular note was the high quality taped seams. Additionally, the large back vent did seem to help minimize sweat collecting across the shoulder yoke. Overall, due to the extremely small packed size and low weight, this is an excellent choice to throw in your pack if a fall ride threatens to get wet. That is if you are comfortable with ponying up north of $300 USD.

Velocio Ultralight Rain Jacket shown in Gold Yellow (size M).

Large back vent helps keep moisture flowing through.
Jacket stuffs down quite small.



Giant


Giant is not the first name you would think of for winter cycling apparel, but they offer a wide variety of well thought out cycling-specific items. From arm warmers to cycling balaclavas, you are bound to be able to find an option to serve your cold-weather needs available at your local Giant dealer.

Although Giant is an advocate and supporter of many important and amazing programs such as IMBA and the World Bicycle Relief, it is unclear on their efforts to reduce environmental impacts. Unlike Velocio, I couldn't find any details on whether a jersey was made from recycled fabric, and I couldn't find any details on whether Giant subscribes to 1% for the planet or something similar. I would think if Giant was doing these things they would be screaming them loud and proud, but maybe I'm not clicking on the proper link. Just something to keep in mind.



Transfer Long Sleeve Jersey
MSRP: $89.00
Sizes: Adult S-XXL (M tested)
Colors: Grey / Black only
Link: giant-bicycles.com

A lightweight wicking base layer is an important foundation for your winter riding kit and helps to keep the sweat off your back and transfer it out to the environment, which is important for staying dry and warm. Giant's Transfer long sleeve Jersey is a very lightweight and breathable base layer made from TransTextura fabric with mesh at the back and sides for extra breathability. The fabric is of the very silky smooth polyester feel, and the mesh is super fine.

The fit of the Transfer is on the slim side and the sleeves are nice and form-fitting. Thanks to the fitted design, I found that it easily disappeared under any outer layers I tested. On particularly cold rides I would "layer up" and stack two or three layers with the transfer jersey against my skin, a warmer base layer over that, and a wind shell to ward off the elements. This gave me lots of options, depending on temperatures and levels of exertion, allowing me to easily adjust warmth and breathability throughout the ride.

Not much to say here, this is a pretty basic long sleeve jersey that works well as both a standalone jersey for warmer fall days, or as a base layer under a jacket to provide wicking and extra warmth on colder days.


Transfer Shorts
MSRP: $89.00
Sizes: Adult S-XXL (M tested)
Colors: Black only
Link: giant-bicycles.com

The Transfer shorts from Giant are another DWR treated piece that pairs well over longer insulating layers for cold weather riding. Slightly heavier duty than the shorts from Velocio, the Transfer shorts are constructed from Giant's TransTextura 4-way stretch fabric which has excellent elasticity while at the same time being abrasion-resistant. There are two zippered pockets—one on each side—if you need to stash keys, etc.

I tested these in size medium, and the fit is very middle of the road: not too slim and not too relaxed. Giant's website shows velcro waist adjusters for dialing in fit, but the pair I tested had a large metal hook and fabric loop mechanism instead. While this might be more durable, I would have preferred a standard velcro tab, as it was surprisingly tricky to remove and replace the hook to get the size right. Once things were set, though, it was all gravy; and I didn't have to monkey with the adjuster again.

In the rain, these are not very water-resistant and would soak through pretty quick. You don't get any extra coverage at the knee either with the straight cut at the bottom, which can lead to some soaked knee pads or underlayers. On the ventilation front, there aren't any vents or additionally openings, but the fabric is pretty lightweight and breathable so I didn't find myself ever feeling the need for them.

These shorts seem better suited to fall/spring riding when things are dryer and temps are on the warmer side. They have excellent mobility thanks to the stretchy fabric and feel great while riding. They just probably wouldn't be my first choice for heading out the door if anything more than a drizzle was in the forecast.

Giant Transfer shorts shown in black (size M).
Waist adjuster hook mechanism.

Proshield MTB Jacket
MSRP: $150.00
Sizes: Adult S-XXL (M tested)
Colors: Black only
Link: giant-bicycles.com

The Proshield MTB Jacket is a fully waterproof jacket built explicitly for mountain biking. It is constructed from Giant's ProTextura Plus fabric which has similar marketing claims as most PTFE fabrics on being waterproof yet breathable (it's rated at 10k/10k). To me, the fabric has a much more soft-shell feel, with a good bit of stretch to it. The jacket also has zippered pit zips and some laser cut venting on the back (covered by a flap) for additional breathability. Finally, there is a detachable hood with draw-cords that can go over your helmet.

The fit of this jacket is roomier than the skinny little trail dancing number from Velocio, yet still has an athletic cut without having a boxy feel to it. There is a drop seat on the hem, but nothing so crazy that it approaches "cape" territory. The hood is a little bit finicky to remove and install, but once you have it on, it feels just like a normal hood and fits over a helmet with tons of room to spare. Although all that extra space does make it hard to keep on your head while at speed. One distinctive feature of this jacket is the large, oversized magnetically sealed flap that covers the front zipper. The magnetic closure and large zipper pull make it easy to take on and off, even with bulky gloves. Plus it seals up quickly without having to fuss around with any buttons, snaps, or velcro.

The 10k waterproofing ability of this jacket isn't Gore-tex (28k), but it's on par with other waterproof/breathable jackets at this price point. The seams are all fully taped, and the wrist and neck openings seal up nicely and did a good job of keeping moisture out when things got nasty out. I did do a fair bit of climbing in this jacket, and yes, while it did get sweaty and moist in there, given the price point, I've no complaints.

Overall this would be more of a jacket I would take out if I knew that I would be riding in the rain, and less of a backup to stuff at the bottom of my pack. It's very comfortable to wear, especially on the bike when that little bit of stretch to the fabric can be appreciated. This is a solid choice considering the stretch fabric, the optional hood, and the overall bang for the buck as compared to some other jackets out there.

ProTextura Plus fabric is more of the soft-shell feel.

Detachable hood has tons of coverage over a helmet.
Large storm flap with a unique magnetic seal keeps water and dirt out.



7mesh


Debuting in 2015 in Squamish, British Columbia, 7mesh makes "Alpine-Grade" cycling gear for mountain biking and road cycling in any weather. Tested extensively in the wet and snowy winters of the BC Sea to Sky Corridor, 7mesh has a wide variety of outerwear to keep you comfortable during all-day pursuits into the unknown. 7mesh has a higher-end fit and finish to their products (along with a matching price tag), but you definitely get what you pay for here.

Similar to Giant, I struggle to find details on environmental sustainability practices by 7mesh. I couldn't find any information on any recycled content or manufacturing practices that go into each piece. Neither could I find mentions of contributing to 1% For the Planet or similar causes. Again I could be missing a link on the site, but I just couldn't find anything specifically "green" on the site.



Northwoods Wind Shell
MSRP: $175.00
Sizes: Adult XS-XXL (M tested)
Colors: Eclipse (tested), Serrano Red
Link: 7mesh.com

If it isn't raining out, a wind shell has become my most used piece of gear for fall and winter riding. Usually, I do most of my climbing in a jersey or base layer, and then quickly slip on a wind shirt or jacket for the descents. It's amazing how much warmer that extra layer will keep you when blasting down an exposed ridge in high winds (we have a lot of that here in the Gorge). Having a lightweight wind shell that you can just stuff and stow or remove from your hip pack on demand is a huge game-changer, particularly if you favor going light and fast vs. the kitchen sink pack load.

7mesh's Northwood shell is a high-quality piece that meets and exceeds all of my requirements. It is lightweight, has a usable hood, and stuffs into its own pocket. To top it all off, it looks really sharp, too, utilizing 7mesh's phenomenal fit and subtle, yet stylish color combinations (which I really like).

While riding, the jacket blocked out all wind and kept me much warmer on all but the most frigid days. Keep in mind, like all wind shells, it isn't the most breathable, so it's usually good to remove it if you know there's a big climb coming. There aren't any pit zips or vents for extra ventilation, but I favor minimalism, so I'm ok with that. Plus it keeps the weight down. There is a DWR coating in case you get caught out in the rain, but this isn't a hardshell: the Northwoods will soak through eventually in rain and snow.

The fit was spot on for me and worked well for layering over everything from skin-tight jerseys to bulkier fleeces. The hood fits darn near perfectly over my Giro Montaro helmet and deploys easily: I used it whenever I wanted to keep a bit more chill off my head or from going down my neck. It also stayed put while riding. One nice thing about the Northwood's built-in storage/stuff pocket is how nice and oversized it is; you can easily and quickly stow the jacket away without feeling as if you're wrestling a bear.

Overall, I would highly recommend this as a must-have wind shell if you don't already have one. Note: I also tested 7mesh's excellent insulated Freeflow Jacket and the Guardian rain jacket. Both are also top-notch options (especially the Freeflow jacket, one of my new favorites) for this time of year; it's worth checking them out.

7Mesh's Northwood shown in Eclipse color (size M).

Hood fits well over a helmet without any flapping while riding.
Storage pocket is nice and oversized. No over-stuffed sausage rolls here.

Revo Short
MSRP: $225.00
Sizes: Adult XS-XXL (M tested)
Colors: Black, Moss (tested)
Link: 7mesh.com

If you haven't tried full-on rain shorts in a rainstorm, you are missing out! Having a rain short allows you to spend hours out in the rain, as opposed to some of the standard DWR treated options out there that will eventually just soak through. Usually well before the midpoint of a hard ride. Additionally, as compared to a full-on rain pant, a rain short provides more range of movement and greater breathability while riding.

The Revo Shorts from 7mesh are a fully waterproof option that is fairly lengthy (they have an 18" inseam). I like to call these my Pantalones Piratas as you get a bit of a pirate look while wearing them (Arggghh!). On the technical details, the Revo Short is crafted from heavy-duty GoreTex 3L with fully taped seams. Construction has been updated from previous iterations to move the crotch seams and gussets to the side of the shorts for increased durability and wear resistance. There are both waist adjusters and belt loops depending on your preference. The two front pockets have drain-holes in case you happen to get some water in them, something I haven't seen before this side of surfwear.

Compared to the fabric of the Velocio and Giant jackets, this Revo's fabric has a much more traditional "hard shell" feel to me, and I'm ok with that. The few times I tested these out in the rain, they were absolutely bulletproof. These are probably best suited for pedal missions in full-on rainstorms, but I would probably take something a little lighter duty for mere drizzle or showers.

I tested a size M, and in that size, these shorts have a ton of room for layering. But 7mesh sizes their shorts roomy; realistically I should have had a size S; size M is for a 34" waist. The long length of these shorts completely covered my knees while riding (even while pedaling), and the articulated legs felt comfortable without any unwanted bunching. One issue I did have, though: occasionally the opening on the bottom of the short would catch on the top corners of my bike's rear triangle. This was a little startling and threw me off balance a few times; a shorter inseam or a way to cinch down the cuffs might have helped alleviate that.

If you need to get out on the sloppiest, wettest rainy days, these shorts should be at the top of your list.

Revo Short with long articulated knee coverage.

Waist adjusters or large belt loops, choices abound.



Norrøna



Hailing from the cold dark winters of Norway, Norrøna is typically known for its skiing and mountaineering gear, but they also have some highly technical gear for biking. Their main Fjørå line for mountain biking has a wide range of items from lightweight base layers to insulated waterproof outer layers.

It's hard to tell from the photos that Trevor took here, but this was a pretty frigid day out shooting. Drizzly rain hovering right around 35°F, patches of snow, and deep muddy puddles to ride through had left us all shivering like drowned rats. Pulling on the Norrøna gear to get some photos was like stepping into summer: It seemed that I was instantly warmer. While shooting (lots of hurry up and wait) it was shocking how much warmer these items kept me than the rest of the test gear, and I was quite forlorn when I had to move onto the next kit. If you need riding gear for cold, miserable weather, Norrøna has got you covered.

Norrøna has a detailed road map on how they are working towards 100% sustainability, becoming more socially responsible, and reducing environmental impacts. They also donate 1% of total sales "For Nature". Additionally, on Norrøna's website, each product has a dedicated "Footprint" section that tells you about the recycled content, fabric impacts, and factory lists that go into making the item. Another leader here, other companies follow suit!



Fjørå Powerwool Long Sleeve
MSRP: $119.00
Sizes: Adult S-XXL (S tested)
Colors: Indigo Night Blue (tested), Bamboo Green
Link: norrona.com

The Fjørå Powerwool Long Sleeve is another excellent Merino wool base layer. This base layer is made from 31% wool and 69% polyester which increases durability and allows for faster drying. It is similar to the option from Velocio, but the fabric has a bit more wool content and is slightly more tight-knit. This leads to a bit more warmth, but at the expense of some breathability. Both are amazing options and I highly recommended either; you just have to choose if you want a bit more warmth (Norrona) vs. a bit more breathability (Velocio).

The fit is pretty slim, which works great as a base layer. The torso length is a bit on the long side as well, so it may stick out under outer layers if you don't tuck it into your pants/shorts. Additionally, there is a bit of drop seat to keep that plumbers crack at bay. There aren't any neck zippers or buttons if you want some extra ventilation. The wrists have a nice, long, stretchy cuff that does a good job of staying in place and keeping out unwanted chills. Note: in Norrøna tops I wear a size small, as compared to medium with most other brands. The fit of the size S was just to my liking and felt about the same as most other mediums to me. Something to keep in mind.

These wool base layers have become my most used items this fall. They are so versatile that I find myself wearing them for everything from plumbing to pubbing. I highly suggest picking one up.

Powerwool Long Sleeve shown in Indigo Night Blue.

Norse gods keeping your handlebars on course.

Fjørå Infinium Pants
MSRP: $299.00
Sizes: Adult S-XXL (M tested)
Colors: Hot Sapphire Blue, Caviar Black (tested)
Link: norrona.com

Norønna's Fjørå Infinium pants are a water-resistant wind stopper pant meant for those days when the wind is howling, the snow is blowing, yet you still need to get outside. Layering these bad boys over an insulating layer will allow you to go out on all but the most forbidding days. The front, knees, and seat of the pants are constructed from windproof/water-resistant GoreTex Infinium, while the rest of the pants are made from the lighter duty wind-resistant/water-resistant Flex1 fabric from Norrøna. This provides maximum wind protection where needed but still has full-frontal blastage protection while shredding, yet there's still some breathability in the areas out of the full brunt of the weather and trail debris.

For these pants, I tested the size medium which was plenty roomy for my size 31" waist. I probably could have sized down to the small, but this allowed me to wear any layer underneath that I desired, and I was able to dial in the fit using the waist adjusters. Additionally, the large zips on the ankles were big enough that I could put on and remove the pants without taking off my shoes. This is a welcome feature, especially when you're on the side of the trail rushing to cram on a pant in a bitterly cold wind as a storm approaches.

These pants are actually way more breathable than you think. I think this might be due to the windstopper material being focused in the front, knees, and seat only. There are also vents on the middle and upper thighs to really get the airflow moving. I would always layer these over lightweight long underwear, and I actually never got hot and sweaty with these during my testing. Although I think the warmest temperature I tested in was around 45°F (although it was sleeting during our photoshoot).

Overall these are another versatile piece from Norrøna that will allow you to extend your riding season through the winter, especially if you live in an area with colder, dryer, windy winter weather.

Infinium pants lock down tight while riding and large zippers open up when needed.
Large vents promote airflow and shed moisture when needed.


Fjørå Convertible Alpha60 Jacket
MSRP: $329.00
Sizes: Adult S-XXL (S tested)
Colors: Indigo Night Blue (tested), Sulphur Spring
Link: norrona.com

The Fjørå Convertible Alpha60 Jacket is an insulated jacket that can be converted to an insulated shirt by removing the sleeves. The front of the jacket is made from a windproof material, while the back is constructed from Norrøna's breathable and lightweight Flex1 fabric. Insulation duties are handled by a healthy dose of Polartec Alpha60 insulation. This jacket is crazy warm. Note: greater than 50% of the synthetic fibers in this jacket come from recycled materials.

An innovative aspect of this piece is the detachable sleeves which come off as one single piece using two zippers and two buttons at the back of the jacket. Another interesting feature is the front zipper which has two possibilities allowing you to either completely close off the jacket or have a long mesh vent opening down the middle (see below). I had never seen this before, and I was surprised by how much a bit of ventilation down your front helped to regulate temperature on the climbs. The number of venting options here makes this a very versatile jacket that you can easily customize for the temperature of the day and the exertion level.

Fit in the size small felt on par with size medium from other brands. I would say this is right down the middle of the slim fit vs relaxed fit spectrum, which allows you to wear it under or over other layers as desired. The torso length is on the longer side with a drawstring for keeping things locked in place. The collar is tall and protective which does a good job of keeping the elements out. A singular front chest pocket lets you stash a few necessities.

Overall this is by far the warmest piece I tested this fall. The new style of long fibrous insulation (almost like your grandmother's shag carpet) does a great job as compared to traditional insulation for providing warmth yet still being breathable. Although things can still get a little bit sweaty on longer, high exertion segments. The Fjørå Convertible jacket might be overkill for all but the most frigid days, but the extra warmth sure is appreciated when you need it.

Convertible alpha60 Jacket with the sleeves on.

And with the sleeves off (also notice the double duty mesh vent zipper).



Giro


Giro is a well-established name in the cycling apparel game, offering everything from elite carbon-soled road shoes to half-shell BMX style helmets. Based out of Santa Cruz, California might not be the ideal location for testing cold-weather gear, but Giro actually has a well thought out and affordable collection for keeping the wind and rain at bay during the dark and cold winter months.

Giro has a large link on the front page of their website detailing their Renew series of cycling apparel that is made from reclaimed fishing nets and other ocean debris. Additionally, Giro strives to use Bluesign approved fabrics where possible, which are fabrics approved by a 3rd party to meet certain environmental impact criteria. For each item on their website, Giro lists whether they use Bluesign fabrics so if that is something that is important to you, you can verify before purchasing. Note that none of the items I tested here were from the Renew collection or use Bluesign fabrics, but I am glad at least Giro is making some efforts to repurpose excess plastic material to lower environmental impacts.



Havoc H20 Short
MSRP: $160.00
Sizes: Adult 30, 32, 33, 34, 36, 38, 40 (32 tested)
Colors: Black, Dark Red, Midnight Blue (tested), Storm
Link: giro.com

Giro's Havoc H20 shorts are a fully waterproof option of their standard Havoc enduro short. Compared to the standard offering, the H20 variety is made out of a 3 layer stretch waterproof fabric with all seams completely sealed. DWR coating keeps the fabric from getting too soggy and maintains breathability while out riding in a downpour. A Cordura seat panel improves durability for the butt to muddy saddle interface (mud is basically tiny rocks.Sitting on tiny rocks and pedaling for hours isn't exactly nice to most fabrics. Just sayin'). Venting is handled by large, water-proof zippered vents right down the middle of your thighs.

The fit on these shorts is pretty standard. The size 32's I tested were (as they should be) slightly too large for my 31" waist, but I was able to easily snug things down with the waist adjusters. The length is right in the middle of the spectrum and didn't totally cover my knees while climbing, but completely covered them while descending. There's a velcro strap on the leg opening to taper the fit at the knee which I appreciated as it kept the fabric of this short from catching on my rear triangle (which often happened with 7mesh, as mentioned above).

Again, for riding in the rain but with warmer temperatures, a waterproof short comes in real handy at keeping your important bits dry while still allowing for a good amount of breathability. The slightly shorter cut and thigh vents ensured that the Havoc H20 was more breathable than the Revo, albeit at the expense of the increased waterproof coverage that the 7mesh short provides.

Note that I also tested Giro's Havoc riding pant (not waterproof) which was an option I really enjoyed for colder but drier riding. Make sure to check out Nikki's review of those pants with the women's gear.

Velcro straps allow you to lock things into place.

Adjuster for dialing in the fit.
Large thigh vents provide lots of airflow.

Ambient Jacket
MSRP: $150.00
Sizes: Adult S-XXL (M tested)
Colors: Black, Midnight Blue (tested)
Link: giro.com

For a lot of people out there, winter riding doesn't necessarily mean a lot of moisture. Cold, dry air and maybe some light fluffy snow are something a lot of riders experience during a season of winter riding. This is where a softshell comes in handy, providing wind protection, mobility, lots of stretch, breathability, and softer fabrics, but at the expense of the armor plate style of total waterproofing that a hard shell gives you.

Giro's Ambient jacket is more of a traditional softshell piece. The jacket's DWR coated outer is made of a four-way stretch, windproof/water-resistant three-layer fabric, while the inner is lined with a fleece-like material. A large, non-removable hood fits nicely over a helmet. There are reflective bits on the jacket as well, perfect for visibility in the dark or during bike commuting (I actually found this jacket perfect for riding to work on cold frosty mornings). There are also some nice wrist gaiters that I always enjoy for keeping the jacket/glove interface locked neatly in place. Finally, there aren't any pit zips on this jacket, but a few small laser cut holes in their place for ventilation.

I found the softshell outer layer actually did a pretty good job of blocking out moisture without becoming saturated. I didn't have this out in any full-on downpours, but I did experience lots of little sprinkles and I still stayed totally dry and warm. The hood was a welcome addition for blocking wind chill down the back of my neck and keeping my head warm. The fleece material is very warm, but not as breathable as the new high tech Polartec Alpha insulation that was used in the Norrona jacket (that also costs a lot more). Keep in mind this jacket is on the bulkier side as well, and not the easiest to stuff into a small pack.

In the size medium, the fit was perfect for me. There is plenty of room inside the jacket for layering underneath, but it's a bit too bulky to layer it under something else.

Pairing his jacket with the Havoc H20 shorts turned out to be a potent combo for riding in pretty cold temps, and I found myself using it a ton this fall. It covered temperatures ranging from around 20°F to 45°F with ease without becoming too cold or too hot. Consider the $150 price tag and this rapidly becomes an appealing option for anything from bike commuting to cold weather shredding.

Hood has an excellent fit over Giro's own Montaro helmet.
Wrist gaiters seal in warmth and pair well with winter gloves.



Sombrio

Pinkbike Fall Gear Guide 2019

Sombrio is another company that hails from Vancouver, BC and produces rugged and stylish mountain biking apparel designed and tested for full send. More on the freeride/DH end of the spectrum, Sombrio has its roots planted in the radical riding that grew up on the North Shore of Vancouver, and you can see how that has influenced their design and intended use of their products.

Details on environmental practices are slim to none on what I could find. There aren't any details on recycled content in clothing or manufacturing practices on each piece of gear. Additionally, I couldn't find any environmental causes or sales donation schemes that Sombrio participates in. Again, I may be missing these items, but hopefully, Sombrio makes that material more available if so.


Pinkbike Fall Gear Guide 2019

Squall 2 Jacket
MSRP: $120.00
Sizes: Adult XS-2XL (M tested)
Colors: Moss (tested), Black
Link: sombriocartel.com

Here is another wind shell option, this time from Sombrio. Made out of Sombrio's S-Tek Lite fabric (92% Nylon, 8% Spandex), this wind shell is on the heavier duty side compared to some of the super lightweight options out there and I really felt that I could take on some gnarly, exposed BC descents while wearing it.

This jacket only has a 3/4 length front zip. This actually worked quite well for me, as I didn't have to fumble around with cold fingers trying to line up a teeny little zipper, so I could just pull the jacket out of its pocket, pull it on over my helmet, zip it up and go. All in record time. Furthermore, the hood has an excellent fit over a helmet and stays in place during high-speed runs.

The large rear pocket serves double duty as a storage pouch. Bonus, there are straps attached to the storage pouch that turn it into a fanny pack! With lots of room for a multi-tool, a few gels, (and probably even a can of beer), you could completely ditch your standard fanny pack if you wanted and just ride uber lightweight, but still, have all your essentials. Talk about the complete package!

The fabric of this jacket feels heavier duty than the fabric from 7mesh and has an almost silky softshell like feel. As a result, it really does block out all wind and has a nice bit of stretch to it, although it does get pretty sweaty during high exertion. I would choose this over the option from 7mesh if I wanted a bit more wind protection and durability over the breathability of the 7mesh. Keep in mind it is also slightly bulkier. The 3/4 zip and fanny pack storage option are both super handy features in my book. Both jackets are excellent options overall, though.

Pinkbike Fall Gear Guide 2019
Hood fits well over a helmet.

Pinkbike Fall Gear Guide 2019
Large rear pocket holds lots of stuff.
Pinkbike Fall Gear Guide 2019
Jacket also stuffs into the rear pocket as a fanny pack.

The Wallace Chaos Jersey
MSRP: $70.00
Sizes: Adult XS-2XL (M tested)
Colors: Wallace Print
Link: sombriocartel.com

We all wish we could have the riding skills and flow on the bike of Reece Wallace, and I like to think wearing this piece gets me one step closer! Similar to Giant's Transfer jersey, the Wallace Chaos Jersey from Sombrio is a lightweight, long-sleeve option with no insulation. Fabric construction is a standard MTB jersey affair with a silky polyester feel. This is best as a standalone piece on warmer days for climbing and as a lightweight wicking base layer, and I would often wear this on mild fall days and layer it under a wind shirt for descending.

The Wallace jersey fits well, the fabric feels comfortable, wicks reasonably well, and the graphics are cool. The Royal Canadian Air Force's digital camouflage design on the front looks great in person and the sublimated graphics are nice, in that they won't fall off over time (sublimination makes the graphics permanent vs. silkscreen). The completely white back is an interesting choice; maybe they wanted you to compete with your friends to see who can create the coolest mud spray design on your back?

Overall a solid option as a simple, lightweight, very breathable, and slim-fitting base layer.

The Wallace Chaos Jersey.

Pinner Short
MSRP: $120.00
Sizes: Adult XS-2XL (M tested)
Colors: Black (tested), Deep Jade
Link: sombriocartel.com

The Pinner shorts from Sombrio are a heavy-duty, DWR coated riding short targeted to all-season riding. Constructed from Quattro Flex Dura fabric (90% Nylon, 10% Spandex), the Pinner shorts are durable yet still retain a good bit of stretch. Pockets abound on these burly bad boys, both front and back, meeting my packrat storage tendencies. Additionally, large thigh vents allow you to blow off some steam if needed.

These shorts are on the larger/bulkier side with plenty of room underneath for layering. The size medium was a tad big for me but I was able to use the waist adjusters to get things right. The length was also on the longer side; longer than Velocio by far, and slightly longer than the shorts from Giant and Giro.

I didn't use these shorts in full-on rainstorms, but mainly for colder, clear, dry days where they performed admirably. The fabric does a great job of blocking the wind and has a nice stretchy feel to it without any bunching or binding. I appreciated being able to open up the thigh vents while climbing to help regulate temperature.

These are an excellent option if you are in need of a bit more freeride or DH durability when ripping through the wet soggy underbrush.

Pinkbike Fall Gear Guide 2019
Lots of pockets and vents for your storage and airflow needs.
Pinkbike Fall Gear Guide 2019
Waist adjuster and button fly.



POC

Pinkbike Fall Gear Guide 2019

POC is a company from Sweden that aims to reduce the consequences of crashes and save lives. Starting with helmets and body armor, POC makes a large range of gear and apparel meant to protect and perform while being stylish at the same time. With a long history in the snow, POC now has a range of cold weather MTB items designed to keep you riding all year long.

Details on environmental impacts and manufacturing processes are not readily evident on the POC website. I couldn't find any information on whether each piece of gear contained some recycled content. Additionally, it is not clear if POC donates some of it's net sales to environmental causes or anything like that.

Note that we were only able to get an outer layer jacket from POC for testing this fall, but there are some options for pants and shorts (including the Resistance Enduro Shorts that I tested this spring) from POC which would be good possibilities for keeping your legs dry and warm.


Pinkbike Fall Gear Guide 2019

Resistance Pro Enduro Rain Jacket
MSRP: $300.00
Sizes: Adult XS-XXL (M tested)
Colors: Black only
Link: pocsports.com

POC's Resistance Pro Enduro Rain Jacket is a durable wind and waterproof jacket meant for taking on rugged enduro stages when the weather goes full hurricane. Constructed from a 3-layer fabric in the body and Vectran abrasion-resistant sleeves, the Resistance Pro is wind and waterproof with fully taped seams and waterproof zippers. In typical POC form, the Resistance Pro is offered in the color black only. Although outside of their norm, please excuse the bright orange gloves from POC pictured above which may have caused permanent eye damage to the children in the next galaxy over. Maybe it is time for POC to branch out into some new colors?

The Resistance Pro features a cycling-specific cut and a massive drop seat hem that inspires your inner Bat Man as you blast down the trail with your "cape" flapping in your wake. The fit is on the slimmer side, and I didn't have too much room underneath for layering anything more than a mid-layer in the size medium I tested. The sleeves have a longer cut at the top of the wrists for additional coverage of your hands and gloves and are constructed out of the military-grade Vectran material. I feel that I could crash on a motorcycle at high speed and slide for a city block on pavement and the fabric wouldn't even get a scuff. Additionally, they have plenty of room underneath for elbow pads if desired. Zippered pockets that perform double duty as vents provide a bit of airflow if needed. There is no hood on this jacket, although the neck is pretty tall with a nice fleece brushed collar that seals up tight for keeping moisture and wind out.

The fabric on this jacket has a very "hard" shell feel and totally blocks all wind. I didn't get to test this item out in any rainstorms, but it does appear to have high quality taped seams and the fabric feels impenetrable so I would hope it would keep the rain out. The breathability isn't the best on this jacket, so things definitely got a bit sweaty on most climbs while wearing it.

This probably wouldn't be my first choice for a rain shell: it lacks a hood, it's a bit heavy (430g vs. 190g for the similar shell from Velocio), and the fit is a little on the tight side for layering underneath. But if you need high durability and abrasion resistance on some rugged, wet, enduro stages, this would definitely be a worthy option. It almost looks and feels like it would be a good option for moto riding as well.

Pinkbike Fall Gear Guide 2019
Long rear drop hem and back pocket.

Pinkbike Fall Gear Guide 2019
Vectran material is highly abrasion and crash-resistant.



207 Comments

  • 264 10
 These prices are absurd.
  • 30 89
flag JDFF (Dec 13, 2019 at 5:49) (Below Threshold)
 Where are you riding that comfort isn't worth $$$? Also note that these are retail prices. Many of these items will eventually go on sale at some point.
  • 107 3
 @JDFF:
But these products really don't offer anything that justify their massive price premium. Theirs a lot of non cycling specific sports clothing that does the exact same thing but at a fraction of the cost.
  • 56 0
 When I saw that price point I "Velocioed" my pants.
  • 18 1
 I love seeing overpriced winter gear on PB, it only means one thing: Summer is coming to the southern hemisphere!!!!!!!
  • 4 0
 Agreed, although 2 brands do somewhat keep the price premium in check and the others go through the roof.
  • 12 0
 @JDFF: lol. You don't need to spend that kinda money to be comfortable. Ya'll must be rich.
  • 41 3
 Absolutely absurd. The only MTB-specific clothes I tend to buy are bibs and shorts. Voler's MTB bibs or Specialized SWAT bibs can be had for $50-$80 and last forever. MTB shorts (Fox, etc.) can be had on eBay new for $50. Target's long sleeve C9 workout shirts are TWENTY DOLLARS, are very comfy, and come in good colors. Just layer that shit for winter. You can get good rain jackets for sub $100 (Marmot Precip, Patagonia Houdini for wind, etc.) preferably on eBay new. And all this stuff won't make you look like a dingus, it looks pretty darn stylish.

All purchases are tradeoffs and I'm happy to save literally hundreds of dollars per year so I can spend that money on something else (tires, save for a bike trip, beer, savings, etc.). The premium for these products is not justified - when I ride in the gear I described above I'm just as comfortable as when I'm in a full "MTB-specific" kit. And when I rip a hole in them on a tree branch I won't cry.

OH! Pro tip - if you don't want to spring for Merino, leave your dirty MTB clothes outside in the sunlight after a ride. UV light dries and de-funks them and they don't progressively smell worse (like they do if you just put them in a hamper and wash them normal).
  • 16 2
 @zephxiii: Not rich, but I do spend 360 days a year in the elements. Comfort and occasionally survival is a priority. Sometimes that means spending a little extra on rain gear that holds up to the work/play tasks at hand. Its not at all about cycling specific or not. I happen to like cycling specific jackets for cycling because of fit, coverage, hood design etc. But Im also not opposed to generic merino wool (Costco merino socks). And for the record, I wouldnt pay the retail prices that are listed, but am very thankful the technology exists.
  • 8 0
 @DangerDavez: I dont disagree and I'm not suggesting people go out and pay these prices. But highly technical cycling gear for bad weather serves a purpose. A well designed pair of cycling trousers will fit better, be more comfortable and more durable than a pair of rain pants designed for hiking. Same goes for jackets and even gloves. Merino base layers dont matter, certainly dont need cycling specific for that. And for the record, Im talking about cool wet/snowy mud rides where surviving and comfort are intertwined.
  • 23 2
 I really wish we could see specific geographic locations for each comment. I have a theory that not everyone understands the importance of being comfortable in elements they aren't riding in.
So Cal: looks chilly, better where a long sleeve.
Nor Cal: hmm...maybe a windbreaker with a base layer.
UK/PNW: Wet AF, but not frozen yet, full coverage and some wool layers.
Wisconsin: yeah fat biking, its all about the down and a Thermos.
  • 6 1
 Thankfully I live in Arizona where the winter riding clothing is not to necessary. This way I can $350 on bike parts and not 1 lightweight rain jacket. For $350 I would rather be wet.
  • 3 0
 @vjunior21: if its over 75 degrees its too hot to ride Wink
  • 8 4
 So are the prices of bikes, ski's, ponies, Tesla's, and tequila. What's your point? If you spend 5K on a bike, is it asking too much to spend $150 on a good pair of winter riding shorts?
  • 4 0
 @gumbytex: also check out the military Gore tex on eBay.
You can find militaty grade jackets for cheap and they even have hoods made to fit over helmets and retain visibility.
  • 4 0
 Went on Amazon, searched winter cycling gear. Got pants for $30 and a Jacket for $32. Figured would be worth the test for $62. They are amazing, just rode at 17F and was perfectly comfortable, breathed good (not great) and moved well too, didn't slide up or down. Ordered a second pair of the pants. Only thing I wish the pants had were zip pockets, there were others on there with zip pockets but the sizing was too weird to figure out. The Jacket has 2 zip pockets and 3 rear open pockets.
  • 7 0
 @Tormy:
But you could have spent $350 on one light jacket. I don't get your logic of being practical and saving money. LOL

Links to the purchase please.
  • 10 1
 As someone who works in the outdoor clothing industry, yeah these prices are. If you know where to look you can find the same quality for much less. The reason is these are all smaller run products. The more volume, the better the price. None of these materials are all that groundbreaking. Its hard for me to bring myself to purchase MTB specific gear because I feel all too often the fabrics are about 5 years behind the rest of the industry, or you pay almost double for the ones that are.

I think the one thing worth it is true winter riding pants since the fit and durability are so important, but most of these jackets you're better off with other cheaper options. I actually prefer SportHill XC pants for truly horrendous conditions, as they are way comfier than any moto inspired pant and the durability and performance of the fabric absolutely blows anything in the industry out of the water. They aren't bike specific, but if you play around with the sizing (I do womens small or medium haha, normally have a 32 waist on stuff and I'm a dude) you can get the fit you need. Those are about 130 a pair, and they also will serve as the best base layer for skiing money can buy. Also, do not buy cycling specific base layers.
  • 5 1
 @nkrohan: next week after a $7K bike review: "if you spend $200 on a simple pair of riding shorts, is it asking too much to spend $7K on a whole bike?"
That one is too expensive, doesn't mean it's OK for the other to be too expensive also.
  • 5 7
 HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA! Please pay $600 to look like some idiot from PNW.
  • 3 2
 @reverend27: You can find militaty grade jackets

So bottom bidder with a bunch of cut corners, then?
  • 1 1
 @DangerDavez: Like, say, 10+ Frogg Toggs jackets for the same scratch as that $350 jacket. Oy.
  • 2 0
 @vjunior21:

You end up spending that much on AC bills. I used to live there.
  • 2 0
 this "shorts" for cold weather are absurd. it's like for summer riding in russia.
there is cold weather below zero.
  • 5 2
 @Tormy:
I'm thinking great, a decent jacket at a fair price, then I looked at the sizes.
Who are these people, dwarfs? A 43.3" chest is not a XXL.
I'm 6' 0" & 200 lbs. I need a 48" chest.
Don't consider myself much more than a XL
  • 2 2
 @Tormy: Please share the link..... send a message to these moronic Marketing managers that cheaper products exist and the Market will put them out of business if they don't read the writing on the wall. Thanks.
  • 5 1
 @Mac1987: This is the 5th winter gear guide I've done. Honestly, the prices haven't changed that much, people just like to bitch more. We are here to review what the companies provide us. If they weren't selling these products maybe we'd see cheaper options. I don't know the answer, but I do know I like a good quality product and I have no issues spending good money on a quality ski or bike jacket. Here is our review from 2015 www.pinkbike.com/u/meagerdude/blog/gear-up-for-winter-25-cold-weather-essentials-reviewed.html
  • 1 0
 @DangerDavez: Have any goto recommendations? I've been curious for a while, but other than fishing gear haven't found much.

Cross country ski gear is way better value and good for just cold, but not really wet.
  • 2 0
 Just bought a 150 weight 100% Merino base top at Costco for $15. Agreed.
  • 2 0
 @JDFF: If you spend that long outside, you ought to have realised by now that non-cycling gear is better and more innovative. The technology you are seeing here came from outside MTB.

It's nuts. Most MTB kit isn't even that good or well made compared to running and hiking gear either. You are paying more simply because they aren't as popular and the economies of scale lesser.

The only 'innovation' these companies are doing is finding new ways to charge more for crap.
  • 1 0
 @JDFF:I'm riding on down to Wally World for sale rack fleece tops and wind breaker jackets.
  • 1 0
 @Denning76: ok, so your hiking rain gear pants don't wear out in the seat, flap in the wind, get caught in the drivetrain or let mud in the back end when roosting loam? Oh, and your hiking rain jacket probably covers your backside when roosting loam? Doubt it very much. And for what its worth, I do have tech "hiking" and mountaineering outerwear from reputable non cycling companies, great quality stuff and excellent use of materials, but honestly not suited for where and how I ride. Its not all about fancy expensive materials either, when I'm working in forestry (in a rain forest) I'm wearing old school rubber rain gear. Lets go for a ride in my zone and see how your gear and physical condition holds up?
  • 1 0
 @MikerJ: where do you ride, what months and how long is a normal ride?

East Coast bike park in Spring/Summer?
  • 1 1
 @Tormy: you wear that crap! Hahahaha!!!
  • 1 0
 @Tormy: I have an Inbike jacket that's entering it's 3rd winter, some other winter pants I got cheap like 5 years ago, a few base layers, gloves and a rain jacket. All are various brands around the 35 dollar mark and they have all been excellent.

Yes I have a few expensive items like Endura etc, but I'm sticking with this cheaper amazon stuff as they have been great. The only stuff I like to spend money on are winter shoes, and our Bioracer team kits that run about 150 bucks and are super comfy.
  • 2 0
 Just paid $12.79 at Costco for Karbon 51% Merino Wool / 49% Primaloft Polyester baselayers. Great blend for MTB, offering warmth and wicking.
  • 1 0
 Holy crap I just won the jackpot not even in need of winter gear. $4 Kil-tech level 3 wind/ water proof/ abrasion resistant brand new at goodwill. I mean nobody has ever worn this, even pockets inside are immaculate. This destroys every jacket on here and in dentist Yet I blue. Check your local goodwill before throwing $300 at some I could tear apart with my bare hands. Happy trails!
  • 52 0
 How can you call a jersey “Merino 160” when it is 72% polyester? Pretty sure you’re not really getting the merino benefits of odor reduction and fast drying at that point...
  • 12 0
 Came here to say the same thing....and $100 for a shirt. It at least better be 95% Merino with some special interlocking threads. I have yet to find "affordable" quality merino. Check out First Lite. Super quality stuff. Yes it's for hunting. You can hunt berms if you prefer. For the extra $0 you get 70% more wool.
  • 12 7
 Most importantly you are not getting the insulation benefit. Merino keeps up to 80% of its properties when soaked (like with sweat under a pretentious jacket) synthetics keeps no more than 50%. The best results are achieved with synthetic base layer, merino in the middle, membrane on top. Even Joe Rogan knows that
  • 3 0
 The 20% baselayers from Costco are actually really good for both odor and general baselayer functionality. But they are only $18
  • 3 0
 @MTBShredda: We make merino jerseys and the fabric is crazy expensive to purchase, if you're getting good quality. There was a shortage of material this year as well, so prices went up around 20% on top of the previous season. FirstLite makes some amazing products at unreal prices (I personally have some of their hunting stuff). I'm not sure how they do it, but I want in!
  • 2 0
 Kuiu gloves and icebreaker merino will always be winners! @WAKIdesigns:
  • 2 0
 ...actually polyester dries *a lot* faster than merino... but yeah, a merino shirt should be 95% merino at least
  • 2 0
 @f00bar: thin merino layers are amazing under thin water proof outers. Best combo. Not restricting and over fluffed. Just warm and dry.
  • 3 0
 @onemanarmy: I use merino base layers for backcountry and downhill skiing. For biking I prefer polyester because it simply dries faster - merino can't keep up with my level of heat generation. I don't care about the smell, it's a "single use" piece of clothing that ends in the washing machine after each ride.
  • 4 0
 Quechua at Decathlon. Great quality merino base layers and shirts. Around 20 euro for SS and 25-30 euro for LS. It's 90-100% Merino wool.

Likewise, you can get their 700 or 900 series bib shorts and pants with gel insert for like 20-30 euro on sale. Fit is great, long bibs have thermal insulation and water and wind resistance.
  • 8 0
 They named it after their polyester supplier in Jersey, Tony Merino.
  • 1 0
 Food labelling 101.
  • 2 0
 @jeremy3220: is Tony Merino in The Irishman?
  • 2 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Yes, I believe he was.
  • 31 1
 Garbage bag with 3 holes in it. Comes in white, black, green and orange colorways. .
  • 4 7
 You beat me to it...
  • 13 0
 Put 7mesh sticker on it and sell for $250.
  • 10 0
 That's Arctic White, Abyss Black, Hunter Green, and Blaze Orange thank you very much.
  • 29 1
 "Cold weather"
  • 24 0
 Wears shorts. . . .
  • 4 1
 "Cold weather" riding for my location is like mid-low 20s (F).
  • 7 0
 Just came here to say that. If you can still wear shorts it isnt cold. It's going to be in the 20's here tomorrow and that is a nice mid December day.
  • 1 0
 I ride in shorts up to - 5C, but you need good socks, long knee pads (think rf flank) and warm underwear. Much better than sweating in pants, which get uncomfy with knee pads anyway.
  • 20 0
 Costco...$22. 100% Merino Long Sleeve base layer, made in Canada. Best piece of winter wear I have for daily wear, fat biking, skiing, etc.
  • 3 0
 Yeah agree they are awesome, I have about 8 of them in all colors and when you crash and rip them like I have no big deal.
  • 1 0
 What's the brand? I have a few 32 Degrees long sleeves and their rain jacket. Paid $19 for the jacket went to Whistler for the weekend rode both days in complete downpour, stayed dry except for my feet haha. Monday after work I went and bought 4 more of those jackets haha
  • 4 1
 84% polyester, 11% Merino wool, 5% Spandex

Would still moisture wicking but 11% merino is just enough to fool people into thinking its a score. . .Whatever works though
  • 1 0
 @dglass: Cloudveil
  • 1 0
 @rsmisko: potato - potat-oe. I'm sure it differs regionally. I bought mine in Calgary and the "brand"
is Paradox.
  • 21 3
 Thanks for including a discussion about the environmental aspects of these products
  • 5 0
 Yes, this was great to see. It would be nice to develop this further, perhaps with some kind of easy to digest scorecard. And it should be applied to all categories of products that you review (obviously different criteria for bikes vs clothing, for example).
  • 1 0
 @mbl77: I love that idea! Maybe different categories such as packaging, manufacturing, recyclability and so on could be evaluated as green, trying, not trying, or unknown.
  • 3 0
 We finally need enviromental "friendly" bike gear.

I really dont want to buy anything Made in China etc anymore.
Its all Made out of polyester which is literally plastic.

Maybe make Tencel biking gear or at least a bit sustanaible like Vaude.
  • 11 0
 Sure, the cost of housing in San Diego is high - but think of the money I save by riding in shorts and t-shirt all year long.
  • 9 1
 Love how 7Mesh are getting the recognition and exposure the brand deserves! The fit, quality and performance of their clothing is absolutely second to none and while yes it is not cheap by any stretch, it damn well lasts! My Revo Shorts are going on their 3rd winter and aside from a little colour fading around the ass where I've been sat pedalling in the saddle, they look and perform like new. Same goes for the other riding gear I've had from them, my oldest pieces are 3 years old and look and perform like new, which is a whole lot more than you can say about other brands out there...
  • 4 0
 Totally agreed. I bought a pair of their shorts (the model totally escapes me) and they are by far the best riding shorts I’ve ever had. So comfortable. 4 great pockets. The waist adjusters are awesome and they look great. MSRP was like $140 but I got them on sale at REI for $70. I saw them go on sale a month later and bought a second pair. Not sure I’ll ever buy any other shorts. I rarely have a need for a rain jacket for cycling but I kind of wish I did so I had en excuse to buy one of their jackets.
  • 3 0
 I am also in love with my Revo shorts, best piece of bike specific winter gear there is! Feels like bottoms needs to be bike specific to work and hold up to the abuse. Tops I use my Arcteryx and Patagonia gear that works for everything. To everyone whining about price... no matter if it is bike specific or some other type of gear, the highest quality costs about the same no matter what it is.
  • 3 1
 Have the 7Mesh Recon windstopper jacket, and the (full) price I paid was absolutely not worth it... the jacket should be longer in the back, the adjustable hem is a joke, and the tape on the seams is starting to come loose.

I have a lot better experience with POC, Gore Bike Wear, heck even with the cheap Endura stuff.
  • 5 0
 @f00bar: Hi there - sorry you’re disappointed. Can’t really apologize for the length, that’s intentional, the Recon was designed to be a simple softshell that works for off the bike use as well, but if you’re having problems with the hem or tape, please send us some pics - our warranty is lifetime on materials and workmanship. Cheers
  • 1 0
 @tj7mesh: hi, thanks for the offer, but the jacket has already been patched up on the shoulder and elbow after the fabric was torn in some crashes, so it's not really worth it sending it somewhere just to have the tape glued back.
As for the hem, I expected a thicker cord and an easier way of adjusting it - not having to pay attention to which end of the loop I'm pulling on (like with a regular cord lock).

Here's the tape below the right pocket:
i.imgur.com/3sauS8S.jpg
  • 2 0
 @f00bar: We quite like the hem adjust because it's designed to be light & low profile under a hip belt, a 'set it and forget it' type use which works for people that don't frequently adjust, and it's been well received on a bunch of our pieces. You're right it's not as easy to adjust on the fly as a traditional system. Regarding the tape, that does occasionally happen after a few years depending on use / wash conditions / etc. We can quickly take care of for you if you have time to send it in, but outside of that I have another idea for you so I'll send you a DM Wink
  • 10 0
 As much as I like to make fun of the Norwegians I can't say enough good things about my Norrøna gear.
  • 6 0
 Or any other scandinavian outdoor brand for that matter - Sweet Protection, POC, Bergans, Craft, Haglofs, you name it. However there is no "bad-weather" bike clothing without Endura and Madison IMO
  • 7 1
 Why do companies discontinue gear after only a year or two? The Dakine Caliber Jacket, Alpinestars Milestone 2, and TLD Ruckus Jacket were all ridiculously good, but all discontinued. If you can get your hands on one of these I'd highly recommend them.
  • 11 0
 Because you can't target your sales towards the the people who want the coolest most newest shiny shine stuff if it's more than a year old in its design.
  • 5 0
 i hear you - searching for some Endura MT500 Burner pants to replace my worn ones - rarer than unicorn poop :/
  • 2 0
 @Bustacrimes: were they the same ones as the old hope branded ones before they went to royal.
  • 21 0
 Why does anyone buy cycling specific gear anyway? It's all inflated by 200%.

You can get a patagonia Houdini jacket, with a lifetime warranty, that can literally fit in a pants pocket comfortably when folded into its own pouch for under $100 (I found mine on sale for $50.)
  • 1 0
 @fatduke: hmm, frantically googling now Smile
  • 1 5
flag WAKIdesigns (Dec 13, 2019 at 6:52) (Below Threshold)
 It’s called progress and you can’t stop it. Things just get... wider!
  • 1 0
 This! The fast turn on clothing is out of control. It creates a lot of waste just because the "season" changed, which is bs. Hardgoods have a longer product life cycle and we believe clothing should too. Buy less and ride more. Function over fast fashion.
  • 2 0
 @Bustacrimes:

Pretty sure i saw some on Wheelbase. The name sounds familiar from when i was on there yesterday looking at MTB trousers (or 'pants', for our trans-atlantic friends)
  • 2 1
 Capitalism.
  • 1 0
 @fatduke: nah, one of the most flashy outdoor companies has been keeping the same product lines for *decades* - they just update the colors every year and do some minor changes to the cut/zippers/material/etc every now and then. They actually want you to repair your old & damaged gear instead of buying new (they offer repairs too).
  • 2 0
 @bikekrieg: The Houdini is easily my most used jacket while biking. For me it is an essential piece of kit that gets used at least 100 times over the year and never as just an everyday jacket. Whether ski touring or biking because of the size and weight it is always in my bag. However- it is a wind shell and not a jacket I would trust for a long ride in sustained rain.
  • 9 1
 Genie prices, lets just think of a number and double it....i'm out
  • 5 0
 Id freeze to death if I wore any of those clothes in the winter where I ride. None of that "winter" gear would work in 3 feet of snow and below zero celsius temperatures.
  • 8 0
 Celsius? You sure you're american?
  • 1 0
 @DangerDavez: Hey, some of us do appreciate Metric standards!
  • 1 0
 Curious where you are riding? Up in the northeast, when we fatbike in the woods you still get quite warm despite the freezing temps. The trees block any wind so you end up riding usually in just in baselayers and only have a light windbreaker for downhills.
  • 5 0
 None of this looks like cold weather gear at all. It looks more like spring weather gear, or rain gear. I want to know what to wear when it's 5 degrees, not 45!
  • 1 0
 Merino base layer and Gore Shakedry insulated jacket. The only jacket I have tried that breaths enough not to be completely soaked on top of the climb and completely shaking from cold on the way back down.
  • 4 1
 One time our friends got to drinking, down the class 4 past my buddy's house. Involved a bonfire, stumps for seats and lots of cans passed around. Where they procured it I don't know but I wasn't complaining. Somehow that turned into what we would bang and it wasn't just cans that were passed around. It was drums. The drum beat got louder and louder until we were in a full fledged burning man, psychedelic cocktail of adolescent hormones and alcohol, deep in the backwoods of the north. Thankfully this was during the week of warm weather we had once a year, because what we would bang would turn into who we would bang, and boy did that escalate quickly. Without going into detail there wasn't a body that wasn't matched to another, which sounds weird but it was true. At that level you become one with the woods, and to have everyone on the same page was strange, yet exhilarating. Afterwards, as weeks and months passed, we didn't talk about it much and most went their separate ways. I guess that's called being a teenager. But damn that's some expensive gear.
  • 3 0
 If you cry over thought of busting an expensive rear derailleur, just think how catatonic you'll be over ripping a $200 jersey or windbreaker every ride. Going full throttle on a gnarly trail all the while thinking "hope I don't rip my new fancy 'whatever'" is not a fun way to ride. Ask me how I know. Full disclosure: my closet is full of Castelli, Assos, PI PRO, et al, and I enjoy the benefits of quality technical gear, whether bike-specific or not, but each was purchased on mega sale. Relegating shredded riding gear to the backup bin doesn't hurt as much.
  • 3 0
 Have you never ridden a bike in Santa Cruz? During the winter when all these other places are shutting down and moving on to snow Santa Cruz is coming alive with the best riding of the year. Wind and water protection is amazing. Might not be the coldest winter riding but people are getting out there in the wind and the rain.

To me... might be a need for two different reviews... most of what you reviewed was WET riding gear not cold riding gear. AKA.... SHORTS and windbreakers. In that category Santa Cruz is an amazing place to test gear and Giro makes good stuff.

Now if you were reviewing COLD weather gear. More pants. Thicker gloves and jackets.... freezing conditions, snow, etc.... then that comment would make sense.
  • 4 0
 cold weather riding..lol. if there's a + in front of the temps, it's not cold. i was riding in -8 yesterday and that's the warmest i'll get for a few months. let's see some gear for that.
  • 3 0
 More on the warranties and support for these companies would be helpful. That is a big deal for me in buying outdoor gear. I am willing to invest a lot because I do prioritize comfort, safety and durability. I also appreciate when companies are responsible with that investment. For example, for ski stuff I do tend to favor OR, Arcteryx and Pata-gucci because they have always done right by their gear for me. Last year I blew a gator zipper out of its track in a pair of touring pants and OR sent a new pair the next day no questions asked. Amazing! Makes me not hesitate to take the chance on products from them. I hear 7mesh is stellar in this regard though have yet to buy something from them. @tj7mesh let me know if you guys make something that will fit humans with the body type of a carp (or "Rossland Fat" as I have dubbed it: 34 waist- 190 lbs- 6'1) as finding technical gear that fits is also a challenge outside of a genetic thoroughbred body shape.
  • 2 0
 @snl1200 My co-founder Calum says 'Rossland Fat sounds like Squamish Fat, where you only have 6 abs instead of 8! Big Grin Calum is 6'2", 185, 33" waist and wears a Medium in the Guardian Jacket - but he has broad shoulders and feels pretty close to maxing it. He can layer with it but if he wanted to layer a lot he would size up to the Large, so that might be better for you being slightly bigger. Our gear has a reasonably athletic fit, but with an intentional allowance for layering. I hope you get a chance to try one on at a shop, but if not you can always order from us - we cover return freight on your first order to make sure there's no risk to try out our sizing. 7mesh.com/sizing-guide
  • 2 0
 @tj7mesh: haha- I’m sure the two fat definitions will merge soon as we seem to be seeing a wave of Squamish ex-pats moving to town likely escaping the housing price boom...we might just turn into a Squamish suburb at this rate! Thanks for the reply. I’ll keep my eye out next time I’m on the coast.
  • 6 0
 That is not winter, this is WINTER!
  • 5 0
 Good grief. Winter gear? I didn't see a single parka. It is flapjack -3F outside.
  • 5 0
 What arsehole would pay 350 to 400 on a pants or a super light jacket? Stupid money....
  • 2 0
 Happy to see I am not the only person completely rejecting the insane inflation pricing on "trendy" apparel. Know what I ride in? Target's house-brand, got some clearanced Walmart wool socks too! Although I did splurge and get a pair of riding shorts for $7 when Performance Cycles ended their business. Sierra trading post if you want to go for the posh gear!
  • 2 0
 Saved some money and went with the MT500 jacket from Endura. I got it from a sale, so I spent around 130 USD. But now that I used for a few times in heavy rain and mud, I'd pay the full price for it.
Some of these might be a bit overpriced, but you only have to buy them once (just don't crash Big Grin ). I use the MT500 as an everyday jacket too, all winter (with an Icebreaker 200 merino base layer + hoodie, since winters are not harsh in Hungary nowadays) so again, for me, it worth the price tag.
  • 1 0
 Sounds good. Is it possible to check your MT500 jacket personally? Maybe on the trail at HHH or somewhere there Smile
  • 2 0
 Here in france's center small mountains (1100 m high for my house, a lot of rain, snow, looks sometimes like brits conditions), I use a mix of quechua/decathlon (layers and jackets), endura (shorts and pants) and patagonia (torrentshell for heavy rain and snow). Then five ten eps shoes, and shimano winter gloves for the extremities. Works relatively well.
With 500 dollars, you should have the entire panoply with shoes, gloves, underwear... and money rest for chocolate and beers...
  • 2 0
 this gear is for the worst weather conditions and if you ride in the uk you need stuff like this to keep you warm and dry. i spend this money on snowboarding kit that i wear once a year so i think its worth buying decent kit that keeps you riding your bike whatever the weather. just my two penneth but im pretty sure brands like 7 mesh or poc will last for many years. but sure if you want to buy cheap stuff from ebay thats up to you.
  • 4 0
 Wool wool wool and more wool. Retains heat even when wet. Can be found at reasonable prices.
  • 1 0
 The one thing I don't like about my merino is that the slightest breeze makes me freeze. I'm wearing a 200gsm and I still don't feel it's warm enough.
  • 2 0
 it's not really meant as an outer layer. it's either the first or second layer of at least 3.
  • 5 0
 Dentists, collect all seven!
  • 5 0
 Christ, when did it become the norm to charge $200 for the some shorts
  • 1 0
 I have a hard enough time paying $100.
  • 1 0
 High prices and sized for the 90%. The S-M-XL sizing model for outdoor gear are almost always undersized and don't compensate for layered clothing. This company, aerotechdesigns.com, makes high quality, reasonably priced gear sized for almost every rider. I know, because I'm 6'6", just like the PinkBike founder and I'm American-sized. Give me more tacos dammit! Their gear isn't overly stylized, but is overly functional. And unlike every other cycling gear manufacturer, these folks listen to their customer's comments and respond with personal messages. Want fleecy knicker-length padded inner shorts? They make them. Prefer full length fleecy non-padded? Got your back jack! Their shipping is fast, and they always include a cool aluminum bike keyring as lagniappe.
  • 2 0
 Never heard of them. Their stuff looks pretty interesting, too bad I just got my last pieces of cold weather kit. Some of it is even made in the USA, which is extra interesting.
  • 1 0
 @Chris97a: They've got great warm weather riding gear too. They don't advertise very well, but I'll throw them in the mix, just to ensure I can still buy their gear down the road.
  • 2 0
 I wish my “winter gear” could include a rain jacket and shorts, my current kit includes a blanket and hot chocolate whilst riding a couch seeing as there is too much snow to even walk the trails lol
  • 1 0
 Now I want a hot chocolate!
  • 4 0
 But what about Goodwill? They have a great selection of cold weather clothing for a fraction of the price
  • 1 0
 Winter riding shorts is an oxymoron. They are just shorts. If you’re going to publish an article about winter riding apparel maybe you should focus on riding in actual winter conditions (I.e. cold temps, snow, etc). Instead this was just a wet-weather gear article.
  • 1 0
 All I really want is decent winter specific bicycling shoes for flat pedals. The 5.10 eps (I can't remember specific) is good for wet, but not just straight up cold. There are lots of good clipless shoes, and some of those have the rubber screw in piece you can use instead of a clip- but no straight up high traction cold weather flat shoes- that I know of at least. I don't want to wear sorel type boots for biking and weird sock and toe warmer strategies just aren't cutting it.
  • 1 0
 Wrap the toes of your 5-10s with duct tape.
  • 1 0
 @DDoc: I do! Looks so ghetto
  • 1 0
 Okay so wallmart leggings under my royal race pants, thin thermal, tee shirt, then heavy flannel (down to 35ish). Add ajother thermal for down to 25, and add a thin pair of runners gloves, after 25 i add a sweatshirt and ride in my fullface. Good till about 15 then i stop riding
  • 1 0
 My cold weather riding kit guide
-10 to -20 deg C - Head: toque under helmet or use ski helmet | Top: shell, puffy/hi-loft mid layer, base layer | bottom: pants (shell if windy), longjohns, ski socks, winter boots.
-20 to -26 deg C: Head: ski helmet + balaclava | Top: Parka, mid layer, base layer | bottom: ski pants, longjohns, ski socks, winter boots.
below -26 deg C - stay inside and drink beer
  • 1 0
 I ride my MTB in the winter. I regularly get covered in mud. I often fall and scrap my clothing. I get hot and sweat whilst riding, so jacket is only required if it's raining or very cold. I don't expect my jacket to last more than 2 seasons.
What's the point in spending + £50 on a jacket? Only time I would wear an expensive jacket would be a long xc ride.
I reckon manufactures need more research.
  • 1 0
 I purchased a Dirtlej Dirtsuit last winter and I an say that i'm very impressed. Turned out to be cheaper than a jacket and shorts combo. Very breathable and comfortable. Would recommend for Scottish winter riding and our ever changing rainy climate too. Just wear a few base layers under as normal depending on the temp. Also a quick spray every wash with Nikwax and its good to go.
  • 1 0
 Pretty much all I do on the coldest days in the upper 20s F is where my limit is. I start with my SmartWool ski base layers. Throw a pair of trunks on the bottom and a 1/4 zip fleece up top with a wind shell. Balaclava on the really cold days. For cold feet a SmartWool thin sock covered by a midweight wool crew usually does the trick.
  • 1 0
 I liked the info about environmental sustainability but wish you would have tested those specific products. In a coming article perhaps?

I live in the PNW and get by without most of this expensive gear. Wool socks, knee pads, liners, cheap mtb shorts, nike base layer, cheap mtb Jersey. Money saved went to a good jacket and I'm happy.
  • 1 0
 I got 3 words for the bike and sports clothing industry "Fellatio - Blow!" These prices are jokes! Even when they are marked down 30%, they're still overpriced. You can get brands like Outdoor Research or Patagonia where they're proven in they're outdoor gears she's get super light rain jackets that are breathable abs are warrantied fire life! You can also get those gear in 50-70% off the MSRP. Kinda tried you how stupidly the clothing industry marks up their prices and limits the sale of their products so that garments can be sold outside a region. Sadly enough, components are being sold the same way with effin SRAM and a bunch of money grabbing US companies dictating the prices!
  • 3 0
 I'll stick with the Arcteryx gear I've been rocking for 15+ years (and lifetime warranty).
  • 1 0
 I never knew Arc had lifetime warranty. I've used Patagonia's warranty many times ($5 shipping, often a long wait for returns, though). Good to know, thanks!!
  • 1 0
 but inarguably more insanely priced than anything here. i know value over time, but initial investment is not possible for most.
  • 2 0
 I'm pretty certain that the people designing the 7Mesh apparel are former Arcteryx employees who wanted to make a more bike specific design. The quality is top notch and you can see the similarity in the fabrics and designs.
  • 1 0
 I was thinking just the other day wouldn't it be a good idea for a water proof shell to pack into its own waist pack! well done Sombrio! that said i don't think it looks waterproof enough for the welsh summer here...
  • 4 0
 You haven't lived until you've sharted in a pair of $300 shorts.
  • 1 0
 Sure pick the most pinner specimen to review gear... all overpriced and probably not that good. Pro tip, helly hanson waterproof coat at sport check $100, enduro paints on chain, still cheaper than the cheapest coat options
  • 1 1
 thanks pb readers for always finding something to bitch about lol, i need new winter gear and this guide will be a huge help to me so i appreciate it very much, and i didnt have to pay for the review, it was just randomly there on the homepage this am, whats better than that?! prices seem rather in line with quality winter riding gear.
  • 3 0
 Over 200 notes for shorts??? F£&? OFF!
Brands, have some shame!? Plus, all kit you will ever need is at Endura!
  • 1 0
 "Bonus, there are straps attached to the storage pouch that turn it into a fanny pack!" - This is some next level shit!! Here I am tying my rain jacket around my waist like an idiot when Sombrio is living on another planet!
  • 1 0
 Once again in the world that believes that skinny riders are the only riders. Zoic claims bigger sizes, but they never stay in stock very long. Aerotech have larger sizes that are actually in stock, even when they have sales
  • 1 0
 On my way to sell a testicle so I can buy a MTB specific shirt, and pair of shorts for riding in the winter. I DO NOT want to get my old pair of sweats and hoodie dirty!!!
  • 3 0
 My winter riding gear so far is a chromag hoodie, a fox t shirt and jeans
  • 3 0
 Where is Fox and Raceface?
  • 1 0
 We try to rotate around to the different brands each gear guide.
  • 3 0
 So the term "cycling specific" adds a hundy to the price?
  • 3 0
 I'm too poor to ride when it's not 70 and sunny
  • 1 0
 Here people start complaining about how hot it is if it gets over 70 by more than a degree or 2.
  • 3 0
 Here i am still rocking all my roach gear.
  • 1 0
 I still ride in my MEC copy of the Roach gear.
  • 2 0
 Pretty soon Titleist, Lacoste and Balenciaga will enter the bike market. We are doomed.
  • 3 0
 and yes, I said tit.
  • 1 0
 I'm thinking it is going to be big designer brands like Hugo Boss, Armani, Ralph Lauren, etc. Heck it would probably be less expensive to just wear that stuff. Lol.
  • 1 1
 @tacklingdummy: that was just springing to my mind as I read Tiger Woods is the best earning "athlete".
  • 3 0
 @xmicherx: The term Bosom is underused my Millennials.
  • 1 0
 @xmicherx: keep it clean dude. Tits is reserved for the women's review only.
  • 1 0
 Just saying.... where are the winter fatbike apparel? Contact me if you need someone to develop/review and charge a lot of money
  • 3 0
 Cold weather riding. Shorts.
You’re doing it wrong.
  • 2 0
 The tip I got was buy runners gear. They sell at a higher volume so it's cheaper and does the same thing.
  • 1 0
 @raceface I don't know why you guys quit making the Agent line. That jacket/shorts combo kept me warm on really cold night rides.
  • 2 0
 How do you leave Endura off of this list?
  • 2 0
 I was thinking that, but wondered if it was because Endura isn’t too common in North America.

They do seem to have avoided any of the brands that you actually see stocked in bike shops and people wearing on the trails.
  • 1 0
 We actually try to use different brands each time and fit in some new or less brands as they come into our radar. If you go to one of the last four winter gear guides you will find the brands you speak of.
  • 1 0
 I have only had bad experiences with endura stuff, had 4 jackets MT500’s last under 5 months before zips broke each a warranty replacement for the last, even though I live under 45 mins from their HQ it’s taken around 2/3 months for them to replace them each time and a lot of arguing. My current one broke a couple months ago down the center zip and now I’m just using it as a pullover with gorilla tape up the zip because I need a jacket in the winter and cannot justify waiting 2 months for them to make a decision on whether to replace it for me. Their waterproof shorts and gloves were also a let down. I know of mountain bike clubs who were supplied by them who have had similar issues. In my opinion they are overhyped, replying good reviews from people who only ride in the proper wet while commuting or every second weekend.
  • 1 0
 @Conanangus: Interesting, seems we all have different experiences. I've had the same pair of Endura riding shorts for 4 years now, ridden hundreds of times, and they're still holding up amazingly, not even a frayed thread, and still maintain their water repellent.
  • 1 0
 Look up 'Geordies on night out'. I will just wear a t shirt like I always do.
  • 2 0
 Because everyone has $7,000 to spend on one set of biking clothes....
  • 1 0
 Breathable and waterproof without actual K/ RET numbers for stuff over 200 bucks? You kidding me right...
  • 2 0
 Looking more and more like Golf Rain Apparel
  • 2 0
 Golf rain apparel is much more inexpensive.
  • 1 0
 I guess a lot of bikers don’t hunt. A little meriono wool under anything and you’ll be warm.
  • 1 0
 No Bontrager, Endura, and Canari. Most all the brands are new to me. Picked out of a Chinese catalog and logo added.
  • 2 0
 I'm typically too fat anyways for this pricey gear.
  • 1 0
 Where are the pants? Only 1 pair in the entire Cold Weather Gear Guide?
common guys..
  • 1 0
 I don't understand this cold weather gear if they're wearing shorts and light jackets. So it's like, fall weather gear?
  • 2 0
 $350 for a rain jacket... $120 for a long sleeve... feck it....
  • 1 0
 That Norrøna jacket must come with a free backpack. Otherwise where do you put the sleeves after you remove them?
  • 1 0
 Why the hell review a raincoat and not use it in the rain?
  • 2 0
 cold eh
  • 1 0
 I think Hugo Boss and are Armani are less expensive. Lol.
  • 1 0
 7 of the Best New Early Fall, Late Spring Riding Kits for Men
  • 2 1
 Cycling Industry: "We don't want you to look cool"
  • 1 0
 I need to find another sport, cannot afford any of this
  • 1 0
 Psssh, wear some layers and spray down with wd40.
  • 1 0
 Cold weather gear, and half of the pants are shorts...
  • 1 0
 Ehh... it's going to be 40°C later this week.
  • 2 2
 If it's too expensive, you could just...you know, not buy it.
  • 4 7
 Too wordy, the excess sounds a bit childish/girlie.
Can you get someone to write these like a normal human being?
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