Giant Trance - First Ride

Aug 1, 2016
by Mike Kazimer  

We first caught sight of Giant's updated Trance a few weeks ago in Kirchberg, Austria, the bike's first public debut after a three year development process. The new version still has 140mm of rear travel and 27.5" wheels, but both the frame's design and geometry have undergone numerous updates.

According to Giant's marketing spiel, this latest iteration will allow riders to "climb like an XC racer and descend like an enduro pro." Those are some mighty bold claims, so in order to get better acquainted with the new ride, and to dive deeper into the details behind its creation we headed to the South Chilcotin mountains, located 2.5 hours north of Pemberton, British Columbia.

Giant Trance Advanced Details

• Intended use: trail / all-mountain
• Rear wheel travel: 140mm
• Wheel size: 27.5''
• 67º head angle w/ 150mm fork
• Carbon front triangle / alloy swingarm
• Metric shock sizing
• Boost hub spacing
• MSRP: $4,125 - $8,050 USD (complete). Frame w/shock: $2,700 USD.
www.giant-bicycles.com, @giantbicycles
Updating the Trance

When Giant's designers began to work on the next iteration of the Trance they had two main goals: to make a bike that felt more balanced than its predecessor, and to improve the bike's overall aesthetics. The first step was to revise the bike's rear suspension configuration in order to give it a lower leverage ratio. Previous versions had required riders to run very high pressures, which made it harder to achieve the desired balance of support and small bump sensitivity.

As it turned out, Giant's design goals overlapped with what RockShox was hoping to achieve with their yet-to-be-released Deluxe and Super Deluxe shocks, and after numerous test sessions (more than with any other bike in Giant's history) the decision was made to go with a trunnion mount, where the shock is attached to the frame on each side of its body, rather than using a single DU bushing in an eyelet at the top of the shock. This design allowed Giant to use a longer shock shaft in the same amount of space as before, and achieve the desired lower leverage ratio. The new shock is also claimed to have a wider range of useable rebound adjustments, which should make it easier for riders to dial in the exact settings they want.


Giant Launch in Southern Chilcotins BC July 2016. Photo Sterling Lorence
The metric rear shock uses a trunnion mount, and the upper link is constructed from molded carbon.

The upper link is now constructed from molded carbon, and weighs half as much as the previous alloy link. The main pivot is also now positioned lower on the seat tube, creating more room for the longer dropper posts that are fast becoming the norm (Giant's own 150mm Contact SL dropper post is spec'd on the Trance).

Other details include the use of a bolt on 12x148mm thru-axle to secure the rear wheel, and a 15x110mm Maxle Stealth for the front. That means you'll need a 6mm allen key on hand if you want to remove a wheel, but it also means there are fewer parts sticking out from the bike where they could potentially get damaged by rocks or other trail side hazards.


Giant Launch in Southern Chilcotins BC July 2016. Photo Sterling Lorence
Boost spacing is in place for both wheels, as are bolt-on thru axles.
Giant Launch in Southern Chilcotins BC July 2016. Photo Sterling Lorence
The Trance's internal cable routing gives the bike a very clean and tidy look.


Geometry

To go along with frame updates, Giant also gave the Trance's geometry a few slight tweaks. The reach has been extended by 10mm, and is now 448mm for a size large. The chainstays were shortened by 5mm to 435mm, and the bottom bracket sits 5mm lower than before. While in the past there had been versions of the Trance that came with a 160mm fork, the new version was designed with a 150mm fork in mind, which results in a 67-degree head angle.


Giant Trance Geometry





The two days I spent on the Trance were filled with punchy climbs and fast, swoopy descents punctuated with the occasional surprise rock garden or snakelike tree root. This time of the year the trails in the Chilcotins can be dry and dusty, but an unseasonably wet summer meant that the higher elevation trails were full of mud puddles, knee-deep stream crossings, and sections of perfect milk chocolate-colored dirt.

The Trance Advanced 0 that I was aboard is the top dog in the lineup, and comes equipped with SRAM's 12-speed Eagle drivetrain, Guide Ultimate brakes and Giant's new TRX 0 carbon wheels shod with Schwalbe Nobby Nic tires. RockShox handles the suspension, with a Pike RCT3 up front and a Super Deluxe RC3 in the rear. The fact that the large frame comes with a 70mm stem and 750mm bars seems like an oversight, especially now that the bike's reach has been increased – at the very least, a shorter stem should have been spec'd, and a wider bar would have been nice to see as well.

The first day's ride began with a steep climb interspersed with sections of hike-a-bike, and from the start, it was clear that the Trance's climbing manners have improved. There's a much more supportive feel when the shock is in the fully open position, and I rarely found myself reaching down to change compression settings no matter the angle of the trail. Not needing to futz around with the shock settings greatly decreases the chance that you'll find yourself performing the classic “I bet I can reach that compression lever while riding one handed at a high rate of speed” maneuver, which doesn't always go as planned.


Giant Launch in Southern Chilcotins BC July 2016


The Trance's handling reminded me a bit of the Santa Cruz 5010, with similarly quick and lively manners. That makes sense since both bikes have the same reach and head angle numbers, but the Trance's extra travel gives it a greater margin for error, which came in handy while charging down trails I'd never ridden before. The Super Deluxe shock gives the rear end an impressive amount of traction, and even in loose, gravelly corners it was easy to carve a nice clean arc (or get both wheels to slide if I decided to go that route).

I'll admit, I did find myself wondering how a version of the Trance with 29” wheels would feel. This year we've seen a number of excellent mid-travel 29ers hit the market, and it seems like a big-wheeled version of the Trance would fit right in with bikes like the Santa Cruz Hightower and Trek Fuel EX. But that's just my own little daydream – Giant's still sticking with their message that 27.5” wheels are the ideal wheel size, at least for the near future.

Two days on a bike doesn't equal a long term review, and I'd be interested to see how the Trance handles steeper, rougher terrain, but my first impressions are that Giant have created a very capable trail ripper, the type of versatile all-rounder that just about any rider could have a good time on.




Visit the high-res gallery for more images from this First Look.




204 Comments

  • + 177
 "this latest iteration will allow riders to "climb like an XC racer and descend like an enduro pro." "

Man, I did NOT see that coming!
  • + 35
 This is a very sophisticated BS, I am impressed. This sentence is true for every bike because it is about the rider. But many people will read it: it will climb like an xc bike and will descend like enduro. Which is of course NOT true, since this is a trail bike. A trail bike will never climb like na XC bike, and will never descend like enduro bike, well, thats why there is a "trail bike" category Wink Otherwise everyone would race XC and enduro on a Trance Wink
  • + 46
 @lkubica: But who does'nt like a bike that will "allow" you to do things you're unable to do?
My girlfriend could "allow" me to take Scarlett Johansson out but trust me, it aint gonna happen.
  • + 43
 i'm waiting for the "climbs like a XC racer and descends like a downhill pro" model
  • + 253
 I climb like a downhiller and decent like an XC racer, and am unparalleled in that regard. Patents pending.
  • + 7
 @knarrr: I already own them, and now you must be punished
  • + 5
 @lkubica: TransNZ Enduro was won by a rider on a 2016 Trance. Just saying.
  • - 3
 It should be "climb like an enduring pro and descend like a xc racer" haha
  • + 1
 *Enduro
  • + 25
 "Climbs like a trail bike. Descends like a trail bike." If he wrote that, who would get excited?

All I know is that bike is sexy.
  • + 2
 @Grmasterd: ummm that's an evil. don't you read the internet
  • + 1
 Atleast they didn't say climbs like and enduro bike and descend like a downhill bike.
  • + 7
 Descend like Giant river of marketing BS
  • + 3
 @knarrr: Finally, someone I can ride with!
  • + 2
 @lkubica: can I just say that as a trance owner, this is not complete BS. It does climb like an xc bike, and can do almost anything that most people would do on an enduro. you have a valid point that it really is about the rider, I hunk what they mean is that the bike is comfortable doing these things. Just like you CAN ride xc on a demo, or you CAN race DH on a xc bike, doesn't mean that the bike feels good do in it. The trance is really at home on an XC course as well as some pretty knarly DH.

Ps. I totally would Race XC on my trance and have raced enduro(and placed second to a guy on an equally light bike in a field on mostly enduro bikes)
  • + 0
 @moefosho: Whoa! Easy on the common sense.
  • + 0
 @knarrr: So you walk everywhere? Wink
  • + 3
 @moefosho: Eh, it's Pinkbike. If the comments weren't mostly negative about whatever the item the article was about I'd be more shocked to be fair.
  • + 1
 @lkubica: ????????????????
  • + 35
 the new giants are looking heaps nice this year... they really killed it with the overall specs, geo and paint of each bike. Good review also!
  • - 12
flag mhoshal (Aug 1, 2016 at 6:57) (Below Threshold)
 Hmm I almost thought it was a yeti review with that color...
  • + 30
 Doing away with a quick release on the rear is not the advantage described. Now, instead of scraping an easily replaced part on the rocks or pavement, the frame gets trashed.
  • + 10
 Hmm, good point. How about the addition of sliders like what most street motorcycles have or those funny foam door savers on cars?
  • + 18
 The scratches give your bike character Razz
  • + 3
 Good point. I didn't care about this until I moved to a place that is tough on bikes. Now I invisiframe my bikes as a matter of survival (and of course resale).
  • + 9
 @iamamodel That doesn't make any sense. Do you have quick releases protecting your frame on both sides? If you're constantly slamming your frame into rocks, you must be replacing derailleurs all the time. Quick releases are antiquated and you should be carrying tools anyway. Nobody needs to "release quickly", it's not the 1920's anymore.
  • + 4
 @mecabeat: I agree with your point about quick releases not being valid protective devices, and obviously not being on both sides of the bike. I'm not sure I would ever even look at them that way.

But I still really like being able to quickly, and tool-lessly, take off one or both wheels to either put my bike in the trunk of a car, or to fix a flat quicker.
  • + 2
 One look at my rear QR and I can tell you it has protected the left side of my bike. And as for the derailleur, it's done the same for the right. It's scratched as hell from crashes but still shifts like a champ...thanks SRAM! (and Obama)
  • + 1
 From my singlespeed days, there are alway times you need to get the wheel off, but either don't have the tool, or it's already packed up (toolboxes are heavy and always the first thing in the car/truck).
  • + 1
 @mecabeat: I do replace a fair amount of derailleurs, but I've been riding so long I unconsciously favor the left side in rocky terrain to help save the derailleur, so I hit the QR lever on the left much more frequently.
  • + 2
 @mecabeat: see what Ryan83 wrote. And I do want tool-free releases because I remove wheels to get the bike in the car and clean the wheel and frame separately etc.
  • + 2
 @mecabeat: the quick releases on the previous model were shit. I was always retightening mine. It's a nice bike....they climb well, and descend okay.
  • + 1
 The reign is a hell of a bike. It climbs well and charges down.
  • + 3
 My current bike is a 2015 Trance Advanced 1 and I drive a Ford Focus. I never have to take the rear wheel off, but if I did and I didn't have a lever on the bike, I would just use the tool in my pack that's with me whenever I go for a ride. There's just no reason to have an obsolete lever hanging off the end of my bike. If I really wanted to go out with a pack, or seatbag, or bottle mount kit, I would strap a short allen to my seat rail. As far as bashing the rear end of my bike into stuff, it doesn't happen. Elevate your riding, float over the rough, get light on the bike. The best way to learn is to learn how to double through technical bmx rhythm sections. It teaches you body position, front and rear weighting and unweighting, looking ahead, and overall changes your perspective on riding from piloting a vehicle, which is how most people ride, to using the bike as a lever, or an extended pair of legs. Skipping over the trail like a gazelle, instead of plowing through it.
  • + 4
 @mecabeat: I feel like you're big-leaguing us (or big-timing if you prefer) . Telling people to elevate their riding without knowing their skill level is a bit presumptuous wouldn't you say? All good though, buy your bolt-on and I'll roll with my rear frame slider.
  • + 1
 @mecabeat: every year when I sell my bike I want it looking as nice as possible. I'm not quite smashing my bike around, but I notice my derailleur and qr lever are always scraped. A scrape on a lever or derailleur is to be expected by the buyer, but paint off the frame means I lose money. My current bike is a 2016 Trance Advanced and I'm awaiting the 2017 Anthem, so Giant's decision affects my wallet. I appreciate your advice on riding: I'd do the same.
  • + 1
 @mecabeat: I just checked to see if the Anthem has no QR for 2017 (Giant may have thought an xc racer needs one) and found only one photo on bikeradar of an Anthem hanging off a scale showing the non-drive side - not only is there no QR, but in the photo their looks to be paint missing from the chainstay near the dropout. Thanks to this conversation I will take preventative action before I throw a leg over it.
  • + 1
 @iamamodel: Yea, I get it. A couple scratches is normal. I think it's a minor issue that can be solved with some clear 3m tape. It was just the idea of depending on a QR lever to function as a bash guard that seemed silly to me.

Also, I forgot what year it was cause I'm on pain killers. My Trance is a 2016. I'll use that as an excuse for coming across as a dick as well.
  • + 25
 Why do reviewers act like not having to use the climb switch is a good thing? Not having to use the climb switch means your suspension tune is probably somewhat compromised for descending. If they're putting a climb switch on, maybe they want you to use it?

Also, did we cover water bottle mounts in this one? I'd hate for someone to get dehydrated on their cool lunchtime shop ride.
  • + 12
 That's only if the bikes uses a lot of compression tuning to create an ideal pedal platform. Pedal induced bobbing comes from chain forces trying to pull the suspension through the cycle, and if you are able to orient the linkages so that the resists chain-induced movement, you can lower the compression tune. You can test this by putting the bike in the stand, and removing the shock. Pedal the bike and watch the suspension rise slightly, some more than others (also works for braking with the wheel spinning and braking) This is counter acted from a design like a dual link suspension design such as a VPP, and it has evolved into designs like Maestro, DW, etc.
  • + 3
 @mtnbykr05: Great explanation, but doesn't that mechanical resistance to bobbing also affect the suspension action anytime when pedaling? It's hard to imagine there isn't always some compromise with any suspension system,,,
  • + 3
 Also a proper suspension design can essentially eliminate the need for "lockout". Plus a slightly active suspension maintains better traction while climbing. It's a trade that is typically worthwhile now a days with where bikes have evolved too.
  • + 4
 @railin: you're right theris always compromise, but since the chain induced force are horizontal, the braking related forces are rotational and terrain related force are mostly vertical, it's possible to design a suspension linkage that adress those force differently. Rigid horizontally and rotationnally and free vertically. and not making too much compromise.

That being said, unless you're clipped and pedal perfectly round like a roadie. There is always a vertical component independent from the chain tension where a climb switch becomes useful.
  • + 1
 @SnowshoeRider4Life: AND...in heavy pedal force situations, isn't fork movement event more of a concern?
  • + 3
 @SnowshoeRider4Life: Not having a lockout works fine until you want to stand up and mash your way up a fireroad to connect two different trail systems.
  • + 1
 @railin: The Giants are designed with quite a bit of anti-squat at 25-30% sag for good pedaling efficiency, but anti-squat drops off sharply further into the travel so that big hits are unaffected and pedal kick-back is minimized. For small bumps, the suspension will be more responsive when not pedaling.
  • + 3
 I like the propedal to get extra firmness when riding smooth trails you can pump a lot and then ditch it when things get gnarly to get a smoother ride. Being someone who rides anything from smooth XC to DH WC tracks on the same bike, I actually use it a lot. I could do without but it would indeed be a bigger compromise, on a bike (my bike) that is already full of compromises.
  • + 1
 @dthomp325: That makes sense - Thanks!
  • + 1
 @DM007: I hadn't thought of it that way. Interesting stuff. Thanks!
  • + 12
 " 750mm bars seems like an oversight, especially now that the bike's reach has been increased – at the very least, a shorter stem should have been spec'd, and a wider bar would have been nice to see as well" did Mike miss the memo that Richie rides narrower bars so now everyone else will want to as well Wink
  • + 19
 All very well but you can cut down wider bars, you can't add width.
  • + 13
 Is 750mm narrow now? I'd have thought anyone who cared enough to add 20-30mm to the bars would be going aftermarket anyway
  • + 1
 @metaam: actually you can over hang the grips up to about an 1/8th" on both sides
  • + 8
 Not to mention trail bikes end up on a lot of XC type trails where you have to fit in-between tight trees. My 740mm bars are too wide for some stuff as it is...
  • + 10
 Yeah complaining about 750mm bars on a trail bike is off base. If you want wider, get wider, but it's plenty for a lot of people (I'll say most people).
  • + 13
 Reading "this bike needs wider bars and a shorter stem" in reviews becomes one hell of a messy drinking game
  • + 1
 so does adam brayton's gambler...740mm bars
  • + 9
 The sizing jump between small and medium in terms of reach is huge compared to the other sizes. Seems to be the same on all of their models. Unfortunately I fall into the small is too small and the medium is too big category They do look nice though
  • + 6
 Since Giant have a habit of speccing slightly too long stems, I bet you could get the medium to fit you with a shorter stem. On the other hand, if they are still using Overdrive 2, then getting hold of a shorter stem might be difficult.
  • + 3
 I ride a medium bike with a reach as long as many L, some XL bikes. Don't be deterred by a roomy cockpit!
  • + 16
 @recipher: They ditched overdrive 2 on their mountain range a couple of years ago I believe
  • + 3
 @recipher:

Even with a short stem its on the too big side, currently got bikes with a 420-425 ish reach and they are comfortably long with a 35 stem.

Problem is I'm 5"6 with really long legs so I need a shorter reach but not that short I hit my knees off the bars while pedaling ha
  • + 1
 @RockNRolla92: Nightmare. Ach well, plenty of other brands that don't screw up their MTB sizing.
  • + 1
 @rrsport: Ha. I see they are still pitching "Overdrive" as a feature on their MTBs, although it's essentially just the same as every other steerer.

Why they are persisting with Overdrive 2 on road bikes is beyond me. That seems like a reason to discount buying one to my mind, but I doubt anyone ever bought one *because* of it.
  • + 2
 You are correct. The jump between the small and medium is huge. It's done like that so more people buy the medium. Specialized has the same crap.
  • + 3
 @enrico650: I wonder why they care?
  • + 1
 @recipher:

It stiffens up the front end significantly. Glad they abandoned it in mountain however. Impossible to sell that fork but who doesn't ride a road bike with the stock fork? Silly ppl
  • + 3
 @ICAS: Its not the issue of changing forks, its the issue of stem selection
  • + 1
 @rrsport:

Meh

Stems a stem. Giant carbon stems are also pretty dope.
  • + 2
 @RockNRolla92: I know this might seem like a strange suggestion but check out the women's line. If I have my info correct they have a shorter reach for the same leg extention. Might be worth a shot, and shoot I think some of the women's bikes look better anyway.
  • - 2
 @recipher: there has been no OD2 for years now. Please get the facts straight.
  • + 1
 @JimRawson: recipher is correct in saying there is still OD2 on the road range
  • + 8
 Wondering why it they don't make one with 29 inch hoops? Well... They've done that before for and umm.... 18 inch chainstays. Enough said.
  • + 3
 They made a decision a couple of years ago to get rid of all of their 29er and move to 27.5 across the board (apart from the XTc). I'm thinking they might go back to 29 for a short travel XC bike and maybe they will come up with a 27.5+/29 (FS) bike like everyone else (the new XTc hardtail has a 27.5+/29 option, so looks like they think it is a go-er).
  • + 4
 I think for a company with reach across the globe like Giant, not having a capable 29ers will have more impact on their ego than their balance sheet really.
  • + 2
 Gt did the same...many scrambling to get 'that bike'...275+/29 mid travel.
  • + 3
 Because they can't get the chainstays short enough to work with the Maestro suspension design. They could probably do it if they dropped the option for a front derailleur, but it seems like companies still want to hold on to the front d. for trail bikes.
  • - 4
flag JimRawson (Aug 1, 2016 at 20:19) (Below Threshold)
 @dthomp325: not true the stays are even shorter this year with the trunion mount. get the fact straight. you are just guessing.
  • + 5
 @JimRawson: I think he's referring to the 29er version
  • + 1
 Yes the original Trance 29er was a dog.
  • + 6
 I was under the impression that Boost came about to help with Plus tire clearance. So it makes sense on a 29er that can also be setup as a B+. Scratching my head at why it should be on a regular 650b bike.
  • + 1
 That's a good point and a good question. Is that the next thing, that all 27.5/650 wheels are going to go boost? If almost all new 29ers coming out are boost, I wonder if there are some manufacturing or other supply chain optimizations to move everything to the same wheel width. Or it makes it that much easier to make a Trance 29er ?
  • + 7
 Stiffer and stronger wheels? No?
  • + 2
 i thought you need 148 boost spacing to run 1x12 eagle drivetrain, or can you run 1x12 with 142x12 spacing also?
  • + 4
 @funkzander: 1x12 works just fine with 142x12mm spacing - it'll fit on any wheel with an XD driver.
  • - 2
 @mikekazimer: but better with boost.

Also thank god it's gone boost, from a shop point of view I need things to be the same. Having to have boost and non boost wheels in stock in a pain.
  • + 3
 Boost was actually co-invented by Trek and SRAM in order to make 29er wheels have the same lateral stiffness as a normal spaced 27.5 wheel through better spoke bracing angles. But if the design helps 29ers, then it makes an incredibly stiff 27.5 wheel. Plus clearance is just a benefit from the design.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: You can run eagle with 142 spacing but need to run a 6mm offset chainring. So you need clearance for that.
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer : how bout the bb shell for boost frame? any dimension difference?
  • + 2
 @Chris97a, Eagle chainrings are available for both 49mm chainlines and for Boost spacing. The only potential clearance issue would come from wanting to run a larger chainring than your frame was designed for.

And @lepak1corner, the actual BB shell dimensions remain the same with Boost frames - the chainline is corrected by an offset chainring, not by a different BB size.
  • + 5
 I had a trance before, very nice bike. However, now I have a reign 2 and can't get enough of it. Even on single track it's fun to ride. It's interesting watching these companies swinging between 150 and 160 bikes. The more types of bikes available, the better it is for the consumer!
  • + 6
 The 2015 Advanced 0 with a 150 pike and a 40mm stem descends like a champ. Love this bike! Ate up the national DH track in Rotorua at pace (not saying its faster than a DH bike though).
  • + 3
 How is the trunnion mount on the shock fixed to the bike? Does the mounting hardware screw into recesses on the shock, or does the mounting hardware have recesses that protrusions from the shock fit into? If that makes sense...
  • + 3
 the 'body' of the shock has threads either side. The old Trek's with DRCV had it. bit of a pig to catch the thread sometimes.. but is straightforward enough.
  • + 5
 Pretty sure that the first photo should be labelled 'NSFW'.... What a beautiful machine.
  • + 3
 Great looking bike. As for the first ride review... it's like there's a template for these things. At least he mentioned which bike it reminded him of- not that it does those who haven't' ridden a 5010 a ton of good.
  • + 5
 Well I guess it would be nice If I could touch your body I know not everybody Has got a body like you....
  • + 0
 pervert... Razz

I'd lick that.
  • + 2
 @popcorn-skollie do you mean every word you say?
  • + 1
 @pancakeflatted: by George I think he does.
  • + 5
 Got the trance X0 2009,and I do literally everything with that... XC, enduro, FR and bikpark. Best bike I've ever had.
  • + 4
 Same! All I have changed is switch to 50MM stem, VS-One bars and a KS Lev Dropper. I love that bike.
  • + 4
 Riding 2016 trance sx, really cool bike. Riding bikepark in two weeks, we'll see....
  • + 1
 @darkmuncan: haha same here mate !!! First thing I did too was buy a 50mm stem and a 780mm wide bar! Otherway... Still rocking a 3x9 deore XT group and 2pistons XT M775 brakes...otherway... Mavic crossmax wheels had a good live but switched to tubeless ztr flow ex's... Stokage!!
  • + 3
 @fracasnoxteam: You'll be alright. 2015 Trance 2 with upgrades similar to SX.

www.pinkbike.com/photo/13774246
  • + 1
 Sorry I can't seem to get it to hyperlink. Old browser doesn't seem to give me the post options. Womp Womp.
  • + 1
 @RedBurn: Mine is still running M970 XTR 3x9 (2nd set of rings) and the Elixir CR brakes. Still running original wheels too.

Considering a switch to Shimano 1x11 XT M8000 when the current drivetrain bites the bullet, which is pretty soon.
  • + 2
 @darkmuncan: M8000 rocks, but the brakes pump up more than predecessors.
  • + 1
 @iamamodel: Im still stoked on the Elixir CR's! So I think ill keep them and just upgrade the drivetrain.
  • + 1
 @darkmuncan: i feel pretty pissed of about no ISCG05 in the Trances frame! Considering I freeride and bikepark a lot, i'd love to go 1x9 with chainguide and short cage rear derailleur!
  • + 1
 I kinda don't understand the top end spec of this bike. For $8k usd ($10500 Canadian) what are you really getting for that amount of cash? Something that isn't an xc race bike nor an enduro race bike? It would make more sense to me to just be available in low to mid spec to attract regular trail riders. Honestly, is anyone going to drop that kind of money for this bike compared to what is available from the competition?
  • + 3
 I think your pricing assumption is way off. CAD$7899

My 09 Trance X0, was rrp AUD$6999 (I paid 1/3 of that for ex-demo)

'16 Trance equivalent is AUD$7499, thats only a 7% increase over 7 years... Thats impressive.
  • + 0
 @darkmuncan: it says $8k usd for the top model in this article.
  • + 1
 @gbeaks33: It does, I can read. However its not always a direct exchange rate comparison. Different prices are set for different markets based on many factors, not just local currency rates.

E.g. current 2016 Trance Advanced 27.5.0 is listed on the respective countries Giant Site with an RRP of USD$7700 / CAD$7899. Using your exchange rate logic it should cost ($10106 Canadian).

Your negative comments were based on the assumption this bike was going to cost $10500 Canadian, It will not. I am merely pointing out it would cost considerably less if bought in Canada.
  • + 2
 @darkmuncan: right ok I see what you mean. My bad. But I feel the same regardless of if the price is 7-8k or higher. Just seems like a ton of money for a non-race bike that isn't designed to rip uphill nor destroy downhills either. Know what I mean? If this bike is designed to be right in the middle of those things (which is def not a bad thing!) I kinda feel it should be priced in the middle too for the high end models.
  • + 1
 @gbeaks33: one level down in spec is under $5k USD. Probably the best bang for the buck around so far for 2017 bikes.
  • + 2
 @yzedf: Dammit, I guess you're right.
  • + 1
 Bike Porn!! Love the new look, specs and configuration. I have a 2014 27.5 with Reverb Stealth 'hite-rite' T2. Great ride. And every ride I learn something new about what I can do on this bike as a geezer and more about what the bike can do. I don't often have bike envy but would like to trade-in but budgets are fixed on bike gear for now.
  • + 1
 I have owned the Trance Advanced 2017 for two weeks now. It does ride like an XC bike and thrash the steeps similar to a DH bike. It is fun, sophisticated and burly. I have ridden the bike on some of the hardest trails in the PNW and all I can say is....dream bike! The cornering and bottomless suspension are the standouts on this bike. I have never felt overwhelmed by any drops or gnarly rock gardens. Would I change anything on this bike? Maybe wider handlebars and a slightly stouter stem. That is nitpicking a nearly perfect bike though. The Trance Advanced is like having your hands in the cookie jar and never being caught..
  • + 1
 what size did you get and how tall are you/inseam? I seem to be in between sizes on the bike.
  • + 1
 Given I am looking at getting a Trance or Reign and have a couple of questions for existing owners. Is there a lot of lateral play in the swing-arm? Do the linkages require a lot of maintenance (e.g. re-greasing, tightening etc.)
  • + 5
 they are pretty normal in terms of maintenance. The rear end is stiff enough as the rear triangle is all one piece.
  • + 2
 my 09 trance had its first bearing replacement last month. the bike is solid, I've had 6 years of thrashing it with very little maintenance
  • + 3
 Two hard seasons on my 2015 reign advance. Done nothing to it. Always tight. Similar in feel to my glory for frame stiffness. Bike rips.
  • + 1
 I've ridden this bike for about 2 months now. Just before this I was on a Devinci Spartan Carbon RC, which is a beast of a bike, but just not great at being an all-rounder. I've also spent plenty of time on the Devinci Troy Carbon XT. I like my bikes toward the descending end of the fun-scale.
Honestly, the Trance is an amazing bike. Climbs great and depends way better than I thought it would. My last ride was The Whole Enchilada, where it smashed my last lap there on the Spartan by 30 minutes. The bike was also more playful and fun the whole ride through, plus I wasn't totally wiped at the end of the ride.
It's a super fun and poppy bike, loads of fun everywhere.
I upgraded the tires, stem, and bars to my liking (which I think most of us do anyway).
BTW, the bike weighs in at 27 lbs 4 oz, w/Atlas pedals.
  • + 5
 Sterl pics are simply stunning.....
  • + 3
 definitely looks like Giant has been taking notes, they nailed the geometry on this bike
  • - 1
 but by "todays" standards short reach
  • + 3
 The new reign looks awesome! All of their 2017 bikes have been released on the US site.
  • + 3
 Isn't the new Reign the same as the 2016 model, but with updated colours?
  • + 2
 @recipher: yes reign is no different. Updated spec and colours only. Doesn't get the trunnion mount and metric shock. Same rocker and geo as 2016. Bit disappointed really. Was looking forward to it, particularly after the new Trance and Anthems look awsome! ......oh well 2018 it is :-)
  • + 1
 @recipher: Same frame but if you look at the Reign 2 it's a downgrade in my opinion.
You get a Yari fork which is heavier and the dated motion control damper a Sram drivetrain and Guide brakes
  • + 1
 new paint job, now boosted.
  • + 1
 @celedonio: Only boosted in the fork, rear is still 142x12.

www.giant-bicycles.com/en-us/bikes/model/reign.advanced.0/26027/92816/#specifications
  • + 3
 The Sx now has 170mm Upfront (slacking it to 64.5H/A), and a coil shock in the rear. HMMMMMMMM!!!
  • + 1
 @Kiwimatt: yes, but the price is lower than last years by about $600. That's a pretty solid build for under 3k.
  • + 2
 So what is the actual shock size and stroke? Telling us the leverage ratio is lower is fine, but what about the actual numbers there?
  • + 3
 Mike's "review" is also lacking another number - weight.

I don't get how these guys don't have a fricken scale available. It's simple. Before throwing a leg over for your test, weigh the damn thing. Actual weights would give so much street cred.
  • - 2
 More than likely the stroke is minuscule, like it always has been. Smaller shocks are lighter and easier to package, even if they are short for their travel.
  • + 10
 @onemind123: We do include the actual weights of bikes and components in all of our reviews. This was a first ride, and I didn't have a scale on hand - sorry.
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer: We forgive you dude!
  • + 2
 Interested in those numbers, too.
  • + 1
 Definitely would agree about seeing a 29er version. That is all giant is missing from there range, is that nice mid traveled 29er. which i think there is going to be a big swing to mid/longer traveled 29ers.
  • + 3
 Someone design a 1 piece upper swingarm for the 2014-2016 Trance. I will give you some of my money for it.
  • + 1
 This bike is pretty much shooting for what my RM Slayer already was in 2012, but it has 12 gears. And this is an "updated" bike? Never ridden a Giant other than Glory's so maybe I'm missing something?
  • + 2
 I assume the Fox suspended bikes are also metric but I haven´t heard anything about a metric Float. Any thoughts?
  • + 1
 “I bet I can reach that compression lever while riding one handed at a high rate of speed” maneuver....story of my life hahaha
  • + 2
 Guys, any idea what shock lenght does the new Trance sport ? (also any idea on the new Hail ?)
  • + 1
 Any word on Canadian pricing, last year it was the same as USD without considering exchange rate. Any rumblings of a late release 29r given the anthem has the option now?
  • + 1
 I have a 2015 Reign and love it. But trunnion-mount shock just reminds me of my 2004 Cannondale Jekyll. Shudder!
  • + 1
 Why hasn't anyone done a review on the 2017 trance 2 yet. Not everyone has this kind of cash. Lets see new car or bike lol.
  • + 1
 Dear Giant,
Can you pls get off a really high horse and make a 29 version of this bike, pls?
  • + 1
 Damn Mike, who'd have thought you'd have Sterling taking pics of you riding new bikes in primo locations?!! Carry on then!!
  • + 1
 Make great bikes and they are really reasonably priced compared to their competitors
  • + 1
 might just have to get the yellow trance2 if it comes to the uk,,seems to be worth it for the updates
  • + 2
 Not bad! Hope the reign gets some love too!
  • + 3
 beautiful
  • - 1
 Spoiled by the gaudy graphics on the rims. Hopefully that peels off.
  • + 1
 How wide are these carbon hoops? Last years model were pretty narrow in this regard...
  • + 7
 They have a 27mm internal width.
  • + 2
 good luck with that dial there
  • + 1
 Rear end is still way too long. Sub 17" inch please.
  • + 1
 The bike weighed 26 lbs before I put the pedals on.
  • + 1
 It is a not so "mini" Reign...!!
  • + 1
 thought I saw you guys out there.
  • + 1
 hue hue hue hueeeee @OllieGiles
  • + 1
 I want one!
  • - 1
 They did have a Trance 29. Good bike. IMO I think they missed a chance by not making the new Trance 29 only.
  • + 6
 Didn't like the trance 29 personally. It's just felt like a slow anthem that didn't quite have the guts to thrash it any harder than the anthem. Loved the 29 anthem though.
  • + 2
 Agreed, I still ride my trance 29 (slightly modded) and enjoy it. Would love to have seen an updated version, especially with this sexy color scheme.

Oh well, the Canfield Riot may be in my future.

Mike can we get a review on that bike?
  • + 1
 Good luck with Giant.
  • - 3
 Thanks god it has 27,5'' wheels! Hate 29''!
  • - 3
 Wow Giant bikes finally come with thru axles, took long enough.
  • + 3
 huh? the last model trance had thru axles too
  • + 0
 @xeren: at least it doesn't take a 10mil like my glory, that's super handy, every tool kit includes a 10mil.......
  • + 1
 @xeren: Last model had smaller quick release skewer and had to be 'upgraded' to 142X12 with $80USD worth of parts.
  • + 1
 @Samgreene: the cheaper models, yes. my trance came 142x12 standard
  • - 3
 Looks nice and some of the best pics I've seen in a bike review. I am getting a bit tired of that color though.
  • + 2
 Peel the stickers to murder out the fork Smile
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