Giro Terraduro Shoe - Review

Mar 25, 2014
by Richard Cunningham  
Pinkbike Product Picks

Giro Terraduro shoe review test 2014

Giro's take on the ultimate trail shoe has a performance-oriented profile, moderated for walking by a more flexible area ahead of the cleat and a grippy Vibram sole.



Giro's Terraduro is an SPD-compatible shoe that was designed to give the performance benefits of a dedicated cross-country racing shoe, while affording a much larger degree of toughness and flexibility for riders who need to be able to walk, scramble or dab a foot during a ride. Developing the Terraduro was a multi-year process that included input and testing by enduro racer Adam Craig and indeed, Giro bills it as a worthy racing shoe for enduro competition. The heart of the Terraduro is a stiff, molded Nylon sole that conforms to a more gentle "S" profile than a traditional racing shoe's. The forward third of the sole is designed to flex slightly and it is also shaped with a pronounced 'rocker' to make the shoe more comfortable to walk in. The uppers are a tough, synthetic microfiber material that is vented and the foot is retained by a micro-adjustable ratcheting buckle with a one-touch release and a replaceable strap - and backed up by a pair of hook-and-loop straps. Brilliantly, Giro offsets the buckle of the center strap to eliminate the pressure point created by side-mount types. The business end of the Terraduro is a molded Vibram rubber out-sole that has plenty of traction in reserve via a radiating lug pattern that is intended to dig into soil, yet slide easily over an SPD-type pedal when engaging the mechanism. Inside the Terradura is a molded antimicrobial footbed that forms nicely into the shoe's comfortable heel cup. Those who have any rough-terrain experience using XC racing footwear will appreciate the final features in this description: a moderately wide toebox that is stoutly armored with a rubberized nose. Giro offers the Terraduro in sizes from 39 to 48, with half-sizes available between 39.5 and 46.5. Color options are black and Glowing Red. Weight is stated at 420 grams per shoe in size 42.5 (our 42.5s weighed 430g) and the MSRP is $179.95 USD. Giro also offers a Terradura model for female riders.
Giro

Giro Terraduro shoe review test 2014

Terraduro shoes use long-wearing Vibram rubber soles, molded with a tread pattern that doesn't hang up on the pedal's engagement mechanism.



Pinkbike's Take:

bigquotes Five Ten skate-style shoes have become the Harley-Davidson 'Hitler helmet' of the high-volume mountain bike crowd, and while there are some good reasons to ride with flexible, flat-soled, heavy hunks of rubberized cloth strapped to your feet (flat pedals, for instance, are good reasons), much of the popularity of flat-soled DH type shoes is just bro-fashion. The Giro Terraduro offers clipped in riders a more efficiently shaped shoe for pedaling, without sacrificing the essential foot-dabbing and drifting capability of a skate-style shoe. It looks pretty good, it is scented to repel spandex and it is easy enough to walk on that pushing uphill to session descents is an experience comparable to bro-fashion footwear. The Terraduro can be used with flat pedals in a pinch too, as its Vibram sole is very grippy material, molded flat over a large enough area to ensure that you contact the pedal squarely - most of the time. All this means is that you can still sprint out of corner should you miss the engagement after dropping a foot. On the subject of comfort, it took a couple of rides for the shoe to conform the feet, after which, the Terraduros became daily drivers. There is more room in the toe-box than a traditional racing shoe - which is a must for serious dirt work, and the shoe is just flexible enough to feel like the feet are comfortably planted on the pedals when jumping. Having a good deal of experience riding roadie-boy man pumps, as well as skate-style DH slippers, I would give Giro two thumbs up for making a true performance cycling shoe that handily bridges the chasm between the two. If you ride AM/trail or (dare I say the word?) race ENDURO events, and you ride clipped in, you will appreciate Giro's take on the ultimate trail shoe. - RC
Check out Giro'sTerraduro Video



Your thoughts on Giro's Terraduro shoe?






124 Comments

  • 68 9
 5-10 Freeriders DO look like skate shoes, that´s true. But at least they look like a shoe, not like a banana with buckles and laces chosen and bought by my Mum.... "What´s wrong with this shoe, son? It´s so nice and practical!"
  • 25 2
 Listen to your parents.
  • 44 5
 "Hitler Helmet of the high volume crowd?" Come on bro! What does that even mean.
  • 19 1
 Means that we all look dumb to enduro racers by wearing 5-10 on flats. I don't care since I'm happy with it
  • 59 0
 "No one knows what it means, it's provocative!"
  • 13 1
 The hitler helmet is the WW2 german army (look alike or real) steel open face helmet that motorcycle gang born to be wild type guys by cliché wear.
  • 4 22
flag Lilshredman (Mar 25, 2014 at 6:17) (Below Threshold)
 I'm gonna be wearing what Gee Atherton wears, and since he wears 5-10, I don't think there's a problem with 'em
  • 9 2
 @Lilshredman, I dunno if you were being sarcastic, (if you were ignore me) but Gee Atherton doesn't wear 5-10 shoes, pretty sure he goes with Shimano as they're his sponsor.

Source:

p.vitalmtb.com/photos/users/2/photos/57447/s780_BT_20130614_untitled_shoot_211.jpg?1371237606
  • 3 2
 @paulsek "No, it's not, it's gross"
  • 2 0
 Godwin's law
  • 30 0
 Excuse me while i go and comfort my 5-10's in the corner... "He didn't mean it baby, I still think you're pretty and no of course you're not fat, he doesn't know what he's talking about"
  • 13 1
 That....was funny^^^
  • 26 1
 Don't hate fivetens because they're beautiful, they get worn because they work
  • 11 0
 I got a pair of the Maltese Falcon shoes, they are amazing!
  • 1 0
 @saintjimmy: me to bro...honestly the best shoes I've spent my hard earned money on...stiff and fairly light, my favs!!!
  • 1 0
 @jnags: shortly after this, mine gave up the good fight. Now... Five 10 Mi6! Even more comfortable!!!
  • 21 4
 If bro-fashion means I'll have arthritis-free knees in 20 years time, then I'm gonna stay one fashionable bro.
  • 14 0
 some of the polls here lack options like 'No thanks, I'm happy with what I got.' or 'No thanks, don't need that.'
  • 2 0
 Consumism....
  • 11 0
 Or consumerism.
  • 4 1
 Maybe you could go ride your damn bike, with your shoes you're happy with.
  • 3 1
 my vote would be stop naming things after 'enduro'..
  • 11 1
 RC, do these shoes allow for more rearward placement of the cleats than typical? I'm tired of drilling my shoes and can't understand why the current full back position where most riders put their cleats isn't further back to allow a similar foot position to riding flat pedals.
  • 6 1
 This is an important point to address and would love to hear from RC on it. If the shoe is aimed at the 'trail riding' crowd, there is no need to have the cleat right beneath your toes—we're not riding road bikes and what we ride greatly contrasts the old standards on cleat placement.
  • 5 1
 I would argue that road riders have their cleats too far forward likely as well.
  • 3 0
 Shoe allows for a pretty rear cleat position. I have a pair now for just over a month. Great shoes. Not great on flats, nothing beats the 5 10's for that. This shoe is much better than my 5 10's Minnaar model when using with clipless pedals IMO. Much more still.
  • 1 0
 Todd, how does the rearward cleat position compare to the Minnaar?
  • 5 2
 "Kramster" Yes, in fact, it is part of the Spandex repellent kit. If you set the cleat in the center of the tracks, the pedal axle will be slightly more than a centimeter behind the ball of the foot - about the right place for taking the stress off the foot and legs for a big landing. Racing shoes usually have the cleat tracks too far forward for technical riding and good lateral balance.
  • 3 2
 @Kramster, If you were to go to a bike fitter/ Cycling coach/ Mountain bike instructor/ professional rider with any type of bike/ riding genre they will tell you that you should be riding with the ball of your foot positioned on the pedal. Exactly like the foot is positioned in the first pic of this post. This position gives optimal power and control on the pedals. It does not matter what type of pedal and shoe combination you may use. I would say especially for flats this position is a must, as you can get more leverage to ride "heavy on the pedals" pushing your heels downward towards the ground. @RichardCunningham I highly doubt that top level DH racers Steve Smith and Aaron Gwin included ride without their pedals lined up with the balls of their feet. However I'd be interested to hear about it from them directly! If you have trouble with stress on your feet and joints from big landings, maybe look into strengthening them?
  • 5 0
 I am not too worried about what a bike fitter/coach/instruction says, nor do I care about power. I just care that my ankles hurt on big impacts from being hyperextended when I'm clipped under the ball of my foot, and it never happens when I put it where I want it. It also makes it easier to clip back in under duress, as the cleat is much closer to where I stand on the pedal when I am trying to find the hole.

It's not like I move it to the middle of my foot. It's about 5-7mm back from full back position on a Shimano shoe. I've been doing this for more than 10 years. Some of the pros must have finally asked for it, because 5-10's new lineup has the slots moved back (so I've read). It doesn't impede 'heels down' foot position at all.

The first pic in the post has it at full forward position. I highly doubt any world cup DHer would run them like that, but I'd be happy for you to prove me wrong.

I also read an article somewhere recently that suggested road bikers are doing it wrong, and it should be moved back. I think they said there's a bit of a 'movement' towards doing this. It talked about lever arms and unnecessary calf engagement. When you squat a barbell, is it more efficient to push off your toes or your heels?
  • 3 0
 i heard gwin drills his dh shoes to move the cleat back further
  • 1 0
 I hear you Kramster. If I'm riding flats and I'm coming up to a drop, I deliberately put my foot further forward so that there is less stress on my ankles.

I think MTB is far more dynamic when it comes to body/foot position and handling than road. Road is all about power and efficiency, but a good DHer on a good DH trail can put in a great time without a pedal stroke (chainless races anyone?).
  • 4 0
 @MWHSINTERn. The problem with a lot of fitters is they come from a road background, or are not progressing with the aggressive riding in the sport. I've read many different points of view on fitness and bike setup over the last 18 months and there is a major shift in thinking happening, being pushed by progressive thinkers and ex pro/elite level riders that have experience in different disciplines to those in the past (DH, trail riding etc). The same people that tell you to place your cleats in the more traditional position, will also tell you to almost always sit while pedalling/climbing. Human anatomy never intended for us be able to generate any sort of serious power in this position…

This same movement is alerting many riders to the fact that cleat positioning can in fact be effective when moved back a little on the shoe (in mountain biking/aggressive trail riding, at least). We're not talking about sticking the axle under the middle of your foot, but as @Kramster stated, a few mm back. It's clear as day based on the range afforded on many of the new clip shoes (510, Teva Pivot [sucks they're no more], Giro Chamber, now these, and probably more I don't know of). Fact is, in mountain biking, few will ride with the cleat all the way forward, so why not move the slots back a little, allowing aggressive riders to position their feet better, while still maintaining ample room for more traditional clip pedal riders to run a satisfactory foot position for their riding.

A number of the worlds best pros (Fabien Barel, to name one; vimeo.com/30128286 ) also recommend for aggressive riding, that cleats be positioned further back on the shoe. Its about control of the bike, and standing on your tippy toes does not achieve the control required (try it on unstable ground, on a subway, or on a bus).
  • 2 1
 ^^ Absolutely. Show me a TdF bike with a dropper post! They wouldn't dare as 'position' is so important.
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: It's 4 years later but the neutral support bikes in the TDF have a dropper post now Smile
  • 2 0
 @ryan77777: I'm impressed with your diligence, or memory, or something. But thanks. And that makes sense so that the saddle height may not necessarily be perfect.
  • 14 6
 So you think I wear 5-10s for looks? You must be high- have you not seen how ugly 90% of the 2014 range are? Mind you, these Giro, lego brick shite looking things could make Hi Tek trainers seem the height of fashion. Advice on style from a 60 year old bloke is a bit like getting wine tasting tips from a toddler.
  • 2 0
 They still have an upcurved sole like my gortex shimanos. My Shimanos at least have laces and look like a shoe. I've tried 661s that have the right shape but they dont hold up too well and offer almost no pedalling support. Are their any flat bottomed skate style spd shoes with a decently stiff sole? Waterproof if possible.
  • 1 0
 Fiveten Hellcat?
  • 1 0
 Hellcat has had terrible review and looks pretty terrible aesthetics wise!
  • 2 0
 What? He asked for advice and I gave some to him.
  • 1 0
 What? I just gave my opinion. Is that okay?
  • 2 0
 Yes, it's fine EDB, I just have had good experiences with the Hellcat.
  • 1 0
 "tips hat"
  • 2 0
 "tips hat right back"
  • 10 0
 ha ha.... "scented to repel spandex" . Like it.
  • 6 1
 That was an editorial not a review. Hasn't clipping in for "enduro"(dare I say it) actually the height of hitler bro-fashion for the past couple of years now? Fashion has nothing to do with style. Clip in to connect. Flats to engage...personally.
  • 2 1
 The point off the article had nothing to do with whether or not people wear flats or clipless shoes. A lot of people in these comments seem to miss this. For flat pedals, the skate shoe shape is the best and people buy and wear them because they work. RC's point is that there are a lot of people buying and wearing clipless 5.10s and other skate-style shoes even though there's no reason for clipless shoes to look like skate shoes.
  • 4 0
 there's good reason why some look like skate shoes. it has every bit to do with preference to form/fit as well as function not to mention style.
  • 4 0
 Fair enough. Still, I think we can both agree that there are disadvantages to large, floppy, flexible shoes with laces. As always, it's going to be down to personal preference and these look like a solid option.
  • 5 0
 agreed. beers!
  • 9 1
 Flat pedals to the medal.
  • 8 0
 Flat pedals to the Metal \m/
  • 2 0
 A very close contender with the Specialized Rime. Both have a vibram sole, the Rime with the boa lace, and giro with the buckle. the only problem I have with these are the color options. solid black on shoes like these is a bit janitorial imo, and the red is only good for some folks.
  • 1 0
 i agree.. Im going to be needing some new shoes and these look like they will fit the bill.. recently tried the teva pivots but I didnt like how flexy the toes were would love to see these in a different color..dont like all black shoes..if these came in grey Id be ordering a set right now
  • 3 0
 being someone who wears a giro gauge or a shimano am45 these are in the exact sweet spot between the two shoes. these are going to be a definite purchase for this season.
  • 1 0
 I have been wearing these shoes for 3 months, and like them. However, I'd point out two weaknesses. With a 168 q-factor crank I had to set the cleats all the way inboard to prevent unreasonable interference with the crank. At this position you do need to remove lugs with a shimano trail pedal.
  • 1 0
 how flexy is the toe? do you feel your toes curl over when standing up and pedaling??
  • 1 0
 My only recent point of reference was my first gen 5.10 Maltese Falcon's. These shoes are noticeably stiffer than the Maltese. I do not notice the toes curling over. They are less comfortable for walking than the 5.10's, as the sole at the ball of the foot is convexly curved, giving a "rolling" effect while walking.
  • 4 2
 flats are where its at. unless I am racing, which I am not... I do way to much hike a bike up impossible slopes and rock gardens too wear clip-ins. Flat bros untie... I mean unite...
  • 5 0
 Note to self don't talk shit about 5 Ten
  • 1 0
 5.10 Maltese ($159 cdn) for 2014 has a certain panache (much improved over last year), the Pearl Izumi X-Project 3.0 ($179 cdn) has a certain style, the Specialized Rime ($200 cdn) is just a nice shoe, and the Italian Fizik's new Uomo M5 ($179 cdn) is an art piece (and damned comfortable from the get go) — alas, the Terraduro looks like my grandfather's safety shoes courtesy Dr. Scholls and Wallymart...and if you can't be fast, you gotta' look good.

I do like the orange version (not shown), reminds me of those orange slime molds you see on the nursery logs.
  • 1 0
 I dig my Hellcat's bro! Thing is down here hardly any people wear 5.10's They are heavy and took a long time to break in but now they are comfy, grippy and protect my feet far better than my Spaz ballet style dirt/roadie shoes. Nope, i would not ride a 30km plus ride in them if I could avoid it, but they are my favourites for any technical descending on DX pedals. Love em.
  • 1 0
 Hi, just a quick question in regards to the fit: how do the Terraduro compare in sizing to say Shimano and SIDI? I usually wear 43 European size in Sidi, Shimano and Specialized... I really wanna get the Terraduro, as i like the look of them and FINALLY someone comes up with a shoe that grips on rock - what a ingenious idea for mountain biking?? Anyhow, I went to the LBS but they only had road shoes from Giro.. slipped on some 43s and 43.5s (they come in half size, which makes the decision process a bit tougher - naturally)... 43 is a bit of a snug fit - they seem to be a bit narrow.. but usually, when wearing, they tend to get a bit bigger after a few rides.. 43.5 is more comfy, but leaves about a thumb and a half space in front of the toes.. So, what do you reckon in terms of sizing???
  • 5 2
 $179.95 USD for a pair? i think i'll just stick to my 6 year old, $80 exustars, thanks.
  • 2 0
 Lol. I just retired my old Exustars for a new set of Shimanos for $40 on CRC. We are truly stingy Pinoys. $180 is ridiculous!
  • 3 1
 Is $180 a lot of money, sure. But when spd-compatible shoes reach upwards of $350 USD, this is not that expensive when compared to the range that shoes are offered in.
  • 1 0
 I bought a pair of NorthWave Artic Commuter M GTX boots for 158 shipped as a comparison...but these are Gore-Tex equipped shoes for winter riding, and money very well spent.
  • 1 0
 @ka-brap. Good point. There are much higher end stuff that does make the Giros look nearly WalMart-ish.
  • 1 0
 $179 MSRP is not out of the ordinary at all for midrange bike shoes. Doesn't mean there's anything wrong with more affordable options though.
  • 3 0
 I recently got a pair of the Shimano XC90s. They are $400 and match my helmet. They are worth every penny because they are so, ahh... they are really... oh who cares about performance? They match my helmet!
  • 4 0
 " it is scented to repel spandex" ...........what?
  • 5 0
 They smell like Bacon....
  • 1 0
 Nothing better than a good road ride, and a bacon sarnie
  • 2 0
 The smell the opposite to a machiato.
  • 4 0
 Just bought a pair of vans for 25 bucks.
  • 3 1
 I can go through a pair of vans in a month or two
  • 2 0
 A month?? Haha mine last at least a season of riding more than three times a week.
  • 1 0
 Not that I don't like vans, they grip really well. I have some heavily pinned pedals plus I trial a lot, so maybe that's why
  • 3 0
 I'll stick to my bro-fashion functional 5-10 Hellcats. $77 can't beat that deal on world champ shoes!
  • 5 2
 hitler didnt wear a helmet
  • 9 2
 Hitler was a helmet!!!
  • 6 1
 hitler was a tool
  • 3 0
 I think he did, check your history....
  • 4 0
 Hitler wore a helmet when he served in the First World War, that is certain.
  • 5 0
 Hitler wore a helmet when he was under the glass coffee table that Eva was on top of...
  • 3 1
 This sole won't provide enough grip in slippery conditions. California shoes IMO.
  • 1 1
 Compared to what exactly?
  • 2 0
 To european mud and XC shoes like Specialized Sport or LG Montana 2
  • 1 0
 Yeah, would have made sense for them to include sockets for mud spikes for some added versatility. Still, there are also lots of situations where a nice rubber sole will provide more grip than plastic XC race shoes.
  • 1 0
 You think that giros sole is nice? For me its way to skateisch to be proper mtb shoe.
  • 2 0
 In BC those mud spikes and narrow hard plastic heels are deathly when you're negotiating wet rocks and wood. What works in wet conditions varies widely depending on location. Around here a Vibram sole like that should be awesome in the wet.
  • 1 0
 That's why I wrote that for me Giro are Cali shoes.
  • 3 3
 Here we go again, another manufacturer claiming their product is the ultimate! It's whatever fits the riders! Shimano shoes and 5-10s has more world championship wins than Giro.
  • 10 1
 ...Never seen a shoe Win a World cup...
  • 1 0
 ...me too, the riders seem to loose them on the finish line. Hopefully giros velcros are better.
  • 2 1
 Check out the 5.10 Maltese Falcon LT guys. It's lighter, more breathable, and the additional velcro strap makes the shoe hug your feet more securely.
  • 1 0
 Yeah bought a pair yesterday !!)
  • 1 0
 Only if they fit. I'm totally between sizes in the new Maltese Falcons. Anyone looking at a shoe like this needs to try it against the Terraduro or the Rime (or..?). They all fit very differently.
  • 1 0
 How 'bout sole stiffness on those new Maltese? Good enough to not be too inefficient for climbing and laying down the power?
  • 1 0
 Less stiff than an XC shoe but not so flexible that there is a hotspot or you can feel the cleat. I could be a touch stiffer IMHO. I would only use this in clipless pedals with some sort of platform
  • 2 0
 I'll buy any company's freeride/enduro shoe when they start making them in size 16 and looking halfway decent.
  • 1 0
 That is hard.
  • 2 0
 Shimano is the only company that make SPD shoes of a size that fit me, and they aren't pretty.
  • 1 0
 I like shoes that don't suck when I have to huck my bike up the mountain I've been using saloman speedcross 3's because there light and waterproof.
  • 2 0
 For rides where you get your feet completely soaked in a creek crossing which shoe, Maltese LT or Terraduro?
  • 3 0
 Would guess that the 5.10s will soak up more water than these.
  • 1 0
 "Terraduro". A name carefully chosen to appeal to the enduro crowd without mentioning the dreaded E word. Clever marketing...
  • 1 0
 Just noticed mine are coming apart at the seams. Both, same place at outside heel cups seams.
Less than year old w/avg 2 rides a week.decent amount of hike a bikes in laguna.
  • 3 3
 Does it have to say enduro in the name? Really? Don't get me wrong, I race enduro here in Colorado as well as DH. But come on....
  • 2 1
 i just bought a pair of these 2 week ago,
  • 3 0
 What do you think of them so far Math?
  • 3 0
 still didnt got them
  • 2 1
 They look like a hideous pair of crok's
  • 1 1
 Have pair waiting for me to at the LBS, but there is still 2 week before I get home from work :-(
  • 2 2
 Giro's are for training, 5-10s are for winning!
  • 1 0
 Ride nothing but vans!
  • 1 1
 Looks like something my granny would wear!
  • 2 2
 Looks like a Crooks
  • 1 2
 Who gives a F*k about a Shoe, -Flip Flop Whips- Enough Said.
  • 3 5
 FLATS FOR LIFE!
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