Review: Granite Design Stash Tools - Hidden Fixes

Apr 24, 2020
by Dave Rome  
Granite Design Stash Tools



Remember back when you rode with a hydration pack? That bacterial experiment faithfully always carried your mini pump, spare tubes, multi-tool and that off-coloured Clif bar.

However, hydration packs simply aren’t as popular as they once were. We’re now in the age of hip-packs and bottles, and an unhindered and breezy feeling body. And with that has come a flurry of methods for carrying spares and tools on your bike. OneUp's EDC, Specialized SWAT, Topeak Ninja, WolfTooth EDC, and the list goes on.

Add Granite, the accessory arm to the Funn brand, to that list. With a tool that fits into most common fork steerer tubes, and tubeless tire plugs and a chain breaker that go in the ends of your bars - there’s some good stuff here.



Stash Multi Tool
• Steerer-based multi tool
• Anodized aluminum construction.
• No specialist tools required.
• Colors: Black or Orange
• Weight: 127 grams
• MSRP: $55 USD

Stash Chain Tool
• Bar-end based chain breaker
• Weight: 48 grams
• MSRP: $25 USD

Stash Tire Plug
• Bar-end based tubeless tire plug tool
• Weight: 35 grams
• MSRP: $20 USD

granite-design.com



Granite Design Stash Multi Tool.
Installed, the Stash Multi-Tool is unassuming, almost boring.
Granite Design Stash Multi Tool.
It goes in there.

Granite Design Stash Multi Tool
The bar end tools are held securely in place with a 3mm hex bolt.
Granite Design Stash Tire Plug
A simple silicon rubber cylinder expands to wedge them in place.


Installation

Multi-tools located in the fork steerer are nothing new. Cannondale did it with its Lefty back in the 2000s, and OneUp and Specialized have only recently renewed the idea.

Granite’s new Stash tool works in a similar way to the Specialized SWAT conceal tool by using the full length of common straight and tapered suspension fork steerer tubes, all with no special tools required and without causing irreversible harm to the fork (or requiring a new stem). It can also be used with headset spacers left above the stem, but does require an opening at the bottom of the fork crown (forks with carbon steerers are out).

Granite’s approach is to run a plug-like cylinder from the top of the steerer, and a plate underneath the fork crown (the tapered fork version uses a larger diameter plate). With the fork star nut removed, a long M6 bolt is tightened with a 5mm hex key to draw it, and your headset preload, together. Two bolt lengths are provided for the tool to fit bikes with “bottom of fork crown to top of stem” lengths between 150 to 240mm.

Installation into both a RockShox SID and then Fox 34 fork was as simple as correctly preloading a headset, and Granite even supply the needed hex key. Admittedly it’s not so easy if you’re dealing with a pre-installed fork. You’ll need to remove the starnut entirely before you can begin. Still, a hammer and the supplied long bolt should make short work of the task. Personally, I used a M6 rod, the tool’s bottom plate and a M6 nut to create a makeshift tool that pulled the starnut out of the fork – a hammer would have been easier and quicker.

The bar end tools are even simpler to put into place, and simply use an expanding silicon wedge and 3mm hex key bolt. Granite supply two different sized bar end caps to suit the diameter of your grips. These tools work with alloy and carbon handlebars that feature an internal diameter of 18 to 21mm and a 10cm straight section from the bar end. Your grip choice will need to offer an open-end, too.

What s included with the Granite Design Stash Multi Tool.
The Stash Multi Tool includes a number of pieces, including two different length bolts and a 5mm hex key for installation.
Granite Design Stash Chain Tool and Tire Plug compared.
The bar-end-based Stash tool include two different sized end caps to fit with common lock-on and slip-on grips.




What’s Included

Granite sell the Stash multi-tool, the bar-end-based Stash chain tool and Stash plug tool all individually. This allows you to mix and match as you please.

The Stash Multi-tool steerer tool retails for US$55, and includes the required headset compression assembly. Missing are specific tools in case you need to remove the star nut, but using a hammer with the provided bolts and/or some M6 threaded rod should do the trick.

The MultiTool itself offers 2-6mm hex keys, a T25 Torx and a flathead screwdriver. There are also four common sizes of spoke wrenches and a tubeless valve core tool. All items work, but obviously leverage is limited in such a fun size tool.

That compression assembly weighs 67g including the plastic top cap. The tool alone is 60g. That’s a 127g combined figure (with the short bolt), and keep in mind that this also replaces the regular star nut, top cap and bolt assembly which typically weigh about 27g.

Priced at $25 USD, the Stash Chain tool features a threaded handle and requires a 5mm hex key to drive the chain tool pin. It’ll work with 9 to 12-speed chains, has a surprising amount of leverage on hand and offers storage for a spare quick link. This tool weighs 48g, including the aluminium bar plug.

The tubeless tire plug tool sells for $20 and includes both a hole opening awl/file and the usual rubber-strip fork. These tools are enclosed within an aluminum barrel that can hold the four included plug strips (1.5 and 3.5mm plug sizes provided). This one weighs a scant 35g.

Granite Design Stash Tire Plug
The contents of the Tire Plug kit are pretty standard.
Granite Design Stash Chain Tool
I really dislike emergency chain tools that lack leverage. That's no issue here.


Rattle-Free Ride

Like a mongoose's relationship to cobras, I equally loathe rattles in my bikes. And so I was pleased to find that neither the bar-end or steerer tools made a single peep. Ok, the chain breaker’s handle actually did rattle, but that was quickly remedied by making sure it was tight. After that, the silence was bliss.

These tools easily go unnoticed, and if it weren’t for the small orange ring on my steerer nobody would know I’ve got tools stashed away. And even that’s an unfair comment given Granite offer these tools in black.

With just an O-ring for retention, the multi-tool is simple to grab and put back into place. However, gaining access to the common sizes is a slight fiddle - and you will surely be left with at least one small piece that you must not lose. Thankfully that piece is magnetic, so it tends to hang around.

Similarly, the multi-tool works as well as any other tiny tool. It’s comparable to the OneUp EDC tool in function, although OneUp has it beat in both leverage and length of the bits. The OneUp also has a makeshift 8mm hex, which may be helpful. Sometimes those stubby bits may present issues, such as reaching into recessed rear derailleur mounting bolts, but generally, the tool does what it needs to. The tool bits themselves are surprisingly good quality, and a micrometer proves they’re sized rather ideally and won’t do fastener damage.

As side notes, the plastic top cap plug can be used without the tool installed, while the aluminum cap at the bottom of the fork (used for the headset compression) aids in preventing muck from getting into your steerer.

The bar end tools go in and out easily, but you will need that 3mm hex key for the task. This isn’t a problem if you need the chain breaker - but I found it a fuss when frantically seeking that tire plug kit. First, you need the multi-tool, then you have to dig out that 3mm bit which is weirdly at the back of the tool, then get the plug tool out, then open it... it’s honestly a heap of fuss compared to my preferred Dynaplug Racer that’s simply a jab-and-go item.

The chain breaker offers plenty of leverage (more than most emergency chain tools) and is easy to use. Like most emergency-based chain tools, this one has a low chain shelf and so care is needed to make sure the tool’s pin is making square contact with the chain pin. I’m typically a fan of bit-based multi-tools which rarely include a chain breaker, and so this Stash tool was my favourite of the trio.


Granite Design Stash Multi Tool versus OneUP EDC tool
Granite versus the OneUp EDC multitool
Granite Design Stash Multi Tool
Care is needed to not lose this piece. It is, however, magnetic.




Pros

+ Good value
+ Quality construction, no rattling
+ Easy install (after you remove the fork star nut)
+ You can buy just the tools you want
Cons

- Bar end tools are slow to get out (but secure)
- Bit length on the multi tool may be limiting
- No 8mm on the multi tool





Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesGranite has done an admirable job at creating hidden tools that should work with a variety of bikes and without the need for advanced mechanical knowledge or specialist tools. The tools are fairly basic, but they do what they need to and at fair prices. Just beware that you’ll likely have a very flat tire before you finally get the tire plug kit ready. Dave Rome








133 Comments

  • 148 0
 I do remember the time I rode with a pack. It was only yesterday after all.
  • 10 0
 you're so old skool :-)
  • 48 0
 I have too many bikes for those integrated tools.
  • 21 0
 I quite enjoy my bacterial colony. It wards off endurbros, they dont want to be seen with my backpack and tray rack.
  • 16 0
 Remember stashing other things in your bars. Tools are always cool too.
  • 1 0
 @fiatpolski: you have to less money for those integrated tools for all your bikes.
  • 4 7
 @takeiteasyridehard: I never put anything but filtered water in my pack's bladder, so there's no worry about bacteria.
  • 4 2
 @rrolly: micros will still get in a grow even with filtered water.
  • 5 0
 @rrolly: I think it's the back-teria. Mine smells a little....I sweat a lot...
  • 10 2
 @daugherd: I have found, if you get as much air out as is possible whenever you fill up - and never drain it - then it stays good for 4-5 years. I think it's the air that those little guys really need to go nuts...just my experience. I can keep my bladders pretty clean for quite a while by just limiting air exposure. I always have water in it with no bubbles.
  • 1 0
 I'm sorry for you.
  • 4 1
 @takeiteasyridehard: can you say 'Legionnaires disease'?!
  • 3 0
 @ryanthedestroyer: I do put new water in each time....I just leave water in it constantly. Every year or 2 I will clean it with some bleach also. But it doesnt grow mold as fast after I started leaving water in...Leee Junn Nears, hows that?
  • 2 0
 @takeiteasyridehard: if your filtered water came from a tap you could still have a bit of chlorine in it. That could be what is saving you from mold death.
  • 3 3
 @fiatpolski: I read that as “I wasted too much money on bikes I don’t ride enough”
  • 2 0
 @fiatpolski: I have 3 bikes that share the same oneup pump, plug & tool setup. Just need a couple extra mounts and you're set.
  • 1 0
 @daugherd: Impossible. I don't believe it. So now I'm safe, right?
  • 1 0
 @takeiteasyridehard: You bleach it!? Holy shit man
  • 1 0
 @fiatpolski: One up pump with tools and tire plugs in the pump, easily moves from bike to bike
  • 1 1
 @takeiteasyridehard: new bladders cost around £10 dude.
  • 7 0
 @thenotoriousmic: yeah but why throw something away when you can just take care of and clean the one you have?

Also, for a point of reference...I have the same bike I have had since 2013....the only original part is the seatpost collar. Every bearing and component has been changed multiple times - when they truly wore out....I dont buy very many things besides what is necessary. I have a small savings, but I dont touch it...I would rather be sure I can make it through unexpected hard times than have new stuff. And for me, frugality is what it takes.

I'm a full time student, and a full time shop employee...I dont have disposable income...I live paycheck to paycheck...and that amount for a new bladder does actually matter. That's cool it's not a big deal to you to buy a new one. It's not a big deal to me to just take care of the one I have.
  • 4 1
 @takeiteasyridehard: "why throw something away when you can just take care of and clean the one you have?"

That's smth new... Representative of the most consuming (in a bad way) nation talking about taking care/fixing something!.. Hmmm.. Seriously, respect!!
  • 2 0
 @takeiteasyridehard: mate its cool you’re saving money, but please don’t clean it with bleach. Do you wash your dishes with bleach? Then don’t wash your bladder with it either.

My bladder is a good 4 years old now. I only fill it with water and clean it with a mix of freshly squeezed lemon juice. The first couple of uses after that have an awesome hint of lemon
  • 2 0
 @timbud: lemon juice is organic. I wouldn't put it in my bladder. A very dilute bleach solution would be fine providing it was rinsed well.
@takeiteasyridehard we should all be consuming less and saving more. Hopefully, that is one thing this pandemic will teach us.
  • 2 0
 @rrolly: Yeah that's exactly why it's so good. Lemon juice is an amazing natural cleaner and steriliser
  • 1 0
 rebel mofo
  • 1 0
 @takeiteasyridehard: no bubbles, no troubles.
  • 2 0
 @takeiteasyridehard:
Life hack : freeze them when empty!
  • 80 6
 "Ah crap, my [insert item here] is loose, anyone got a 5mm key?"
"Sure, just wait while I dismantle my bike, assemble the tool, mow the lawn, grout the bathroom, and defend my unnecessary purchasing decisions"
  • 11 4
 If you were to own one you'd know that it take 2 seconds to do that and not some massive task as you described
  • 7 2
 @stumphumper92: Sure I can dismantle my bike, assemble the tool, mow the lawn, grout the bathroom in 2 seconds but it takes another 20 minutes to defend my unnecessary purchasing decisions.
  • 4 0
 @stumphumper92: Yep, this. The tool is literally in front of you at all times. Just pull on the cap above the stem, it's in your hand.
  • 5 0
 @DaveRome: The Tool is in your hand, another case of lockdown fever.
  • 16 0
 The only thing holding me back from buying these bar end tools is the amount of damage they must surely pick up. How do they cope with punters constantly dropping their bikes on them after bailed jump attempts? Asking for a friend.
  • 2 0
 I've got the bar end tire tool on my MTB and gravel bike. Can confirm they are relatively unscathed. Yeah, the MTB one is losing it's finish, but the cap itself has no actual scratches or dents I can detect.

Warning to those who want to put these in a drop bar bike (gravel or road), you may have trouble if your drops aren't particularly long. I made mine fit with a hammer, but I wouldn't want to do that if I had nice or carbon bars..
  • 3 0
 No issues here. The replaceable caps are anodised aluminium and have a chamfer to them. The caps will get scratched with use, but the tools will be unaffected.
  • 13 1
 These integrated tools are the right tools for tools.

Talking about EWS... there was a live video of a two top riders helping each other changing a wheel. Video made by spectator. They were in a hurry. Did they pull out the tool from the steerer? No. They just pulled out mini tools from their pockets.
  • 5 3
 Wouldn‘t know why... I cannot imagine any location, where I could reach a mini tool faster than the EDC in my steerer tube. There are quite some arguments against it (very expensive, a little flimsy,...) most of them valid, but accessibility definitely is not one of them.
  • 6 6
 @FuzzyL: I think it is cool there is such a tool, but it is lame to try to pass it for something it is not (something new/easier/faster/better to use).

Ever raced? The EDC is the last thing I would want to use. It takes more than twice as much.

EDC:
1: Pull out from steering tube
2: Remove gloves (I assume you can't pull out the tool otherwise)
3: Pull tool out of plastic sleeve
4: Use
5: Put tool back into shell
6: Put shell back into steering tube
7: Put gloves back

Pocket tool:
1: Pull tool out of pocket.
2: Use
3: Put back in pocket.

The narrow and short tool shape, makes it harder/slower to use compare to more squared designs. Less leverage, more chances to drop it.

If you need to put the bike upside down, you need to remember to pull the tool out of the steering tube first.

That said I like companies like OneUp because they design their own stuff. Unlike some others (RF, AB, etc.) that just buy some stuff from Alibaba catalog.
  • 1 1
 @RedRedRe: But do you really carry a multi tool in your shorts pocket during an enduro race? I used to have mine in the backpack, and there it definitely took me longer to access it.

And if you can use the tool with your gloves on you can also get it out of the steerer tube that way.

Yes you can not apply much torque with it, but it’s a multi tool, it’s meant for small trail side repairs.
  • 1 0
 @RedRedRe: it’s not like that at all. I have a tool in my pocket and I still go for the EDC in my steerer tube. It doesn’t fall out when my bike is upside down. I don’t have to remove gloves. Etc. Your assumptions are not my experience today.
  • 1 0
 @FuzzyL: You don't put a multitool in your shorts - every racer rides a jersey with back pockets.
  • 2 0
 @deepcovedave: In cross country racing? Sure. Enduro racing? Not so much, I see a lot of people who wear jerseys by Troy Lee etc. that don’t have back pockets.
  • 1 0
 Specialized SWAT bibs hold everything you need, securely, and snugly. Multi-tool? I don't even know it is in my thigh pocket.
  • 11 0
 I don't see this is better than an CamelBak - you get a back protector, more fluids if required, tools, spare tube, inflator etc and ability to carry clothing or rain top. Rather than stashing stuff all over the bike, a bottle, and strapping tubes to the frame to rub your paint off etc ! Fashion over actual practicality
  • 6 1
 Spare brake pads, tube repair kit, pliers (to undo tight tubeless valves), personal locator beacon, ride snacks or lunch, 2 litres water (500ml water bottle is not enough for a full days ride), chain lube, quick links, spare derailleur hanger...etc.

The drawback is I often wind up carrying stuff for mates who dont have a backpack, the same mates who want to drink my water when their little bottle runs out.

And I can take any one of my bikes without swapping stuff over or duplicating all this stuff.
  • 11 0
 Why not use the BB spindle as well?
  • 2 0
 There is a tool out there that does exactly that. Forgot the name.
  • 4 0
 @fiatpolski: all in one
  • 4 0
 @fiatpolski: I think the 'All In Multitool' is what you're thinking of.
I carry a simple tyre plug (bacon strip installed, ready to go) in my BB.
  • 1 0
 It doesn't Fit to SRAM DUB BB. Unfortunatelly lots of us have this BB so we have to store multitools some other way.
  • 5 1
 www.allinmultitool.com I can see that nobody provided the answer so I decided to be helpful.
  • 1 0
 @fiatpolski: Tried it, lost it after one month. Beautiful machining and great quality tools, though it's very easy to lose it and not notice until after your ride.
  • 2 0
 I saw some dude on the Youtube that 3d printed his own.
  • 2 0
 We're going to cram crap into every void space on a bike, like a profit-hungry drug mule. BB's, thru-axles, pedal gaps. . .
  • 6 0
 @rrolly: I took out my cushcore and run cocaine now. Works like magic and can be profitable.
  • 3 0
 @MattyBoyR6: and if you are feeling slow just pull your valve core, couple quick snorts, and then you be fast
  • 1 0
 Had one. Fell out without me knowing. Gone forever.
  • 2 0
 @MattyBoyR6: with the sealant emulsifier you're one step closer to crack too
  • 3 1
 @Pokrowiec: why is anyone buying into that BS 28.99 new standard? If I bought a bike that came with it, I would go out of my way to pitch it (not even to mention that there are so many better cranks than anything SRAM makes).
It’s Saturday morning and I’m already getting all riled up by how much the Sram catalog sucks. Damnit.
  • 1 0
 @erikkellison: The allinone tool requires a crank axle hole diameter that is at least 21mm. Won’t fit some Shimano...
  • 7 0
 For some reason, I just don’t want to add weight to the far ends of my handlebars or stem top cap. Just doesn’t seem ideal. I’d rather carry the weight down low on a stationary location of the frame.
  • 6 0
 good point also is that now, hidden multi tools are the same price than our old BackPacks, multi tools, spare tubes, and Cliff bars combined, so you won't notice the difference.
  • 12 7
 "Like a mongoose's relationship to cobras, I equally loathe rattles in my bikes."

You know a Cobra isn't a rattlesnake right? I'm guessing Mongeese (plural?) would love rattles, it would make their life easier. They also eat the Cobra, so the analogy would be better if you hunted rattles? To complete the Mongoose - bike website reference complaining - most Mongoose bikes rattle a lot.

I feel better now.
  • 20 0
 Careful, don't think too hard. Mongooses hate cobras, and Dave hates rattles - that's the analogy.
  • 3 1
 @mikekazimer: but it's cobras that hate mongooses, mongooses love to eat cobras. So in this analogy, Dave loves rattles, because he loves to fix them?
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: I will cease thought and consume free content happily now. Thanks for keeping me on track.
  • 5 0
 @mikekazimer: is it mongeese?
  • 1 0
 @cuban-b:
Mongooses everypersons knows this
  • 4 0
 I've bought the tool that goes into the steerer and installation was not easy. The cone that must go in the steerer did not fit, I made it fit with some filing though. But that's not something you want to do to a new tool Frown

Also, there is no way to adjust your headset preload whilst on the trail. You would need a second tool that has a long allen key to reach into the steerer setup. Could be a deal breaker...
  • 1 0
 That is annoying. What is the fork that required filing the tool?

And you're right about the inability to adjust headset preload whilst on the trail. However, the design of this should allow you to align your stem without losing preload.
  • 2 0
 @DaveRome: I've got a formula sekva and install was easy as, no mods required
  • 1 0
 @DaveRome: I have a RS Lyric RTC3 from 2018 I beleef.

Aligning your stem is possible indeed, but it wouldn't be a first to notice your headset is loose when already on the trails
  • 3 0
 I bought both barend tools as soon as they came out. I really liked their valve caps, so I had high hopes. But they are limited as to bars they fit - didn't work in either carbon or Spank vibrocore - and they require you to have a 3mm allen available to get the tools. So they immediately went into the drawer of crap that doesn't work. Spend a little more and get a better tool.
  • 5 0
 I think it’s a sign I’m getting older but new tools get me more excited than most other articles on here
  • 2 0
 Swat so far one of the best, you can carry multi tool at your pocket there are plenty of supe slim, and chain device at your steer tube; for the tire plug - steertube or not at all; cause bare ends tend to meet your chest sometimes
  • 5 0
 This some top quality plumbing
  • 1 0
 I've got a tire plug tool too with those strips, fork and reamer.But mine also comes with some kind of cement I have to soak the strip in before I plug it into the tire. I have yet to use it but to me it seems something gunky on those strips would indeed help with with the seal, especially if it is a sidewall cut. None of these plugs featured in PB articles seem to use that though so I'm wondering, is there anyone else soaking the plug in tire cement before inserting it or is it really uncommon and not needed? I think mine is from a brand called Lifeline. It comes in a plastic box. The plug tool and the reamer both come with screwdriver type handles so it is nowhere as small as the tool featured here. The size is not much of an issue as I ride with a pack, but I was curious about your answers before I show myself out and you slam the door.
  • 2 0
 I have a similar kit and have used the strips without adding rubber cement on several occasions without issue. I keep one strip loaded in the plug tool taped under my top tube in a pen lid. Quick access and ready to save the day!
  • 1 0
 I have the Panracer version, that comes with a little scissor and a tube of glue.. it works really well, but that ain't very practical to bring along... that is a really old type of plug kid.. think the new ones have the glue integrated into the strips...
  • 1 0
 @saladdodger: Oh, ok. I'm fine with it as long as it works. I see that they don't sell it any longer. It is a bit like the one in the link below, except mine indeed comes with a knife to trim the excess of the strip. Do people no longer need to trim the excess either? Apparently yours comes with a scissor, mine with a knife. I think I'd prefer the knife as it seems easier to wipe off after cutting a glue soaked strip.

www.bike24.com/p2208505.html?menu=1000,185,188
  • 1 0
 My experience with this style of headset tightening vs a star nut is that they come loose a lot more often than a star nut. I had the di2 stem system on for a while and I found after about a year I was tightening it every second ride. I just ditched it.
  • 1 0
 Honestly no such issues here. I know the Pro Di2 stem you're referring to, and it's a totally different design that resulted in the stem pinch bolts being less effective – that's why it came loose.
  • 1 0
 Why would the headset ever come loose once you have the stem bolts tight?
  • 1 0
 @friendlyfoe: I was never sure why, but it seems that @DaveRome knows what I'm talking about.
  • 1 0
 @friendlyfoe: to my own surprise the stem bolts alone are not enough to keep the headset from coming loose. Remove the headset cap and nut and within a couple rides your headset will become as loose as Kevin Bacon's feet back in 1984.
  • 1 0
 Jees, so many comments on steerer tools vs a tool in your pocket.... I really don't understand why people are so against carrying fewer tools on them. The specialized seat tool has a chain breaker included, which I deem essential even though I've very rarely broken a chain. Not a fan of the bar end tools. Unfortunately, I bought the specialized one and my steerer is a few mm too long at the moment for it to fit!
  • 1 0
 does it requred +100€ special tool to destroy steering tube, like retarded version??

its ok if you own one bike. but continues transferring from bike to bike, thanks no.
just put one multitool in hydration pak and its always with you doesnt matter which bike you ride today or tomorow etc
  • 1 0
 The Granite tire plug is awesome. For everything else, just get syncros mb tailor cage r. mini hv1.5 bottle cage. Pump, multi tools, and water bottle cage. A 3 in 1. You're welcome.
  • 4 2
 my backpack has a handy little pocket on the waist strap for a multitool. Don't even have to take the pack off to access it.
  • 3 0
 I refuse to give up my DeathGrip handle bar grips for any kind of bar insterted tool.
  • 2 0
 who has experience with bar end tools?
What about balance? Is it still possible to drive no-handed?
  • 1 0
 The granite tire plug kit is light and you wont notice in your bars. A must have. Plugged at least 6 punctures already.
  • 2 0
 No-hands only possible if you use a 29" front wheel. /s
  • 1 0
 I've been using the Granite tire plug for the past 10 months or so, it's well built but I had to wrap the thing with paper to keep it from buzzing inside the bar.
  • 1 0
 Thanks for sharing. This isn't an issue I had in my testing, but it does highlight the challenges of stashing tools in a component that can differ so much. I suspect a thin o-ring (like that on the chain tool) would help remedy this, too.
  • 1 0
 @DaveRome: A thin o-ring does work as well. but it was harder to remove the tool from the bar without losing the o-ring. I agree though, different bars may not have this issue.
  • 1 0
 Why not a minipump on the steerer tube and tools at the end of the bars, then you carry a tube on the frame with two tire levers and you're done for normal riding
  • 2 0
 Good to see Dave here from your sister site.
  • 4 0
 WHATS YOUR BUSINESS WITH MY SISTER ??? (Disclaimer: might only be able to understand if you ever visited Corsica)
  • 1 0
 Thanks! It's good to be here. Smile
  • 1 0
 Does this or the OneUp fit 2021 Fox forks with their new internal steerer shape?
  • 3 1
 Off to ride my bike whilst wearing a backpack !!!!!
  • 1 0
 Ah, beat me. You guys are quick.
  • 1 0
 Price is more attractive than oneup
  • 2 0
 not actually correct. One-Up gives you an additional strage (seriously, usefull enough!) or you can threadin a CO2 canister.
  • 2 2
 But everything else about it is less attractive... The oneup makes this look like a secondary school design project that somehow made it into production. The only advantage this has over the oneup is not threading your headset. And oneup make a pump that fits their tool inside if you don't want that. IMO it's pricey, but it's worth it.
  • 1 0
 @mountainsofsussex: I have the Oneup and my only criticism is the chain tool. I rounded out the 3mm allen bolt the first time I used it. 3mm just doesn't give you the required oomph to break a chain. I've now modified it with a 5mm bolt and it's much better.
  • 1 1
 @mountainsofsussex: I thought the most recent version of the OneUp tool doesn't require you to thread your headset, but instead it requires a different stem. Unless someone is very specific about their stem (I honestly don't get why there are so many out there) but does like to install the tool inside the steerer, I'd say that would be a good way to go.

Personally I'm not (yet) at the stage where I'd be willing to go such lengths to carry stuff hidden inside bike components. Even if I would like to take more tools and stuff off my back, I think most conventional pouches and bottle-mount-mounted solutions are good enough. Especially if your frame has a bottle mount under the downtube (which literally litterally makes it a shit solution for actual bottles but good enough for tools). I think the OneUp pump and tool combination that attaches to the bottle mount instead of inside the steerer is pretty nice.

One other solution I still haven't seen is to have the tool slide into the bottom of steerer instead of inside the top. As long as fork travel is bigger than the length of the tool you can probably reach it with the wheel mounted. Obviously it does definitely require a secure (and idiot/rider proof attachment for it to not drop out) but if done properly, it seems convenient and it could also close off the bottom of the steerer against debris and muck.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: the headset fitting is still available, I believe. And I've seen pretty poor reviews for the stem (finally, oneup made a duff component!). The bottom of the steerer is quite small diameter if you look, so no room for a tool. I've seen some of the pro bike checks with a tubeless plug installed up there, in a rubber bung. I imagine some people might choose to store other items in there ;-)
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 @commental: I'll consider myself warned to be gentle with it! Thanks for the heads up
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 @commental: photos, please, of your "upgrade".
  • 2 0
 @commental: I once had a chain tool integrated in the folding tool. I think it was from Specialized. It broke when I used it trailside. Luckily I was riding with friends (who also carried tools) so I could still fix that chain but I ditched the complete tool after that. For me, portable tools need to be at least as comfortable and reliable as home-workshop tools. When you're cold, wet, tired and maybe even injured, you never have the same motor skills as you have when you wrench on your bike at home. And you don't have spare tools nor are in the position to do it another day. I'd take bulky but reliable and comfortable tools with me any day over the super refined minimalist stuff you can get. Nothing too flimsy, nothing with loose parts that needs assembly before you can even use it. My favorite portable chain tool is the Park Tool CT-5. Never failed me.
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 @vinay: giant makes a co2 holder like that. I've had it for a couple months.
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 @vinay: Specialized SWAT tools fit sort of like that, in a steerer. You can buy them separately.
  • 1 0
 Should that read Bactrian (as in camel) rather than bacterial?
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 Where is this tool manufactured PB?
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 I can tell you...myself. It's from C-H-Y-N-A. Wolf Tooth will be my choice.
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 @chasejj: Taiwan is to China, as Canada is to the USA, Ireland is to the UK, New Zealand is to Australia ... so on and so forth
  • 1 0
 @Screaming-Gecko: An argument can certainly be made on that issue, however those who do business and visit there will document that the differences are significant enough to still support Taiwanese goods for now. I will never purchase knowingly anything made in mainland China again.
  • 1 0
 will they work with ergon grips?
  • 1 1
 Yes, I have Ergon grips, no problem.
  • 1 0
 Like the OneUp tool, but worse
  • 1 1
 If you want this, you better buy if quick before Specialized sues FUNN.
  • 1 0
 What grips are those?
  • 1 0
 Giant Tactal
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 @drangus: Correct. Not my usual choice of grip, but in this case, the pictures were taken with an XC bike on test.
  • 1 0
 @DaveRome: Thanks. I'm unusually interested in finding new grips and the pattern looked intriguing.
  • 1 0
 Nice one guys!

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